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Post-Grads unite for action Tomorrow, Wednesday, 14th of March, is the Day of Action in support of the Grants Campaign. Included in the Programme of Events will be a discussion on Post Graduates Affairs in Mech. Eng. 220 from 11 a.m. onwards* The discussion will be on a broader level

NEWSPAPER OF IMPERIAL COLLEGE UNION 13th M a r c h , 1973

F R E E !

than just grants, though this will constitute an hnpor-

I S S U E N o . 332

tant part. Other topics of interest to P.G.'s are demonstrating fees, insurance whilst working, the standard of catering facilities and other problems of College bureaucracy.

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS A FLOP

T h e basis f o r the discuscussion w i l l be the replies to the recent questionnaire sent to a l l post graduates of w h o m over 240 replied. It showed their P.G.'s are interested, are concerned a n d are w i l l i n g to d o something. H a v i n g the i n f o r m a t i o n is very i m portant. I n a recent N U S publication, "Post graduate Studentship: A n interi m R e v i e w " is stated. " W e seriously d o u b t the v a l i d i ty of D . E . S . ' s estimate that postgraduate (demonstrating) earnings averaged as m u c h as £160 in 1969 . ."

Last week's Presidential elections were a complete wash-out. Only 540 students voted, a shortfall of nearly 500 on the number required to make the vote "quorate". It was the third such election held this year, and few expected it to be any more successful than its predecessors. T h e candidates, S i m o n A l l n u t t a n d J o h n H e r r i c k for President a n d R o b A r m i t a g e a n d F r a n c i s M a t t h e w s for Secretary,, were standing f o r posts f o r the next academi c year, 1973-4. B o t h posts carry a sababout a h u n d r e d each — batical year. N o m i n a t i o n s there were a record 833 opened yesterday f o r the abstentions, m a i n l y caused re-election. F o r m s w i l l reby a p r o p a g a n d a leaflet m a i n u p unt i l the last day put o u t b y the constituent of t e r m o n F r i d a y week, college executives. a n d the elections w i l l be T h e re-election, held i n held a week after the start of next term, o n M a y 8th N o v e m b e r , brought with it five candidates — J o h n and 9th. L a n e was eventually electA n election was held i n ed, b u t o n l y by a vote that O c t o b e r f o r President f o r fell short of the q u o r u m by the current year, f o l l o w i n g about 40. the failure of C h r i s Shepp a r d , President-elect, to In view of the n u m b e r take his examinations last of elections held this year, summer. T h e candidates a n d the l a c k of p u b l i c i t y for the last ones, it seems were R o b A r m i t a g e a n d Adrian Smith. Although a h a r d l y surprising that there q u o r u m of votes were cast, is such a l a c k of interest i n them. the candidates only got

Action in Confusion Last Thursday's U G M passed a motion calling for a lecture boycott tomorrow i n support of t h e N U S D a y o f A c t i o n . T h e N U S is c a l l i n g f o r a n a t i o n a l s t r i k e o f s t u d e n t s f o l l o w i n g its abortive attempts last w e e k to persuade t h e D E S t o increase s t u d e n t grants f o r t h e next session. T h e G r a n t s A c t i o n C o m m i t t e e w a s m a n d a t e d to o r g a n i s e a n " a l t e r n a t i v e e d u c a t i o n p r o g r a m m e ' ' to replace lectures, a n d this w i l l take place i n the G r e a t H a l l . A n u m b e r of speakers h a v e b e e n i n v i t e d to a d d r e s s t h e m e e t i n g f r o m t r a d e s u n i o n s , p o l i t i c a l p a r t i e s , e t c . In the afternoon, there w i l l be a p u b l i c education campaign, i n O x f o r d Street, n o t quite a l o n g t h e l i n e s s u g g e s t e d i n a r e c e n t F E L I X e d i t o r i a l , but m o r e r e s e m b l i n g a l e a f l e t i n g campaign. The

Ents

attempting

NUPE threatens to close college M ' ' P L is the union of non-technical and non-administrative workers at IC, its membership is 90% of the night security guards, messengers, catering and refec-

these

times

there

is

no-one

at the desk a n d hence

no-one

the fire

alarms

to

supervise

or check entries of

unwanted

tory staff, cleaners and certain sections of the mainten-

people—this

ance personnel. They have given the college notice that

fire precautions a n d banishes

they are considering holding on the spot 24 hour strikes

any

notions

one

NUPE

in the near future.

"students CUT-BACKS T h i s is the first

say,

time

ever

of

that

the main

every

entrance

building

is

industrial

a security guard or a messen-

tion

which

has

situa-

precipitated

ger

day. If

is i l l o r o n holiday

owing

in

staff,

the entrances are

the n u m b e r s of night security

only

manned

guards a n d messengers

During the night the security

need

the

continuing

has

for

such

resulted

action

cut-backs

in them

which being

to

the

then,

is

the

reduction

g u a r d s have to m a k e

an

"clocking i n " at certain

they

the messengers from

cite

have been cut

59 t o 3 5 o v e r

3 years

that

the last

a n d the reduction of

c l e a n i n g staff f r o m

100 to 20.

points take

their

periodic

checks

example

of

in

often

b y one person.

ijnable to f u l f i l their jobs. A s

e n route,

building, fixed

and it can

u p to 3 hours for

them

to m a k e o n e r o u n d . T h e messengers

also

have

to

leave

their posts d u r i n g the day; to deliver

EXPLOSIVE K E G Fire regulations

state,

they

even

mail,

fill

of

security.

messenger i n hall

a n explosive

are

of

As

p u t it living

keg."

be

manned

The

a

to

-that I C N U P E h a s t h r e a t e n e d action.

24 h o u r s

on

makes a farce

a kettle

or

just go to t h e loo.

At

ROBBERY N U P E say that the lack of adequate security a n d fire is deplored by precautions t h e a c a d e m i c staff, t h e w a r dens a n d t h e halls committee have also w r i t t e n to t h e college about this issue. In some Of the messengers' areas there i s a safe w h i c h contains money, neither they nor the night security m e n have been issued w i t h keys. robbery In the event of a nobody w o u l d believe that the night security m e n d i d not have the key, w h i c h could l e a d to p h y s i c a l i n t i m i d a t i o n and possibly violence. There is n o a l a r m a t t a c h e d to t h e safe n o r a n y that c o u l d be operated b y the m a n on duty should such a situation occur.

When N U P E worried by the implications, explained this to Carl Seaford, he poohpoohed the idea, saying that a robbery would not possibly take place at IC. T w o days l a t e r r o b b e r s m a d e off w i t h £10,000 f r o m t h e I C b r a n c h of t h e N a t W e s t bank in College Block. PUSHED

TO

LIMIT

A night security m a n said that F i r e P r e c a u t i o n Officers would disallow many U n i o n building functions as there escape are n o t enough fire routes a n d often too m a n y to allow easy ' obstructions H e seemed to evacuation. regard the general situation as o n e w h i c h h a s b e e n p u s h ed to the l i m i t — j u s t a single emergency which could have been contained by previous c o n t r o l s w o u l d n o w flare u p into disaster with needless danger to persons a n d property. SAFETY This is w h y N U P E will be striking, their reasons are not primarily wages, t h o u g h they feel that t h e i r w a g e s r e q u i r e drastic restructuring, b u t one of safety to themselves, to t h e staff a n d to t h e s t u d e n t s .

committee

to organise

kind of e n t e r t a i n m e n t evening. a

a n d there

bands

if i t is

to get College sent

i n the

T h i s w i l l b e at least

disco,

some

is some

Block

will

be

possible (at pre-

the Dancing Club has a

booking

on

it,

and it

them).

of the The organisation Day o f A c t i o n o n a L o n d o n scale w a s discussed at a meeting last T h u r s d a y evening at the University of London U n i o n . A m a t e u r c h a i r i n g of the meeting was responsible for its wasting ninety minutes discussing t h e m e r i t s a n d demerits of a regional demonr stration o n the day, w h e n it had been more than obvious f r o m the start that the meeting w a s a g a i n s t i t ( t h e v o t e was 2 i n favour, 2 abstaining, e v e r y o n e else a g a i n s t ) . The Day o f A c t i o n is o b v i o u s l y going t o b e totally d i s o r g a n i s e d i f t h i s m e e t i n g was any-

t h i n g to go by. I C was o n l y represented

ordinator

b y the

52 per cent of respondents receive the basic research c o u n c i l grant o f £650, a n d a further 10 per cent receive less. Therefore, bearing i n m i n d that o n l y 44 per cent c a n supplement their income by demonstrating etc., there are m a n y postgraduates w h o are worse off than their fellow undergraduates. U . G . ' s in L o n d o n should receive £15 per week, assuming a 30 week year w i th £1 per week in vacations, c o m p a r e d to a postgraduate £12.30 per week f o r a 52 week year. T h i s c o m p a r i s o n is a d m i t tedly unfair to U . G . ' s , as m a n y d o n ' t receive a l l they s h o u l d , a n d m a n y can't live f o r £1 per week in vacations (who can!), but the fact remains that the Government thinks that that is h o w the situat i o n is.

T h e m a i n reason that U . G . ' s a r e apparenty better off is the existence o f a L o n d o n A l l o w a n c e for them. A l l P . G . respondents w h o took their first degrees outside London are agreed that student costs i n L o n d o n a r e significantly higher than outside. T h e r e is a g o o d case for a London A l l o w a n c e for P.G.'s i n a d d i t i o n to a nationwide review of P . G . awards.

will

probably be almost impossible to r e m o v e

T h i s i n a very vague statement. F r o m the basis of the reply, we c a n n o w say that at I.C.. the averwho age postgraduate was l u c k y enough to get any demonstAiting at a l l . a n d it seems that only 44 per cent have managed t o d o i t since their a r r i v a l here, h a d average earnings considerably less than £100, a n d only very few have earned more than £160, the D . E . S . ' s average figure.

U S K Co-

and t h e Felix re-

p o r t e r ; n o n e of the o f f i c i a l s of t h e U n i o n a t t e n d e d . R e a d e r s w i l l b e i n t e r e s t e d to h e a r t h a t IC h a s t h e o n l y c o m p r e hensive p r o g r a m m e of events for t h e D a y i n L o n d o n ; o t h e r colleges are merely boycotting l e c t u r e s o r sitting in.

The Ashby Report in 1960 recommended that a studentship should be sufficiently h i g h to a l l o w " a standard of l i v i n g rather higher than that enjoyed b y most undergraduates of comparable ability." T h i s appears to be the case i n C a n a d a a n d A u s tralia, a n d to quote f r o m one questionnaire: " l i v i n g i n L o n d o n is m u c h more expensive than l i v i n g in B r i s b a n e , A u s t r a l i a , yet A u s t r a l i a P.G.'s on A u s t r a l i a n G o v e r n m e n t scholarships receive about the equivalent of £1400 p.a. before demonstrating o r tutoring payments. In other words, they c a n d o more than just exist whilst u n d e r t a k i n g P . G . studies."

Continued on page 3


From our observant reader

Letters Theological Felix (cont) Sir,

i

The arguments last week in support of the existence of this: figure called Christ amounted to sheer nonsense; thus to go on and compare with a revolutionary Christ is to stand all logic on its head. A revolutionary or groups of revolutionaries are groups of people who strive towards the overthrow of the old order and by implication the construction of a new social structure. Christ from whatever stand-point never stood to challenge the slavthat existed withery system in the Roman Empire in any meaningful way. On the contrary, he took on precisely the opposite role; that of advocating an ideology which could offer no guide on earth to the emancipation of any oppressed people but actually offered the opposite, thai of accepting whatever fate or conditions on this earth which confronted the masses. "The almighty, all powerful wonderful loving God looks on, he understands". So the message is no need to struggle now (accept your conditions now no matter how bad they are) for God understands and anya life of mismay it's worth ery just to know that you are going to have eternal bliss after death. The development of all religions contain this same train of thought of how to avoid the material world and replace it by the mystical (the emphasis on one's-self, the egocentric nature occurring from the whole philosophy that I must be here for some purpose mustn't I; the whole world is then analysed in terms of how it fits in with one's-self and not the contrary). Does the Christian philositself foster any harmophy ful ideology (i.e. ideas which are opposed to the interests of the masses)? In fact it represents one of the biggest schools of thought opposing revolutionaries; not only in its escapist philosophies but through its institutions which reflect the Christian ideology within the present system. It was no accident that Muisolini and Franco both had open backing including a big flow of gold from the Vatican's coffers to support the rise of Fascism in Europe. Greek Orthodox Church supported the Greek coup, the Anglican Church preaches racial segregation .within South Africa and actively supports the regime. Hitler like us in Britain had God on his side during the last war. Always great bastions of religion (the Church) come down on the side of the old reactionary social structure and oppose the new social structure. Accepting God is supernatural, the all-mighty powerful creature he is supposed then does he to be, whey condemn two-thirds of the world to a permanent level of starvation and malnutrition; to allow massive wars, the dropping of atom bombs, suffering and misery. There can only be one conclusion —this God must be a vicious, cruel God who coldly subjects millions of new born babies generation after generation to this world of without doing anymisery thing about it. (It is more probable that this God has no super-natural powers and so is powerless to intervene

T u e s d a y M a r c h 13th 1973

FELIX

Page 2

in the changing events the world; so is it praying to an God?)

Sir,

within worth impotent

Within this country the trade-union movement has won virtually every right working people have today which we all take for granted, the church on the other hand has spent its last 100 years campaigning against the trade union movement. Today, working people, students, whole layers of people into struggle to are thrown defend their rights; what philosophy should they take up? Mystical or material. (Prayer or struggle?). Even in Imperial College that God Soc it is noticeable is not represented on the grants action committee (which is open to anyone); is it that they are opposed to students getting higher grants or are they too busy praying to the government to concede NUS's demands? JOCK

ME

ALL.

UGMs -who takes

Being an observant member of IC Union I have observed the following interesting occurrence. In the last week article on SCAB the following phrases were noticed. (1) "misconceptions", (2) "for the benefit of the students of Imperial College", (3) "Ents this year has been an outstanding financial success and assuming they continue in this vein in coming years then it was felt that their excess should be used to benefit the entertainment of smaller minority groups within the college", (4) "swallow up Film Soc or any other club", (5) Co-operation is the name of the game, not Monopoly". When I compared these and other phrases with those in an article in the RCS Broadsheet I discovered that a large amount of the material in the two articles was duplicated. There was, however, one major difference. In the Broadsheet article, the name at the bottom was that of D. Dawson. The name at the bottom of the Felix article was M. J. Simmons. This in itself is not particularly eyebrow raising until you realise that Mr. Simmons is standing for the new post of Social Secretary instigated by this board. Just who is it that will actually be in charge of the committee if Mr. Simmons gets elected? Mr. Simmons or Mr. Dawson? Yours

observantly, K.H. address

thd blame?

(Name and supplied).

Sir,—This is a letter deploring the attitude taken by certain individuals to try to disrupt the union meeting, or censorship of individuals, or calling quorum (when, at the instant it was called, the quormeeting was definitely ate). A large part of the blame must fall on Mr. Black, Mr. Jowitt and Mr. Lane.

Sonia resumes her Jottings

The ultimate authority for the conduct of IC student affairs rests with the student prime union meetings. The task for the executive must be to ensure the smooth running of these meetings, to try to minimise disruptions and maximise discussions. If Exec disagree with motions they should stand up and argue against them as opposed to using the rule book to positively discourage discussion. Even Mr. Lane allows this procedure to occur without a murmur of criticism. The Chairman's time and time again, failure, throughout this year, has been to point out to the meetingthe purpose of having a rule book is to increase the smooth running of the meeting and not to do the opposite. As a consequence of the weak chairing, very bad publicity and the failure this to encourage debate, has allowed a continual degeneration of meetings since Mr. McCullough's era last year. We the undersigned hope will in future the executive make much more effort to encourage debate at Union meetings.

VEALL

J. R. L.

LOLLEY

D. C.

OSBORNE

S. F.

MOULT

C. W. F. C. D. P. R. S. J. A. A. P. N. C. T.

LAMONT LABBETT

CAINS HARVEY EAST SMITH CORBYN LEPMAN LEARY

ROB

ARMITAGE

TREV

PHILLIPS

D. R.

CHANNING

Sir,—/ wish to make certain comments on the running of IC Union Meetings. It is each member's democratic right to challenge the in the quorum at any point meeting and it is absolutely correct that motions requiring a large amount of support for them to be put into effect such as the motion at the UGM on Thursday, 1st March proposing a lecture boycott on March 14th should not be passed at an inquorate Meeting. But it is becoming obvious that certain elements in the union are using the quorum call simply as a means of opposing a motion and ignoring the proper means of doing so—that of making a speech against the motion and letting people hear the reasons for opposing. There were no speeches against the motion mentioned (an amendment is not a speech against). the lack of On this point, knowledge of the constitution displayed by the chairman of the meeting (Paul Jowitt) is to be deplored. According to Standing Order 12, if there are no speeches against a motion the chairman must "formally ask if there is any opposition of discussion, and warn the meeting that if there is no opposition or discussion he will declare the motion . . . carried and shall, in the still no event of there being opposition or discussion, declare the motion . . . carried." This he did not do; instead he moved to a vote. Finally I wish to deplore the undemocratic behaviour of certain other members of the union who, after the successquorum had been fully challenged, tried by various means to get the motion carried anyway. The this correct way to go about is to call an EGM on anoththat er day and make sure it is quorate. It is pointless to go ahead with such action without as a lecture boycott

the mandate of a union meeting—and the proposer of the that motion himself stated he did not want a vote if the meeting was inquorate. Surely if we are to get a greater amount of interest and involvement in the union which is essential if the union is to defend and advance the interests of its members, we must have decisions taken democratically by the members. Yours sincerely, SONIA HOCHFELDER. ED'S NOTE: This letter should have been published last week. Its u n f o r t u n a t e o m i s s i o n w a s o w i n g to c i r c u m s t a n c e s b e y o n d our c o n trol.

State of the Union Dear Oily, — Knowing my restrained nature as you do, will realise how disyou turbed I must be, to express my views in your hallowed columns. It will be clear to anyone who heard about Friday's fiasco in the Great Hall, that the time has come for a reappraisal of the Union's role in Imperial College, particularly with reference to its policy making; a look at the State of the Union, in fact. In my long experience of being closely involved with the Union's affairs, there has always been general agreement on internal policy; everyone wants diversification, more representation and better food. The violent clashes that have been occurring recently have been almost entirely over external policy; over Grants, Autonomy, NUS, Trades Unions; the list is as long as Penney's limousine. Granted, there are very sharp divisions over all these issues, but as a democratically-organised body we should be able to make decisions on the issues and take action according to these decisions. Is it, then, that we are not a democracy? Universally agreed criteria for a working democracy are that all citizens should be adequately informed and that there should be universal suffrage. We all have the vote; and as strongly as we may criticise Oily, Felix, and I believe Broadsheet and the (unmentionable) Guilds and Mines rags generally manage to mention the issues; Cefe. So and let's not forget where is the missing link? It revolves around one word, participation. Without universal participation there can be no democracy. What, this inthen, can encourage volvement? On reflection, one answer is discussion on more relevant issues; but what is more relevant than Grants, Autonomy, and Education? The only other answer is more credible leadership. Without doubt this is where we are failing, and it is inexcusable that people do not take the elections of sabbatical officers seriously. The primary leadership of the Union should be the Executive; but how can one follow the lead of Messrs. Lane, Jowitt and Black, when they cannot even be responsible enough to maintain their credibility and to stop scratching each others' eyes out in public? Mr. Lane, sincere, but embattled, tries to do the "right" thing, but is caught in the impossible position of trying to satisfy both the Union and the Communist Party. Mr. Black, the supremely efficient bureaucrat, tries to stay out of politics, having burnt his fingers a few times. Mr. Jowitt is an admitted super-reactionary, posing as the champion of liberty, but only individual managing to stifle it by his total irresponsibility. The CCU Presidents, also on the Exec, seem to have their abdicated (in disgust?) responsibility to ICU. Where is the leadership in that? The UGM is the policymaking body of the Union; what a farce! The centrists and conservatives complain that the Union is having leftist policy foisted on it by the small group of people who

MANIFESTOS for the new post of SOCIAL S E C R E T A R Y to be elected at Thursday's U G M H a v i n g r e a d m y article o n h o w S C A B is g o i n g to w o r k in last w e e k ' s F e l i x , y o u w i l l not be s u r p r i s e d to learn that I a m standing for S o c i a l S e c retary. I h a v e b e e n i n v o l v e d in the f o r m a t i o n of SCAB from the beginning and k n o w , as I s a i d last w e e k , w h a t h a s to be d o n e a n d h o w to d o it. If e l e c t e d I w i l l g i v e a n y h e l p w h i c h it is w i t h i n m y p o w e r to g i v e to a n y o f the s o c i e t i e s o n the B o a r d . I w i l l b e r e a d y to a d v i s e a n d give a s s i s t a n c e to t h e m a n d to a n y o n e w h o w i s h e s to start a new club which w o u l d require f i n a n c i a l a s s i s t ance from SCAB. For exa m p l e , if a n y o n e w a n t e d to re-start the now defunct Blues Club. I b e l i e v e the f u n c t i o n o f S C A B w i l l be to p r o v i d e e n t e r t a i n m e n t , a n d not m e r e l y popular entertainment, for the s t u d e n t s of Imperial C o l lege. T h i s c a n o n l y be a c h i e v e d if m o n e y s p i n n e r s like Ents., w h o h a v e n o w d e c i d e d to f u n c t i o n m o r e or l e s s as they h a v e d o n e this y e a r , c a n h a v e their profits directed t o w a r d s the benefit of s m a l ler clubs like Folk Club. T h e s e c l u b s are not p u r e l y for e n t e r t a i n m e n t but are i n t e n d e d to p r o m o t e interest and participation. Entertainment in Imperial College w i l l not be i m p r o v e d until all those concerned co-operate in f i e l d s s u c h as p u b l i c i t y (it is h o p e d to m a k e m o r e u s e of Wellsoc's silk screen machine). Al l these things will be a t t e n d e d t o if I a m e l e c t e d . In t h e five y e a r s I h a v e b e e n at IC I h a v e n o t e d a d i s t i n c t lack of c o m m u n i c a tion b e t w e e n the o r g a n i s e r s of e n t e r t a i n m e n t a n d t h o s e w h o are e n t e r t a i n e d . If e l e c t e d , I w i l l a t t e m p t t o find a solution to this state of affairs. In t h e s e two y e a r s , I h a v e p l a y e d an a c t i v e part in the r u n n i n g o f IC F o l k C l u b (for m o s t of this s e s s i o n as P r e s i dent) a n d a l s o o n R C S E n tertainments Committee. I have therefore c o n s i d e r a b l e e x p e r i e n c e in t h e r u n n i n g o f a n d t h e n e e d s of s m a l l e r c l u b s a n d a l s o in t h e o r g a n isation of larger e v e n t s . A l t h o u g h , as S o c i a l S e c r e t a r y , I would not be directly i n v o l v e d in t h e r u n n i n g o f s p e c i f i c e v e n t s (that is u p t o the c o m m i t t e e s of the s e p arate o r g a n i s a t i o n s ) I h a v e the e x p e r i e n c e t o a p p r e c i a t e the n e e d s a n d p r o b l e m s o f the organisations on the Board. T h e e l e c t i o n w i l l be b y p o p u l a r b a l l o t at the U n i o n m e e t i n g on T h u r s d a y . P l e a s e bother to compose motions: Corbyn, Smith, Hochfelder, Lane, Armitage. Why is it, then, that the centre and the right cannot present its own motions, rather than waiting policy, to destroy the leftist or amending it until it effectively says nothing? Messrs. Sinclair and Jowitt are brilliant at composing amendments; have they no policy to present? If people can turn out to block the Rent Strike, why they turn out to vote can't for what they think is reasonable? Or is it the feeling generally that we should do nothing on Grants, Autonomy and White Paper? I'd like to see the Union being positive; we can't all be socialist, but we can be activist, and participate in the running of the Union. Centrists and the Right should not react to leftist policy by destroying it, but by presenting alternative policy; there must be a dialogue in the Union rather than messy, juvenile squabbling. The solution to our problem is participation, not redbashing; if we're dissatisfied with our official leadership let's censure it, or even replace it; but for Christ's sake talk let's all sit down and rationally and positively. Yours etc., M.

T.

PHILLIPS

c o m e a n d v o t e . It is vital that S C A B g e t s t h e right k i n d o f l e a d e r s h i p if it is t o f u n c t i o n as it is i n t e n d e d to f u n c t i o n a n d I b e l i e v e that I c a n p r o v i d e that, k i n d o f l e a d e r s h i p . A l s o , I b e l i e v e , as I feel s u r e y o u w i l l , that w e m u s t p r e v e n t a great E n t s t a k e o v e r . Please c o m e along and v o t e , a n d better s t i l l , v o t e for m e , M i k e S i m m o n s , for a m o r e unified a n d c o m p r e h e n s i v e s y s t e m of e n t e r t a i n m e n t a n d r e c r e a t i o n at IC. MIKE S I M M O N S . I w o u l d like t o i n t r o d u c e y o u to J i m M i t c h e l l . J i m h a s emerged from Aero 2 to s t a n d for the n e w l y c r e a t e d p o s t of s o c i a l s e c r e t a r y . F o r the p a s t y e a r h e h a s b e e n a c t i v e l y i n v o l v e d in t h e r u n n i n g of b o t h I.C. e n t s a n d C a n d G e n t s . T h i s m e a n s he has helped organise both large s c a l e e v e n t s , e.g. C a n d G c a r n i v a l , I.C. ents c o n c e r t s , a n d s m a l l e r e v e n t s , e.g. C a n d G r e v u e . T h e first o f these meant close liaison w i t h d r a m s o c a n d film s o c w h o are both m e m b e r s o f SCAB. He is very well known around college and has always involved himself in d i s c u s s i o n s on any aspects of entertainments. Therefore, please support Jim in t h e elections on Thursday. P. A.

WADSWORTH

Hello! Well you've heard who I a m and where I c o m e f r o m , I'd n o w like to s a y w h y I think I'd m a k e a g o o d S o c i a l S e c r e t a r y next y e a r . T h i s job o f s o c i a l s e c is a job c o m m o n in o t h e r c o l l e g e s and is i d e a l l y just a q u e s t i o n of c o - o r d i n a t i n g t h e e v e n t s put o n by F i l m s o c , F o l k Club, Ents, etc., a n d doing this without treading on anybody's toes. S C A B must be run to g i v e e n t e r t a i n m e n t f o r all m i n o r i t y a n d majority groups within college and only secondary allowance m u s t be m a d e for o u t s i d e r s . This could mean supervising the birth or r e s u r r e c t i o n of othe r entertainment clubs s u c h as B l u e s s o c . F i r s t l y , though, we m u s t find out w h a t Y O U w a n t a n d to t h i s e n d an A r t s festival c o u l d be run next t e r m . S C A B w i l l m a k e it e a s i e r for b o o k i n g s a n d p u b l i c i t y , IC Ents h a s the c o n n e c t i o n s to m a k e b o o k i n g of b a n d s a n d artistes of all k i n d s e a s ier, h e n c e e a s i n g t h e l o a d o n othe r parts o f S C A B . Rag Week events. Folk carnival etc. could be m a d e m o r e v i a b l e by S C A B , i n s t e a d of the c u r r e n t s i t u a tion in w h i c h CCU's run these events in a semiamateur manner. Financially, matters c a n be made m o r e s e c u r e by pooling resources, hence a n y c l u b s c a t e r i n g for total m i n o r i t y interests w i l l not be considered "poor cousins" of E n t s , F i l m s o c , e t c . A s S C A B w i l l be the s o l e representative on council for e v e n t s , this w i l l g i v e a fair h e a r i n g t o all i n s t e a d of just Ents as is n o w t h e c a s e . It m u s t b e u n d e r s t o o d that S C A B is not a n Ents t a k e o v e r of t h e rest. R a t h e r it is a p o o l i n g a n d c o - o r d i n a t i o n of resources and experience that events w i l l be m o r e v i able and desirable, e s p e c i ally w h e r e large s c a l e e v e n t s are c o n c e r n e d . So oome along to t h e U n i o n m e e t i n g next T h u r s d a y a n d v o t e for the s t u d e n t s candidate and make your c o l lege more enjoyable next year. J.

MITCHELL

G e t the F a c t s Straight Read— "MARX AND ENGELS ON RELIGION" P r i c e 50p From

R. Ezban, c/o Union Office or IC. C. P. B o o k Stall, J C R some lunchtimes.


Tuesday, March 13th, 1973

PCs

FELIX

HO'

" T h e college authorities accept n o l i a b i l i t y for a c cidents to students w h i l e pursuing a n y part of their course . . . . a n d they recommend that students should take steps to insure themselves against a c c i dents. Postgraduate students, p a r t i c u l a r l y if married, a r e advised to c o n t r i bute to N a t i o n a l Insurance." If a n y week a postgraduate undertakes paid demonstrating, a c o n t r i b u t i o n is m a d e b y the college f o r i n j u r y insurance, a n d he is then covered against i nj ury w h i l s t he is d e m o n strating, but at no other time. If a student does contribute to the N a t i o n a l Insurance Scheme (at a cost o f £51.48 p.a.) h e receives scarcely a n y benefits w h i l e a student. What the student is most l i k e l y t o need is some f o r m o f sickness o r injury benefit. A s a n o n employed person he w o u l d not be eligible f o r this . under the N a t i o n a l Insurance scheme. It is the S . R . C . ' s norm a l practice, when a student is a w a y f r o m w o r k o w i n g to illness or injury, to continue his studentship at the full rate of pay f o r the first four weeks a n d at half rate for the next four weeks. A f t e r that t h e student must depend on his savings, his f a m i l y, or as a last resort, social security. A student w h o permanently injures h i m self i n the course of h i s studies c a n o b t a i n n o c o m pensation unless he has himself taken out a personal injury policy or c a n prove that the injury resulted f r o m another perI n the son's negligence. latter case he c o u l d obtain compensation b y sueing the college but this is a lengthy a n d costly business. C l e a r l y great h a r d s h i p c o u l d easily arise. T h e reputation of I m p erial College depends very m u c h on the quantity a n d the q u a l i t y of research that is carried out there. T h e college receives large research contracts a n d grants f r o m industry a n d the government. M o s t of this research is c a r r i e d out by post-graduates a n d yet the coilege, despite a l l the benefits it reaps f r o m this w o r k , is not prepared to provide cover against accident f o r the oostera-

\ Plethora 1 | of i Elections i

GRANTS

(Continued from page 1) Perhaps the N.U.S. c l a i m of £100 o n the basic grant p l u s £60 L o n d o n is modest, or weighting perhaps, as some respondents t hi nk, it should only be £78 to be w i t h i n the limits of phase II. W h a t ever y o u t hi nk, a fuller discussion o f P . G . views w i l l be very useful. A p a r t f r o m the financ i a l p r o b l e m s of P . G . ' s whilst healthy, the situat i o n c o u l d be f ar worse i f they suffered injury d u r i n g their course. Postgraduate students are n o t i n sured against accident d u r i n g their course of studies at I . C . T h e C o l l e g e C a l e n d e r gives the following information.

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DEMONSTRATING EARNINGS

(40% can't)

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at j Thursday's! UGM | THURSDAY 13.001 Great Hall

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duate. It is h i g h time that the college authorities the value of recognise postgraduate work and provide insurance cover for all postgraduates whilst w o r k i n g at Imperi a l College. Some of the other topics to be discussed are the p r o v i s i o n of m o r e coffee services and common rooms, the standard of c a tering, the leak of U . G . / P . G . contacts, their typing a n d b i n d i n g costs a n d the inefficiency of College beaurocracy. These a r e all subjects w h i c h were i n evidence i n the comments section of the questionnaire a n d w h i c h c o u l d be the basis of a further questionnaire to find out more of what people t h i n k To quote a few of the comments:— " V i r t u a l l y a n y major university ( B u t of course not I * * * C ) has c o n t i n u -

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ous cafeteria service d u r i n g a n o r m a l student d a y (8 a . m . 11 p.m.). Why doesn't the ADMINISGET OFF TRATION ITS * * * A R S E . " " T h e i n c l u s i o n of the cost of p r o d u c i n g a thesis only enhances the requirement that research students must obtain parttime w o r k , w h i c h is provi n g h a r d to find." 'On the question of whether P . G . 's are students or employees . . . . conditions w o u l d be vastly i m p r o v e d i f w e were e m ployees." " I feel strongly that there is not enough sense of Postgraduate C o m m u nity . . . i n the College as a w h o l e . " " G r a n t s should include N a t i o n a l Insurance C o n tributions for a l l students."

100

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unbelievably bad. W h y doesn't the U n i o n r u n its o w n catering service." W i t h reference to the last point, there must be P.G.'s at I . C . w h o between t h e m have spent 3 years at nearly every U n i versity in the country. Therefore w e should be able to establish whether I.C. catering really is the worst, w h i c h is better t h a n only h a v i n g R . C . A . as a comparison. But what we really need, more than a n y t h i n g else, is a community, we c a n w o r k towhere gether, pool o u r knowledge i m p r o v e I.C., improve o u r position a n d m a k e P . G . education worthwhile. y o u think, Whatever take time off on Wednesday m o r n i n g at 11 a . m . C o m e to M e c h . E n g . 220 H e a r a n d be H e a r d .

" T h e food supplied i n the whole of the College is

LSE STUDENTS OCCUPY Story page 4

£

C©CICROACH ADDENDA By our Entomological Affairs Reporter Last week F E L I X revealed that the cockroach and mouse problem in halls and refectories had reached such epidemic proportions that it was necessary for the college to spend 0,350 on cleaning the kitchens to try and rid IC of its unwanted menu additions (see R C S Broadsheet "Mice Pie" edition). IMMUNE Both M r . Mooney and Dr. Levy (respectively College C a t e r i n g M a n a g e r and C h a i r m a n of the R e fectory C o m m i t t e e ) regarded the infestation as s m a l l i n c o m p a r i s o n w i t h other areas of K e n s i n g t o n . M i c e were h a r d to get r i d of, they said, as one cannot use mouse poisons near f o o d ; cockroaches o n the other h a n d are fairly easy to get r i d of, p r o v i d i n g one changes the poisons regularly as they become i m m u n e after a while. LOW INFESTATION Mr. Erskine, Public R e l a t i o n s Officer for the R o y a l B o r o u g h of K e n sington a n d C h e l s e a , said that the mouse p r o b l e m i n S o u t h K e n . was n o different f r o m a n y other part of the b o r o u g h b u t that certain districts h a d a higher infestation. These were Redcliffe, B r o m p t o n Road and Earl's Court. The Gloucester R o a d to E x h i b i t i o n R o a d area was below the average for S o u t h K e n . T h e m a i n reasons f o r the increase i n the rodent p o p u l a t i o n , he c o n tinued, were the d r o p i n p o p u l a r i t y of cats as pets, the p r o l i f e r a t i o n of bedsits w i t h i n d i v i d u a l kitchens a n d the increase of resistance to poisons. LEFT TO GO A s p o k e s m a n f r o m the Institute of Cleaning Science w h o is also a m e m ber o f the H o t e l , C a t e r i n g and Institutional Manage-

(the ment Association self-explanatory profess i o n a l bodies for the cateri n g trade) said that it was inexcusable f o r a catering establishment i n this d a y and age to have any pest infestation whatsoever, and p a r t i c u l a r l y so i n y o u n g buildings l i k e I C . P r o v i d e d the k i t c h e n a n d refectory areas h a d regular routine cleaning, o c c a sional checks b y the l o c a l H e a l t h Officer a n d that the Pest Infestation Officer is called i n at the first sign of cockroaches o r m i c e (recommended catering practice) then there w o u l d not be a n y p r o b l e m at a l l at I C . F o r a s u m as large as £3,350 to need to S e spent o n disinfecting H i e refectories, i n c 1 u d i n g steam c l e a n i n g a n d w a l l washing, means that the kitchens were o b v i o u s l y just left to go. POSITIVE D A N G E R M r . M o o n e y as College C a t e r i n g M a n a g e r is the one responsible f o r the hygiene of the kitchens a n d refectories a n d so ought to have ensured that the p r o b l e m never reached the p r o p o r t i o ns of today. N o t o n l y are cockroaches generally u n w e l come i n Yorkshire P u d , but i n the words of the spokesman f r o m the I C S : " A n y pest infestation i n a n area where f o o d i s being prepared o r consumed positively endangers the health of the staff a n d customers".


FELIX

T u e s J a > , M a r c h 13th, 1973

LSE

STUDENTS

B Y O U R M A N O N T H E P I C K E T LINE

SCUFFLES A s w e l l as o c c u p y i n g t h e St. C l e m e n t s b u i l d i n g t h e y also p i c k e t e d classes a n d the library on Thursday and F r i day. A b o u t 150 s t u d e n t s slept

in on Thursday night including Jeff Siannitorth, NUS T r e a s u r e r . T h e r e were a few scuffles o n T h u r s d a y evening on the p i c k e t l i n e but g e n e r a l l y it has been q u i e c — it was so q u i e t a n d so lacki n g i n v i o l e n t s t u d e n t clashes that the m e d i a r e v e l i n t h a t the M i r r o r was f o r c e d to des c r i b e it as the " m o s t b o r i n g strike in B r i t a i n today". O n Friday morning about 50 p i c k e t s stood at the v a r i o u s entrances. Everyone that w e n t i n was a s k e d to s i g n a d e c l a r a t i o n of s o l i d a r i t y w i t h the p i c k e t s ' a c t i o n , but the response was poor w. h A d a m s l o o k i n g on. t

ALLIANCE The decision to boycott was t a k e n on T u e s d a y a n d i n spite of o p p o s i t i o n f r o m some U n i o n Exec, members, milit a n c y was the o r d e r of the day, h o w e v e r s u g g e s t i o n s f o r r i p p i n g up p a v i n g slabs a n d stoning Parliament, and simil a r v i o l e n t a c t i o n were reject e d as i n f a n t i l e d i s o r d e r . The three main points of the campaign were agreed as firstly "to p r o t e c t the r e n t strikers. against victimisat i o n " ; secondly "to support

the national campaign for higtier g r a n t s " a n d t h i r d l y "to support the worker-student a l l i a n c e a g a i n st a c o m mon e n e m y " . In t h i s l a t t e r a i m t hey h o p e d to get support from Briant's colour printers whom they had s u p p o r t e d w h e n they were picketing. The college porters w e r e h e l p f u l at n i g h t b u t i n the morning a few went round and cut chains b a r r i n g doors.

PRESIDENT'S PIECE

Activity;

(2) Organise a petition round your class asking lecturers to support you by postponing the lecture (petitions available from the union office). (3) Turn up early tomorrow morning to man the entrance to your department to persuade other students to attend the alternative activities (teachin on education etc.) instead of their usual lectures. If even a small faction of the readership of Felix do the three things mentioned above the strike will be a success. WHY STRIKE? As the campaign has developed the reasons people have given for not supporting militant action have been disproved in no uncertain fashion. The idea that militancy alienates the public has been shattered. This campaign has had- a lot of good publicity (and virtually no bad publicity) centring around the rent strikes and demonstrations. Also the idea that what is needed is reasoned discussion between N.U.S. and the D.E.S. has been proved absurd. It was a hard fight to get that discussion and when it came the Government con Id not argue against our case but argued solely that the state of the economy could not support a

Tuesday 12.35 12.40 13.00

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SUPPORT A t the u n i o n m e e t i n g o n F r i d a y a f t e r n o o n it was dec i d e d to d i s c o n t i n u e the o c c u pation. Carl Saunders hall and two b l o c k s of s t u d e n t flats d e c i d e d to stay out o n strike and full support from the U n i o n was voted to t h e m , i n c l u d i n g the p r o m i s e to pay a l l l e g a l fees, a n d possible lines. So the s i t u a t i o n is that w i t h o n l y one week of t e r m t i m e left at L S E , it is possible that those on rent strike will find themselves locked out of their halls w hen they arrive back i n L o n d o n next t e r m . T h e r e are s e v e r a l ways t h a t the s i t u a t i o n c o u l d be a v o i d e d . A sit in next week to effectively put the college out of act i o n ; or a sit i n t h r o u g h the h o l i d a y s i n the h a l l s affected; or by B l a c k i n g (no r e l a t i o n ) the halls; i.e. no student w o u ' d r e o c c u p y the v a c a t e d rooms next t e r m . Next week c o u l d see the head-on clash at L S E ( a g a i n ) !

ALWAYS READ THE SMALL PRINT ALL OUT QN M A R C H 14th Friday's extraordinary general meeting was a good start in the right for 100 per cent support tor the National Student Strike tomorrow. The meeting was one or the best advertised this term, it was well quorate and passed the strike motion by a solid majority. It was really hilarious to see the expressions on the races of the poor saps who came along for the sole purpose of challenging tne quorum, when the E.G.M. turned out to be very well attended indeed. We have rather too many wet sponges and prophets of doom in I.C. telling us how apathetic we all are. It's real good to see them put in their place once in a while. Nobody ican now complain that the decision to support the N.U.S. strike was undemocratic. It has been debated at two union meetings, the issue has been discussed throughout the college over the last fortnight, and everyone had the chance to come along on Friday to speak and vote. Once a decision is taken in a quorate union meeting it should be implemented by every member, however the good thing about Friday's meeting was that we voted in favour in the knowledge that everyone there would have to work to make the strike a success. Ordinary students will have to be convinced by personal discussions to support the strike and that's where Y O U come in. You can do three things:— (1) Discuss with the others in your class why they should strike on Wednesday and join in the

Felix Diary

OCCUPY

Faced with an ultimatum from Principal Walter Adams, LSE students occupied o ne of t h e college buildings f r o m last T h u r s d a y m o r n i n g t i l l F r i d a y a f t e r n o o n , s l e e p i n g in o v e r n i g h t . O n M o n d a y last w e e k A d a m s t o l d s t u d e n t s on r e n t s t r i k e that unless t h e y p a i d t h e i r h a l l fees by t h e e n d of the w e e k they w o u l d be e v i c t e d . T h e r e have b e e n r u m o u r s t h a t overseas s t u d e n t s w o u l d be sent d o w n if t hey f a i l e d to pay u p . NICE ONE WALTER (censored) Once a g a i n W a l t e r A d a m s has broken rank with the o t h e r vice c h a n c e l l o r s w h e n he (and the Dundee VC) entered i n t o d i r e c t conflict with students s u p p o r t i n g the NUS grants campaign. The expected conflict with the police d i d not o c c u r d u r i n g last w e e k's sit i n . W a l t e r , it seemed, w a s q u i t e h a p p y f o r the s t u d e n t s t o o c c u p y St. C l e m e n t ' s as l o n g as t h e y d i d not i n t e r f e r e w i t h the r u n n i n g of the S c h o o l . H e d i d get a n n o y e d at the p i c k e t s however. H e t o l d the t h r e e ' l e a d e r s ' o f the sit i n t h a t he w o u l d have t h e m a r r e s t e d u n less t hey called them off. This brilliant tactical move by Mr. Adams was ably t h w a r t e d by the leaders. T h e y p o l i t e l y a s k e d the p i c k e t s to move o n . who p o l i t e l y refused! T h e three had absolved t h e m s e l v es of legal responsibility!

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grants increase. Unfortunately for them, this argument looks a bit thin when we remember that the surtax reforms in the budget gave for instance Edward Heath a £ 6 . 2 0 per week bonus and that education and housing expenditure is being cut back to allow for expansion in defence expenditure. The Government is doing little to hold down prices and many of its measures are pushing them up—floating the pound, V.A.T. AH we are asking is for the right to maintain the standards that students had in the immediate past and to ensure that no student is discriminated against because of their parents' meanness or the type of course they are doing. In fighting for higher grants we are not being selfish—some of us will not even benefit directly. We are representing the interests of future students and trying to safeguard the right of people to enter higher education regardless of their parents' wealth. For if the value of the maintenance grant continues to decline education will become a privilege for those whose parents are able (and willing) to subsidise their children.

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13th I.C. Catholic Society: M a s s . Chemistry 2 3 1 . I.C. C h r i s t i a n U n i o n : R e v . D e n n i s P a t e r s o n . Life is a t r a g e d y to t h o s e w h o f e e l a n d a c o m e d y to those w h o think. U n i o n S C R . R . C . S . M a t h e m a t i c a l a n d P h y s i c a l S o c i e t y : I.C.I, f i l m s W a r u n d e r t h e m i c r o s c o p e ; Bridge across the w o r l d . Physics Theatre 3. I.C. H o c k e y C l u b . A n n u a l G e n e r a l M e e t i n g . U n i o n L o w e r L o u n g e . S T O I C Television Service: M u s i c Alive with Soft M a c h i n e . J C R a n d South Side. Guilds Elections. M e c h Eng 5 4 2 . M r . Stephen C h a p l i n (Department of Fine Arts, University of Leeds; Current exhibitor, C o n s o r t G a l l e r y ) . F r o m i d e a s to i c o n . E l e c E n g 4 0 8 . Dr. K i t P e d l a r (Creator of B B C T V D o o m w a t c h ) . T h e need for e n v i r o n m e n t a l a c t i o n . P h y s i c s T h e a t r e 1. M r . O w e n B r y c e (Lecturer a n d journalist in m u s i c ) . T h e beginnings of jazz. M e c h Eng 3 4 2 . I.C. W i n e t a s t i n g S o c i e t y : T a s t i n g of G e r m a n w i n e s b y S i c h e l a n d C o m p a n y ( a l l w e l c o m e ; s m a l l charge for n o n - m e m b e r s ) . P h y s i c s Level 8. Historical and Documentary F i l m s S e r i e s : A t t i t u d e s to W a r M * A ' S * H * ( R o b e r t A l t m a n . U S A 1 9 6 9 ; r u n n i n g t i m e 11 5 m i n u t e s ) , G r e a t H a l l . I.C. T r a n s c e n d e n t a l M e d i t a t i o n S o c i e t y : I n t r o d u c t o r y t a l k . E l e c E n g 6 0 6 . Holland Club Bridge Club. 15 Prince's Gardens. Holland Club Art Society. 15 Prince's Gardens. I.C. D r a m a t i c S o c i e t y : " A l l things bright a n d b e a u t i f u l " by K e i t h W a t e r h o u s e a n d W i l l i s Hall (tickets 2 5 p from U n i o n entrance hall lunch-times). U n i o n Concert Hall. Hall Dinner. Union. i . C . Catholic Society: shared prayer, 5 3 C r o m w e l l R o a d . !

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14th

11.00

M e e t i n g for I.C. p o s t g r a d u a t e s to d i s c u s s a n d d e c i d e further a c t i o n o n a n i n c r e a s e in d e m o n s t r a t i n g rates of p a y ; i n s u r a n c e a g a i n s t a c c i d e n t s in the c o l l e g e ; L o n d o n w e i g h t i n g o n grants; a n d the c r e a t i o n of a p o s t g r a d u a t e c o m m o n r o o m . M e c h E n g 220. 13.30 Advanced class in Hebrew. Elec Eng 1 0 0 9 . 14.30 A c a d e m i c Staff A s s e m b l y : A n n u a l M e e t i n g w i t h the R e c t o r . M e c h E n g 2 2 0 . Beginners class in Hebrew. Elec Eng 1 0 0 9 . 14.45 U n i v e r s i t y of L o n d o n H o c k e y C u p - F i n a l : I.C. v G u y ' s (free c o a c h e s f r o m U n i o n at 13.00). Motspur Park. 18.00 H o l l a n d C l u b P h o t o g r a p h i c S o c i e t y : M r . P. M i t c h e l l . F l a s h a n d its u s e s . E l e c E n g 209. 18.30 I.C. Islamic S o c i e t y : M e e t i n g a n d d i s c u s s i o n . C o l l e g e B l o c k 0 0 2 . 19.00 I.C. A r t S o c i e t y . R o y a l C o l l e g e of A r t . 19.30 I.C. D r a m a t i c S o c i e t y : " A l l t h i n g s bright a n d b e a u t i f u l " . U n i o n c o n c e r t h a l l . Thursday 15th 13.00 I.C. U n i o n G e n e r a l M e e t i n g : E l e c t i o n r e s u l t s . G r e a t H a l l . I.C. C a t h o l i c S o c i e t y : B i b l e S t u d y G r o u p . F a l m o u t h 1 1 8 . 13.15 I.C. S t a m p C l u b . C i v E n g 4 1 2 . 13.30 Lunch-hour Concert: C a r s o m a y s Piano Trio. Sally M a y s , piano; Peter J o h n Carter. violin; Marilyn Sansom, cello. Beethoven, Trio in G; Mendelssohn. Trio in D minor. Library, 5 3 Prince's Gate. 19.00 I.C. A r t s C l u b . R o y a l C o l l e g e of A r t . 19.30 I.C.S.S.R.S. M r s . Rose (Family Planning Association). The relevance of birth control to modern society. M e c h E n g 6 6 4 . I.C. Friday 11.00 12.45 13.00 18.00 18.30 19.15 19.30 20.00

To those who are not swayed by any of the above arguments can I say this? What is your alternative? The March 14th strike can be a very impressive demonstration of support for the claim. It will also give the Government some considerable food for thought. If N.U.S. can bring higher education to a standstill for one day, wiil there ever be peace in the Colleges until the claim is met? Are we just going to allow the Government to "think about our claim'-' till doomsday? If so, we might as well send a nice letter to St. John-Stevas saying " O . K . , Norman, we weren't really serious about the grants increase—sorry about all the demos and shouting, etc., etc." Well we could just lie down, curl up and die, but I think the E.G.M. showed what the majority think — continue the fight — stop the delays on the grants claim — all out on March 1 4th.

Friday

Note. Overseas students may be worried that joining the strike could lead to deportation or withdrawn scholarships. It is the N.U.S.'s belief that an overseas student sponsored by the British Government will not suffer as a result of the day's activity. It is just possible but extremely unlikely that a "politically sensitive" overseas student sponsored by his home government may have problems. I would urge all overseas students to support the Day of Action, even if it does not affect their own grants, to help their fellow students. If, however, they are frightened of reprisals, the union will of course, make every allowance for this. But the best solution is to make sure that there aren't any classes to go to anyway!

19.30

Dramatic Society:

" A l l things bright a n d be a ut i f ul ". U n i o n Concert

16 th Governing body. Council Room. I.C. I s l a m ic S o c i e t y C o n g r e g a t i o n a l P r a y e r s — J u m a . C o l l e g e B l o c k 0 0 2 . S T O I C Television Service. T o p i c — s p e c i a l Easter edition. J C R a n d South Side. S T O I C T e l e v i s i o n S e r v i c e : Repeat of 1 3 . 0 0 t r a n s m i s s i o n . S o u t h S i d e . I.C. C h r i s t i a n U n i o n : R e v . J o h n H a l l . C o l o s s i a n s Library, 5 3 P r i n c e ' s G a t e . I.C. F i l m Society: Patton; " L u s t for g l o r y " (non-members 2 5 p ) . M e c h E n g 2 2 0 . P u b l i c meeting o n " C h i l d r e n a n d Welfare in A l b a n i a " , o r g a n i s e d by N e w A l b a n i a Society, 1 5 5 Fortress Road, N W 5 . (Tufnell Park tube station). I.C. C h o i r . S t . M a t t h e w P a s s i o n — B a c h ( a d m i s s i o n 5 0 p , s t u d e n t s 4 0 p ) . G r e a t H a l l . 16th—Saturday

17th

I.C. C a t h o l i c S o c i e t y : A l l n i g h t v i g i l of p r a y e r . W o r t h Sunday 10.00 11.00 18.00 19.30 Monday

Abbey.

18th Holy C o m m u n i o n . Ante Room, College Block. I.C. C a t h o l i c S o c i e t y : M a s s . 5 3 C r o m w e l l R o a d . I.C. C a t h o l i c Society: Folk M a s s . 5 3 C r o m w e l l R o a d . I.C. C a t h o l i c S o c i e t y : M r . B r u c e K e n t . " B u t t h a t ' s p o l i t i c s , not r e l i g i o n . 5 3 C r o m well Road. 19th

R . C . S . elections. S e e p a g e 6. Friday

23rd I.C.W.A. Easter Ball. £5.50 double. Geology 3; Anna Purvis, Zoology 3.

from

Chris

Brown,

92

Beit;

Hilary

Royal College of Science Union

PAPERBACKS ' J u n g ' by Anthony Storr, Modern Masters. 40p.

Fontana

It i s a f r e q u e n t c r i t i c i s m of e x planatory books on great m e n a n d their w o r k that t h e o r i g i n a l w a s m o r e c o m p r e h e n s i b l e t h a n the B o w d l e r ised version a n d , that p e o p l e ' s a w e of a legendary name exaggerates the i m a g i n e d difficulty of reading h i m . W i t h t h i s i n m i n d o n e t e n d s to a p proach any item in the 'Fontana M o d ern M a s t e r s ' s e r i e s w i t h a c e r t a i n suspicion. However, Anthony Storr's b o o k o n J u n g is a w e l c o m e e x c e p t i o n . Jung, psychologist c u m philosopher, is a n a m e to c o n j u r e w i t h . In s p i t e of his w i d e s p r e a d r e p u t a t i o n v e r y f e w d o s o o w i n g to u n e q u a l l y w i d e s p r e a d of the c o n t e n t of h i s ignorance w r i t i n g . If F r e u d h a s s u f f e r e d b y m i s representation then J u n g has been excluded from the c o m m o n under s t a n d i n g by having no representation at a l l . F e w n a m e s c a n b e s o w i d e l y k n o w n a n d so little u n d e r s t o o d .

T o a d d to t h i s p r o m i s i n g start J u n g ' s w o r k is e x c e s s i v e l y o b s c u r e . H i s r e m a r k a b l e i n a b i l i t y to c o m m u n i c a t e a n d the w e i g h t of h i s w r i t i n g s d e m a n d the sort of e x p o s i t i o n that the F o n t a n a s e r i e s a r e d e s i g n e d to provide. M r . S t o r r d o e s w e l l in c o m p r e s s i n g into 1 2 0 p a g e s a n a p p r e c i a t i o n of J u n g ' s i d e a s . H e c o n c e n t r a t e s o n the b a n e s of J u n g ' s t h o u g h t rather t h a n e m p h a s i s i n g the historical, narrative aspect, w h i c h renders the book both more readable and more useful. He s u c c e e d s in s e t t i n g o u t the major developments first a t t r i b u t a b l e to J u n g , as w e ll as J u n g ' s understandi n g of t h e m , a n d r e l a t i n g these to c u r rent t r a i n s of t h o u g h t . T h e r e s u l t is that o n e f e e l s it w o u l d be difficult a n d u n w i s e to a r g u e o v e r t h i s b o r d e r line area of m a n ' s p e r s o n a l i t y r e l a t e d to h i s h e a l t h a n d b e l i e f s , in d i s r e g a r d to t h e f o u n d a t i o n s of m o d e r n u n d e r standing. R. C R A G H E A D .

Hall.

Friday, May 4th, 1973 IMPERIAL

COLLEGE

M A I N DINING COLLEGE

HALL

BLOCK

7.00 p.m. for 7.30 p.m. Ante Room Lounge Suits

Guest Speaker:

Michael Green A u t h o r of ' ' T h e A r t of Coarse R u g b y "

Tickets £1.75 from R . C . S . U . Office, Southside or from Social Y e a r

Representatives

Adams,


Tuesday, March 13th,

1973

FELIX

Entertainments Once one

of

again, for

most

of

this

year,

the p o p u l a r pastimes of

both

u n i o n members and college a d m i n i s t r a tion has been the " k n o c k i n g " of

I.C.

E n t s C o m m i t t e e . T h e time has a r r i v e d , spurred SCAB, some

on for

of

by the

the

introduction

committee

these comments.

to

of

answer

In this ar-

ticle we hope to present a m u c h greater statement of our policy, aims, method of

r u n n i n g , reasons, etc. than we

be-

lieve have been actually printed at any one time before. D u r i n g the course of this year, E n t s has r u n what it regards as one of

the

most successful scries of concerts ever r u n at I C . I n this series an

attempt

has been made to cater for a l l tastes. W e have had f o l k artists ( F a i r p o r t C o n vention), heavy r o c k (Beck, Bogert, A p good "old - fashioned" dance pice), bands (Brett M a r v i n ) , ultra-progressive ( A m o n D u u l ) and a l l other shades and types of music between. It has been argued that we ought to have more folk a n d jazz artists because l . C . students prefer this type of music. T h i s is a l l very w e l l but such artists don't exist ad infinitum. R a l p h M c T e l l was b o o k e d for this term but pulled out. W e are trying to arrange a return date for next term. W e had a chance of T o m P a x t o n ( w hi ch we were going to accept) but he has decided that he doesn't want to do a n y L o n d o n dates at the moment. Despite people's insistence that f o l k and jazz are what the committee should promote this does not appear to be the case. R . C . S . r a n a folk c a r n i v a l a short time ago w i t h some of the best k n o w n artists o n the f o l k scene at the present time. T h i s was advertised a l l over L o n d o n and yet it still o n l y managed to d r a w about 250 people, of w h i c h p r o b a b l y only half were f r o m I.C., and made a loss of about £200. If E n t s . r a n o n this basis over a period o f 20 weeks we w o u l d lose £4,000 w h i c h I'm sure w o u l d not be p o p u l a r w i t h anyone. N e i ther f o l k or jazz c l u b , to o u r knowledge, are exactly overwhelmed w i th the n u m ber of people c l a m o u r i n g to j o i n them. W e w o u l d hope that w i t h the f o r m a t i o n of S C A B that next year folk c l u b (who this year have w o r k e d on a total allowance of £97) a n d jazz c l u b w o u l d be in a p o s i t i o n to present more a m b i t i o u s programmes than they w o u l d otherwise be able to afford. T o d o this it w o u l d be neccessary for the E n t s c o m mittee to be i n a position to be able to finance them. It is hoped that Ents w o u l d continue to put on the big names who are o b v i o u s l y beyond the capability of folk or jazz c l u b , w i t h the clubs presenting better names than at present and o n a more regular basis.

A large number of compl ai nts c o n cern the fact that non-students attend Ent s concerts in large numbers. We have said all a l o n g that this is necessary f r o m a financial point of view and this w i l l be even more the case if Ents are to be expected to be the m a i n finance providers for S C A B . However, n o w that we have such p o p u l a r groups o n it is neccessary to alter o u r policy so that I.C. students get by far the better chance of o b t a i n i n g tickets to Ents functions. It is only since we have had this long series of sell-out concerts that the p r o b l e m of outsiders receiving tickets for I.C. students has arisen. F o r future concerts the f o l l o w i n g proceedure w i l l be adopted. P u b l i c i t y for c o m i n g dates w i l l be given firstly to I.C. students o n l y (e.g. F e l i x , notice boards, etc.). We w o u l d hope that when I.C. students get in touch w i th the c o m mittee about tickets for a concert, wc w i ! 1 k n o w definitely when tickets w i l l be o n sale but the date cannot be g u a r a n teed because we are at the mercy of the printers. W h e n tickets are on sale

the f o l l o w i n g p r i c i n g w i l l apply. A l l concerts w i l l have three stated ticket prices. T h e lowest of these w i l l be the price to I.C. students of the first two tickets they buy. T h e reducti on w i l l be given o n the p r o d u c t i o n of a college registration c a r d . T h e r e w i l l be someone selling tickets i n the R o o m A t T h e T o p every week-day dinner time (this cut-price w i l l not be a v a i l a b l e at the bookshop). T h e reducti on w i l l take effect o n tickets for concerts held next term and future concerts. Please notice that it is also l i m i t e d to two per registration c a r d . T h e second price w i l l be that for a l l subsequent tickets and also the advance price for non I.C, students. T h e t h i r d price w i l l be the price of a l l tickets sold o n the door. T h e difference in price of the first two prices w i l l a l ways be at least 1 Op and likewise for the second and third price. It may, however, be more. T y p i c a l price structures c o u l d be £1.00, £1.30, £1.50 for an expensive concert or 60p, 70p, 80p, for a cheaper concert. I.C. students c o u l d therefore save up to 50p on the door price. T h e r e are further points arising f r o m the' admittance of n o n - I C students or even non-students. A t present N . U . S . is r u n n i n g a grants c a m p a i g n . O n e of the ways in w h i c h they are t r y i n g to w i n p u b l i c support is by i n v o l v i n g the general p u b l i c i n their cause. Surely the student age g r o u p of the general p u b l i c is as important as the older •members of the country. T h e y can after a l l vote nowadays. Therefore, w h y not extend some of o u r facilities to non-students. So l o n g as students are allowed to have special facilities purely f o r their o w n use it is going to make the case for higher grants that m u c h harder. Conversely, if non-students are allowed to participate in functions such as E n t s concerts then they w i l l be more inclined to support o u r c a m p a i g n .

A t a n y given concert there w i l l be a certain n u m b e r of I C students. W e estimate that the average n u m b e r is in the region of 400 but that it w i l l vary f r o m 200 u p to I.C. students only. T h i s m a y not seem to be a very large percentage of the audience but surely we should provide them w i th the entertainment they want and then ensure that it is financially viable b y a l l o w i n g non I C students to attend rather than not r u n anything at a l l . I C students d o attend our functions. S h o u l d we stop them just because there are not enough of them?

D u r i n g the last year an extension has been built in the lower lounge of the u n i o n . T h i s is to enable the union to cater for larger crowds of people. T h i s situation only arises on a regular basis when the E n t s committee has a function. A l l this term the Ents c o m mittee members have been giving directions to the Queens p u b l i c house rather than the union bar. It appears, however, that the o r d i n a r y I.C. student (who are the people on behalf of w h o m at least one member of this college believes he is actively fighting) have been giving directions to the u n i o n bar. F u r t h e r more, it is not only o n the nights that Ents has a f u n c t i on that outsiders frequent the bars. It has been reported that the l a n d l o r d of the E n n i s m o r e public house k n o w s that a l c o h o l at I.C. is cheap and that he has been losing cust o m to our bars. It w i l l be interesting to see how m u c h the bar profit w i l l start to fall now that c a r d checks are being enforced. T h e takings in the J . C . R . bar i n college block used to be regularly in the £400 region on the night of a n E n t s function. T h e loss i n takings then, since the b a r has been closed, w i l l be in the region of £4,000. It was also reported that the brewery were threatening to stop s u p p l y i n g the college b l o c k bars because it was not

economically

v i a b l e for

them

to

con-

tinue d o i n g so. W i t h the i n t r o d u c t i o n of V . A . T . o u r prices w i l l have to go up. V e r y s i m p l y, V A T w i l l affect E n t s in that oneeleventh of a l l money it receives (from ticket sales or any other source) w i l l have to be p a i d in tax. O n this year's showing this would approximately equal this year's profit as it stands at present. T h e average I C student w i l l not be able to fully afford the increase that w i l l be necessary in ticket prices, and we w i l l have to pass as m u c h of this as possible on to non I C students. F i n a n c i a l l y this year the committee has done very well. T h e profit stands, at present, at £1,650 and the forecast for dates rem a i n i n g and next terms as well is that this figure w i l l increase by the end of the academic year. A t last c o u n c i l it was officially agreed to record the Ents account as h a v i n g to m a k e £1.000 rather than b r e a k i n g even. T h i s £1,000 a'ong w i th a s i m i l a r s u m f r o m reserves w i l l be used to b u y a complete new set of chairs for the u n i o n concert hall and a new carpet for the southside lounges, practical proof that the profit f r o m Ents has enabled the u n i o n to purchase articles that they m a y have otherwise been unable to afford. C o m p a r e d w i th other colleges, the financial situation of I C E n t s is excellent. Places l i k e Leeds Po'v are at present r u n n i n g at a deficit of £4.500 this year alone (information f r o m Leed's official college newspaper). N u m e r o u s colleges i n L o n d o n are losing u p to £1,500 w i t h the average being about £700 (these two figures come from a survey of L o n d o n ' s colleges' entertainments committees done p r i o r to a meeting of L o n d o n social secretaries organised by I C Ents c h a i r m a n P a u l W a d s w o r t h ) . W e are the only L o n d o n college to o u r knowledge to be m a k i n g such a large orofit and this is in face of competition f r o m places l i k e the R a i n bow, the S u n d o w n , the Festival H a l l and a l l the other large promotors. W i t h the i n t r o d u c t i o n of S C A B it w i l l be necessary for TC E n t s to m a k e a profit to ensure the financial feasibility of the b o a r d . T o ensure this we need to c o n tinue to promote the largest named bands that o u r h a l l w i l l a l l o w us to.

T h e subject of large names brings us on to the E l t o n J o h n concert w h i c h , by the time y o u read this, w i l l have already been held. W e w o u l d l i k e to clear up some of the misunderstandings that seem to have arisen f r o m the ticket selling for this concert. T h e E l t o n J o h n date was not advertised outside college at a l l until after it had sold out. T h e tickets went on sale on a T h u r s d a y and had completely so'd out by the fo'lowing Tuesday lunchtime. T h e first mention in the music press of the date was on the afternoon that the concert sold out. It has been said that an inadequate union c a r d check was d o n e while the tickets were being sold. If outside people d i d not k n o w about it h o w c o u l d they have bought tickets? W h i l e we don't admit that not one single N o n I C student bought a ticket the n u m b e r of tickets sold to non I C students were m i n i m a l . A l s o , surely the people that regularly support o u r concerts are entitled to attend a l l of our concerts if they so wish.

Staying with the subject of large name bands some people seem to think that it is possible to o b t a i n large name bands on an irregular basis. It is only because we r u n on a regular basis that we are able to get big named bands. T o get these people to w o r k for y o u , y o u d o n ' t only need a h a l l and a n ability to pay their price, you also need

to be able to assure them that yours is a date that is going to i m p r o v e their r u p u t a t i o n or w h i c h w i l l live up to the standard that their fans expect to be able to see them i n . I C Ents is in the position where it is able to get a good range of top name bands. People who have played here in the past have norm a l l y been very pleased at the reception they have been given b o t h by the audience and by our o w n committee, often c o m p l i m e n t i n g us o n a well r u n concert. T h i s year's committee has built up I C to be one of the prestige dates to do on a L o n d o n tour. T h i s can only be done by the regular b o o k i n g of large names. S C A B has been mentioned at v a r i ous points in this article. T h e setting up of this board is welcomed by the Ents committee. A t last a w o r k i n g c o m mittee has been set up that w i l l be able to co-ordindte a l l entertainments w i t h i n the college. O u r c o m m i t t ee has no intention of t a k i n g over film soc or a n y other of the committees a n d societies that form S C A B . T h e confusion over film society arose at the p r e l i m i n a r y meeting held to discuss the f o r m a t i o n of S C A B , where it was said by the film soc representative that they d i d not want to show p o p u l a r films next year. O u r committee realised that this w o u l d leave a gap in the type of entertainment provided to I C students a n d so offered to fill this gap by showing p o p u l a r fi'ms. L a t e r that week the r u m o u r started that E n t s were trying to take over f r o m film soc but this is not the case. F i l m soc are h a v i n g the first choice of films that they want to show next year, but there w i l l , however, at their o w n choosing, only be a few of the type of film that they have been showing this year. T h e E n t s committee w i l l be p r o v i d i n g those films that the film soc don't want to i n c l u d e in their programme. W e w i l l start w i t h a trial r u n next term for four weeks (see list at end of article). O n e of these dates is actually a f i l m soc date w h i c h has a l ready c o m e about as a result of cooperation between us and film soc. F o r m a t i o n of S C A B w i l l enable profits f r o m E n t s to be used to support the other, smaller c l u b s represented on the board. T h i s has been an attempt to i r o n out any of the difficulties and c o m p l a i n t s that have been levelled at our c o m mittee. W e w o u l d appeal for active practical criticisms, advice, ideas or any other comments that people w o u ' d like to m a k e about the c o m m i t t e e and the way it is r u n n i n g at present. W i t h the reduction in the price o f tickets for I C students wc w o u l d hope to see an even greater number of y o u at o u r concerts. If you w o u ' d like to ask about any problems regarding E n t s there is always an E n t s executive m e m ber in the R o o m A t T h e T o p at dinner times and they w i l l be o n l y too grateful to sit y o u d o w n , listen to y o u a n d then get involved in a discussion w i t h y o u . F i n a l l y , here is a list of the films that we w i l l be showing next term. T h e y w i l l a l l be in M E 220 and the price of entry for the Ents r u n ones w i l l be lOp. F r i d a y M a y 4th D i r t y H a r r y F r i d a y M a y 11th C a r n a l K n o w l e d g e F r i d a y M a y 18th Brewster M c C l o u d (film soc)" F r i d a y M a y 25th E v e r y H o m e S h o u l d Have One P. A .

WADSWORTH I.C. E n t s c h a i r m a n

for and o n behalf of I m p e r i a l

College

U n i o n Entertainments Committee.


Tuesday, M a r c h 13th, 1973

FELIX

Page 6

W$t 2&Cg> proausihtet presents

IX FIHAHCIAEEY it's your money they're after . . . but who and what are they ? a d v i c e , b u t e v e n w i t h t h e b e s t of t h e u n i t t r u s t s , everything hinges on h o w well you time your buying a n d s e l l i n g of y o u r i n v e s t m e n t w i t h t h e m . the government grapples with the trade unions, no A n o t h e r type of unit trust is the property b o n d . T h e s e are often o r g a n i s e d by insurance c o m p a n i e s , matter how many times a week the world wobbles w h i c h p u t y o u r m o n e y i n t o p r o p e r t y r a t h e r t h a n in on the brink of monetary c r i s e s — n o matter what, it s h a r e s . N o w , t h i s c o l u m n h a s a l w a y s a d v i s e d in seems, there never seems to be any shortage of favour of putting m o n e y into property, a n d m a n y of these property trusts d o represent a reasonable people reaching out for your money. hedge against inflation. J u s t t a k e a l o o k at t h e f i n a n c i a l c o l u m n s o f any T h e t r o u b l e is t h e y h a v e p r o v e d s o p o p u l a r i n n e w s p a p e r . It w i l l be c r a m m e d w i t h a d v e r t i s i n g the p a s t y e a r that m a n y p r o p e r t y b o n d o p e r a t o r s h a v e b o u g h t e v e r y t y p e of p r o p e r t y in a k i n d of f r o m a l l sorts a n d c o n d i t i o n s of institutions v y i n g blind panic. The properties are valued each month w i t h e a c h o t h e r to g r a b y o u r m o n e y a n d u s e it, a s by independent valuers a n d they a l w a y s report i n they s a y , t o y o u r a d v a n t a g e . c r e a s e d v a l u e s . T h e s n a g is that w h e n t h e f u n d g o e s to s e l l , it m i g h t w e l l find that p r o p e r t i e s d o Schemes, plans, policies, blueprints, programmes, not f e t c h q u i t e t h e s a m e a s t h e i r v a l u e o n p a p e r . projects, strategems a n d s y s t e m s pour out of the Nevertheless, it has to be said that this is one p a g e s i n a n a v a l a n c h e of p r i n t . E v e r y o n e s t u f f e d way of getting into property—and a continually rising market—without committing yourself to o n e w i t h r e a s o n s w h y y o u o u g h t to part w i t h y o u r c a s h building. a n d a l l o w s o m e b o d y of f a c e l e s s m e n w o r k a k i n d I n v e s t m e n t T r u s t s a r e n o t to be c o n f u s e d w i t h U n i t o f m a g i c a n d m a k e it m u l t i p l y f o r y o u . Trusts. Investment Trusts are merely private trading c o m p a n i e s w h o s p e c i a l i s e in the b u y i n g a n d T h e y c o m e u n d e r a v a r i e t y of h e a d i n g s . U n i t s e l l i n g of o t h e r c o m p a n i e s ' s h a r e s . T h e y t e n d to be Trusts, Property B o n d s , Guaranteed Growth B o n d s , more internationally-minded than other investment programmes, a n d have a fairly s u c c e s s f u l record. S i n g l e P r e m i u m A n n u i t i e s or m e r e a d v i c e o n i n A s w i t h unit t r u s t s , there a r e t a x a d v a n t a g e s f o r t h e vestment. A n y t h i n g this s i d e of the l a w w h i c h might i n v e s t o r . T h e real t r i c k here is to p i c k t h e r i g h t o n e , earn a buck for the operator. s i n c e t h e r e a r e o v e r 2 0 0 of t h e s e to c h o o s e f r o m . E q u i t y B o n d s a r e s i m i l a r to p r o p e r t y b o n d s , W e l l , of c o u r s e , w e a l l k n o w that v e r y f e w r e a d e x c e p t t h e i n v e s t m e n t is d o n e in e q u i t i e s . H e r e e r s of F e l i x F i n a n c i a l l y h a v e e n o u g h s p a r e loot to a g a i n , the results w i l l d e p e n d on w h e n y o u get in be over-worried about the m a c h i n a t i o n s of these and w h e n y o u get o u t — a n d w hether the managem e n t a r e t h e f a t c a t s of t h e f i n a n c i a l w o r l d or t h e t h i n g s r i g h t n o w , b u t w e t h o u g h t it w o u l d b e i n t e r bright young m e n . e s t i n g to e x p l a i n w h a t s o m e of t h e m a r e a n d w h a t Guaranteed G r o w t h B o n d s are issued by insurt h e y d o . A f t e r a l l , w e ' l l a l l be i n t h e c h i p s o n e d a y , ance c o m p a n i e s , as a rule, a n d they are merely s i n g l e p r e m i u m i n v e s t m e n t s w i t h a g u a r a n t e e d rea n d f o r e w a r n e d is f o r e a r m e d . turn over a p e r i o d of years. H o w g o o d they are Probably the best known of these ideas are those d e p e n d s o n t h e o v e r a l l f i n a n c i a l s i t u a t i o n at t h e t i m e known as Unit Trusts. A unit trust is simply a pool of i n v e s t m e n t . T h e y a r e s o m e t i m e s v e r y a t t r a c t i v e , but t h e g a m b l e a l w a y s is w h e t h e r t h e rate y o u a r e of money c o n t r i b u t e d in small o r large amounts offered t o d a y is g o i n g to be r e a l i s t i c i n five y e a r s ' by numbers of individuals and which is then intime, w h e n your money is still tied u p . vested by the trust managers in stocks and shares. S o , t h e y a r e j u s t s o m e of t h e i d e a s m o n e y m e n No matter what the crisis, what the state of the

nation, no matter how long and over what issues

T h e value of any one person's investment

is the

value of the shares the trust has bought for them. A s the market goes up and down, so does the value of the investment you make. The their

o p e r a t o r s of s u c h s c h e m e s a s t h e s e profit

b y m a k i n g an i n i t i a l

make

charge—usually

b e t w e e n 3 a n d 5 per c e n t of e v e r y p o u n d i n v e s t e d — a n d a m a n a g e m e n t fee, u s u a l l y l e v i e d h a l f - y e a r l y , on t h e i n c o m e f r o m t h e i n v e s t m e n t s . T h i s n o r m a l l y c o m e s to b e t w e e n one-fifth a n d o n e - h a l f p e r c e n t . S o m e u n i t t r u s t s s p e c i a l i s e i n different t y p e s of i n v e s t m e n t . F o r e x a m p l e , s o m e g o for N o r t h A m e r i can shares, s o m e for m i n i n g shares, others go for retail shop shares, a n d so o n . A n d t h e a i m s of different u n i t t r u s t s a r e different. Some a i m to p r o d u c e i n c o m e f o r the i n v e s t o r ; o t h e r s go f o r s t r a i g h t c a p i t a l g a i n . B u t t h e m a j o r i t y s p r e a d t h e i r i n v e s t m e n t f a i r l y w i d e l y and t h i s i s t h e c a s e w i t h m o s t of the 2 8 0 o r s o unit t r u s t s n o w o p e r a t i n g in t h i s c o u n t r y . O n e i n c e n t i v e here, of c o u r s e , i s that the opera t o r h a s t h e s a m e interest i n t h e p r o f i t a b l e w o r k i n g of t h e t r u s t a s t h e i n v e s t o r , s i n c e t h e b i g g e r t h e t r u s t f u n d i s , t h e b i g g e r t h e profit f o r its m a n a g e r s . In r e t u r n , t h e i n v e s t o r i s s u p p o s e d t o g e t s k i l l e d , p r o f e s s i o n a l m a n a g e m e n t , w h i c h o u g h t to m a k e his money grow. But if the aims and methods of unit trusts vary, so does the performance. On past results, it appears they will take about 16 years to double your investment, and that's not a lot of good in these inflationary times. Naturally, a lot d e p e n d s o n w h e n y o u buy into the t r u s t a n d when you sell out. You p a y for expert

h a v e h a d to m a k e a profit. T h e r e a r e m a n y w a y s to d o it, of c o u r s e , a n d w h e n it c o m e s to m a k i n g a s h i l l i n g , t h e g n o m e s a r e w i s e to t h e m a l l . But always remember it's your money they're after. Before ever you fall for the blandishments in the ads, or get conned into thinking you have only to sit back and wa?t for your money to grow, have a good look at the investment scheme that attracts you and make sure it's right. C h e c k its p e r f o r m a n c e , i t s r e p u t a t i o n a n d i t s v i a b i l i t y . T a k e i n d e p e n d e n t , e x p e r t a d v i c e if y o u c a n . A n d don't take anything entirely on trust—even if it is a unit trust.

F E L I X N o . 3 3 2 ; T u e s d a y . 13th M a r c h , 1 9 7 3 . Editor: Oliver D o w s o n . Assistant Editor and Editor-elect: Alasdhair Campbell. I m p o s s i b l e w i t h o u t the i n v a l u a b l e c o n t r i b u t i o n s of R o n A p p l e b y , B o b Carter, D e r e k E . C u m m i n g s , D a v e G r i b b l e , D a v i d G u r n e y , D a v e H o b m a n , G r a h a m K i n g , J o h n Lane, Alf Perry, S e t h , Michael Silveriest,. Dave Sugden (return a p p e a r a n c e b y c o u r t e s y of the F E L I X A n t i q u e s and Curios M u s e u m , curator John Stares), M i c h a e l Southon, Jock Veall and Paul W a d s w o r t h . P r i n t e d by F. B a i l e y & S o n L t d . , D u r s l e y , G l o s . 4BL.

GlTI

Advertising tion.

contracted

by U n i v e r s i t y

Press

Representa-

F E L I X N a t i o n a l a n d International H e a d q u a r t e r s are at M i a m i B e a c h . L o c a l office: t o p floor of the U n i o n B u i l d ing, a d d r e s s : Imperial C o l l e g e U n i o n , P r i n c e Consort R o a d , L o n d o n S W 7 2 B B . T e l e p h o n e 0 1 - 5 8 9 5 1 1 1 ext 2229 ( P O ) , 2 8 8 1 (Int). T h e E d i t o r is still living in Room 1 4 , W e e k s H a l l , int. tel 4 2 3 6 , ext. t e l . 5 8 9 9 6 0 8 , until S u n d a y next. P u b l i s h e d b y t h e E d i t o r for a n d on b e h a l f of Imperial C o l l e g e U n i o n P u b l i c a t i o n s B o a r d . A l l rights r e s e r v e d . ©1973. FELIX Press

is a f o u n d e r Assn.

member

of

the

London

Student

Y e s friends, w i t h the t r i v i a l I . C . U . a n d D e p . R e p . elections o u t o f t h e w a y , i t's t i m e f o r some R E A L elections, namely the R . C . S . U . elections. These get under w a y today, note that f o l k s T O D A Y , w i t h the R.C.S.U. Hustings, held i n P H Y S I C S LECTURE T H E A T R E T H R E E at 1.00 p . m . A splendid t i m e is guaranteed for a l l (except perhaps the candidates) a n d y o u c a n get to see those w h o w a n t to be H o n . Sec. and A . A . O . next year, n a m e l y . . . HONORARY SECRETARY: M i s s J . E . P i c t o r proposed b y M r . S. C h u d y M r . P. F . T h o m a s proposed b y M r . P. H a s k i n g M r . M . J . L . W i l l i a m s proposed b y M r . M . T . Phillips. ACADEMIC AFFAIRS OFFICER M r . S. C h u d y proposed b y M i s s M . E . L a v i n M r . J . A . C . H o r s f a l l proposed b y M r . J . C . G i b b o n s M r . K . R . W h i t b r e a d proposed b y M r . D . S i n c l a i r T h e other three posts were uncontested w h e n t h e papers came d o w n (8 days ago) a n d so next year w e shall have as officers of the U n i o n . . . P R E S I D E N T : M r . M . C. Turner V I C E - P R E S I D E N T : M r . R. J . K i l l H O N O R A R Y J U N I O R T R E A S U R E R : Miss J . A . Brown. j. V o t i n g for H o n . Sec. and A . A . O . takes place o n M O N D A Y M A R C H 1 9 t h ; n o w we need 2 people o n a B a l l o t b o x per hour, so w i t h 4 boxes i n a l l that means 64 people w i l l be needed to m a n the boxes. If y o u c a n spare o n e measly little h o u r f o r y o u r great U n i o n then d o please volunteer to m a n a b o x , b y putting y o u r n a m e on the lists that are u p i n a l l departments! T h e 4 B a l l o t boxes w i l l be placed i n : P H Y S I C S : Level 2 C H E M I S T R Y : M a i n entrance M A T H S : Huxley building BOT/200: C o m m o n R o o m . I n this week's B R O A D S H E E T (out T h u r s . M a r c h 15th) we w i l l feature manifesto's f r o m A L L the c a n didates ( i n c l u d i n g unopposed ones) a n d reports o n the Hustings, etc. i n o u r " E l e c t i o n S p e c i a l " . REGISTRATION CARDS MUST BE SHOWN W H E N V O T I N G , so d o n ' t forget to b r i n g y o u r green 72-73 cards w i t h y o u next M o n d a y . O n Wednesday, M a r c h 21st a F R E E results edition of Broadsheet w i l l be o u t , this follows the R e s u l t s U n i o n meeting on T u e s d a y , M a r c h 20th. So for the U n i o n that y o u want to see next year, V O T E o n M o n d a y ! ! ! T h e coverage o f this year's R . C . S . U . elections is the fifth such one undertaken b y Broadsheet i n its five year existence. I n V o l u m e 1 N u m b e r 8 ( M a r c h 13th, 1969) w e reported o n the election of J o h n B u t t e r w o r t h (President), B a r r y P y w e l l ( V - P ) a n d M i s s Penny W a l ters as H o n . Sec. T h e f o l l o w i n g year a p o l l of 331 was reached, this being c o n s t i t u t i o n a l l y too s m a l l the election was reheld the f o l l o w i n g term. (See w e beat I . C . U . b y a l l of 3 years!). T h e " w i n n e r " of this presidential election, M r . P. S h a r k e y , c a m e o n l y t h i r d i n the second election, w h i c h was w o n b y Steve C o o k e , w i t h N i c k W i l k i n s o n beating T o n y J o h n s o n as V - P . H o w ever this second p o l l (of 385) was a g a i n too s m a l l (by a b o u t 115 votes) b u t not to w o r r y f o l k s , a n i n q u o r a t e results U . G . M . accepted the election (things never change, d o they?). T h e f o l l o w i n g year (in one of the first R o n e o ' d Broadsheets) the p o l l was better (442) and B i l l G e r r a r d beat Pete G a n n e n (231 to 156) t o become President '71-2 a n d M . C . B l a c k (I've heard o f h i m ) became H o n . Sec. by beating N . W i l k i n s o n . T h e f o l l o w i n g year's election results edition of Broadsheet done b y a newly a p p o i n t e d ( V o l . 4 N o . 7j—brilliantly editor) told the story of last year's 507 vote p o l l , w i t h R o s e m a r y P a r k e r w i n n i n g the presidential election (against J o h n H i g g s ) , C a r o l i n e B i n g h a m beating B i l l C o l l e tt (and h o w ! 368 to 90), J o h n S m i t h got elected as A A O i n preference to J o h n G i b b o n s a n d there were 3 candidates f o r the post o f H o n . J u n i o r Treasurer, B r i a n S m i t h beating M i s s M a r y Short a n d Ian O r a m . J o h n N u t t a l l was unopposed as H o n . Sec. (oh so that's h o w he got it — E n l i g h t e n e d R . C . S . U . member). W e there'll be the usual a m o u n t of b u m p h f r o m the candidates a b o u t again this year a n d if someone h a d saved a l l of last year's election b u m p h they c o u l d write a n interesting article o n h o w the candidates f o r I . C . U . a n d R . C . S . U . posts lived u p to their promises. N o w it just so happens that last year I d i d save a l l the election b u m p h . . . Ron Appleby (Broadsheet E d i t o r )


Tuesday, March 13th, 1973

FELIX

TOUCHSTONE

Page 7

Le Bristol

n

' **» ifwr fee ANYpN£HSVP*ANyVHERB?

The writing is clearly on the wall for all students everywhere. There are meaningful questions outs i d e science to extend your mind, and one example shown above is taken from the wall of the beer pressure reliever at Silwood Park, that well-known country haven of Imperial College. After the Flintstones came the Touchstones, and after the Touchstones came me. A college career of idle curiosity almost behind me, I dared venture

A f t e r a l i f e t i m e of c o n s i d e r i n g t h e e t e r n a l u n a n s w e r a b l e " W h a t is L i f e ? " , " I s t h e r e a p u r p o s e ? " , " W h a t d o W e m e a n ? " I have, finally, d i s c a r d e d philosophy, for I have discovered a question more profound than a n y of these, — deeper a n d harder to d i s c e r n e v e n t h a n t h e i m m o r t a l " W h y ? " If I c a n f i n d a n a n s w e r to t h i s q u e s t i o n , I w i l l d i e a h a p p y m a n — but I fear I never s h a l l . M y question? " W h y do people compete in 2 4 Hour Pedal C a r R a c e s ? " T h e 8 t h N a t i o n a l P e d a l C a r R a c e w a s h e l d at W h i t c h u r c h A i r f i e l d last w e e k - e n d ( 3 p . m . F r i d a y — 3 p . m . S a t u r d a y ) , a n d a s last y e a r , I.C. s e n t t h r e e cars — two from guilds (Hurrah, Rah-Rah-Rah, boomaleka, b o o m a l a — oops, sorry, forgot I w a s meant to be impartial) a n d o n e from M i n e s . U n fortunately the former G u i l d s C l a s s I car " L i t t l e B o " got nicked around Christmas time, so a n e w car (completed t w o minutes before the race) w a s built for t h i s c l a s s , a n d " B i g B o " m a d e h i s ( h e r ? ) u s u a l a p p e a r a n c e , w i t h the c r a n k s h a f t c o m i n g u n s t u c k t h e standard number of times. Mines car " St ri kal i t e'' w a s C l a s s I c a t e g o r y , ( R u n n e r - u p to " L i t t l e B o " last y e a r ) — t h e s a m e c a r a s last y e a r , i n f a c t , w i t h t h e s a m e u n m i s t a k a b l e c l a t t e r of t h e f o r w a r d " f a i r i n g " (a w o r d I u s e i n t h e b r o a d e s t p o s s i b l e s e n s e ) . The race w a s started w i t h the customary " L e M a n s " type start ( N . B . M a l e N e w m a n w a v i n g h a t in last w e e k ' s F e l i x ) a n d m o s t of t h e 8 0 o r s o e n t r a n t s w e r e s o o n r a t t l i n g g l e e f u l l y a r o u n d the 5 0 0 y a r d course. T h e boys from Hele's S c h o o l , Exeter, w ere, as ever, s h o w i n g very p r o m i s i n g l y in their superb C l a s s II c a r s " C l a u d e t t e " a n d " C l a r e " — t h o u g h t h e y s e e m e d t o l a c k s o m e of t h e i r f o r m e r e l a n ( n o w there's a n i d e a l ) . B i g B o s t a r t e d n i c e l y , a n d M i n e s

24

Heures

soon got m o v i n g steadily (most teams change drivers e v e r y l a p — 6 d r i v e r s in a t e a m ) — b u t B o B e l l e (the n e w c a r ) w a s t e d n o t i m e in d e m o n s t r a t i n g a c l a s s i c c a s e of b e n d i n g f a i l u r e — w h i c h c a l l e d f o r a n h o u r ' s w e l d i n g ( o n l y , a l a s , t h e first of m a n y ) . T h e h o u r s of p e d a l l i n g p a s s e d , a n d a l l t h e I.C. c a r s s e e m e d to b e d o i n g f a i r l y w e l l u n t i l , ne a r M i d night " B i g B o " split her (his?) c r a n k s h a f t — a n d " B o B e l l e " revealed defects in t he earlier W e l d i n g . " B o B e l l e " w a s patched up in a couple of hours w o r k , b u t " B i g B o " w a s t o o f ar g o n e to m e n d u n t i l fresh w e l d i n g apparatus b e c a m e available the next morning. S o t h e p e d a l l i n g w e n t o n , — t h r o u g h the h o u r s of d a r k n e s s to the s u n l i g h t , a n d o n to t h e a f t e r n o o n . M i n e s " S t r i k a l i t e " d i d very w e l l , a n d led C l a s s I almost throughout. " B i g B o " d i d her (its?) best — crankshaft permitting — a n d " B o B e l l e " showed s o m e p r o m i s e for the future — but w h a t c a n replace " L i t t l e B o " ? ( c r i e d he w i t h t e a r s of n o s t a l g i a in h i s eyes). 3 p.m. Saturday arrived in it's o w n good time, and, as expected, Hele's School h a d w o n overall, w i t h M i n e s 1 s t in C l a s s I, h a v i n g b e a t e n a M o b i l e bath p r o p e l l e d by t h e British J u n i o r C y c l i n g C h a m p i o n ! I won't mention the G u i l d ' s positions (largely because I d o n ' t have them), but their lowness w a s v e r y l a r g e l y d u e to t h e s u r p r i s i n g l y l o n g t i m e s p e n t in t h e P i t s . " D i d n ' t y o u s l e e p at a l l ? " "Not a wink." " W h y no names, B o b ? " " T h e r e are too m a n y . " BOB CARTER

forth to brain-crippling pursuits elsewhere.

ICU FLATS

" T h i s is your last chance, s o n , take it and they'll make a man of y o u . " M y curiosity has been satisfied, I now know that I should never have gone to Touchstone. Had I gone in my first, my s e c o n d , or even early in my third year, it would have been a g o o d idea, but all in all the experience is far too enjoyable for anyone to go if they will not have the chance to go again. The

"coachload

of

pseuds"

can

be

simply

divided into two parts, those who go to take an active part in the discussion and those who go because a weekend of good f o o d , good drink and good surroundings appeals to them. Both groups returned well satisfied. T h e latter group slept off their vices during the discussion. They missed a lot. At the last Touchstone we were graced with two guest speakers who promoted subject of " H u m a n

discussion on the

Rights", a subject so wide-

spread in relevance that everybody got a chance to mount their own personal hobby-horse.

T h e two

speakers were Professor Raphael, Director of A s s o ciated Studies at

Imperial College (in

case you

TAX Sheffield University students' Union has recently sent me a letter giving information about one of the proposed changes in the taxation system. It has been suggested that Family Allowances and tax allowances for children should be replaced by a single tax credit which is given to the father. Students are excluded from the tax credit system and so students at present receiving Family Allowances may lose this income. If you would like to support the Child Poverty Action Group campaign for payment of Child credits to the mother, in the same way as Family Allowances are at present, the a d dress to write to is: C h i l d Poverty Action Group, 1 Macklin Street, Drury Lane, London WC2B 5NH. If you prefer you may write direct to: The Clerk, Select Committee on Tax Credits, House of C o m m o n s , London S W 1 . I hope this information is of use to some of you. JENNY ROGERS I.C.U. Welfare Officer.

didn't know) and Professor Costa, of the University of Rome. Unfortunately Professor Costa was banned from achieving the full potential of his contribution by virtue

of

language

Raphael's expert

difficulties,

but Professor

handling of the discussion and

willingness to supply Professor Costa with the mot juste at necessary times much ground was covered in keen discussion. I at least felt that I had seen many different

points of view which I had never

previously considered. T h e discussion centred around the Declaration

of

Human

Rights"

"Universal

adopted

by

the

General Assembly of the United Nations on December 10th, 1948. Each member country of the United Nations is now pledged to " c a u s e the text of the Declaration to be disseminated, displayed, read and compounded principally in schools and other edu-

I S R A E L Be there for the 2 5 t h Anniversary celebrations

TOURS TRAVEL

ISRAELS 75th ANNIVERSARY

TICKETS KIBBUTZ

Complete programme of ISTC flights, trains, ships from

HOSTS STUDENT TRAVEL SERVICE LTD. 161 GREAT P O R T L A N D ST, W 1 N 6 N N Telephone 0 1 - 5 8 0 7733

cational institutions, without distinction based on the

or

territories".

Think about the implications of that.

political

status

of

countries

Interesting?

Then Touchstone is for you also. Boring? Then Professor Raphael and Mr. M c D o w e l l are back in C o l lege

Block and

keen

to

hear

what you

would

like out of General Studies. I would like to have

HALLS & HOUSES 1973-74

been persuaded to go to Touchstone sooner. O h ! In case

you're

worried,

then

Touchstoners

are

a

friendly bunch too, but watch out for the Australian snooker player . . . he'll beat you. DAVE SUGDEN

Application forms available now from Union Office and Residence Office, College Block.

A t present I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e U n i o n rents twelve flats in Hamlet Gardens, Ravenscourt Park, W 6 , and one flat i n C a m b r i d g e G a r d e n s , L a d b r o k e G r o v e , sub-letting these to its members. T h e flats house eighty-nine students i n total, seven at C a m b r i d g e G a r d e n s , a n d the rest at H a m l e t G a r d e n s i n flats of v a r y i n g sizes, the majority a c c o m m o d a t i n g seven persons. A l l the flats are selfcontained w i t h a lounge, k i t c h e n a n d bathroom(s). Rents, considering there is n o subsidy, are competitive, electricity and gas being extra at the standard rate. T h e lease f o r the property at H a m l e t G a r d e n s is subject, unfortunately, to a n n u a l negotiation. T h i s , of course, enables the l a n d l o r d s to d e m a n d a higher rental each time, however, i n view of the 1 0 % increase last year a n d the better prospects f o r s u m m e r letting, it is reasona b l y certain that rents w i l l r e m a i n at the same level. N o t h i n g need be said here about the grants s i t u a t i o n, save that a n y increase i n flat rental w o u l d be extremely unwelcome, especially as the cost of non-College a c c o m m o d a t i o n w i l l n o d o u b t m a k e its usual u p w a r d movement next session. E c o n o m i c a l l y it is c r u c i a l that the scheme does n o t finish its second year i n the r e d , as it d i d its m i s - m a n aged first. A s electricity a n d gas are n o w p a i d f o r b y those w h o use them, the o n l y possible source of deficit is the rent. T h i s year rents were evaluated o n the basis of a forty-eight week y e a r — t h a t is w e c o u l d have a l l flats standing empty f o r four weeks a n d just b r e a k even. T h e o n l y time that this c o u l d possibly h a p p e n is over the s u m m e r vacation, hence, it has been decided to offer a n y b o d y o c c u p y i n g a place over the vacation a place next session, p r o v i d i n g they a p p l y b y the end of the week. T h i s offer m a y be extended indefinitely depending o n d e m a n d . A n o t h e r w a y to achieve f u l l occupanc y over the s u m m e r is to let to non-members of the U n i o n — t h i s was done last year, b u t o n l y to a s m a l l extent. Needless to say, U n i o n members w i l l have preference. A n y surplus c o u l d be used i n a n u m ber of ways, p r o b a b l y the most constructive being to offset future rent increases. A s f ar as lettings next session are concerned, the a l l o c a t i o n of places w i l l be made i n the fairest possible manner, that of first c o m e first served. H o w e v e r , g r o u p appl i cati ons f o r whole flats w i l l be favoured as experience has shown that such flats are m o r e desirable i n all aspects t h a n those r a n d o m l y filled. I n order to a v o i d a repeat of the chaos last summer, person o r persons accepting the offer of a r o o m o r flat w i l l be required to cancel i m m e d i a t e l y a n y a p p l i c a t i o n f o r H a l l o r H o u s e . Transfer of places is i n general not a fair practice w h e n there is a w a i t i n g list, so except i n special cases this w i l l not be permitted. A p p l i c a t i o n forms f o r v a c a t i o n a l and sessional letting a n d further details of rents, etc., are a v a i l a b l e n o w f r o m the U n i o n Office. A p p l i c a t i o n s w i l l be accepted indefinitely i n view of the possibility of further flats being a v a i l able next session, b u t a large d e m a n d is expected, so remember that early appl i cati ons w i l l be favoured.


T u e s d a y , M a r c h 13th, 1973

FELIX

Page 8

t h e sports p a g e rapid rambles rowing A s k any cross country runner where he went on the first S a t u r d a y in M a r c h a n d h e ' l l say " t o the N a t i o n a l s . " A s k h i m whether he r a n a n d h e ' l l most p r o b a b l y u m m and ahh and m u m b l e something about not bei n g fit. T h a t just about sums up the a n n u a l circus that goes under the name of the E n g l i s h N a t i o n a l cross c o u n t r y c h a m p i o n s h i p s , ft is a g r a n d race t o w a t c h , but an a w f u l race to r u n in. T h i s year this event took place on Saturday, 3rd M a r c h at P a r l i a m e n t H i l l Fields, N o r t h L o n d o n a n d the course was surprisingly d r y for the time of y e a r — quite different f r o m its usual state where one w a l k s a r o u n d u p to the knees in m u c k (and bullets???!), f ' m sure the organisers must have slipped u p a n d d i d n ' t order the m u d in time. T h e C h a m p i o n s h i p s consist of three races, youths, juniors and seniors a n d , surprise, surprise I C had runners in a l l three and actually f i nished a team (of four) i n the J u n i o r event. R . A l l i n s o n .(I'm sure he's not still under 18) represented us i n the 4 m i l e y o u t h event. T h e six m i l e J u n i o r event got u n derway at 2.30 and the I.C. team consisting of D . Payne, J . K a l i v a y , P. J o h n s o n , a n d P. D o n n e l l y surged a w a y to a good start . . . and then slowed to a nice easy j o g — a s a l l I.C. runners do.* P a d and Pete eventually returned home at about 3.15 just i n time to see the m a i n event of the afternoon begin—the 9 mile senior event. T h e procedure for starting this race is to fire a m a r o o n (loud bang) 5 minutes before the start a n d then fire another one five minutes later to start the race. T h i s year there were 1200 starters, i n c l u d i n g Dave Bedford, a New Z e a l a n d team (who we shall hear more about later) & two runners f r o m I.C. W h e n the second bang went off we a l l shot off u p the h i l l at a pace that w o u l d d o any 4 m i n u t e m i l e r p r o u d , m i n d i n g any rubbish bins, p a r k benches, trees etc. that happened to get i n the way. A n d that is a b o u t a l l I remember of the r a c e — t h e rest being rather a b l u r except for the rest of the I.C. team and o u r c a p t a i n tv/ho incidentally didn't run because he'd forgotten his shoes — a l i k e l y story) shouting (and laughing) at us as we d i d the three laps of the course. T h e results of the race (as t o l d to m e — I missed it, I still h a d another 2 miles to go) was R . D i x o n of N e w Z e a l a n d 1st, beating D a v e B e d f o r d by a b o u t 13 sees., S. L i t t l e w o o d a n d S. W e b b of I . C . 763 a n d 766 respectively. T h i s N e w Z e a l a n d e r caused u n t o l d c o n f u sion as he was not supposed to be there anyway but was just a guest—so D a v e B e d f o r d w o n after a l l , b u t he d i d n ' t really, or d i d he? I d o n ' t k n o w it was a l l too confusing for me. S o a tired little b a n d of I.C. runners returned to a certain house of refreshment at South K e n s i n g t o n , consoled, b y the thought that on the W e d n e s d a y f o l l o w i n g was a league race and we w o u l d once again be r u n n i n g against athletes of our o w n class. Little did we k n o w . . . . O n Wednesday the last league race was held at I.C's. home course at R i c h m o n d P a r k . T h r e e of the Internat i o n a l N e w Z e a l a n d team came, t a k i n g the first three places, the w i nner br e a ki n g the course record b y 30s. t o m a k e it 2 5 m . 33s. (for 5 J miles) I.C. was there w i t h the usual team of varied talents R o b P a r k e r m a d e his c o m e b a c k ? A l m o s t beating P a u l C l a r k e , but neither were q u i c k enough to beat R o b A l l i n s o n w h o was first b a c k for I.C. i n 26th place w i t h 29-48. D a v e P a y n e a n d Stuart L i t t l e w o o d were not far b e h i n d (43rd a n d 48th) t h a n J . K a l i r a y ( k n o w b o d y k n o w s his c h r i s t i a n name) and D a v e Jones (72nd and 76th). Pete J o h n son a n d P a d D o n n e l l y also r a n i n this race a n d achieve d the u s u a l good placings w i t h 95th a n d 96th.

A n y o n e l o o k i n g over the parapet of Putney B r i d g e on Wednesday w o u l d have seen, besides the o d d o i l slick a n d l u m p of d r i f t w o o d , 20 college boats a n d the d y n a m i c T y r i a n ( U . L . II), m a r s h a l l i n g for the start of the U . L . H e a d of the R i v e r R a c e . F o r n o n - r o w i n g readers, a H e a d race is one in w h i c h the crews set off at a p p r o x i m a t e l y 10 second intervals a n d are t i m e d over a set distance, i n this case the B o a t R a c e course f r o m Putney to M o r t l a k e (4£ miles), the w i nner being the crew returning the fastest time. T h e r a c e . i s split up into divisions (in this case, O p e n , J u n i o r a n d N o v i c e ) w i t h the crews' starting order determined b y the previous years results.

T y r i a n , al though not officially part of the race (not being a college), d u l y lined u p i n front of the field for their a n n u a l ego trip. Just behind them were the I.C. 1st V I I I , h a v i n g w o n the event last year. I.C.'s recent rise to prominence h a d o b v i o u s l y got a r o u n d and the open d i v i s i o n w as sadly l a c k i n g i n numbers. (Although there were some surprisingly fast J u n i o r crews). T h e race f i n a l l y got underway w i t h I.C. chasing T y r ian. T h e water was quite rough for the first mile throughout w h i c h the I.C. c o x kept y e l l i n g something about T y r i a n having only 6ft. of clear water. Havi n g h e a r d it a l l before, the rest of the crew decided that T y r i a n must be disappearing under H a m m e r s m i t h B r i d g e . It was w i t h great surprise that, on reaching the c a l m e r water above the M i l e Post a n d r i s k i n g a q u i c k glance over their shoulders, the rest of the crew found the c o x was telling the truth. T h e two crews were level b y H a r r o d s a n d stayed l i k e that for the next mi l e. D u r i n g this period both crews gave everything they h a d a n d in between g i v i n g tens a n d answering the others tens, a l l one had time to d o was to decide w h i c h side of the boat to be sick over next. T h i s i n tensive r o w i n g c o u l d not continue, a n d just as the T y r i a n c o x was telling his crew that I.C. were going to b l o w up, his o w n crew began to d r o p b a c k . I.C. got \\. i n one of their tens and after that, soon b r o k e contact. F r o m this point on, I.C. slowly went away f r o m T y r i a n al though they d i d h i t a half submerged r a i l w a y sleeper a n d a nasty wash f r o m a string of barges.

T h e final positions put I.C. 21 seconds i n front of T y r i a n a n d a n enormous l m . 53sec. i n front of the t h i r d crew, St. T h o m a s ' s H o s p i t a l . T h e 2 n d V I I I , r o w i n g i n the J u n i o r d i v i s i o n came second behind U . C . T h e other star performance was b y the I V t h V I I I . T h i s crew was made u p of fresher novices w h o have only been r o w i n g since September. I n one of the best rows ever by an I.C. fresher novice crew they w o n the N o v i c e d i v i s i o n b y almost 2 minutes over several m u c h more experienced crews. If this crew stays together a n d improves as it s h o u l d , they s h o u l d have little difficulty in p i c k i n g u p their Novices i n the Summer. A s for the 1st V I I I , their performance was except i o n a l . F o r the first time i n years a l l the winter t r a i n ing and g r o un d w o r k h a d been done, d u e i n part to I.C's. N a t i o n a l S q u a d members. T h e y go to B e d f o r d o n Saturday to try a n d w i n the colleges pennant but the e x a m p l e set a n d encouragement given by some of their m a i n hopes must lie i n the S u m m e r regattas.

hockey KODAK

1, L C . 1st X I 2

T h i s was I.C.'s final league m a t c h of the season played at K o d a k ' s g r o u n d i n H a r r o w . A g a i n J o h n A n t ley took a chance a n d travelled alone b y scooter, fina l l y a r r i v i n g w i t h some minutes of the m a t c h h a v i n g been played. H i s e x p l a n a t i o n is that his c l u t c h cable b r o k e or something l i k e that, but we k n o w he got lost agai n. D u r i n g the m a t c h one of K o d a k ' s players was ordered off the field for five minutes for t r y i n g to strangle H e i n e k e n D o w n s — better l u c k next time. Kodak.

I . C . 2, P R E S I D E N T ' S X I 1 O n Sunday, the 1st X I completed the weekend d o u ble w i t h a very shaky w i n over the President's X I at H a r l i n g t o n . Before the m a t c h the I.C. team went through its usual t r i a l s a n d tribulations. Heineken b o o k e d a c o a c h for 1.30 w h i c h arrived at 11.30 a.m. a n d left because n o b o d y was ready to leave. So the m a t c h started half-an-hour late after a trip via H o u n slow West. T h e first half was completely d o m i n a t e d by the President's X I . A l t h o u g h they peppered the goal f r o m a l l angles, most of the shots were hastily taken and easily cleared. T h e goal I.C. scored i n the first half was o u r only direct shot of that half. J a g G a h i r broke through o n a solo r u n , a n d w i t h the goal at his m e r c y Jules Sargeant clobbered h i m g i v i n g away a penalty flick, w h i c h J a g somewhat l u c k i l y converted. T h e second h a l f was more even a n d C o l i n T o w n s l e y h a d a little m o r e to keep h i m w a r m i n the President's goal. I.C.'s second g o a l — o n e of our best movements of the season — came after ten minutes of this half. J a g G a h i r picked u p the b a l l o n the President's twentyfive, went to the right a n d gave a reverse stick pass to the top of the c i r c l e where C h r i s G a n k r o g e r i m m e d i a tely passed it out to the right of the D for H e i n e k e n to c r a c k i n first time. P r e d i c t a b l y this encouraged the President's X I to p i c k u p their game a n d they nearly scored after a movement on the right led to a shot by Jules Sargeant at least four feet off the g r o u n d . H o w e v e r , after it easily beat S i d B o u l t o n , R i c h a r d C a m e r o n made a fine save o n the line. T h e President's g o a l finally came f r o m a l o w h a r d shot by C o l i n R i n g r a s e f r o m their one short corner. Teams: — Sid Boulton; Simon Tyrrell, Richard C a m e r o n ; G r a h a m Popple, A l a n B r o w n , D i c k W h i t t ington; Heineken Downs, Chris Gankroger, Jag Gahir, Dave R i c h m a n , John Astley. Colin Townsly, M i c k Burt, R o n Palmer; Martin F i e l d , J u l i a n Sargeant, C o l i n Ringrese; J o h n M a n n i n g , I a n Tasney, Pete Bates, James C o m y n , D a v e R i c h a r d s . Umpires: Dave Browne, E d Castell.

I.C. M I X E D X I vs H E S T O N M I X E D X I I.C. 3, Hestoh 1 Despite h a v i n g their r a n k s depleted b y the c a l l of the first team, I.C. M i x e d team soldiered o n to yet another victory. A l t h o u g h they deserved to w i n , I.C. never really d o m i n a t e d a m a t c h w h i c h was spoilt b y the pettiness of some of the H e s t o n players. T h e first half was very one-sided w i t h I.C. on the attack almost continuously. H o w e v e r , half-time a r r i v e d w i t h the score still 0 — 0 . A f t e r a d y n a m i c pep-talk d u r i n g the interv a l I.C. started the second half in a m u c h m o r e resolute manner and very q u i c k l y opened the scoring. A r u n b y W B 2 ended w i t h C h r i s B r o w n putting the b a l l i n the b a c k of the net. S h o r t l y after this W B 2 added a second w i t h a devastatingly solo effort. I.C. continued to a p p l y a l l the pressure but the next goal was scored by Heston f o l l o w i n g a q u i c k breakaway, w h i c h split the I.C. defence and left the goalkeeper w i t h no chance. H e s t o n never really l o o k e d l i k e scoring again and when W B 2 added a t h i r d goal the f i n a l score became more representative of the o v e r a l l play. T e a m : J e r r y Heffer; Pete F o x t o n , J u l i e ( O A P ) ; Jacqui Buzzard, T i m Hansen, A n n e Purvis; Blossom, W B 2 , Chris Brown, A d r i a n Evans, Geraldine Bowden.

Photo: The

O b s e r v e r , 4 M a r c h , 1973

See F e l i x d i a r y for this week's c o m i n g events.


STUDENTS DAY OF ACTION

This siis part of the national student campaign for higher grants. For the f i r s t time i n the history of N.U.S. i t has c a l l e d for a national stoppage of a l l c o l l e g e s . As far as Imperial College i s concerned there i s going to be a s s t r i k e of lectures t h i s Wednesday morning. An alternative syllabus and a play have been arranged for the morning (for d e t a i l s see overleaf) and a surprise event i s planned for the afternoon. There are not many of us who regard the grants s i t u a t i o n as acceptable. The Government, The D a i l y Telegraph, through to the Morning Star have a l l recognised our demands as reasonable but the Government i s loathe to take immediate a c t i o n . The main points of the grants campaign arc a b o l i t i o n of the means test - restoration of the grant to i t s 1962 l e v e l - end discrimination against women, i n that they should get a f u l l grant whether or not they are married an annual review i s needed to protect students against i n f l a t i o n , with a view to introducing some supplementary grant to compensate for i n f l a t i o n The government has had four months to consider the N.U.S. grants claim* Students are s i c k and t i r e d of the government's delaying t a c t i c s . We cannot afford to wait while the mandarins of Whitehall "look" at our campaign. ALL OUT

-

MARCH 14TH

SUPPORT THE DAY OF ACTION We would l i k e you also to act as pickets i n the morning* Picketing i s only a d i r t y word i f i t i s done badly. I t ' s up to you to make sure i t ' s done w e l l . We are asking you to form a united student body. We don't expect everyone to agree with everyone else - just to t r y , MEETING for a l l students who are w i l l i n g to picket on Wednesday between 9 ÂŤ 0 0 and 1 0 . 0 0 a.m. i n Senior Common Room, f i r s t f l o o r , Union B u i l d i n g , (-^ ^ p ^


PROGRAMME FOR MARCH 14TH

9.0O-10.00a.m« Picketing outside your department b u i l d i n g , IN THE GREAT HALL 9 . 3 0 - 10,00

Cartoon or short f i l m .

10.00 - 12.30

Alternative syllabus on education. Speakers scheduled are MIKE DUANNE, ex Rising H i l l Comprehensive School headmaster whose ideas were a l i t t l e too progressive for the a u t h o r i t i e s . PHIL KELLY, from Time Out, on education and the mass media. MARY RICHARDSON, from N . U . S . , and RICHARD KIRKW00D, ( A . T . T . I ) . f r o m Central P o l y , on education and Maggie Thatcher's white paper• MR. ACHE-ORR, on education and authoritarian c o n t r o l ,

1.00- 2.00p.m. KARTOON KLOWNS, a very popular theatre group. In the concert h a l l . (We were exceedingly lucky to obtain t h i s group as 16 other colleges wanted them to perform on the same day) 2.00

SURPRISE EVENT.

8 00

DISCO i n Union B u i l d i n g . 1 0 p (Sorry, the only non-free event - the money goes towards helping N.U.S, meet t'ha cost of expenses for the l e a f l e t s i t produced)

0

0CO0COOG0O0O-

* * * * * * * * * EXTRA 11.00

EXTRA * * * * * * * * *

Postgraduate meeting i n Mech, Eng. 220 to discuss * H i e g r a n t s for PG's and London * Di v

derating rates

* Cctuaoa roota o u d

^uuiiities.


http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1973/1973_0332_A