Page 1

LOOK OUT FOR CHANGE T A B L E S IN THE REFECTORIES STARTING

THIS

WEEK! N E W S P A P E R O F IMPERIAL C O L L E G E October 23rd, 1973

FREE

UNION

ISSUE No. 343

SEE

BEL O W.

F I R E

PROPOSED BY

F I R E B R O K E O U T i n t h e lockers of the F o r b e s L a b o r a t o r y i n Z o o l o g y last •

ICUGM AT

LAST

TUESDAY'S L G M , ICU

pledged itself to a c a m p a i g n r o u n d the current 5 per cent increase i n refectory prices

that

were

imposed

at

the

beginning of this term. A m o t i o n proposed by P a u l W a t k i n s suggesting a petition to be prepared c o n d e m n i n g the price increases a n d handed i n to the R e c t o r at a large demonstration. It also proposed that E C U h o l d b a c k a s u m of money equal to the difference between the o l d a n d new prices f r o m payments m a d e to the college. If this failed to stop the p r i c e rises a n E . G . M . w o u l d be called to discuss different tactics. J o c k V e a l l argued against W a t k i n s ' m o t i o n c a l l i n g it a "recipe for defeat" and proposed a n amendment a s k i n g f o r students to be issued w i t h o l d price lists so that they w o u l d only pay the o l d prices. H e called for a c a m p a i g n o f e x p l a n a t i o n to p u b l i c i s e the increases and decisions t a k e n to the staff a n d students. Pete L a m b e r t argued against the amendment saying that i t tied people to Mooneys, whereas inflation w a s everywhere, therefore one s h o u l d c a l l f o r supplementary grants. T h e amendment was passed 88-76 and the amendment m o t i o n was passed overwhelmingly. N o r m Sayles, President I C U , argued against the amended m o t i o n saying that his m a i n points were those printed i n

his c o l u m n i n F e l i x 9th O ctober edition. R e c a p p e d , these were that a c c o r d i n g to the l a w , t h e College h a d no alternative and that at least the recommended increase wasn't higher.

ents are able to p a y the correct money for the o l d prices i n the refectories. 2. O l d price lists to be distributed i n the refectories.

3. A c a m p a i g n o f e x p l a n a t i o n to the refectory staff and students, t o publicise the issues at stake a n d the decisions taken. IC U n i o n notes: A n entertainments m o t i o n was passed I. T h e continued erosion of the a b o l i s h i n g the m o t i o n passed at the last student l i v i n g standards caused by the C o u n c i l meeting o f last year w h i c h l o w grant and the high cost of food a n d restricted the n u m b e r of "large g r o u p s " accommodation. per term to three. 2 T h a t the college has increased reA n amendment was proposed b y J o h n fectory prices b y 5 per cent despite L a n e increasing, the n u m b e r of " l a r g e U n i o n representation o n the Refectories g r o u p s " to four per term but was C o m m i t t e e - a n d the G o v e r n i n g B o d y . rejected as v a r i o u s Ents. personnel I C U n i o n believes: promised no return to the situation of last year, despite the m o t i o n not g i v i n g T h a t the G o v e r n i n g B o d y should a n upper l i m i t to the n u m b e r of defy the G o v e r n m e n t ( U G C ) self bal" l a r g e g r o u p s " per term. ancing j e g u l a t i o n s , a n d subsidise prices The original Council motion was with a view to f o r c i n g the G o v e r n m e n t passed to ensure Ents. cater f o r a wider to introduce refectory subsidies u n t i l the range of tastes t h a n just the groups N U S demands on grants are fully scene, w h i c h is w h y this year w e have satisfied. films a n d f o l k groups as w e l l as some 1 C U n i o n recommends: "large groups." T h a t i n order to implement the V o l u n t e e r s n u m b e r i n g a b o u t a dozen decision taken last term b y a U G M to f r o m the meeting were co-opted o n t o the freeze prices (i.e. to rescind the 5 per G . A . C . a n d i n c l u d e d Piers C o r b y n ( I C cent increase) a n d to stop further veteran) w h o was described b y T a r i q increases, the G r a n t s A c t i o n C o m m i t t e e L o l l e y as being " t h e o n l y one w i t h a n y and volunteers f r o m this U n i o n meeting brains o n the G A C . " w h o should be co-opted o n to the G A C T h e q u o r u m Was then challenged shall o r g a n i s e : — successfully a n d the meeting was closed 1. T a b l e s to be set u p i n A L L before it c o u l d m o v e o n to the next refectories to give change, so that studitem: C h i l e . m o t i o n passed The full quorate (!) U n i o n M e e t i n g is:-

by

the

T h u r s d a y afternoon. b y a technician w h o Discovered opened the door to the locker r o o m and found it full o f thick smoke, the fire destroyed a large n u m b e r of plastic c o n tainers and incinerated the wood of the lockers. F o u r fire engines were rapidly outside Beit H a l l s u m m o n e d b y the fire a l a r m i n c l u d i n g t w o w i t h extending ladders. W a t e r to extinguish the fire was p u m p e d f r o m a hydrant outside Botany in Prince Consort R o a d . T h e F e l i x editor writes: T was i n the Buttery at the time the a l a r m s went off, assuming them to be a routine practice I strolled outside to find smoke b i l l o w ing out of the third floor w i n d o w s of Z o o l o g y . Upstairs the F o r b e s l a b was full of dense acrid s m o k e w h i c h i m m e diately made your eyes water. People were attempti ng to p u t the fire out w i t h hand extinguishers but the fire appeared to have too great a h o l d . ' T h e firemen were q u i c k l y o n the scene w i t h a hose hauled up f r o m B e i t q u a d . A few l u c k y ones h a d breathing a p p a r a t u s — t h e others w o u l d o n l y be able to stand it i n the l a b f o r a f e w minutes before d a s h i n g out eyes streaming, gasping a n d coughing. A f t e r about five minutes the s m o k e started to subside, the w i n d o w s were opened to disperse what remained of the c h o k i n g fumes a n d we c o u l d see the extent o f the damage. W a t e r and f o a m covered the floor and walls of the locker r o o m , two w i n d o w s had been broken to let the smoke o u t , burn m a r k s a n d melted plastic were everywhere. Inside the locker r o o m the heat was still intense—so m u c h so that the translucent plastic coyer o n a fluorescent r o o f light h a d melted a n d distorted out of a l l recognition. T h e fire itself was b y a l l appearances centred at a l o w level i n the lockers'. T h e cause of the fire has not been a n d a c c o r d i n g to N o r m discovered Sayles arson is n o t being discounted as a possibility.


FELIX

, Page 2

ITERS Dear F r i e n d s , A s o n e w h o is n o t a s t u d e n t , b u t a w o r k e r i n a university b o o k s h o p in L o n d o n , I w o u l d be m o s t g r a t e f u l if y o u w o u l d a l l o w m e t h e u s e of y o u r c o l u m n s to m a k e a n a p p e a l to y o u r r e a d e r s . A group of p e o p l e in P h o e n i x , A r i z o n a a r e att e m p t i n g to r a i s e f u n d s t o b u y m e d i c a l m a t e r i a l for those w o r k e r s in C h i l e w h o are in a r m e d c o n flict w i t h t h e m i l i t a r y r e g i m e . T h e f o l l o w i n g i s part o f a letter f r o m t h i s g r o u p w h i c h w a s p u b lished by the A n a r c h i s t paper " F r e e d o m " i n the issue dated 2 9 . 9 . 7 3 : " M o n e y is u r g e n t l y n e e d e d b y C h i l e a n w o r k e r s , s t u d e n t s a n d r a d i c a l s . A s w e k n o w A l l e n d e is dead, along w i t h 5 , 0 0 0 of h i s fellow w o r k e r s . S t u d e n t s , w o r k e r s a r e s t i l l w a g i n g fierce b a t t l e s against junta troops. W o r k e r s h a v e taken over factories a n d are still p r o d u c i n g — w h i l e b e i n g b o m b e d by j u n t a p l a n e s ! W o r k e r s i n V a l p a r a i s o s u r p r i s e d junta groups a n d re-captured half the t o w n . S o l d i e r s a n d l o w - l e v e l officers i n t h e s o u t h of C h i l e are g r o u p i n g w i t h a r m e d r a d i c a l groups of w o r k i n g p e o p l e a n d m o v i n g t o w a r d s S a n t i a g o . T h e junta mi l i t ary i n v a d e d the U n i v e r s i t y o f S a n t i a g o a n d m u r d e r e d h u n d r e d s of s t u d e n t s . L e f t i s t s and supporters are being r o u n d e d u p a n d s u m m a r ily s h o t . P o l i t i c a l e x i l e s — a r o u n d 3 0 0 — i n C h i l e h a v e b e e n r o u n d e d Up a n d s h o t . " (I t h i n k there c o u l d b e s o m e d o u b t a s to t h e accuracy of classifying A l l e n d e as a worker, but I t h i n k i n t h e c o n t e x t of t h i s a p p e a l t h a t is n e i t h e r here n o r there.) U p o n r e a d i n g t h i s I s e n t t h e g r o u p a letter req u e s t i n g further i n f o r m a t i o n , a s e v e n t s i n C h i l e w e r e m o v i n g at a r a p i d p a c e , a n d t h e i r r e p l y , i n p a r t , is a s f o l l o w s : " A t p r e s e n t (letter d a t e d 6 . 1 0 . 7 3 ) i n f o r m a t i o n o n t h e j u n t a t a k e o v e r is v a g u e . O n e i m p o r t a n t aspect is the g r o w i n g b o l d n e s s of ' r e s p e c t a b l e ' journalistic purveyors w i t h i n C h i l e w h o are stepp n g a little m o r e h e a v i l y o n t h e t o e s o f p r i n t c e n s o r s h i p b y w r i t i n g m o r e of t h e r e a l i t y i n s i d e t h a n t h e j u n t a f e e l s is n e c e s s a r y . A m e r i c a n n e w s s o u r c e s are s p e a k i n g less t i m i d l y . W e ' v e learnt more o f the slaughter, round-ups, tortures, intimidations, book burnings, etc., from big established n e w s p a p e r s n o w . A t first t h e y w e r e s i l e n t , n o w they're speaking louder. Of course, w e don't expect t h e m to e n c o u r a g e a r m e d r e v o l u t i o n o r t o ag.tate the U . S . Government to c o n d e m n a n d not r e c o g n i z e t h e u s u r p e r s . I t h i n k t h e p o i n t at w h i c h the U . S . P r e s s k i s s e d a little l e s s a s s w a s w h e n n e w s of g r o w i n g , s a n c t i o n e d a n t i - S e m i t i s m c a m e out. ' E l M u r c u r i o ' — t h e r i g h t - w i n g p a p e r — p r i n t e d a letter, v e r y p r o m i n e n t l y , w h i c h c a s t A l l e n d e a j a c o g in the ' J e w C o m m u n i s t Conspiracy' a n d c o n c l u d e d b y u r g i n g a p o g r o m of C h i l e a n J e w s . The author wanted, as succour, ' a J e w hanging f r o m e v e r y l a m p - p o s t in S a n t i a g o ' . T h i s , t h e i n c i dents of book burning by the a r m y a n d eyew i t n e s to t o r t u r e a n d s u m m a r y e x e c u t i o n , s o r e m i n i s c e n t of H i t l e r ( a m o n g o t h e r s ) s e e m e d t o make the b i g shot news p u b l i s h e r s uneasy. C o n s e q u e n t l y , m o r e n e w s is c o m i n g f r o m t h e s e a g e n cies. M y o w n news sources are from A s i a N e w s S e r v i c e , P r e s n a L a t i n a , Inter N e w s S e r v i c e a n d N A C L A . W e p l a n to i s s u e a p a m p h l e t o r n e w s summary o f the events within t w o weeks. A t the moment, information on contacts, financial disp e r s i o n , e t c . is v a g u e — r a t h e r , w e a r e s t i l l nuturing o u r l e a d s . W e ' r e t r y i n g to c o - o r d i n a t e (if o u r i m m e d i a t e contacts fail) relief w o r k w i t h a group in B e r k e l e y , C a l i f o r n i a . W e a n t i c i p a t e a l o n g p e r i o d of w a i t i n g f o r s t r o n g , r e l i a b l e c o n t a c t s t o d e v e l o p — b u t w e ' r e o p t i m i s t i c . If h o w e v e r , all avenues e r e unsuccessfully exhausted, we'll i n form eacn contributor a n d either refund the c o n t r i b u t i o n or u s e it e l s e w h e r e . " T h e r e is v e r y l i t t l e s t u d e n t s o r w o r k e r s i n t h i s c o u n t r y c a n d o at t h e p r e s e n t t i m e to d i r e c t l y assist the C h i l e a n w o r k e r s but s u p p o r t i n g this

A -THE

W E E K

IN

T H EL-JPE

J>AWwfrJif ©crofce*. S V V

WAIVES A Pre*,

ITS

Cr-tPifticAi fottS^e sonnet styMSefc...

-THE w£#.e

O c t o b e r 27th, 1973

f u n d d o e s m a k e s o m e c o n t r i b u t i o n to t h e i r s t r u g gle. Please send a l l m o n e y a n d information o n further c o n t a c t s i n C h i l e or A r g e n t i n e t o : D A R I O M c D A R B Y , 1 4 2 2 1 E. V I R G I N I A , P H O E N I X , A R I Z O N A 85006, U.S.A. Yours sincerely, Leonard Still. Dillons University Bookshop Ltd., Mail Order Department, 1 Malet St., London, W C 1 . (Envelope marked ' P E R S O N A L ' )

NOT ENTSHEET FOOLED USK

Dear Ed,

T h i s year w e a r e h o p i n g to put t h e o l d U . S . K . E n t s sheet o n a m o r e s o l i d basis, b r i n g i n g i t o u t regularly every Wednesday. W o r k will start o n Tuesday l u n c h - t i m e i n the U n i o n Office area, a n d we w o u l d appreciate a n y offers o f help, especially w i t h stapl i n g i n t h e evening, a n d with distribution. A n y notices s h o u l d be in t h e U . S . K . pigeon hole by Tuesday lunohtimes—if y o u have a n y i n f o r m a t i o n on Events, 'please send i t in. W e also need contacts in the other colleges roundabout, if anyone knows of anyone " o u t s i d e " who w o u l d be interested in helping, w o u l d they please d r o p us a line. Thanks, and d o drop by, Chris a n d P a u l .

MRPHY^ DAY Dear Editor, I feel (often), as President of the Royal School of M i n e s , that I should warn all those bumpkins and general scrape-thebarrel slag who intend to oppose us on Morphy Day (See and Pee and arse-ease-rest are the technical descriptions of the enemy): that we shall win. That we shall take no prisoners. Rape, plunder and loot are our battle orders, and the safest thing for them is to keep their life insurance policies intact and slink quietly from the battlefield. T h e oar will be ours, and our ladies rowing eight will win, while our ever-victorious Rugby team crushes in turn their opponents on some far-flung field. Remember you have been warned. W e have already won, our firepower is invincible, our crack troops will not waver. Heed not the call to battle of your presidents, you alone will be the one to suffer. Paul Gee.

O F * P P . ccjLs A t - W E A S V H-AR.5 iQ-T

Sir, S o w e cannot get anything out of the Tory government (not even £20 increase on the grant). Thank y o u for making it c l e a r this week. Therefore your s o l u t i o n is t o r e p l a c e t h e Tory government by a "Labour government pledged to socialist polic i e s " . T w o main questions then arise. 1. A c c o r d i n g t o y o u r o w n argument, the Tories a r e b e i n g f o r c e d to attack the living s t a n d of the w o r k i n g ards class because of the rapidly deepening economic crisis which, as you point o u t i n your editorial of O c t o b e r 1 6 t h , i s taking place on a w o r l d scale not just in B r i t a i n . W h e n (if) a L a b o u r g o v e r n m e n t lis e l e c t e d , I doubt very m u c h that the w o r l d e c o n o m i c c r i s is w i l l r e s p o n d t o t h i s by disappearing, so w i l l not the Labour governm e n t be f o r c e d to c a r r y out t h e s a m e p o l i c i e s to try a n d p r o v i d e some s o l u t i o n to t h i s c r i s i s ? 2. Y o u w a n t a L a b o u r government p l e d g e d to socialist policies. The L a b o u r p a r t y is a l w a y s p l e d g e d to s o c i a l i s t p o l i cies. But, y o u may not r e m e m b e r t h e last L a b our g o v e r n m e n t . I d o . I can remember " I n place of s t r i f e " , t h e L a b o u r prices a n d incomes policy, high unemployment u n d e r L a b o u r ; I c a n remember when troops w e r e sent in t o break t h e 1966 dock strike, a n d the Labour g o v e r n m e n t s ' support for t h e Southern A f r i c a n regime, for U . S . aggression in V i e t n a m and for Israels' expans i o n i s t p o l i c i e s . A n d it was a Labour governm e n t t h a t s e n t t r o o p s to suppress the people of Northern Ireland. W i t h s u c h a r e c o r d , I d o u b t if most people are fooled by these any longer these ' s o c i a l i s t p o l i c i e s ' . Yours sincerely, Kathleen Corcoran.

Autonomy Warning Dear Sir, L a s t week's U G M expressed a serious c o n t r a d i c t i o n . T h e argument i n favour of the U n i o n withh o l d i n g m o n e y f r o m the College e q u a l to t h e refectory p r i c e increases was defeated by someone p o i n t i n g o u t that the C o l lege h a s complete c o n t r o l over U n i o n finances. T h e

College w o u l d merely deduct the same amount f r o m the U n i o n ' s funds, a s it c o u l d e q u a l l y d o i n t h e case of a rent strike. A t t e m p t i n g to l a u n c h serious c a m p a i g n s to defend I . C . students' interests let alone t h e interests of exploited groups outside College, w h i l e t h e U n i o n has n o r e a l a u t o n o m y , is naive a n d shows o u r s to be a U n i o n with*; out priorities. J o e Herbertsom (Met.

ARE SCIENTISTS ILITTERATE? The sceintist (that is acording to the other lot, is uncultured, narrow m i n d e d , and ignarant on any subject outside their own chosen subject, in fact they can hardly read nor write. Can their be any truth in this? T h e below questions were tested on a tipycall group of arts students, there avaradge mark was only 98 per cent. See if your result can do better than them. * T h e stared questions what are marked with an aterisk are slightly difficulter, they are optional! and you need not try to attemp them unless you want two. Spell the folowing words corretly: (i) ^ambiguous (ii) "dissipate (iii) ^independent Complete the quotations: (i) "I wandered, as a c l o u d " . . . (ii) " A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a (iii)

" T h e Lord is my Shepherd, I shall not wan—" W h o wrote: (i) Henry IV, Part I (Clue: S h - k - s p - - re) (ii) Henry IV, Part II (iii) *Henry IV, Part III? (Be careful) Arrange in the correct order: World War I; W o r l d War II What do the following have in c o m m o n : (i) (ii) (iii)

* P o p e Gregory, Pope J o h n , Pope Pius I X Violoncello, kazoo, viola, violin Edward Elgar, Benjamin Britten, Albert Hall W h i c h is the odd one out: (i) Beethoven's 6th, Schubert's Unfinished,, Beethoven's 9th, Beethoven's 5th (ii) M a r c o Polo, Christopher Columbus, Vase© da Gama (Clue: how many of them were English?) (iii) Queen Victoria, Martin Luther, Alexander the Great (Clue: how many of them air® still a l i v e ? ' Discuss and describe: (i) the old Pretender (ii) Eric the Red (iii) the Black Hole of Calcutta (confine vow answer to less than 2 words) Where is: (i) the Indian O c e a n ? (ii) the Great Wall of China? (iii) *the North Pole O R the South Pole? (Give reasons) W h o painted: (i) Van Gogh's self-portraits? (ii) Whistler's mother? (iii) those unspeakable pictures in the toilets? (If this question is not answered in less than one minute, E V E R Y O N E will be punished.)

RON «rvo

v

T O W E R

PPLEBY

you

i yes you,

( H A L O OHIHVAM THIS

POOF 5

/ \

NcflfMAc

5ALES

scewe

m o & e

irveeurf At

wctt..

ivexr week J


O c t o b e r 2 3 r d , 1973

NATIONAL The following is taken from the National Grants Briefing Conference held at the Collegiate Theatre in U C L on 13th October. Delegates from IC were present to state their case in the discussion. ;

J o h n R a n d a l l opened w!i!tih a speech b r i n g i n g delegates up to date w i t h the o n g o i n g negotiations between the N U S , D E S a n d the S E D . T h e y have set up seven costing c o m mittees to t h r a s h out the costs of the N U S c l a i m s . These are as f o l l o w s : ! 1. O n D i s c r e t i o n a r y A w a r d s a n d itheir Abolition. T h i s is a hopeful sign, as it is a c r a c k i n the D E S ' s w a l l of resistance re a b o l i t i o n of discretionary a w a r d s . T h e N U S has suggested that costing b e considered im (three " t i e r s " o'r groups: i . m a n d a t o r y awards for H N D or degree-equivalents. i i . m a n d a t o r y awards to a l l 18 + students. H i . m a n d a t o r y awards to all 16 + students. A s regards i i i . this w o u l d i n c l u d e the vast m a j o r i t y of T e c h n i c a l C o l l e g e students. T h e majority of students between 16 and 18 are not i n schools b u t i n Techs and F E colleges (many people forget this). T h e D E S does not appear to be interested i n ithe a b o l i t i o n of the D i s c r e t i o n a r y A w a r d Scheme. H o w e v e r , • it w i l l be a n advantage in presenting the N U S case for a b o l i t i o n i f we have a real figure for the cost. L e g i s l a t i o n Will be needed to a m e n d the 1944 E d u c a t i o n A c t . T h e r e w i l l definitely b e an a m e n d m e n t next year, Ito p r o v i d e a m a n d a t o r y grant for the D i p . H E (as proposed i n the G o v t . W h i t e iPaper). It is hope d that i f a n y legislative action is t a k e n over discretionary awards, it w i l l be t a k e n at this time. A n o t h e r encouraging a c t i o n on this front is that L E A ' s w i l l be able to recover 9 0 % of itheir expenditure o n m a n d a t o r y awards f r o m 1st A p r i l , 1973. I n theory, they c a n n o w be m o r e generous w i t h discretionary awards. (Hitherto, ithey c o u l d only recoyer 6 0 % o f their expenditure). 2. T h e C o s t of a b o l i t i o n of d i s c r i m i n a t i o n against m a r r i e d w o m e n students has been established as (a) £l-^m. i f ithey a l l received the " a t - h o m e " grant (about £390). (b) ,£3m. i f they a l l received the " a w a y - f r o m - h o m e " grant (£520). L i n k e d to this is the question o f dependants' allowances. The DES p o l i c y (Which was l a i d (before the H o u s e of C o m m o n s two days before the recess) lis that £250 per week should be p a i d for ithe academic year, and d u r i n g the vacations, the c l a i m ant has to go to the D H S S Hike anyone else. T h i s amounts to £4.81 per week i n term-time. A c a m p a i g n a r o u n d this issue is Ito be r u n , w i t h i n the G r a n t s C a m p a i g n , •to involve w o m e n i n local Colleges, it is hoped that there w i l l be a meetling between N U S Exec, a n d U n i o n W e l f a r e Officers shortly. 3. A new a w a r d system for students studying abroad. Students studying in foreign countries often r u n out of money before the end o f their courses because of c u r r e n c y exchange fluctuations and high cost of l i v i n g i n some foreign countries. T h e D E S wants a n administratively Simple system; perhaps banding together several countries under a part i c u l a r rate of grant. T h e D E S has provided some cost-of-living figures for some foreign countries, p a r t i c u l a r l y E E C countries. T h e N U S posit i o n is that no student a b r o a d should receive less than the L o n d o n grant, and -that i t should be p a i d i n one of t w o ways: (a) the grant should be paid termly, w i t h adjustment for exchange fluctuations and h i g h cost of 1

FELIX

GRANTS

BRIEFING

l i v i n g i n same foreign countries, the grant s h o u l d be p a i d i n the appropriate foreign c u r r e n c y at the start of the a c a d e m i c year. A s f o r overseas students, there is little chance, i t seems, of a b o l i s h i n g the 3-year residence qual i f i cati on. T h e o n l y m o v e m e n t here is the possibility of students l i v i n g i n the E E C m a y receive m a n d a t o r y awards. iv. A b o l i t i o n of the M e a n s Test. V a r i o u s a p p r o x i m a t e figures of the cost h a v e appeared over 'the past five years; they range f r o m £6m. ( N U S ) t o £20m. ( D E S ) . N U ) S has/ pointed o u t that w i t h d r a w a l of tax allowance f o r parents w i t h c h i l d r e n receiving grants w o u l d p a r t l y offset the cost of a b o l i t i o n . T h e D E S has been " c o - o p e r a t i v e " i n these negotiations, b u t the I n l a n d R e v e n u e Service has been distinctly stroppy, and refuses to give u p the relevant figures to N U S . v. G i v i n g cash grants to College of E d . students T h e D E S instituted a Pilolt Scheme i n ten Colleges a few years back, but appears to have gone off the i d e a now. T h e y are now saying that they have c o m m i t m e n t to introduce c a s h grants a n d w a n t to introduce subsidies to cover the losses i n c u r r e d i n C o l l e g e of E d u c a t i o n H a l l s a n d catering. T h e N U S E x e c u t i v e therefore considers it unwise to continue l i n k ing this c l a i m to the P i l o t Scheme a n d p l a n to raise ithe question in general negotiations. vi. R a i s i n g the m a i n rate. T h i s is ithe most difficult costing, i n c l u d i n g , as i t does, the assessment of the n o t i o n a l element for b o a r d and lodging. H i t h e r t o this has been t a k e n as the average of h a l l rents. T h i s is, of course, m i s l e a d i n g , because h a l l rents are largely dependent o n subsidies, " h i d d e n " or otherwise. T h e w i t h d r a w a l o f w h i c h m a y lead to sudden rises. F u r t h e r m o r e , as regards " d i g s " , ithe r e t a i l price index only measures the cost of unfurnished a c c o m m o d a t i o n , the cost of w h i c h rises m u c h m o r e slowly t h a n the cost of furnished a c c o m m o d a t i o n . Hence, the cost of a l l student a c c o m m o d a t i o n is to be t a k e n into account i n these present negotiations. E q u i p m e n t grants are also being discussed i n this context. v i i . Students o n l o n g courses. T h i s includes h e a l t h students, a n d postgraduates. H e a l t h students m a y be studying for 44 to 48 weeks every year, but only receive the n o t i o n a l element for boar d a n d l o d g i n g for t h e e x t r a weeks (14-18 weeks). These students have no o p p o r t u n i t y to w o r k d u r i n g the holidays, (only 4 weeks). T h e N U S case is that they s h o u l d receive the f u l l grant for a l l 44-48 weeks. P a r a m e d i c a l students ( m a n u a l hospital workers, etc.) are included i n the section (i), as they receive discretionary awards. Ft appears t h a t no-one i n the D E S knows h o w the P G grant is assessed; this m a y be one reason w h y there has been no a c t i o n f r o m them o n it! T h e N U S has suggested t h a t it be assessed i n one of two ways: i. as for other long-course students, (ii) part or whole of a recent g r a d u ate's salary; 7 5 % has been raised as a figure. T h e most significant point, however, lis that N U S has little o r no p o l i c y on the postgraduate grant. Any ideas? There are a few other areas w h i c h have been discussed: (a) F i e l d T r i p s T h e N U S has taken the line t h a t i n term-time, Students should receive a certain a m o u n t of money to def r a y , extra costs i n c u r r e d b y a field t r i p . D u r i n g vacations a l l the elements i n the grant s h o u l d be i n c l u ded i n the s u m given, instead of just b o a r d , lodgings a n d travel. N o t e : T h e U G C gives each institut i o n a c e r t a i n a m o u n t to subsidise field trips, f r o m a cen(b)

Page 3

CONFERENCE

t r a l p o o l . It is l i k e l y that I C is one C o l l e g e that benefits f r o m this scheme, (ib) T h e T r i e n n i a l R e v i e w O n e o f N U S ' s demands t o go to the 1973-74 T r i e n n i a l R e v i e w is the a b o l i t i o n of the T r i e n n i a l R e v i e w , T h i s , N U S feels, s h o u l d be replaced b y a n a n n u a l review of student finance. A questionnaire to be sent out to 10 institutions o n a proposed pilot f o r the N U S scheme is to b e prepared by the D E S . (c) D e l a y i n Ithe payment of grants. T h i s year it was caused b y L E A ' s 'being forced t o recalculate the grant levels because of the changes i n the means test. N U S hopes to speed up the T r i e n n i a l R e v i e w this year so that i t doesn't d r a g on into the summer, and delay the payment of the (higher?) grant. The Campaign N o n e of the D E S - N U S negotiations c a r r y any c o m m i t m e n t s f r o m either side. A t the end of the negotiations, the p o l i t i c a l decisions Will be t a k e n i n D E S T r e a s u r y infighting. N U S E x e c u t i v e believes that it is at this p o i n t that the C a m p a i g n must b e strongest—we must a p p l y o u r p o l i t i c a l weight to produce the right d e c i s i o n ; hence the c a m p a i g n shoul d b u i l d u p to the R e v i e w , a n d i f necessary, c a r r y o n beyond it. Steve P a r r y spoke o n the c a m p a i g n . H e pointed out Itihat the c a m p a i g n must be c a r r i e d out to 'back the negotiations a n d i n c o n j u n c t i o n With T r a d e U n i o n s a n d other g r o u p s o n low and fixed i n comes, e.g. pensioners a n d claimants. A f t e r M a r g a t e , activity should be built up on a n area basis d u r i n g the second term. A c t i o n s h o u l d be taken a r o u n d L E A meetings, etc., and c u l m i nate i n a massive demonstration at a significant juncture i n the T r i e n n i a l R e view.

k is hoped that areas w i l l c o m m e n c e a c t i o n on students rights i n c o n j u n c t i o n Wiith the G r a n t s c a m p a i g n . In I C W e w o u l d hope to do several things this t e r m : i. Inform students, particularly freshers, about the grants c a m p a i g n . ii. Raise the level of consciousness enough to provide ithe semblance o f a mass m o b i l i s a t i o n i n the College. iii. Pave the way for a n effective rent strike next term, a c r u c i a l p e r i o d . iv. Partake in the a r e a c a m p a i g n , a n d provide some effective assistance to smaller Colleges i n the area. T h e m a j o r argument o n Saturday was the posing of n a t i o n a l vs. l o c a l actions. M y feeling is that a n y -action, l o c a l or n a t i o n a l depends o n the effectiveness of l o c a l student u n i o n officers. It is u p to the U n i o n E x e c u t i v e to organise a n effective c a m p a i g n , a n d Ito m o b i l i s e sfu* dents to enter the c a m p a i g n . It i s often very useful to capitalise o n feeling o v e r local issues, e.g. refectory prices, a n d use these to show the nature o f the grants situation ito G o v e r n m e n t E c o n o m i c p o l icy a n d the affect it has o n students a n d others o n low and fixed incomes. I hope that there W i l l be some c a m paigning w i t h outside groups: i. Trades Union via Hammersmith Council. ii. Pensioners; h o w a b o u t some c a m - ' paigning for t h e m ? iii. Claimants. i v . T e n a n t s ' Associations. Dates to R e m e m b e r : — O c t o b e r 24th or 25th: A r e a a c t i o n . Proposed: brief rally, t h e n m a r c h to a n d picket of L E A A c t i o n o n discretionary awards. November 7ih: National Rally. N o v e m b e r 14th: W o r k - i n (and PrirH cess A n n e ' s wedding day). C o n t i n u e d o n page 4

Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals show support for higher grants

. . . but words don t pay hills At its meeting this morning the Vice-Chanceilors' Committee discussed the issue of student grants against the background of the review currently being conducted by the Department of Education and Science to determine the grant levels for the three years commencing next autumn. It has been the declared policy of successive Governrrents over many years since the Anderson Committee reported, that subject to a parental means test, grants should be available to cover the reasonable basic maintenance costs of undergraduate students. T h i s is the Anderson principle. But in recent years, Governments have begun to threaten this principle by fixing grants which fall short of basic for the p r i m a r y purposes living costs. Universities are hit by the decreasing value in student grants i n two ways. In the first place, students ought to have the basic means to support themselves so that their studies are not adversely affected. In the second place, if u n i versities are to continue to try to house students and prevent a crisis in a c c o m m o d a t i o n , they must be able to fix rents w h i c h meet the cost of p r o v i d i n g accommodation which now has to be financed p r i n c i p a l l y through loans raised o n the open money market. E q u a l l y students l i v i n g in lodgings must be able to pay rent at ithe going rate. The Committee's concern about student grants has become m o r e acute over the last t w o years. W h e n the D E S announce d

press release

the levels that were to a p p l y f o r the three acad e m i c years 1971-74, the C o m m i t t e e said that i n adequate grants were in-

consistent w i t h the G o v ernment's policy which required universities to make economic charges for b o a r d a n d lodging. O v e r the past year the students' grievances against the Government about the d e c l i n i n g purchasing power of their grant took the f o r m of rent strikes and protest action directed against universities. A l t h o u g h the universities sympathised wilth the students' difficulties, they were b o u n d to tell their students that they c o u l d not provide wideranging subsidies from funds voted by P a r l i a m e n t

of teaching and research. Student protest action d i r ected against universities is misconceived. It wastes time and money o n c o n flicts which are not created by universities a n d w h i c h are not in their power to resolve. T h e D E S review of student grants for the three years from nc::t September is now under way. T h e Committee believes that the A n d e r s o n p r i n c i p l e is at stake. It is essential that student grants should be properly assessed, fixed initially at realistic levels and between reviews supplemented annually to take account of c h a n g i n g prices. T h e C o m m i t t e e has already m a d e its general Views k n o w n to M i n i s t e r s and proposes to m a k e further representations as the review proceeds.


ANTILOMBARD M i n e s have passed a resolution against the Rent Strike proposed by a quorate ICU E M to s t a r t n e x t t e r m a n d it i s rumoured similar motions will be put to G u i l d s a n d R C S a t their next union meetings. A collection of M i n e s men, as y o u can see in these pages, attended a G A C meeting a n d prop o s e d a m o t i o n t h a t it be postponed until the last d a y o f t e r m . A s everyone knows, IC U n i o n i s t h e o n l y p o l i c y m a k e r that r e p r e sents all U G ' s a n d P G ' s . It i s n o t a s s u m e d t h a t M i n e s m e n , G u i l d s m e n or those of R C S a r e intrinsically any different w h e n it c o m e s t o e a t i n g . S o w h y t h e re-emergence of C C U chauvinism in opposition to I C U when the former are w h a t c o n s t i t u t e t h e latter. It c o m e s d o w n t o a question of leadership. W t h i n the C C U ' s the C C U execs have a certa n d e g r e e o f c h a r i s m a for a certain section o f their m e m b e r s h i p w h o attend the C C U meetings. S o w h y t he attempt to l i q u i d a t e t h e G r a n t s Action Committee. T h e leadership o f the C C U ' s is traditionally a react i o n a r y o n e a n d t h i s year especially s o . W h e n students are faced w i t h ever m o u n t i n g c o s t s a n d flat refusals from St. J o h n Stevas to inci ease grants, what w o u l d the C C U execs wish? F o r the.'r m e m b e r s h i p t o b e driven out of college or live in pre-Weimar conditions rapidly turning into those resembling the depression of t h e 30's? Last w e e k 7 4 2 i t e m s went up in price according to " T h e G r o c e r " , establish'ng a n e w record for a l l t i me in this c o u n try — b u t n o t a penny on w a g e s , nor a penny went o n grants. A l m o s t each w e e k this record i s b r o k e n sett n g unprecedented highs in our c o s t o f l i v i n g . The question is w h o has got policies to meet this crisis. The Y S S S urge everyone t o c o m e t o o u r classes on the e c o n o m c c r i s i s s t a r t i n g th s W e d n e s d a y i n IV"sen. E n g . 2 1 4 at 1 . 3 0 p . m . W e say with complete c e r t a i n t y that u n l e s s a revolutionary party is built in this a n d a l l countries to lead the w p r k n g c l a s s to power, then f a s c i s m w i l l b e i m posed in this country by the r u l i n g c l a s s that w i l l make Chile seem I k e a summer hol'day. In c l o s i n g I w o u l d l i k e to r e m i n d e v e r y o n e o f t h a s l o g a n s of t h e IUat ' o n a l F r o n t , s h o u t e d in their m a r c h d u r i n g the summer: " H a n g a l l students, castrate all blacks". It's that s o r t of a future i n store f o r u s o r e l s e w e fight t o b u i l d this revolutionary party. Editor

October 23rd, 1973

FELIX

Page 4

r FUNNY ONE ONE Dear E d i t o r , T h a n k G o d there is o n e sane compassionate h u m a n being here w h o c a n u n derstand other's s e x ua l problems. N o w t h a t o u r G a y B r o t h e r s are being liberated it i s time t o t u r n o u r 'attention to 'that other sadly repressed m i n o r i t y beaten d o w n b y the Fascist vanguard o f capitalistic narrow minded society (thank G o d ) ! I a m t a l k i n g about Sado-Masochis'ts. T h e r e i s n o reason w h y a man's relationship w i t h his w h i p c a n n o t b e just as l o v i n g as t h a t w i t h a n other h u m a n being. A l o t of sado-masoehists are f a r more n o r m a l than so c a l l ed h u m a n beings. A n y o n e interested i n sado-masoc h i s m d r o p a r o u n d to m y torture c h a m b e r sometime a n d t a l k i t over, over a red hot poker. Right On. Adolf Hitler. Continued from

page 3

PURPLE PATCH

some b e : — change tables i n each of leave us to find the refectories, a n d f r o m e x t r a money f r o m some1 Departmental meetthese s h o u l d p r o v i d e where, a n d it was decided ings w i t h the S a b b a t i c a l people w i t h the accurate to find this money f r o m officers plus C . C . U . Presiof the Rector's dent. change w h i c h they require some so t h a t they c a n p a y last funds, this money to go 2 Profiles of certain of year's prices for the food towards certain types of the U n i o n a n d College w h i c h they are about to rcdecoration of the refec- officials i n Felix.. eat. Thus the people tory areas. 3 Better use of the P . A . would look down last A t a G r a n t ' s a c t i on System i n C o l l e g e B l o c k year's price list, a n d then committee ( G . A . C . ) last before U . G . M ' s . offer the o l d a m o u n t o f T h u r s d a y evening, about 4 R e s t r u c t u r i n g of the money to the lady .behind 30/40 R.S.M. students the cash desk, a n d refuse turned up to express their U . G . M ' s b y : — to p a y her a n y more. L i m i t i n g the speeches to d i s a p p r o v a l of the decision by the U . G . M . three minutes; G u i l l o t i n e W h e n this m o t i o n was taken decision was of 75 minutes o n the meetput forward, I spoke A . G . A . C . More motions at against it o n s i m i l a r lines taken that the meeting ing; to those w h i c h I put for- s h o u l d a d j o u r n a n d that it U . G . M ' s referring to o u r i n F E L I X ' t w o w o u l d not reconvene until o w n problems; Decisions ward weeks ago. D u r i n g the the 14th December. It w a s o n N . U . S . P o l i c i e s to be discussions last term w i th also decided that at the t a k e n b y the E x t e r n a l the refectories committee next U n i o n meeting, a affairs committee. a n d also the B o a r d of C o n s t i t u t i o n of the G . A . C . It was suggested that a l l G o v e r n o r s , we were told should be d r a w n u p , a n d of these ideas w o u l d be so that the discussed at the next meetthat it was estimated that approved, the overall loss at the end G . A . C . w o u l d have some ing of C o u n c i l . T h e y were o n w h i c h it proposed by a w o r k i n g of the session 1973/74 framework w o u l d be i n the region of c o u l d w o r k . ( N . B . T h e party o n P u b l i c a t i o n s a n d £35,000 unless the prices R . S . M . h a d a U n i o n meet- p u b l i c i t y last week. i n the refectories were i n - ing o n the same d a y as the Just before I finish, I U n i o n meeting at w o u l d creased. P a r t of this i n - I.C. like to inform crease c o u l d be offset b y w h i c h they decided that everyone that at a B o a r d i n c l u d i n g the net surplus the R . S . M . w o u l d not sup- of G o v e r n o r ' s F i n a n c e a n d of a r o u n d £11,500 from port the Rent strike. D u r - E x e c u t i v e committee A s far as the refectories the Bars a n d the cellars ing the next couple of meeting o n F r i d a y of last m o t i o n is concerned, the t h u s leaving a n overall weeks both R . C . S . a n d week, it was decided that meeting asked that the deficit of some £23,500. also C . & G , are having the U n i o n s h o u l d receive B o a r d of G o v e r n o r s re- T h i s c o u l d be offset b y a n U n i o n meetings at w h i c h an extra £5,000 o n t o p of move the increase that increase of 7\ per cent, they w i l l b o t h discuss the the subvention w h i c h they they suggested last term a n d w o u l d need a sub- R e n t strike m o t i o n a n d receive at the moment. I f t he Refectories anyone feels that the and that t l v subsidise the stantial a m o u n t of the re- also refectories f r o m non-refec- fectories surplus to help m o t i o n . I w o u l d hope that G o v e r n i n g body are really out thus as m a n y people turn u p to against us then they c o u l d finances tory sources, thus break- the ing the U . G . C . r u l i n g that l i m i t i n g the amount of the next I . C . U n i o n meet- possibly try to e x p l a i n this they should in no c i r c u m - m u c h needed decorating ing as w i l l turn up to the one to me. ( M a y b e even -three C . C . U . U n i o n meet- someone w i l l d r e a m u p stances subsidise the refecT h e boar d of governors ings ! ! ! the idea of using this tories, b u t that the refec-, decision was that the tones, should be totally refectory prices should be T h e r e are m a n y other money to subsidise the rather than self-financing. In order to increased b y 5 per cent issues w h i c h I w o u l d like refectories implement this policy and (i.e. to everyone i n c l u d i n g to discuss i n this Patch, using the money o u t of to force the boar d o f the staff, a n d also those but unfortunately neither the student's pockets!). governors to accept o u r persons ordering dinners time nor space w i l l permit demands, we should set u p etc.). T h i s w o u l d then this. Some of these w o u l d Norm

A t the U n i o n G e n e r a l meeting o n Tuesday the 16th O c t o b e r , t w o decisions were made, both of w h i c h bear a reasonable a m o u n t of relevance to the students in this college. T h e first of these two motions was that this U n i o n demands that the governing body remove the 5 per cent increase w h i c h they have p u t o n the refectory prices, a n d m a k e good the loss o n ' t h e refectories by subsidising them f r o m n o n refectory profits. T h e second decision w h i c h was made was that the Entertainments committee should be restricted to h a v i n g three concerts per term, unless the S . C . A B. committee sanction another concert for one reason or another. This second decision the E n t e r t a i n enables ments committee to provide reasonable entertainment for the students of this college, and at the same time limits the n u m ber o f concerts they are allowed to put o n .

R e n t Strikes Bristol, Liverpool and C e n t r a l L o n d o n Poly are on rent strike, P C L since J a n u a r y ; they n o w have £22,000 in their rent strike fund. K e n t a n d others have passed motions i n U G M s . A b o u t three have decided not to, m a i n l y because they have a'ready been o n strike a n d fc't that they were not b a c k e d by other colleges a n d N U S Exec , strongly enough. This shows the effect of solidarity action. Reading, E x e t e r a n d Y o r k are not going o n strike. it shou'd be noted that (a) C o n t i n u e the present the effect of the c a m p a i g n situation where support w i s to squeeze a n extra and encouragement for £20 f r o m M r s . Thatcher. locally initiated rent There are, at present, strikes is given, a n d (b) two lines o n rent strike, C a l l for a N a t i o n a l Rent one of w h i c h w i l l be Strike. chosen at M a r g a t e : " T R E V O R PHILLIPS

SOCIAL SECRET AR1ES CONFERENCE We played o u r first Those present (from league gam." o n Saturday, Q M C , C e n t r a l Poly, N o r t h 13th O ctober against London Poly, Redbridge, K o d a k . Play was scrappy C i t y , L o n d o n a n d IC) told at first but I.C: soon began the meeting what they had pressurising t h e K o d a k o n this term. goa! a n d eventually forced T h e meeting discussed a short corner. Mick problems w h i c h had arisen Downes netted f r o m the out of agents, etc. N o short and we went l-O up. concrete decision w a s Kodak's negative play taken. continued but they scored A n a l l night event was just o n half time, i n the proposed f o r 23rd N o v e m second half several defenber at C i t y w h o h a d a l sive mistakes gave K o d a k ready booked two groups. their second goal. Imperial Q M C agreed to bring in again put on the pressure their g r o u p f o r that night. and M i c k Downes netted I C agreed to sell tickets. his second goal. We also got the impresAfter another frustratsion that other colleges ing period D a v e H a r r i s o n were rather jealous of o u r and Nigel Woodhouse reputation in the field o f c o m b i n e d together to proentertainments. duce c r third a n d best C i t y U n i v e r s i t y have a n goal, N i s e ! being t h e idea for a large event at scorer. I.C. then c l a m p e d the Agricultural Hall, d e w n in defence a n d we w h i c h has not been used ran out winners 3-2. O u r for years a n d needs exthanks to G . P o p p l e w h o tensive renovation, for umpired. about 17,000 people. Names suggested were The Imperials teams Jelferson Airplane and were selected f r o m : R. Pink F l o y d . B a t e m a n . S. B o u l t o n . M . V i e y r a . R . C a m e r o n , R. T h e meeting closed with Evans, T . Hanson, A . a resolution to meet again Brown, M . Hatcher, K . at Hatfield a n d p u t a Ross, N . Woodhouse, D . m o t i o n o n agencies a n d Harrison, G . Popple, M . the legality o f contracts to Downes (capt.), P. Jowitit. NUS. ( C o n t i n u e d f r o m page 7)

How nice to meet someone who speaks your language. W h e n you meet our interviewer you'll usually find he's a specialist i n your field—whether it's chemistry, physics, engineering, mathematics, economics or arts. T h a t means he can answer your questions from personal experience and discuss career opportunities from first-hand knowledge. T h i s year we shall be recruiting people for engineering, research and management services and keeping a particular eye open for people from all kinds of backgrounds who want to have a marketing commercial career. W o u l d y o u like to meet someone who speaks your language ? T h e n ask your Appointments Service for details of how to apply.

Central Personnel Department, Imperial Chemical Industries L i m i t e d , M i l l b a n k , L o n d o n S W i P 3JF.


October

23rd, 1973

FELIX

SABOTAGE? At Grants Action Committee Meeting Allegation College A u t h o r i t i e s w i l l respond

favourably

just d e m a n d s

Refutation

fool-about, a n d challenge the q u o r u m i f they c a n , d i d n o t c o m e to help the implementation of U n i o n policy.

N o - o n e expects that t h e to o u r

w i t h o u t us

putting u p a fight. Indeed,

T h e y came instead to t r y and sabotage U n i o n p o l i c y , by p r o p o s i n g that its i m student a c t i o n last term plementation be postponw h i c h made t h e college ed to the last d a y of t e r m ! find some (small) subsidy, If they h a d a n y t h i n g to express—by speeches o r not d i r e c t l y f r o m tine U G C , v o t i n g — o n refectories a n d to h o l d off 1 p e r cent o r grants i n I C U n i o n the so o f t h e refe'c p r i c e i n place to d o i t is i n a crease. A l r e a d y , t w o days Union meeting. They after the U n i o n decision, c l a i m they h a d their o w n vague threats against t h e meeting o n at t h e same Union are b e i n g p u t time as I C U G M so c o u l d about i n a n attempt to n't c o m e ; w e l l M i n e s meetb l a c k m a i l us . . . these ing was c a l l e d after become t h r e a t s — i f they I C U — p r o b a b l y as a p l o y ' o f f i c i a l ' — w i l l o n l y serve to show the college i n the to t r y a n d keep I C U i n quorate—a ploy which light they deserve t o b e d o u b l y failed. T h e fact is seen. they cannot have their M o o n e y a n d eat i t , I C H o w e v e r w e d o not n o r Students must always m a l l y expects threats of w e l c o m e discussion but sabotage a n d t h e l i k e t o cannot tolerate these silly come from any group o f disrupters. I C U n i o n p o l students—however small icy is m a d e b y I C U n i o n and unrepresentative. meetings—no-one else. The Grants Action C o m m i t t e e meeting called A f t e r t h e 35 gentlemen o n T h u r s d a y evening t o (?) of M i n e s etc. departed discuss the i m p l e m e n t a t i o n the remaining people— of U n i o n p o l i c y w a s re- largely those who had m a r k a b l y w e l l attended. been elected to G A C plus A b o u t 50 p e o p l e turned a few co-opted volunteers up, 35 o r so of w h o m —met a n d organised p u b (who were new a n d i n this licity. C h a n g e (the Presicase unwelcome because o f dent is being asked to their u n r u l y behaviour) make i t available), a n d were f r o m a g r o u p i n the leaflets, etc. 35 students R S M c o m m o n l y k n o w n as w h o appear to W A N T ? ? ! ! THE Minesmen. This price increases i n refectorgroup w h i c h bears a close ies c a n n o t be p e r m i t t e d t o resemblance t o those w h o sabotage the struggle sometimes c o m e a l o n g t o w h i c h is i n the interests o f U n i o n meetings t o heckle. a l l I C students. it w a s o n l y the threat of

;

It has been suggested that I write t o e x p l a i n w h y so m a n y people t u r n e d u p to t h e G r a n t s A c t i o n C o m mittee ( G A C ) last night, and w h y they adopted such a n " o b s t r u c t i v e " attitude. F i r s t l y the G r a n t s A c tion C o m m i t t e e is a purely ad h o c c o m m i t t e e w i t h n o constitution o r rules d r a w n up. T h i s lays a n y s u c h committee o p e n to c o n t r o l by definitive groups w h o can m a n i p u l a t e to suit their o w n ideals.

not a prefabricated jerry built f a i l u r e . It should be marketed as b y anyone else i n industry does with their o w n products. T h e c a m p a i g n s h o u l d be carefully thought, h a m m e r e d into shape, extensively expl ai ned a n d advertised and then released with considerably m o r e chance of success.

IWR'^JLONDON

P. G ee

A t a u n i o n general meeting o n T u e s d a y at t h e Polytechnic of N o r t h L o n d o n i t was decided b y a p p r o x i m a t e l y 350 f o r to 100 against t o o c c u p y the A d ministration block i n the H o l l o w a y precinct.

T h e students have been sleeping i n overnight a n d m a n n i n g the telephone exchange as well as preventing the A m i n i s t r a t i o n staff f r o m h a v i n g access t o a l l A d m i n , b l o c k H o l l o w ay R o a d . files a n d documents necesThe G A C h a d been sary to the r u n n i n g of the the occupying students ents face i n the o r i g i n a l mandated b y t h e I C U n - college. a n d several h a d copies o f m o t i o n . ion m e e t i n g t o organise a letter f r o m the U n i v e r T h e students are c a l l i n g the m o t i o n o n refectories T h e foyer of the A d m i n sity o f S t i r l i n g i m p l y i n g the resignation of t h e for dealing w i t h p a y i n g o n l y block i n Holioway R o a d that M i l l e r h a d a p p l i e d f o r Director of N L P , Terence the o l d prices f o r food. T o was plastered w i t h posters the post of P r i n c i p a l a n d M i l l e r . H e has fought since leave such v i t a l matters i n exclaiming "Millerman his a p p o i n t m e n t against V i c e - C h a n c e l l o r there. the hands of a committee must g o ! " referring t o the student representation o n run o n t h e lines e x p l a i n e d Lfcst T h u r s d a y meetings d e p i c t i o n o f M i l l e r as a committees a n d the a u t o above is lunacy. were held i n a l l t h e prestudent-bashing r o b o t i n n o m y of the student u n i o n . T h e other question raisvented by the T o r i e s i n the cincts ( N L P is spread over quite a large area) to disA motion which amounted was whether Refectorcurrent edition of the P o l y cuss the o c c u p a t i o n . T h e ed to a m o t i o n o f n o c o n ies have a n y t h i n g t o d o handbook. general feeling of the.se with a G r a n t s C a m p a i g n . fidence i n M i l l e r was narT h e students m a n n i n g meetings was one of c o n If t h e students a t Imperr o w l y defeated a t a C o u r t fusion at w h y the executhe telephone exchange i a l College feel t h a t t h e re- of G o v e r n o r s meeting o n tive, h a v i n g tabled the o r a n d upstairs sitting o n fectories offer p o o r v a l u e the M o n d a y before the cushions >n the offices were i g i n a l m o t i o n , appeared a t for m o n e y , o r p o o r q u a l U n i o n General Meeting by a l l w e a r i n g badges saying that stage to be t r y i n g t o ity, o r p o o r service then 15 votes t o 1 1 . " M i l l e r o u t " w h i c h date r u n the o c c u p a t i o n d o w n . let us stir u p the refectorT h e President, Terry f r o m t h e first o c c u p a t i o n ies t o establish t h e needs Terry Povey told m e Povey t o l d m e that the to try a n d remove M i l l e r of Ithe customers. " w e a r e keeping the o c c u o c c u p a t i o n w o u l d continue f r o m his post. Let us n o t establish a pation s m a l l so that studu n t i l M i l l e r leaves. T h e r e G r a n t s C a m p a i g n that is ents d o n ' t become d e m o r was n o m e n t i o n of the T h e files i n t h e A d m i n so a l l encompassing o f a l i s e d " whereas t h e s t u d other problems that studh a d been checked over b y every grievance w e have; ents i n the precinct meetthat it becomes so masings appeared to feel that sive a n d u n w o r k a b l e as to the reverse s h o u l d be t h e b l a t a n t l y f a i l before i t case. should leave the di scussi on Perhaps the m a i n reason table. for d e m o r a l i s a t i o n is s u m It i s m y o p i n i o n that a n y JAI i?«ox»£5»-W. med u p b y a poster p r o m \ G r a n t s C a m p a i g n should inent i n the entrance r e a d \ \ \ be a single forged p o l i c y ing " L e t ' s inject some \ "\ politics into this o c c u p a tion".

ARE WE UP-SIDE DOWN ?

hy are we at IC (continued) W h a t is the m o t i v a t i o n that keeps not s i m p l y t o acqui re scarce " k n o w us studying? money? status? l a c k o f ledge" to monopolise it a n d sell it as job? prestige? college's atmosphere? an expensive item o r exchange it f o r security? If s o , it i s o b v i o u s that we status security, etc.; o r not s i m p l y t o be should feel bored a n d f o o l i s h . W e should able t o accept whatever k i n d o f " k n o w rather learn h o w t o get money, a j o b , ledge" i s being p u m p e d -in o u r heads etc., w i t h o u t h a v i n g t o learn a n d w o r k after a forced selection f r o m a m o n g a with a l l these difficult scientific a n d e n n u m b e r of pre packaged choices being gineering subjects M o t i v a t i o n precedes put t o us. all meaningful learning. Let me consider a subject l i k e m a n y But if o u r " m o t i v a t i o n " is either i n others, say N u c l e a r R e a c t o r Physics; the ertia o r that we like M a t h s . Physics, etc.. typical order o f teaching i s more o r then o u r motivations a r e academic a n d less: to s o m e extent independent of t h e " o u t 1—The a t o m , -its nature, etc. side w o r l d " , w e are l i k e l y t o feel there2—E=mc fore irresponsible, ordered about, a r b i 3 — N u c l e a r reactions, energy liberation, trarily graded, useless, etc., M o t i v a t i o n etc. should c o m e f r o m t h e " r e a l " o r " o u t 4 — T h e reactor, description, classificaside w o r l d " a n d not f r o m w i t h i n the tion, etc. college o r f r o m (prepackaged curricu5 — N u c l e a r reactors engineering la. "Phis applies unless we expect to 6 — (Sometimes) N u c l e a r reaction econosolve iproblems o f Ithe college only, remics. gardless of a n y t h i n g e l s e — o r unless we Separately, if o n e is l u c k y enough t o intend t o declare ourselves irresponsible find out, one c a n join such courses as (i.e. someone else's tools) a n d . want to " E n v i r o n m e n t a n d M a n " o r Science 8c coroperate b l i n d l y to increase t h e a l Society", where (again with l u c k ) someready overgrown world's power f o r one m a y t a l k of t h e role o f N u c l e a r rewhatever t h e " f u t u r e " (i.e. t h e people actors in some r e a l s i t u a t i o n s u c h as h o l d i n g power o r the system's inertia) solving the energy crisis. I n a n y case, b y m a y reserve for us. the t i m e w e find o u t something about O n e s h o u l d be allowed t o learn what the real problems, i t is t o o late F O R U S one is really motivated to learn, a n d to decide whether o r not t h e course i s 2

Page 5

M i l l e r m a n after

defeat.

useful. R e s u l t : o n c e one has a l r e a d y studied all that, t h e o n l y possibility o f feeling that o n e is useful o r needed, or o f finding a j o b , is by trying to solve a n y p r o b lem by a p p l y i n g the learned techniques of N u c l e a r Reactors. O b v i o u s l y the m o t i v a t i o n t o study in such a w a y m a y be status, money, inertia, etc., b u t n o t the wish to solve real problems such as energy supplies, crisis, etc., simply because we d i d n ' t even k n o w that such problems existed sometimes. H o w about t r y i n g the other w a y a r o u n d ? i.e. based on m o t i v a t i o n , e.g. 1— E n e r s v requirements of present w a y of life" 2 — A l t e r n a t i v es If the student s t i l l believes that more energy is required a n d that it is the o n l y solution (or the best) . . . and feels inclined to try o r help t o solve the p r o b l e m : 3—— E n e r g y production methods, consequences, costs, etc. If the student still believes that N u c lear energy is a solution . . . 4 — N u c l e a r Reactors, types, economy, social i m p l i c a t i o n s , ecological a n d p o l i t i c a l effects, possibilities, etc. A g a i n , if the student still . . . 5 — N u c l e a r R e a c t o r physics a n d engineering: research design, construction maintenance, management, etc., j o b conditions, possibilities a n d scope,

He has frozen their funds f o r the t h i r d t i m e , a n d t h e students a r e d e m a n d i n g that they be i m mediately unfrozen.

present organisations, etc. If the s t u d e n t . . . -The a t o m , its nature. E = m c nuclear reactions, energy liberation. etc. 2

R e s u l t : 1—only those w h o believe, i n what they are d o i n g w i l l continue, 2 — the m o t i v a t i o n w i l l be a c o n t i n u o u s d r i v e i m p r o v i n g the l e a r n i n g , 3—those who don't feel motivated to the subject simply split a n d have o p p o r t u n i t y to cither deal w i t h the same p r o b l e m i n a different field o r to look f o r more satisfying studies, problems, w o r k , etc. In short: H e a l t h y responsible learning not indoctrination. T h i s means saving, o f e d u c a t i o n a l resources (time, money, lectures, etc.) o » the side of the educating organisation, and of precious time, effort, frustration, etc.. Oil the part of the student: plus this also leads t o enjoyable a n d desirable work rather than a c o m p u l s o r y a n d d u l l one. If what we want is people's education rather than b o o s t i n g o u r statistics a n d records, we s h o u l d stop c o n s i d e r i n g education as c o m m e r c i a l goods that c a n be given to a n y b o d y w h o pays f o r it independently of whether o r not that person is interested o r motivated to learn. J . Aguirre, C i v . E n g . 310


P

a

g

e

FELIX

6

X

O c t o b e r 2 3 « L 1973

REVIEWS

HEATRI Who's who in the Ancient World nsti* urn 6

BOOKS

by Betty Radice Penguin 60p

T h i s b o o k i s what is says i t is, o r to a n d psychoanalysis — enabling one to be more exact a 'who was who" in theinterpret the significance of t h e symbols a n d characters i n v o l v e d i n them. G r e e k and R o m a n classics. T h e comprehensive a n d f u l l y u p to O u r heritage of art i s f u l l of the i n fluences b o t h h i s t o r i c a l and m y t h o l o g i - date index makes a l l the i n f o r m a t i o n cal f r o m this era, the m y t h o l o g y o f the i n the d i c t i o n a r y readily accessible, and time especially presenting an a m a z i n g this b o o k is i d e a l f o r reference o r f o r a f l u x of fascinating characters w h o ledc o n f i r m e d browser, being f u l l o f intervery c o m p l e x lives b y a n y standards esting snatches of i n f o r m a t i o n w h i c h and w h o a r e further confused b y they o u r u n across u p o n l o o k i n g u p a parElektra v a r i o u s interpretations m a d e over a ti cul ar topic such as F r e u d ' s thousand years of the G r e e k and R o m a n compl ex, Picasso's use o f the M i n o t a u r or the p o p u l a t i o n of the circles of H e l l cultures. Betty R a d i c e presents a very clear in Dante's Inferno, to n a m e but a few. T h e r e are 56 rather beautiful b l a c k picture of what c o u l d be chaos a n d what is perhaps more i m p o r t a n t follows and white plates illustrating i n t r o d u c the strong classical influences over a t i o n , a b i b l i o g r a p h y , t w o m a p s and a vast range of art, from the Renaissance c h r o n o l o g i c a l table finish of the book. Recommended. to the present d a y , spanning poetry, Philip Webber p a i n t i n g , sculpture, m us i c, p l a y w r i t i n g , films, p h i l o s o p h y a n d even astronomy

Almost free theatre

N o w a d a y s l u n c h t i m e d r a m a is becom- (the guest) is really a " d i r t y o l d m a n " , ing very p o p u l a r i n L o n d o n , attract- w h o cannot come t o terms w i t h himself ing an audience f r o m office workers a n d unless he regularly indulges i n his h o b b y the urba n po p ul a c e that c a n n o t stay i n of m a k i n g obscene phone calls a n d is t o w n late just t o see a play. T h e A l m o s t m u c h p u t off when the voice at the other Free Theatre is one theatre r u n n i n g a end is not indignant but inviting. M i s s series of l u n c h t i m e plays, a n d I went to D r e w t u r n s out to b e a s e x u a l l y " l i b e r see Instrument f o r L o v e b y Jennifer ated g i r l " Who prefers a c t i o n t o c o n Phillips, w h i c h i s r u n n i n g at 1.15 p.m. versation a n d the silent M r . D r e w makes (except Sundays) u n t i l O c t o b e r 27th. his o w n revolutionary stand against his T h e theatre a u d i t o r i u m i s very s m a l l wife b y refusing the cordon b l e u p i c n i c so that a n intimate relationship i s m a i n - w i t h . champagne f o r the preferable tained between the actors a n d the a u d i - corned beef s a n d w i c h a n d pale ale. T h e ence w h i c h is exploited b y t h e cast overall effect is the h u m o r o u s creation very well so that the audience actually of a very realistic situation that we have feels that they are a n integral part o f a l l found ourselves i n at one s o c i a l functhe action and n o t just passive obser- tion o r another. T h e p l a y was directed by L i a n e A u k i n , w h o has managed t o vers. T h e pl ay itself is about four people handle the p r o d u c t i o n w i t h great sensiw h o snatch a p i c n i c o n the l a w n outside tivity a n d n o t h i n g i s overdone so the an open house d u r i n g the interval. T h e whole effect is realistic rather t h a n N o t a b l e performances were party consists o f M r . and M r s . D r e w , absurd. their fed u p daughter, a n d a guest w h o given b y G i l l i a n M a r t e l l as the trendy later transpires just to b e a friend of m u m a n d D a v i d G l o v e r as the sexthe o r i g i n a l guest w h o c o u l d not m a k e i t crayed guest. at the last minute. A s the p l a y progresses T h e play was p r o d u c e d b y Interaction, we f i n d out that M r s , D r e w was thew h o are a group experimenting i n a l l organiser and the only person that really forms of art and c o m m u n i c a t i o n s f o r " T h e Best of Private E y e " — that's funny indeed: wanted to see the opera. F o r the other use at c o m m u n i t y level, and w i t h this Second C a r r i a g e a bit of a l i b e l . ( W h a t happened t o the three it is only a social drudgery that pl a y they have p r o d u c e d a very g o o d Cloggies, for o n e thing — a n d Pseud's H.lvl. A y e s h a H u s h p u p p i z L a u n d e r a m a must be borne out and i t i s r e m a r k a b l e d r a m a p r o d u c t i o n that w i l l a p p e a l t o C o r n e r a n d B a r r y M c K e n z i e ? ' . it's n o t M e t r o g o l d w y n M e i r ( A k o n d a of Swat); h o w little i s ever said about the opera, l u n c h t i m e audiences, especially as there the best — i t ' s m o r e l i k e a r a n d o m Field M a r s h a l H a s h i s h Delhitelegraph as the parity are too i n v o l v e d w i t h them- are n o fixed prices, b u t y o u just p a y sample p i c k e d out from the last couple ( G r a n d V i v i e r and M a s t e r of t h e I m selves. It also transpires that M r . H a r p e r what y o u want to. T i m Jeffes of years. Y o u c o u l d say it is exceedingly perial U m b r e l l a ) ; L a d y A n g e l a F i t z boring. T h e usual hate figures get their alan T i g h t l y ( L a d y - i n - W a i t i n g ) ; H . R . H . D u k e of E d i n b u r g h . share of paper darts. Some o f it is c h i l d W e l l , y o u either l i k e i t o r you don't. ish and self-indulgent (anything's funny if you hear it often enough, often enough But unless you're a n i n c u r a b l e addict it c a n damage your . . . often enough . . . get it?) a n d some (remember, already seems dated; about as useful health) this is not a b o o k to b u y . It's a n d interesting as a collection of vintage worth the o d d l o o k i n the shops, t h o u g h ; potato crisps. Some, of course, is very y o u m i g h t get a l a u g h o r two.

RIVATE EYE

Quartet 50p

Y AUTOBIOGRAPHY by Charles Chaplin T h e title is " M y A u t o b i o g r a p h y " , a n d it is. C h a p l i n ' s w r i t i n g is as personal and as dead-pan as his c a m e r a - w o r k ; W h a t he saw, felt and thought is here, stated so b a l d l y that y o u sometimes wonder if the book is a translation. T h e memories near the beginning, and the- anecdotes in the rest of the b o o k , are strung a l o n g apparently at r a n d o m and it was not unt i l 1 h a d been carried t h r o u g h several scenes that 1 became conscious of the easy directness of his approach. T h i s is the essence of C h a p l i n , in p, int. a n d with it comes the realisation that in h i s private life he was an artist a n d b y n o means the clown a n d tramp. A s a child he Knew extreme poverty, but does not fall into the trap of glorifying i t : " 1 found poverty neither attractive n o r edifying. It taught m e n o t h i n g n.ore t h a n a distortion of values, a n overrating of the virtues and graces of the r i c h and the so-called better classes". H e toured A m e r i c a w i th the K a r n o C o m p a n y , and later reiurned there full of hopes and dreams to distill the i n i m i table tramp. T h e story c f that process is one w h i c h most of us, as s.udents, w i l l hope to paral l el. ', C h a p l i n was 21 when h e first saw B r o a d w a y and N e w Y o r k and his descriptions of those places and of his feelings f o r them w o u l d fit many freshers c o m i n g to L o n d o n f o r the first time: the distractions, impersonality, i mpet u-

TONIGHT! osity a n d occasional beauty of a b i g city a n d a legend. M o r e than anything else, this feeling of identity and comprehension draws one i n t o sympathy w i th h i m . A l s o thought p r o v o k i n g a r e h i s comments o n the attitudes and posturing of the press a n d the A m e r i c a n bureaucratic system. In its early chapters, the b o o k is full of memories of L o n d o n before the F i r s t W o r l d W a r — habits a n d a. way of life now totally lost. T h e r e is m a t e r i a l here for the sociologist and historian, as w e l l as interest for the casual browser. Later, the b o o k becomes m o r e anecdotal, is full of well-worn names, some new o l d gossip and characteristic snatches of homely philisophy, yet remains readable a n d absorbing. T h e pictures, and there are 113 of them, tend to be b l u r r y period prints a n d newspaper snaps, b u t they fit, and give valuable glimpses of the surroundings and social strata through w h i c h C h a r l i e gravitated. A n y C h a p l i n - f a n s , film-fanatics a n d devoted nostaigists w i l l have snapped up the first p r i n t i n g : i f y o u want to k n e w rao.e about the m a n b e h i n d the clown and be given a n absorbing view of the w o r l d " a s it w a s " i n t o the bargain, try this snip at 65p. " A f t e r a l l — (P.320) — "there are m o r e v a l i d facts and details i n w o r k s of a r t than there are in history b o o k s " . Candi

-

Tues 23 O c t - O S I B I S A + Heavy M e t a l Kids in G r e a t H a l l — 8 0 p o n n i g h t T h u r s . 25 O c t . - S o l d i e r B l u e + B o b , C a r o l , T e d & A l i c e 6.30 in M e c h . Eng. 2 2 0 - l O p Fri. 2 6 O c t . - D I S C O in L o w e r R e f e c t o r y — l O p Sat 27 O c t - M A N F R E D M A N N ' S E A R T H B A N D in G r e a t H a l l . I C S t u d e n t s 5 0 p i n a d v a n c e Fri. 2 N o v . - Q U E E N - U n i o n C o n c e r t H a l l Sat. 3 N o v . - S H A F T - 7 . 3 0

30p

i n M e c h . E n g . 2 2 0 - 1 Op

S a t . 17 N o v . - R A L P H M c T E L L - i n G r e a t H a l l IC S t u d e n t s 7 O p i n a d v a n c e T i c k e t s will be available later this week

Sat. 2 4 Nov. - B A C K D O O R - in G r e a t H a l l IC S t u d e n t s 5 0 p i n a d v a n c e Tickets available from Nov. 1 TICKETS

FROM

U N I O N OFFICE DURING LUNCHTIME R E G I S T R A T I O N C A R D N E E D E D F O R IC REDUCTION


FELIX

October 23rd, 1973

CROSS I DUN FRY CLUB

l

Page 7

l "u'.Jub.'*.,

»ne o f those i n t e r e s t i n g stories A f t e r last week's report y o u p r o b ably gained the i m p r e s s i o n that a large field was expected at the 2nd U L C r o s s C o u n t r y T r i a l . I n fact there were o n l y 36 runners: m a y b e the others were p u t off by the previous m u d d l e (or perhaps they d o n ' t exist). T h e fact that U L were Without any o r g a n i s a t i o n was a g a i n the cause of some d a s h i n g a b o u t b y some people a n d s o m e standing a r o u n d i n the c o l d by others. F i r s t of a l l , i t was generally decided that we'd d o the 5 rather t h a n the 6 m i l e course, a n d we were about to start w h e n it wasn't a g o o d idea because the course wasn't m a r k e d and half the people w o u l d n ' t k n o w the way. N o w , b y coincidence, there were two other iraces at P a r l i a m e n t H i l l that afternoon a n d w e s o m e h o w co-opted one of their courses w h i c h was w e l l marked. Someone then went r o u n d the course so he c o u l d describe it. Past gems of course-description here have i n c l u d e d ' G o r o u n d the tree t h a t isn't t h e r e " , and "It's the s a m e as the 1938 N a t i o n a l course"; this year i t was " D o n ' t go round the E x t e n s i o n , " whatever that was. S o , somewhat colder, we set off a n d found o u r w a y r o u n d t w o l a ps totalling about 5 J miles. R i c h a r d G a r n e t t a n d R o b A l l i n s o n were tenth e q u a l i n a b o u t 32 minutes, f o l l o w e d by I a n E l l i s (12th),

K a l i r a y (14th) a n d D a v e West (15th). T h e rest of us were w e l l spread over the r e m a i n i n g finishers w i t h P a d bringing up the rear despite a 6 m i n u t e i m p r o v e ment over a s i m i l a r distance last week. U n f o r t u n a t e l y N e i l B o a g a r r i v e d too late to r u n h a v i n g been t r a p p e d b y B R i n a l o c k e d u p s t a t i o n. A f t e r the race we set off for the stat i o n v i a G r e a s y Joe's T e a a n d Chess E m p o r i u m , a n d , after w a i t i n g for a lift for some t i m e I a n E l l i s decided (disp l a y i n g t y p i c a l C r o s s C o u n t r y C l u b leadership) to o p e n the gates o f one of the lifts already w a i t i n g at the t o p l a n d i n g , a n d we a n d other people got i n . U p o n a l l this a c t i v i t y a n a i l m a n appeared a n d offered hi s estimate of h o w l o n g we'd have to w a i t for the lift to move, so everybody got o u t a g a i n . O n Wednesday w e went to R i c h m o n d P a r k . There's not m u c h to say about this because n o t h i n g went w r o n g . W e went r o u n d o u r course (each a t his o w n pace: a n d m a n y a n d v a r i e d these were), and a r r i v e d b a c k i n t i m e to p l a y o n the swings w h i l e w a i t i n g f o r the c o a c h . N e x t week Inquests o n the U C R e l a y a n d the L e a g u e R a c e , a n d I a n Isherwood's e x p l a n a t i o n of w h y he's s t i l l not running. DJ.

HOCKEY CLUB! A rather depleted 2nd X I played the first m a t c h of the season away against l.'.C. 2nds o n Saturday. A f t e r recruiting players f r o m 1st a n d 3rd X I s (thanks to A n d r e w , J e r r y a n d R i c h a r d ) ten i n d i v i d u a l s i n v a d e d 5th K e n s i n g t o n underground complete with sticks a n d other assorted weapons, so b e g i n n i n g the m a r a t h o n journey to Shenley. T h e g a m e got underway w i t h s o m e intelligent a n d positive p l a y b y a l l members of the t e a m . U . C . were c o n tained i n itheir o w n half, a n d a l t h o u g h shots at g o a l were not i n a b u n d a n c e , a w e l l taken g o a l , f r o m deep i n the ' D ' , struck by M i k e H a t c h e r gave us a deserved 1-0 lead at h a l f time. A f t e r the break, however, the t e a m seemed to f a l l apart w i t h U . C . forwards finding ample

r o o m to score three goals Ito seal o u r fate. A f t e r the m a t c h U . C . showed a m a r k e d l a c k of h o s p i t a l i t y , a n d — m o r e i m p o r t a n t — a m a r k e d l a c k of jugs. So it was a generally p d off t e a m t h a t returned t o I.C. A w o r d of encouragement to freshers !to show u p o n Saturdays (at 1.00 p.m. i n the union) i f y o u w a n t y o u r talents to be recognised. It lis g o o d to have your subs b u t better 2nd team results necessitate • regular t u r n out. IAN

M i n e s

e a r l y

b i r d s

h e a d

f o r

TIDDLEY W I N K The traditional Tiddlely W i n k Race d o w n O x f o r d Street was once a g a i n a great success. T h e w i n n e r was M i n e s Fresher J a m i e ' B l u r ' B e l l . H e led i n great style, l e a d i n g the M i n e s contingent to victory, a n d was accorded a n exclusive interview o n STOIC. O n a 'per c a p i t a ' basis M i n e s once

W i n k e r s

t h e

s t a r t

RACE

collected m o r e t h a n either of the other constituent Colleges, and a t o t a l of £420 was collected. T h e h a r d w o r k and f u n realised i n this event c a n ibe judged by the n u m b e r of students h o b b l i n g a r o u n d over the weekend. N o arrests were made, a good start.

at

w o r k

T e a m : R . B a t e m a n , J . Heffer, J . D a n , 1. R e a d (capt.), J . S i m o n , P. C r a v e n , A . Brewster, M . Matcher. J . W o n g , G . Robinson.

JUDO CLUB I.C.'s J u d o C l u b only c a m e b a c k into existence last y e a r — s o n a t u r a l l y , i t is still a very new c l u b , and c o n t i n u o u s l y undergoing the process of change a n d development, eventually we h o p e i n t o a very prominent a n d successful c l u b . W e have h a d m a n y of last year's c l u b members r e t u r n to f o r m a nucleus for this year. W e have also h a d over 28 newcomers w i t h a range of experience from white belt to black. A s at ithe beginning of a n y year, there is also a l o t of interest f r o m prospective beginners who m a y w e l l j o i n on h a v i n g h a d a n introduction to judo. D u r i n g this first t e r m w e hope to organise several demonstration/friendly competition events w i t h other college

clubs i n U L U , to w h i c h a n y b o d y interested—if o n l y to w a t c h — i s very w e l come. T h e n after C h r i s t m a s things w i l l become more serious as we enter ' f u l l b l o o d e d ' competitions (not too m u c h b l o o d we hope!), and w i t h a little l u c k take off some trophies. W e w i l l be very pleased at a n y t i m e to welcome new members (from begin ners to b l a c k belts). T h e c l u b practises every Tuesday a n d T h u r s d a y evening, starting at 6.30 p.m., i n the U n i o n G y m with two b l a c k belt instructors. S. J . R I C H A R D S O N (Secretary) M.E. 3 J . W . B L O O M E R (Captain) Physics 3.

i.e. hockey: Wednesday, 10th O c t o b e r saw 'the start of a new season. I m p e r i a l , under the delusion of p l a y i n g B r u n e i 1st X I , played w i t h i n themselves i n the first half and at half t i m e the score was 2-0. M i c k Dovvnes t h e n informed us we were playing B r u n e i 2nd X I a n d we composed ourselves a c c o r d i n g l y a n d ran o u t w i n ners 7-0. T h e scorers were G . Popple

(3 + 1 jus), M . D o w n e s (2) a n d K . R o s s (2). Wednesday evening was also P i e a n d M a s h night. It was a night enjoyed b y everyone especially N i g e l W o o d h o u s e , who still has to learn to count, a n d T i m H a n s o n w h o h a d s w i m m i n g lessons i n a S e l k i r k Bath. W e w i s h to t h a n k everyone for s u p p o r t i n g the occasion. C o n t i n u e d page 4

MORPHY DAY OCTOBER 24th I n 1920 A r t h u r M o r p h y presented I m p e r i a l College w i t h a c u p to be r o w e d for b y the C o n s t i t u e n t Colleges. T h e race was started f r o m s'takeboats a n d raced i n E i g h t s f r o m H a m m e r s m i t h B r i d g e to the U n i v e r s i t y Stone at P u t n e y Bridge. C o m p e t i t i o n for the M o r p h y first eights was so strong that i n 1945 C o l o n e l L o w r y , then the secretary of the C o l lege, i n t r o d u c e d the L o w r y C u p for second eights. It is a regrettable fact that p u n y C a n d G have managed to c r a w l h o m e first 39 times, M i n e s 8 times a n d R C S , b e i n g gentlemen, have considerately exerted their a u t h o r i t y a mere 6 times. T h i s year C & G have fielded an eight w h i c h is p r o b a b l y the fastest i n B r i t a i n . T h e y have s i x i n t e r n a t i o n a l oarsmen and the rest are m a d e ' u p of n a t i o n a l c h a m pions. T h e R C S crew have most of the I C first eight, a n d M i n e s are also competing.

A f t e r the second w a r the Stakeboat starts were replaced b y free starts a n d then i n 1960 t h e course was shortened to 2,500 metres f r o m H a r r o d s D e p o s i tory to the U n i v e r s i t y Stone. PaSt tow path battles i n c l u d e a m o c k funeral w i t h coffins c a r r i e d by C & G a n d R C S , complete w i t h police escort across P u t n e y B r i d g e a n d d o w n the E m b a n k m e n t to I C Boathouse. C i t y a n d G u i l d s have n o w ordered their usual five hundredweight o f flour, but it is r u m o u r e d that M i n e s , w i t h a n unusual display of intelligence, have phoned up the c o m p a n y a n d diverted the cargo into their o w n coffers, at C G ' s expense. D i d y o u k n o w that R C S has w o n the towpath battle twenty-six times (once w i t h the h e l p of M i n e s ) a n d the score stands the same w i t h C & G ? C o m e o n R C S (I try not to be biased), we need that M o r p h y D a y M a s c o t , a n d for the M i n e r s , i n case y o u ' d forgotten, it's a sawn-off oar. /


FELIX

ffage 8

W . N . O . Safety a n d First A i d In view of the recent fire i n Z o o l o g y , I think that it is the right time to b r i n g to your n o t i c e that there w i l l be a firsta i d briefing session later t h i s t e r m . I t w i l l be held p r o b a b l y on T h u r s d a y , 6th December, i n the G r e a t H a l l , f r o m 12.45 to 13.45. T h i s is a free, open meeting and a l l students are encouraged to attend.

Policy S t a t e m e n t A p p e n d i x T h i s is n o w ready a n d i n t h e U n i o n office. A l l studerits a r e encouraged t o have a copy. I w o u l d l i k e to k n o w i f there are a n y m i s t a k e s so that these c a n be corrected at the next U n i o n meeting, w h i c h w i l l be, Incidentally, o n N o v e m b e r 1st.

Parking

and should be collected as soon as possible. A L L SPACES H A V E N O W BEEN A L L O C A T E D . I sympathise w i t h those w h o have not got a place but 1 a m u n able t o allocate a n y m o r e places as I have no m o r e to allocate.

Concessions Directory T h e r e are four copies o f the above available i n t h e U n i o n office f o r c o n sultation. If y o u w o u l d l i k e t o k n o w how to use y o u r N U S c a r d t o t h e best advantage this is the b o o k to l o o k at.

Barber A new b a r b e r w i l l be starting w o r k this week. T h e service w i l l be a v a i l a b l e f r o m 1.30 o n T h u r s d a y s i n the d r a m a t i c society c h a n g i n g r o o m , i n the U n i o n building. T h e price w i l l be 25p f o r short h a i r .

T h e traffic warden w i l l soon refuse to a l l o w students t o p a r k w i t h o u t a permit. A l l permits are.now in m y office

PHOENIX . F r i e n d s , i f y o u perused t h e first edit i o n of o u r esteemed college j o u r n a l , F e l i x , this t e r m y o u m a y have seen m e n t i o n of a magazine, by name P H O E N I X . E v e n i f this is n o t so, d o not despair, f o r I s h a l l briefly recap and e x p o u n d here a n d n o w . P H O E N I X is a magazine steeped i n history. It w a s founded n years ago by n o lesser a person t h a n H . G . W E L L S , a n d has since been t h r o u g h i n n u m e r a b l e hands. A s of course, i s t o be expected the magazine has greatly evolved i n b o t h f o r m a n d content; though some might say t h a t the changes have been b y r e v o l u t i o n n o t evolution. W e l l , friends, n o w is y o u r chance to acquaint yourselves w i t h a n d even b u y this famed magazine as last year's rather delayed (to b e regarded as a proof the adage that 'time a n d printers wait f o r no editors, be they F e l i x or P H O E N I X ' ) edition i s n o w o n sale. T h i s excellent magazine contains poems a n d prose a n d a r t w o r k (ate.) h o t f r o m the fervoured minds o f I.C.'s literary giants (who h a p pen to be p o s i n g at this m o m e n t as u n cultured science a n d engineering students). T h e o n l y catch i n this superb a n d unique offer is that ithe magazine costs 20p. N o w don't stop reading! C o m e o n , put y o u r minces closer t o this article and have a good butchers! T h i s u n fortunate accident i s n o fault of the editors b u t i s o u r l o t deemed unto us b y those above, a n d is specially designed to protect y o u r scant dues p a i d into the Union. W e l l a further evolution has o c c u r r e d and I a m e d i t o r — a n editor, I m i g h t a d d , w i t h n e w ideas f o r t h e next edition of P H O E N I X . H o w e v e r I a m also a n editor Who is slightly l a c k i n g i n staff, o w i n g to the almost total third-year m o n o p o l y of last year's magazine. So I a m l o o k i n g

P. A . W a d w o r t h H o n . Sec. I.C.U.

ARISEN for some fresh energetic m i n d s w h o are interested enough t o d r o p m e their n a m e s — y o u d o n ' t have t o be Shelleys or Cervantes', just o r d i n a r y students who c a n offer ideas a n d m o r a l support to y o u r w i l t i n g editor as he fights against the a p a t h y of I.C. A n d n o w w e a r e a t the heart of t h e matter, a p a t h y — o r as I prefer, ignorance a n d diffidence. I n m y conversations w i t h m a n y people across the c o l lege I f o u n d t h a t i t w a s n o t that they ' c o u l d n o t be bothered' to c o n t r i b u t e articles, b u t that they h a d never h e a r d of P H O E N I X o r h a d never seen o n e and s o d i d n o t k n o w what sort of material was wanted. So I s h a l l t e l l y o u now that we w a n t : P O E M S , P R O S E (fiction a n d non-fiction), A R T W O R K , C A R T O O N S — i n fact almost ANYT H I N G . N O w there are 4000 o d d students a t I.C., a n d I want every o n e of y o u to p u t pen/brush/ehareoal/etc. to paper a n d create something f o r the next P H O E N I X . T h e r e i s excellent potential at I.C. t o produce a n o u t s t a n d i n g m a g a zine; b u t t h e editing b o a r d cannot do this on their o w n — P H O E N I X is Y O U R magazine a n d stands o r falls b y Y O U R contributions. So d o n ' t be shy, send i n y o u r piece n o w ! I a m going to start early to b u i l d u p a good magazine, a n d I need Y O U R help. So i f y o u are interested i n h e l p i n g behind the scenes o r w i s h to be the star a n d have y o u r n a m e printed under every fruit of y o u r fertile s p a w n o f genius, send w o r d (or composition) to m e — S T E V E H E R M A N either (carefully labelled) v i a t h e F e l i x Office ( 3 r d floor, U n i o n ) o r V i a t h e Physics letter rack. M a n y Thanks, K E E P O N W R I T I N G ! ! and B U Y PHOENIX ! ! STEVE HERMAN.

GET MOVING by Father W i l l i a m Younger's T a r t a n — F r e e A l i g h t f u n record distributed free by Y o u n g e r s to promote ' T a r t a n ' beer — one of those paper t h i n single sided P . V . C . efforts presumably given free w i t h n barrels o f T a r t a n . A t y p i c a l example of this advertising m e d i u m , the repetitive theme i s o r i g i n a l enough " G e t M o v i n g (for Y o u n g e r s ' T a r t a n ' ) " b u t t h e b a c k u p lyrics ( e g "It's time f o r l i v i n g , i t ' s time f o r . . . any time at a l l " ) I feel I've heard be-

fore. H o w e v e r , for it's k i n d t h e m u s i c a l content is above average, a n d the a r rangement showed some forethought, the tune's very c a t c h y (of course!) a n d c o u l d o n l y be described as the c o m m e r cialist of pop. Definitely a n e w departure f o r Y o u n g e r s — transferring t h e image of ' T a r t a n ' f r o m the d r i n k o f the b u r l y H i g h l a n d e r ito that of the ' T o p of the P o p s ' set. In short, w o r t h a play i f y o u get i t free. D.G.F.

GHOST The Wellsoc Ghost Study G r o u p w i l l hold a meeting on T h u r s day, 25th October, at 7.30 p.m. i n Southside U p p e r Lounge. A l l interested are invited to attend o r contact A L A N L I T T L E F O R D via M a t h s II letter rack.

O c t o b e r 2 3 r d , 1973

STOIC Tuesday 23rd October 12.45 M y C h o i c e — m u s i c . A n y o n e wanting to choose the music for ' M y C h o i c e ' should come to Elec. E n g . -306 at lunchtimes or ring I N T . 3061. 12.55 B B C Television News. 13.00 Sarting P o i n t — L i v e discussion programme. 13.40 Closedown. Friday 12.45 12.55 13.00

26th October M y Choice. B B C Television News. T O P I C . A news-magazine programme featuring a l l i n a n d around I.C. 17.45 B B C Television News. 18.00 T o p i c . 18.25 L o n d o n Survival: F O O D . C a t h y G e e takes a look at eating in London.

C A L L I N G

U N S A - T W 1

A s s o c i a t i o n

It appears (in the eyes of the Social C l u b s Committee) that this C l u b is n o w dead. If there are any committee members lurking, then c o u l d they please contact the Secretary (Peter Hughes, C h e m . E n g . P . G . , Linstead H a l l ) . Otherwise, its continued existence w i l l be questioned at the next S . C . C . meeting (due to be held on December 6th, 1973).

BEWIEil

I0RPHY DAY

R O W I N G RACES (includin g Ladies Eights) SMASH YOUR RIVAL C C U T h i s is the only day of the year to let your hair down (Flour, Soot, Rotten Fruit provided by your C C U ) T i m e t a b l e : 2.00 p.m. Supporters to their College Union. 3.00 p.m. Lowry Race and c o m m e n c e m e n t of B a t t l e outside Boathouse. 3.30 p.m. M o r p h y Race.

YSSS National Conference Students and the building of the Revolutionary Party Saturday, 27th October 2 p.m. Union Concert Hall, Imperial College. Credentials 20p.

The

USK handbook is n o w available

FREE from the U n i o n Office and is certainly well worth having

H o p p a l o n g plus B . T w e e d y a n d C h r i s M i l l s plus P . B r a i n , t h e n proceeded to show the w a y r o u n d a n d g a i n i n g 2nd, 3 r d , 4 t h after some fair t e a m r a c i n g . A f t e r t h e first c o u p l e of weeks of W i t h a good 2|- pts lead the o l d lags total a n d absolute chaos w i t h s a i l i n g t o o k t h e h e l m w i t h every confidence of c l u b trials a n d freshers days, a b i t o f boosting this l e a d still further. sanity reigned as the I . C . S a i l i n g C l u b E v e r y t h i n g w a s O . K . until the start t e a m m a d e t o w a r ds P o r t s m o u t h , at least gun went a n d there were H e f t y a n d d u r i n g the chase d o w n there. T w e e d y stuck h a r d u p against a jetty H o w e v e r , things were b r o u g h t b a c k and a couple of c r u i s e r s — n e i t h e r were to n o r m a l i t y , as o u r navigators m a n moving. aged to get us lost somewhere o n S o u t h H o w e v e r , at the first m a r k a P o l y sea front. boat retired after a port side incident with yours t r u l y . H a l f - a n - h o u r late, we a r r i v e d , a n d W i t h one short beat t o go a n d i n a i t i s here t h a t I h a v e to report the first comfortable 1, 2, 4, a certain u n - n a m e d a p p a l l i n g efforts of o u r n e w c a p t a i n , m e m b e r of the t e a m m a n a g e d t o neatly B r i a n (Tweedale) Rogers, V . C . — n o convert this at the finish to 1, 3, 5 after first r o u n d w a s bought (many thanks t r y i n g to get o u r h o n . c a p t a i n t h r o u g h for the c o k e N i g e l ! ) . to third. Sorry folks ! ! E v e n t u a l l y the P o r t s m o u t h P o l y team T h i s gave us the m a t c h quite c o n led us t o some s u b m a r i n e base i n t h e depths of P o m p e y D o c k y a r d where w e v i n c i n g l y b y 7 pts. A further scratch was p u t o n a n d o u r Freshers neatly proceeded t o start the first o f three notched u p a 1, 2, 3 t o e n d a pleasant races. day's sailing. T h e three newcomers t o t h e team, p.p. P . B R A I N . R i c h a r d W o o d s (crewed b y hefty I a n

Sailing!

P r i n t e d b y F . B a i l e y & S o n L t d . , D u r s l e y , Glios. c o p y r i g h t 1973. A l l r i g h t s r e s e r v e d .

http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1973/1973_0343_A  

http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1973/1973_0343_A.pdf

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you