Page 1

MIKE

G O N E s

w M I K E , IC's new, unstealable mascot lasted just five weeks. Beetween 1.30 and 5.30 am last Thursday it was removed from its plinth in the Union lower lounge. The vice-jaws, which gripped the body, were cut with an oxy-acetylene torch; the ring which circled the barrel had been broken in an attempt on the previous Monday by drilling and chiselling and was removed using toe torch. It appears that one of the thieves stayed in the U n i o n after it was closed on Wednesday night by A c t i n g Duty Officer T o n y D u k e . T h e U n i o n doors facing into Beit Q u a d were chained to repel defenders. T h e other assailants entered through the back entrance which was opened by unscrewing the lock. It is estimated that the operation would take some forty minutes to complete. T h e m a s c o t w a s s u p p o s e d to b e protected by ingenious a l a r m system so that a n y t a m p e r i n g w o u l d set o i l tne s i r e n . H o w e v e r , o n t h e n i g h t of t i i e r a i d n o n e o f these systems w a s connected, the W o o d e n Horse O r g a n isation, who are responsible for mascotry, wer t r e l y i n g on the protecti o n ot t h e p l i n t h a n d t h e p r e s e n c e of t h e S e c u r i t y g u a r d s . A c c o r d i n g to t h e " r u l e s ' of mascot stealing the mascot m a y o n l y be r e m o v e d d u r i n g U n i o i n h o u r s , w h i c h w o u l d p r e v e n t t h e use of torches a n d t h e other e q u i p m e n t . A l s o it is a g a i n e s t t h e r u l e s t o d a m a g e the m a s c o t — i t is l i k e l y t h a t the c u t t i n g t o r c h w o u l d easily m e l t t h e brass b o d y . W h e n the siren was tested on F r i d a y (to see if it r e a l l y d i d w o r k ) i t w a s f o u n d t o be q u i t e w e a k , c e r t a i n l y not l o u d e n o u g h to w a k e any of t h e r e s i d e n t s o f B e i t H a l l , e x c e p t p e r h a p s s o m e o n e o n fifth floor O l d Beit. A t the t i m e of w r i t i n g (Sunday) n o thing had been heard from the t h i e v e s , a l t h o u g h it is c u s t o m a r y to i n f o r m t h e v i c t i m s w i t h i n 24 h o u r s . However. D e p u t y President D a v i d M c B a i n h a d discovered that MIKE was i n the custody of U n i v e r s i t y C o l lege.

The damaged, empty plinth

s 'We've mucked this place up'

I n order to enlist t h e i r support i n r e c o v e r i n g M I K E , t h e m a s c o t of t h e College of Estate M a n a g e m e n t , a concrete owl, was stolen during Friday lunch-time. The owl was found in their U n i o n bar during prep a r a t i o n s for a d a n c e a n d i t w a s a n easy m a t t e r to effect its r e m o v a l . O t h e r I C s t u d e n t s are m a k i n g a t t e m p t s to r e c r u i t m a s c o t s so t h a t m o r e help can be bought. T w o v e r y embarrassed p e o p l e are T o n v D u k e , w h o h a d p l a c e d bets w i t h other Presidents that MIKE w o u l d not be stolen, a n d R a l p h C o r n f o r t h , President of the W . H . O . , w h o is b e i n g b l a m e d f o r the loss of the mascot. O n W e d n e s d a y e v e n ing C o r n f o r t h wrote a report on the attempt made on M o n d a v . H e c o n cluded, " M I K E W I L L N E V E R B E S T O L E N F R O M ITS P L I N T H " . Berford College, whose mascot—a u n i c o r n — w a s stolen earlier this t e r m , h a v e s t i l l n o t h e a r d o fits w h e r e a b o u t s , a n d P H I N E A S , t h e m a s c o t of U n i v e r s i t y C o l l e g e has s t r a y e d f r o m h o m e . W h e n the N e w S c i e n t i s t h e a r d of t h e c l a i m s for M I K E they p r o m i s e d the U n i o n a f i r k i n o f b e e r i f i t c o u l d be re t a i n c d for o n e y e a r .

C . E . M s owl

The characteristic atmosphere of a Guild's Union meeting—4 parts nitrogen, 1 part oxygen and n parts paper darts, was well in evidence at the last meeting and the hornblowers, tablethumpers and chorus chanters had their usual field day. What were not characteristic of a Guild's meeting were the excesses of the meeting which was never fully under control.

In their exuberance and recklessness,

many members, encouraged by the U n i o n officers, exceeded the limits of safety and decency : to set fire to a paper dart and then •htow it into the audience cannot be excused on any grounds, especially in the finest lecture theatre in the College. T h e noise l e v e l subsided o n l y d u r ing the presentation of rowing colours, after w h i c h President Pete Roberts a d j o u r n e d the m e e t i n g a n d convened an E x t r a o r d i n a r y G e n e r a l M e e t i n g to pass s o m e c o n s t i t u t i o n a l changes. W i t h o u t further explanation he then declared that whatever he w i s h e d t o pass w a s p a s s e d . M o n o syllabic objections were raised to this unjustifiably h i g h - h a n d e d attitude, these w e r e c o m p l e t e l y ignored. S w i m m i n g

G a l a

H a v i n g thus a b a n d o n e d the constitu t i o n , t h e m e e t i n g p a s s e d o n to h i g h e r m a t t e r s as P h i l M a r s h a l l l e a p t o n to t h e stage i n a n e c k to k n e e b a t h i n g suit a n d c a r d b o a r d b a n a n a h o r n s , w h i l e his a c c o m p l i c e , R o g W h i t e , i n s i m i l a r dress, b o u n d e d f r o m b l a c k b o a r d to b l a c k - b o a r d s c r i b b l i n g sexual graffiti. "You m a y w o n d e r w h y w e a r e w e a r i n g t h i s spastic g e a r ' said M a r s h a a l l , and offerred the forthc o m i n g s w i m m i n g g a l a as a n excuse. D e f e n d i n g h i m s e l f f r o m a h a i l of paper, chalk and a probing lecture p o i n t e r , b y w a v i n g his h e l m e t , t h e Guild's Vice President spent a boisterous ten minutes alternatively describing future G u i l d ' s activities, a n d s h o u t i n g for o r d e r . C h a r a c t e r i s t i c ally, he p l a c e d great emphasis on free booze in his address. T e r e m a i n d e r of t h e m e e t i n g w a s taken up with children's games, laughingly called a competition. T h e basis o i these w a s an i n t e r - y e a r c o n test i n v o l v i n g t h e b u r s t i n g of b a l loons by sheer lung power and the eating of drv Weetabix. It

also i n v o l v e d t r a m p l i n g s a i d W e e t abix into the doer a n d smashing one pint mug. The result was n e v e r i n d o u b t , since R e g W h i t e , f i n d i n g n o t h i n g b e t t e r to d o w i t h h i s p i e c e of c h a l k , w r o t e t h e w i n n e r s . C i v i l s , p l a i n l y on t h e board—and C i v i l s it w a s . A l l parties cheated vigorously, casting sporting instincts a s i d e , a n d t h e l u r e o f the p r i z e , a largo volume of beer. was so g r o a t t h a t a t t i ' ;le b r o k e out in the w i n n i n g te a m over the distributi o n of t h e b o o t v .

C h i l d r e n A final f r i e n d l y f o l l o w e d , i n c l u d i n g a P r e s i d e n t i a l team of D u k e . M c B a i n a n d Roberts, a n d . on paper plates, several rounds of Bird's Instant W h i p (neapolitan flavour;. A t the e n d o f t h i s contest D u k e s h o w e d h i m self t o be n o m o r e r e s p o n s i b l e t h a n t h e w o r s t of ' t h a t c r o w d ' , w h e n h e flung one o i the plates into the audience covering several people with the mixture and depositing p o r t i o n s of it o n f u r n i t u r e a n d w a l l s : a l l g o o d d i r t y f u n l S h o r t l y after t h i s Roberts appealed for some order s a y i n g 'I t h i n k w e ' v e m u c k e d t h i s place up quite enough." They h a d indeed I O f i n t e r e s t , i n c i d e n t a l l y , is t h a t t h e noise level reached a definite m a x imum d u r i n g t h e r e a d i n g of t h e minutes—perhaps Guildsmen just aren't interested in the aiiairs of their i r r e s p o n s i b l e U n i o n officers. J. Mullay, C.G.H.


2

FELIX

Rubbish! 'It's a l l r u b b i s h ! ' c o m m e n t e d D r . D . E . H , Jones o n manufacturers litera t u r e o n ' H i - F i ' p i c k - u p a r m s , as h e demonstrated his o w n design, c o n t r a c t e d f r o m t h e t u b e of a b i c y c l e iump. I n his lecture on 'Rubbish dachines,' the production of useful articles f r o m r u b b i s h , D r . Jones d e s c r i b e d to t h e M a t h s a n d P h y s . S o c . s o m e o f h i t o w n p r o d u c t s , s u c h as his r u b b i s h t a p e - r e c o r d e r , a m p l i f i e r , and record players. H e then discussed the other side of t h e subject, that is, useless p r o d u c t s , c o n s t r u c t e d i n order to show it could be done, s u c h as s t e a m - p o w e r e d boats, a n d his p r o p o s e d s t e a m b a l l o o n s . H e a l s o t a l k e d briefly about h i s interest i n theory of h o w a b i c y c l e works, a n d h o w i t is p o s s i b l e t o steer i t . H e asked anybody w i t h a n e w theory to contact h i m v i a the C h e m i s t r y D e partment.

Ships from computers A r e s e a r c h contract- w o r t h £ . 5 3 . 0 0 0 hn* lieen granted to Professor Stanlev G i l l of the C o m p u t i n g Section b y Uie M i n i s t r y ot lecmiology. liie contract involves investigating the a p p l i c a t i o n ot c o m p u t e r s t o t h e d e s i g n ot nulls t o r ships, a n d w i l l r e q u i r e the purchase ot g r a p h i c a l display equipment a n d a P i J P - 7 computer to control it. Professor E l l i o t t , also of the C o m puting Section was interviewed recently on a radio programme about the a p p l i c a t i o n of c o m p u t e r s to t h e d e s i g n o f p r o f i l e s w h i c h is n o w b a s e d largely o n experience rather than science. N . Shindler

s y T h e H . G . Wells Centenary Lecture organised by the National Wells Society was given by L o r d Snow. L o r d Snow gave an informal lecture, as he said Wells did not approve of f o r m a l l y , and spoke of his personal impressions of Wells. H e first m e t h i m i n 1 9 3 4 W e l l s w a s t h e first p e r s o n t o s h o w a n y interest i n a n o v e l L o r d S n o w h a d just w r i t t e n , a n d asked h i m to l u n c h to discuss i t . L o r d S n o w a r r i v e d p u n c t u a l l y at W e l l ' s L o n d o n h o m e o n a dark a n d miserable afternoon. Wells was not punctual but w h e n he d i d appear showed great i n terest in L o r d S n o w a n d h ' 3 w r i t i n g s , w a n t i n g to k n o w where h e got his

R. B a s s

In Unilever, management is more than a career... . . . it has acquired the status of a profession and, as such, requires highly developed skills - skills that are never found ready made. For this reason we have evolved a comprehensive system of management training and development for young men and women of outstanding calibre. Unilever is the sixth largest company in the world, with about 300,000 employees in 80 countries. We make and sell consumer products which are household names and produce raw and manufactured materials for other industries. A high proportion of the management of this widely diversified company are graduates. For 40 years we have been systematically recruiting students from Universities.

Challenging Opportunities for Scientists and Arts Graduates In Unilever, we do not simply accept change, we play a large part in creating it. Keeping the company in the forefront of its field means many intellectually exacting and satisfying jobs for scientists and technologists, for economists, mathematicians, sociologists and all types of Arts graduates. No matter what your discipline at University, you have a wide choice of career in Unilever. A physicist might well turn to Market Research. Or a Zoologist to running a factory. The direction you take is largely up to you. If you are interested in a career in Unilever, our booklet on the Unilever Companies' Management Development Scheme gives simply and factually much of the information you will require - the structure of the Company, prospects, how training is carried out and an indication of some of the things you mightfindyourself doing if you joined. It also contains details of the selection procedure and how to apply. If you would like to know more about the U.C.M.D.S., and about Unilever, ask your Appointments Officer for our booklet, "Careers in Unilever 1967", or write to: C. R. Stewart, Personnel Division, Unilever House, London, E.C.4. A manager from Unilever will be visiting your University during the Spring Term to interview students. Details of his visit can be had from your Appointments Officer.

information on married life for example. Although well entertained Snow was only invitee to W i l l s home once, perhaps because W e l l s didn't like other m e n t a l k i n g to h i s w i f e . S n o w r e m e m b e r e d W e l l s as t h e i n ventor a n d the writer, the m a n w h o forecasted the c o m i n g of w a r tanks and a i r battles. I n his w r i t i n g s he t o l d of his y o u t h a n d hopes for a Utopia founded on education and science. A l t h o u g h W e l l s is r e m e m b e r e d as a w r i t er he only took u p this o c c u pation because of i l l health. H i s a m b i t i o n w a s to b e c o m e a scientist an F . R . S . a n d a Professor E m e r i t u s , However, as h i s p e r i o d o f g o o d education was short a n d his health poor his ambition was never fulfilled a n d this depressed h i m . In one startling conversation W e l l s asked if he h a d ever thought of suicide. " Y e s H . G . " w a s t h " rer.lv. "<?•• l - i v p T. b u t n o t t i l l I w a s p a s t 7 0 " . L o r d I n o w rcoalls h e must h a v e b e e n t h i n k i n g o n l y o f t h e p r e s e n t as W e l l s hod written in his ivutcbiogrsphy that he h a d contemplated suicide 16, w h e n h e w a s w o r k i n g i n a d e pressing drapers shoo.

R e c o g n i t i o n In his later life W e l l s realised his ambition might never achieved b u t h e s t i l l t r i e d . H e w r o t e s» t h e s i s in the hope that the R o y a l Societv w o u l d r e c o g n i s e h i m as s c i e n t i s t i f he h a d a doctorate. T h e v didn't a n d L o r d S n o w felt that for a Decern s u c h as W e l l s w h o f o r e s a w the science of the 20fh Century should have b a d his much-wanted recognition. W e l l s said h e found d y i n g rather a messy business e v e n though, d e a t h itself d i d n o t w o r r y h i m . H i s p e r s o n a l a i m w a s n o t satisfied b u t h is w r i t ings, for w h i c h h e h a d little patience are still w i d e l y k n o w n . J. M o o n t

Southside bar brawl A complaint has been received i n Southside B a r f r o m t h e staff about various customers o n S w i m m i n g G a l a night. I t seems that t h e enforced absence of M e c h . En g.2 from the event, caused b y t h e c o n currence of a Departmental dinner, p r o v e d sufficient reason f o r t h e m t o disturb the usual tranquil atmosphere of t h e b a r a n d f o r o n e m e m b e r o f t h e p a r t y t o flout t h e n o r m a l s o c i a l code i n discriminating where he got rid of t h e exc ess b e e r h e h a d drunk. H o w e v e r , b l a m e d o e s n o t rest o n the students alone; a c c o r d i n g to Stan the behaviour of the members of staff p r e s e n t w a s e v e n w o r s e t h a n that of t h e students. T h e duty-officer w a s c a l l e d twice, once for non-payment a n d the second t i m e , f o r m i s c o n d u c t . S e v e r a l threats to close t h e b a r w e r e m a d e i n a n a t tempt to calm everybody down a n d at 1 0 p . m . d e f i n i t e p r e p a r a t i o n s w e r e m a d e for this. T h e telephone seems t o b e sufferi n g n o ill-effects despite several a t tempts to lender it a mischief. f.J.

Morris


FELIX

n

S e l w y n L l o y d r e c e n t l y v i s i t e d a l u n c h - t i m e m e e t i n g of C o n S o c t o g i v e a general talk o n the present p o l i t i c a l scene. H e opened his talk on the s u b j e c t ot V i e t n a m , s t a t i n g t h a t t h i s issue is t h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t i n f o r e i g n affairs. H e thought that the eontliet c o u l d only b e settled a r o u n d a c o n f e r e n c e t a b l e w i t h t h e A m e r i c a n s a n d t h e C h i n e s e n e g o t i a t i n g a joint w i t h d r a w a l t o l e a v e V i e t n a m as a f l a b b y , c e n t r a l p a d b e t w e e n these rivals. H e also t e l t , t h o u g h ; t h a t t h e A m e r i c a n s s h o u l d k e e p u p t h e i r o f f e n s i v e , i n c l u d i n g b o m b i n g r a i d s , u n t i l n e g o t i a t i o n s s t a r t , as t h e C o m m u n i s t s a r e n o r e s p e c t o r s ot w e a k n e s s ' . H e d i d n o t otter a m e t h o d o f a c h i e v i n g n e g o t i a t i o n s o t h e r t h a n g i v i n g t h e C h i n e s e a f u l l seat i n t h e U N s e c u r i t y council. Continuing with foreign affairs, he t h o u g h t t h a t a s e t t l e m e n t o f t h e Rhodesian situation would come more easily f r o m negotiations t h a n from sanctions w h i c h w o u l d affect the Z a m b i a n a n d B r i t i s h economies C o n t i n u i n g , h e c r i t i c i s e d the p r e and would solidify the white sent g o v e r n m e n t f o r i n c r e a s i n g th< the Smith Rhodesians behind p o w e r o f t l i e state i n five sectors o f government. H e felt that the colourthe economy. H e slated the nationed c i t i z e n of R h o d e s i a s h o u l d not b e a l i s a t i o n p l a n s f o r s t e e l a n d t h e setgiven an immediate vote but ting u p of the n e w national authorBritain should send a 'large s u m ' to ities f o r f r e i g h t , l a n d e t c ; h e d i s Rhodesia to be spent o n a massive approved of the abandoning of his educational d r i v e to fit t h e c o l o u r e d own National Economic Developcitizen for a vote. ment C o u n c i l , the introduction of C o n c e r n i n g t h e role of B r i t a i n i n new c o n f u s i n g ' c o m p a n y taxes a n d the defence of t h e free w o r l d , h e the resulting increase i n the C i v i l said that w e have taken too m u c h Service on ourselves a n d w e s h o u l d h a n d over many of o u r responsibilities to other nations. H e d i d n o t , h o w e v e r , say h o w w e w e r e t o g e t r i d o f t h e s e commitments. T u r n i n g to domestic issues, h e spoke of his surprise that w e d i d not have a m u c h worse balance of During question time, he said payments crisis i n v i e w of t h e w a y t h a t h e w o u l d l i k e t o see a r e v i s i o n industry has b e e r u n since the w a r . of t r a d e u n i o n l a w t o set u p a r e A s for the present balance of p a y strictive practices court for the ments crisis, he gave n o real solution unions a n d to increase t h e p o w e r of but he w a r n e d against devaluation the f a i r - m i n d e d u n i on leaders. of t h e p o u n d . T h e m e e t i n g h a d to b e w o u n d u p t h r o u g h lack of t i m e at 4.30 a n d t h e enthusiastic applause reflected t h e excellence of the speech a n d t h e p r e cise n a t u r e o f M r L l o y d ' s r e t o r t s t o the questioning. Dave Ormiston

R e c e n t l y a visit w a s p a i d to t h e college by a n N b C colour television u n i t . T h e u n i t is m a k i n g a scries o f t w o - h o u r films o n the theme " s e l l i n g Britain's f u t u r e " . A m o n g the topics covered are education, music a n d fashion. In connection w i t h this, the N . B . C . unit i n t e r v i e w e d Professor C h a i n a n d Professor L a i t h w a i t e . T n e p r o g r a m m e is s i m i l a r i n c o n c e p t t o o u r " 2 4 H o u r s " ; a n d i t is w a t c h e d b y 8 0 % of U S C o n g r e s s m e n . P. Munday

y

A t t h e last S C C m e e t i n g n o t i c e was given of the intention to f o r m a H i n d u Society. T h e Society w o u l d a i m to spread k n o w l e d g e of H i n d u philosophy a n d c o m p a r e it w i t h that of o t h e r f a i t h s .

LUCA

e

Jane Pearson a n d D a v i d P e i r h from I C w o n the L o n d o n University Conservative Association speakers' c o m p e t i t i o n last w r e k against o p p o s ition from four other L o n d o n C o l l e g es.

n

n

Trade

Hindu

I C in colour

n

e

3

Unions

Diwali - Asian Festivities

On December 2nd t h e I n d i a Society celebrated Diwali—the a u t u m n harvest festival of fireworks, illuminations, and music. Fire regulations rule out fireworks i n the U n i o n , so t h e c e l e b r a t i o n h a d t o b e limited to food, dancing, music, and magic.

Food T h e dinner consisted of favourite S o u t h K e n s i n g t o n dishes like t a n d o o r i c h i c k e n , p i l a o , a n d shik kabab, supplie d b y a n outside restaurant, a n d was a t t e n d e d b y over 140 people, i n c l u d i n g s e v e r a l m e m b e r s o f staff and the Denuty H i g h Commisioner for I n d i a . T h e r e w e r e, perhaps surprisingly, no after-dinner speeches, a n d t h e guests a d j o u r n e d r a p i d l y t o the Concert H a l l for die variety programme.

T h i s was easily the best that the I n d i a S o c i e t y h a s e v e r starred, a n d different from a n y t h i n g else ever seen at I C . F o l k dances from M a l a b a r a n d R a j a s t h a n w e r e d a n c e d w i t h profes^ sional excellence i n really gorgeous costumes; a n d the evening was greatly enlivened by M e c h . E n g . P . i,,. K . Patankar's displays of magic aud niime. t h e show, naturally, over-ran; a n d as t n e a u d i e n c e w a d e d o u t t h r o u g h t h e d e b r i s ot t h e S w i m m i n g G a l a they could reflect on a unique evening well-spent. P.M.R.

SouthSide Stomps

I.C.W.A. Champion

A f t e r U i i s t e r m ' s C e l l a r sessions, i n which Dick Morissey 4tet, the G r a h a m C o l l i e r 7tet, a n d the D o n R e n d e l l 4 t c t h a v e b e e n g u e s ts , t h e Jazz C l u b are presenting another another season of S S stomps. T o set t h e s t o m p s oft w i t h a b a n g , t h e first o n e (on W e d . 1 8 J a n . ) w i l l feature Spencer's W a s h b o a r d K i n g s a n d promises to be a good evening for those w h o care to d a n c e , listen, or s i m p l y d r i n k at t h e b a r . F u t u r e s t o m p s w i l l f o l l o w at t w o w e e k l y i n t e r v a l s . B o o k i n g s f o r these will include M a x . Collies' Rhythm w h o helped to m a k e this Aces, year's M o r p h y D a y stomp s u c h a g r e a t success.

Carnival: Treble

s

W i n t e r s tor D e e . 3 r d 1966. N o c a r d was sold that obtained an a g gregate- o f m o r e t h a n s e v e n g o a l s . T h e following cards, w h i c h h a d an aggregate of seven goals, each w i n one seventh of the £ 7 . 1 0 . - p r i z e : — N o s . 162, 258. 622. 667. 676, 797, 801. E a c h w i l l receive £1.1.5d. F . J . M o r r i s (Pool Promoter)

O n Sunday the weather improved a n d t h e p a r t y split u p to visit t h e S n o w d o n horseshoe a n d E l i d i r F a c h w h i l s t o t h e r s s t a v e d at t h e c o m f o r t a b l e Scout h u t at H a f o d B a c h . T h e w e e k e n d w a s n o t w i d i o u t its l i g h t e r moments a n d w e must record that the snowball match on F o e l G o c h was w o n by I C W A a n d a snowman was built i n due recognition. The u s e o f M i n i - b u s e s e n a b l e s us to g e t i n t w o good days w a l k i n g i n the weekend. A t various times o n Saturday 3 D e c e m b e r , 19 m e m b e r s o f t h e H o v e r G r e w a r r i v e d at t h e s u m m i t ot S n o w don i n their respective groups, g l a d to g a i n respite f r o m t h e d r i v i n g snow w h i p p e d up b y the strong winds. T h e s n o w w a s a b o u t six i n c h e s d e e p a n d this obscured footpaths m a k i n g c l i m b i n g interesting. T h a n k s to t h e organisation of M i k e Garrett we were prepared for the worst weather condition ( l i lbs of dates pur m a n ) * a n d thus enjoyed the c l i m b . B.F.

Tunbridge

* T h e C r e w n o w has a surplus of dates... a n y offers ?

SPOTS BOILS PIMPLES

DO

THEY

SPOIL YOUR

FUN?

R e a d n o w w h a t p e o p l e say about M a s c o p i l — t h e tried a n d tested formula used by thousands ! "After only one supply of Mascopil the spots have virtually gone. It's l o v e l y t o go o u t a n d m i x w i t h p e o p l e again . . . " F . P . of N o r w i c h something that " . . . at last actually' w o r k s . " A.J.P., Radley College . . . m y f a c e w a s a mass o f spots b u t t h e y h a v e almost gone n o w " . C . C . Enfield Y o u too c a n enjoy M a s c o p i l Treatment. Just s w a l l ow t w o tiny pills a d a y — w h a t could be simpler. F o r a d e s c r i p t i v e leaflet a n d a 3 0 - d a v t r e a t m e n t just s e n d 8 / 6 (post free) t o : — CROWN DRUG COMPANY Dept. F E , Blackburn, Lancashire.


FELIX

4

F HIX

COLCUTT

Imperial College U n i o n Prince Consort R d . L o n d o n , S.W.7 Internal 2881/2799 T e l e p h o n e s : K E N 2963

EDITOR C. G . HARRISON

A s s t . E d i t o r : N i g e l Shindler With: R o n Bass, N i c k Clarke, Colcutt, Roger Cooper, Brian Costin, Sports E d i t o r : Alan Robins Adam Gawronski, Justin Griffith, F e a t u r e s E d i t o r : D a v i d Potter Paul Heath Frank Morris, John M u l N e w s E d i t o r : Stewart Barnes laly, D a v e Ormiston, Paul Smith, B u s i n e s s M a n a g e r : R i c h a r d Davies Dave Sullivan, Mike Y u , Ian S a l e s : C h r i s Palmer, Peter Munday A s s t . Sales M a n a g e r : Judith Pearson W i l l i a m s . Advertising Manager : Robin Hall C a r t o o n i s t : B o b Russell W h a t ' s O n E d i t o r : K e n Simpson Advertising Agency : E d u c a t i o n a l Publicity (Partners) L t d . C H A 6081

A s o n e o r t w o p e o p l e w i l l b e a w a r e , t h e r e exists i n I C U n i o n a s y s t e m of U n i o n D u t y Officers. T h i s s y s t e m is d e s i g n e d t o e n s u r e t h a t b e h a v i o u r n t h e U n i o n b a r s is n o t u n d u l y b a d , a n d t h a t t h e U n i o n is c l o s e d a t t h e appointed hour. T h e D u t y Officers themselves a r e a l l s o l i d , d i s t i n g u i s h e d , l e a d i n g members ot the U n i o n , carefully chosen f o r their ability t o look after a w k w a r d b a r situations (in other w o r d s , t h e D e p u t y P r e s i d e n t just T h i s is f i n e , o r • u ts a l l s o c i e t y c h a i r m e n a n d o t h e r w o r t h i e s o n a r o t a ) . w o u l d be i f t h e D u t y Officers ever b o t h e r e d to t u r n u p . T h e D u t y Officers' books i n Southside a n d t h e U n i o n show that very f e w d o bother. Is t w o nights a t e r m i n t h e b a r r e a l l y t o o onerous a task ? S o m e d e l i q u e n t D . O . ' s a g r e e t h a t i t is n o t , b u t t h a t t h e y n e v e r r e c e i v e d n o t i f i c a t i o n t h a t t h e y Finger out, M c B a i n ! w e r e supposed to be o n d u t y .

C omment EDITOR'S

O n c e a g a i n , t h e E n t s . C o m m i t t e e is t h e o b j e c t o f g e n e r a l c r i t i c i s m i n tne Union. T h e complaints are m a n y a n d various, b u t most are o n t h e t h e m e of l a c k of c o - o p e r a t i o n w i t h societies t r y i n g t o organise h o p s , b o t h over the arrangements f o r the hops themselves a n d i n t h e stocking of t h e C r u s h H a l l b a r . E n t s . h a d a v e r y b a d start t o t h e y e a r , a n d B o l d o n a n d G u y d i d w e l l t o step i n w h e n t h e y d i d a n d t r y t o d o s o m e t h i n g a b o u t i t . A r e t h e y s t i l l t r y i n g as h a r d o r h a v e t h e y b e c o m e b o r e d w i t h t h e j o b ?

e We are S O good I t is a d i s m a y i n g e x p e r i e n c e t o r e a l i s e just h o w i n w a r d - l o o k i n g t h i s U n i o n i s . T h a t t h e C o l l e g e as a w h o l e should choose to isolate itself f r o m t h e N a t i o n a l Student b o d y is puzzling enough, but when I a m told b y some of o u r clear-thinking, rational G u i l d s m e n that the R C S d e bates o n N U S are of n o c o n c e r n to t h e m , I confess m y s e l f to b e b e w i l d e r e d . A r e t h e y r e a l l y so s h o r t - s i g h t e d or d o they actually believe that i f G u i l d s ' considered joining that different a r g u m e n t s w o u l d a p p l y ? M e m bers o f t h e U n i o n c o m p l a i n t h a t F E L I X has g i v e n too m u c h space t o the N U S debates—perhaps they w o u l d rather have m o r e space d e voted to the r e a l l y significant events of t h e U n i o n ' s calendar. T h e r e are those interesting incidents of M o r p h y D a y or the L o r d Mayor's Show, w h i c h show t h e f u l l extent of t h e students' good relations w i t h t h e p u b l i c o r t h e r e is t h e p e t t y b a c k - b i t i n g t h a t h a s gone o n i n R C S this t e r m . S u c h is the U n i o n ' s consciousness o f its role i n n a t i o n a l s t u d e n t affairs t h a t i t c o n siders N U S t o b e o f s m a l l c o n c e r n .

INTERESTED I N : TANKS TELEPATHY TUTANKHAMEN Then

come

to the

HALDANE LIBRARY 13 P r i n c e s for

Open

Gardens

a b o o k about it.

l l - 7 p m . d a i l y (11-5.30)

Monday

& Wednesday

T h e N U S question has been settled for another year, I hope. A s I said in an e a r l i e r i s s u e , o n e o f t h e f a i l i n g s o f t h i s t y p e o f a r g u m e n t at I C is t h a t f e w p e o p l e t a k e t h e t r o u b l e t o find o u t t h e f a c t s o f t h e m a t t e r , a n d prepare a reasonable argument f o r , or against. M a n y were, therefore, h e a r t e n e d t o see t h e p o i n t s f o r b o t h s i d e s p u b l i s h e d i n t h e last i s s u e o f 'i"ELLX'. H o w e v e r , a closer e x a m i n a t i o n of these points shows t h a t t h e y m i g h t n o t b e as s o u n d as t h e y a p p e a r . F o r example : '3 M P ' s have told u s ...the r i s e w . l l d e f i n i t e l y b e i n t h e f o r m o l a l o a n ' . A pretty powerful interest i n argument. U n f o r t u n a t e l y , w h e n t h e n a t i o n a l press s h o w e d t h i s s t a t e m e n t a n d e n q u i r e d o f M a r t i n L a c k t h e i d e n t i t y o f these t h r e e M P ' s , it t r a n s p i r e d that h e k n e w definitely of o n e , a n d , i f there w a s o n e , there w o u l d p r o b a b l y be mor e, a n d a n y w a y , three sounds better t h a n one. 1 M r . L a c k doesn't k n o w t h e identity of t h e one M P a n d can't r e m e m b e r w h o told him.

I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e is t h e f o r e m o s t in the technological institution c o u n t r y , i t is famous f o r its d i s t i n g u i s h e d a c a d e m i c staff, t h e s u p e r b Halls of Residence a n d its ' s w e a t cattle markets'. W h e n the College was mentioned i n conversation at the Margate conference, however, the delegates were p u z z l e d about t h e U n i o n ' s a t t i t u d e . ' W h y is I C s o d i s i n t e r e s t e d i n n a t i o n a l s t u d e n t affairs?" and 'Silly' were the comments. Perhaps w e are so g o o d that w e c a n b e a l a w u n t o ourselves... perhaps n o t . T i m e a n d again t h e title ' U n i v e r s i t y o f S o u t h K e n s i n g t o n ' is r a i s e d i n publications, broadcasts a n d governm e n t a l c i r c l e s , I C is w e l l - k n o w n a n d acknowledged throughout E u r o p e and different, t h e w o r l d as s o m e t h i n g something special. B u t h o w many students realise t h e esteem i n w h i c h the C o l l e g e is h e l d a n d compare i t w i t h t h e respect d u e t o o u r U n i o n ? T i m e a n d a g a i n I find t h a t f o r so m a n y p e o p l e t h i s is just a s u p e r technical college.

The

y

Sir, M a y 1, t h r o u g h y o u r c o l u m n , a p p e a l to those members of the U n i o n w h o insist u p o n m a k i n g t h e u p p e r lounge into a n absolute piggery every l u n c h - t i m e t o a t least r e t u r n i t t o its i n i t i a l state b e f o r e l e a v i n g . T h i s r o o m , p l a c e d as i t i s a t t h e t o p o f the U n i o n , is ideally suited to its actual purpose of p r o v i d i n g a quiet place o i r e l a x a t i o n — h o w e v e r , this is impossible d u e t o its p e r m a n e n t worse-than-slum condition. W h i l e c o n s i d e r i n g t h e 3 r d floor o f t h e U n i o n m a y I suggest that t h e table tennis club a p p l y for a supplementary grant or something to c o v e r the cost of either a f a n or resp i r a t o r s f o r t h o s e w h o pass t h r o u g h . ...-.r B . O . s a t u r a t e d c l u b r o o m ? ? Roderick J . Redmayne

A s C o l c u t t casually glances r o u n d t h e C o l l e g e l o o k i n g f o r some l i k e l y f e l l o w w h o s e failings a n d / o r idiosyncrasies m i g h t c o n c e i v a b l y fill another column inch, he cannot help noticing a certain college administrator, w h o shall b e nameless. I t suffices t o s a y t h a t h e is a l s o w a r d e n o f o n e o f t h e Southside halls. A m o n g s t other things, this august gentleman has a d o g , w h i c h h e r e g u l a r l y exercises ( w i th o ut a lead) i n P r i n c e s G a r d e n s , q u i t e o b l i v i o u s o f t h e n o t i c e s o n t h e gates w h i c h s a y ' D o g s m u s t b e k e p t o n a lead. B y Order.' Perhaps the secretary to the Parks a n d Gardens C o m mittee, M r . C . C . Seaford, c o u l d b r i n g this notice to the attention of the gentleman concerned.

\jtttlAA

to

, bias and Match Sir. T o l i t i c s * seems t o b e a b a d w o r d at I C — r e f . letter to t h e E d i t o r i n t h e last issue i n ' F e l i x ' s i g n e d b y t h e VIP's of the C & G U n i o n — w h i l e r a c i a l i s m i s a p p a r e n t l y n o t q u i t e so low. M r J . G . P ' l e m i n g states t h a t A s h o k G u r u s w a m y ' s letter 'stank of intolerance'—strange from someone supporting Rhodesia. W h i l e y o u rep l i e d to A s h o k G u r u s w a m y ' s letter b y saying t h e 'support R h o d e s i a " a d v e r t w a s , i n f a c t , a n a d v e r t , a n d as such d i d not represent t h e views of F E L I X — c a n I dare d e d u c e f r o m this that t h e a d v e r t d i d n o t reflect t h e views o f I C students, ' F E L I X ' b e i n g the voice of the I C U n i o n — n o w y o u m a k e the somewhat sweeping statement that it d i d , i n fact, 'represent the feelings of a significant n u m b e r o f p e o p l e i n t h e C o l l e g e ' . I f t h i s is so, w h y w a s t h i s n o t s a i d i n r e p l y to Ashok G u r u s w a m y ' s letter ? A n y h o w , w h a t statistical research d i d l e a d y o u t o this conclusion ? I d o , however, support v o u fullv i n the view that ' F E L I X ' should be a 'forum for political debate', b u t w h y t h e q u a l i f i c a t i o n : "... p r o v i d e d i t r e mains independent a n d unbiased'? Surely, one of the functions of any j o u r n a l is t o p r e s e n t a p o i n t o f v i e w .

fELIX Apropos 'FELIX Late News'. 'Aftermath of Operation M a t c h ' , the reference to your flat-chested neffress' w a s i n e x t r e m e l v b a d taste ( ' F E L I X ' unbiassed?) a n d I hope that there are m a n y other letters d e n l o r ing it. A s for 'Operation M a t c h ' , on ringing u p m y ' i d e a l date* I w a s i n f o r m e d that I w a s h e r '71st ideal date!" 1 9 - 3 5 seems t o b e t h e average number! Quote from blurb in Operation M a t c h introduction : ' W e w o u l d rather give y o u four good matches than compromise i n qualityl'. Rakesh

Mohan

The Expert Sir, I n answer to J . T . G r e y ' s letter i n y o u r l a s t issue I m u s t p o i n t o u t t h a t t h i s p a i n t i n g w a s s e l e c t e d b y n o less a person than the D e a n of the R o y a l C o l l e g e o f A r t as b e i n g t h e best o n e o n s h o w , a n d h e is p r e s u m a b l y b e t ter qualified than M r . G r e y to judge. I r e g a r d t h e t h e m e as a p e r e c t l y v a l i d one to inspire a painting if the artist feels strongly about i t . B u t of course, i f M r . G r e y demands u n e m o t i o n a l t h i n k i n g w e m i g h t as w e l l throw creativity out of the w i n d o w a n d concentrate on b e i n g m a c h i n e w i t h no intellect, m i n d e d morons pseudo or otherwise. C.E. Phillips Organiser Art/Science Exhibition


FELIX

5

e O n e d e f i n i t i o n o f ' C u l t u r e ' i s i m - t y p i c a l o t W e s t e r n ' C u l t u r e ' is t h e provement and refinement b y educattendency to eulogise t h e interpreter i o n a n d t r a i n i n g ; as h u m a n beings, of a w o r k o f a r t , r a t h e r t h a n t h e w e must always strive for i m p r o v e creatorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;tor example the conductor So said ment, towards perfection. of a piece o f music rather than t h e O t t o K a r o l y i a t t h e last o f h i s five composer, or the newspaper art on Music a n d the T w o lectures critics, i n fact, h e said, some n e w s Cultures. papers use their journalists as ' c u l t In defining culture, h e quoted iigures' for a d v e r t i s i n g â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a n d h e cited m a n y sources : f o r e x a m p l e M a t t h e w an example o f r a i l w a y stations w h e r e A r n o l d , w h o s a i d t h a t ' c u l t u r e is a h u g e pictures of these inelividuals statement of perfection' 'Culrus' stare d o w n a t y o u f r o m a d v e r t i s e ments t o r their papers. really means 'adoration of t h e g o d s ' â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a n d culture, through the centH e w e n t o n t o discuss c e r tain uries, h a s always been inextricably c o m m o n features i n t h e w a y artists linked with religion. I n the words of a n d scientists t h i n k , t o s h o w that the famous psychologist William culture is c o m m o n t o allâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;scientists, James ' a l l art embodies some too, h a v e aesthetic experiences, i n element ot myth'. I n fact nearly a l l spirations w h e n they conceive a n e w eany art, painting a n d music, Was idea. Kepler w a s a good example of ot a r e l i g i o u s n a t u r e ; t h e w o r k o f a a scientist whose theories were M e d i e v a l composer w a s as m u c h initially intuitive. I n fact, h e said, w o r s h i p as a r t . b o t h science a n d a r t w e r e conscious i n tact even i n t h e 20th century pursuits of b e a u t y : i n t h e words of Keats 'Beauty is T r u t h , Truth w e h a v e o u r 'cults'; o n e ot those Beauty...' t h a t M r . K a r o l y i p o i n t e d o u t as b e i n g

e British management is 'disreputable, nepotistic, conservative, and amateurish compared to that in the U S A and Germany. This, according to M r J . P . Carruthers, a lecturer at L S E , has been the fact,

that

has been responsible

for the Trades Unions' continued, association with the Labour Party. M r Carruthers w a s sneaking at t h e Touchstone W e e k e n d 3-4 D e c e m b e r . H e also r r i t i c i s p d t h e T r a d e U n i o n c V i c t u r c f o r b e i n g 'too d e m o c r a t i c ' â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

this m e a n t t h a t i t w a s i m p o s s i b l e t o have a unanimously approved policy, anel t h a t t h e G e n e r a l Secretary's position was t o o vulnerable since sudden ote-election scandals c o u l d easily topple h i m . T h e G o v e r n m e n t , also, c a m e i n f o r some c r i t i c i s m â&#x20AC;&#x201D; i t h a d gone l o o f a r w i t h its deflationarv measures a n d t h e i n e v i t a b l e result w o u l d b e a rise i n u n e m p l o y m e n t to over a m i l l i o n . Both unions a n d employers d o t h e i r bes^ t o k e e p t h e G o v e r n m e n t out o f their consultationsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;this is evident f r o m t h e fact that only about 2 0 % of workers i n Britain have m i n i m u m w a g e s fixed b y l a w â&#x20AC;&#x201D; i n t h e U S A f o i example nearly a l l m i n i m u m wages are controlled. F o u r of t h e p e o p l e present were i n fact Trades Union membersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Union mature students o n T r a d e scholarships at L S E â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a n d the r e m a i n ing eleven were from I C . D a v e Sullivan

Cherry's Concrete Concepts T h e primary function of language is n o t c o m m u n i c a t i o n , b u t t h e ' c o n cretization o f concepts', stated Professor C h e r r y i n h i s recent G e n e r a l S t u d i e s l e c t u r e . A g r e a t g u l f exists b e t w e e n m a n a n d beast, h e p o i n t e d out, because o f this. W h i l e animals can communicate, concepts are beyond them. A bee waggles its a l x l o n m e n a t a rate inversely proportional to i t distance f r o m t h e nearest p o l l e n s o u r c e , i n tliis w a y c o n v e y i n g v i t a l i n f o r m a t i o n t o its n e i g h b o u r ; b u t â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and w e must take Professor C h e r r y ' s w o r d o n t h i s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a b e e is i n capable o f even a m e n t a l concept of p o l l e n , l e t a l o n e a reasoned d i s cussion o n t h e subject. F o r parents driven insane b y their child's babb l i n g h e found a message of hope i n t h i s . I t p a y s d i v i d e n d s ; b a b y is c o n c r e t i z i n g h i s concepts. T h i s gives h i m t h e p o w e r t o d o m o r e t h a n just waggle his abdomen, i n time; he c a n also t a l k about i t , o r consider i t . H e has a concept c f i t . P r o f e s s o r C h e r r y l a i d g r e a t stress on this. H e p o i n t e d o u t that s u c h concepts vary from o n e culture t o another. F o r a Russian the w o r d ' r e d ' evokes thoughts of heroism, f o r an E n g l i s h m a n , merely thoughts of blood; a n d n o t only o u r concepts of words, b u t o u r habits, o u r customs, a n d o u r emotional traits a r e b o u n d u p i n o u r national culture, a n d thus, i n o u r language. F o r this reason, i t would, unfortunately, b e futile for the w o r l d t o l e a m English. W h i l e t h o average C h i n e s e c o u l d speak s i m p l e E n g l i s h , t h e rift between A s i a n a n d B r i t i s h c u l t u r e is s o w i d e , t h a t t h e subtleties inherent i n E n g l i s h c o n cepts w o u l d b e t o o m u c h f o r h i m . W h e n pressed f o r evidence t o support h i s idea of t h e mindlessness of animals. Professor C h e r r y answered that h e himself w a s quite capable o f sleepwalking to the lavatory without u t i l i z i n g his c o n c e p t o f i t , b y sheer force of habit. A n i m a l s , even w h e n a w a k e , d o e v e r y t h i n g l i k e this, w i t h out thinking. Several disbelieving Voices were raised a t h i s a s t o u n d i n g claim of instinctive direction finding; b u t at this p r o m i s i n g p o i n t discussion ended. , J. M u l i a l y

        



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CENTRAL ELECTRICITY GENERATING BOARD


6

FELIX

E Rejuvenation

at Si I w o o d

by Martin Walker

Park

The medieval assayer had a simple way of grading that most precious of metals. By rubbing a piece of gold of known purity on the touchstone and comparing the streak with that of the piece in question, he determined its purity and value. A bit inaccurate and haphazard perhaps, but it served. And so does its modern allegorical substitute, for at Silwood Park one can rub one's brains against another's and compare the resulting parks. Touchstone provides the opportunity, largely lost to technocrats who must deal with arguments that are tor the most part cut and dried, to argue about abstractions, to philosophise, to relax and baggie over questions that nave no simpie answers, or no answers at all. The Park itself is the ideal place for such a garthering; its serene peacefulness evokes the kind ot emotion that must have prompted men who travelled the world to sentimentalize about green England.

..the park and its quiet serenity remove the tension of the city.

A N D R E W S T O N E (24), a g r a d u a t e ( E n g l i s h ) of t h e U n i v e r s i t y C o l l e g e of S o u t h Wales, now teaching English l a n g u a g e a n d l i t e r a t u r e at t h e W h i t e Nile Secondary S c h o o l , El D u e i m , 130 m i l e s s o u t h of Khartoum.

Who will replace him? VSO is looking now for 1000 graduates and professionally qualified volunteers for service from next September V O L U N T A R Y S E R V I C E (Member of British Volunteer

3

HANOVER

STREET

O V E R S E A S Programme}

LONDON

W1

The trip from L o n d o n makes the transition easily. U g l y , dirty industrial central megalopolis occasionally relieved by imaginative architecture gives w a y to t h e u n i f o r m mediocrity t h a t is s u b u r b i a w i t h i t s r o w s o f s e m i detached dwellings, neat small gardens, hedges, small newish looking c a r s — a n d finally, t h e c o u n t r y s i d e i t self. N o w t h e c o n t r a s t is i m m e d i a t e . Greenness a n d brownness come through fresh, even i n the drizzly cool o f a n a u t u m n a f t e r n o o n . G r e e n fields, framed perpendicularly b y oak a n d elm, roll through on e's peaceful s t u p o r . T h e gates o f S i l w o o d P a r k l o o m u p to o p e n o n t h e s w e e p o f a tree-lined drive. A once magnificent E n g l i s h c o u n t r y estate, s t a n d s o n a rise i n t h e l a n d w i t h its skirt of lawns stretching majestically away t o fields b e y o n d . T h e h o u s e is s o r r o u n d e d o n t h r e e sides b v r e c e n t a d d i t i o n s . M o d e r n b r i c k structures h o u s i n g labs a n d l i v i n g quarters f o r t h e residents, unfortunately clash w i t h the more ornate architecture of the house i t self. T o o n e side i s a unsightly h u d d l e composed of prefab refrectory a n d quonset huts i n w h i c h , w e are i n f o r m e d , w e w i l l sleep. T h e majesty o f t h e p l a c e lessens w i t h t h e n e w s . T e a is s e r v e d i n t h e l i b r a r y w h i c h is r e a c h e d b y p a s s i n g t h r o u g h t h e m a i n h a l l w i t h its h i g h b e a m e d roof a n d h a r d w o o d floor, its b r i c k e d - u p f i r e p l a c e , spaces f u r n i t u r e a n d g e n e r ally f o r b i d d i n g air. T h e library, h o w e v e r is w a r m a n d i n v i t i n g — i n v i t i n g too for the sandwiches, cakes a n d tea s p r e a d a r o u n d . H e r e , d e s p i t e t h e collection of learned biological journals, the atmosphere of the c o u n t r v estate U r e t a i n e d . O n e r e l a x es a n d t a l k s e a s i l y . T h e n a r k a n d i t s auiet serenity remove the tensions o f t h e c i t v . T h e m i n d shifts i n t o neutral a n d idles away h a p p i l y w i t h inconsequentials. In the small sitting r o o m next d o o r t h e a ' m o s p ^ e r m is e n h a n c e d b y g r e a t b u n c h e s o f flowers a n d f e r n s a r o u n d t h e grate. I n front t h e guest sneaker, perches u n c o m f o r t a b l y on the soap b o x o f free speech (but n o t , as w e w e r e i n f o r m e d , o f l i c e n c e ) a n d talks, the touchstone before h i m o n a table. H a v i n g c o n c l u d e d , h e retreats t o a n a r m c h a i r t o f e n d off s e v e r a l a t tacks o n w h a t h e has said. The g r o u p is l i v e l y a n d a r g u m e n t s r a n g e

f r o m semantic difficulties to sound comments. W e adjourn for a beer i n the great h a l l a n d then for supper i n t h e l o w , s q u a t r e f e c t o r y . T h e roast b e e f o f O k i e Englande accompanied b y a Yorkshire p u d d i n g of more dubious o r i g i n is s e r v e d b y a h e a l t h y l o o k ing y o u n g w e n c h w h o distracted at least this visitor's a t t e n t i o n f r o m t h e c o n t i n u i n g a r g u m e n t . D i n n e r is c o m pleted, b u t the discussion continue in groups. B e e r m e a n w h i l e keeps the tongue lubricated though having a m o r e d u b i o u s affect o n t h e m i n d . T h e n e x t m o r n i n g is l e i s u r e l y , f i l l e d w i t h t h e S u n d a y papers, talk, or a w a l k a r o u n d t h e estate. F r o m the w i n d o w at t h e b a c k o f t h e house there is a v i e w of a small neat garden, encompassed b y lawns a n d large trees. Walking down the l a w n s , o n e is o v e r w h e l m e d b y t h e quiet solitude; there are almost groups of E d w a r d i a n ladies p l a y i n g This c r o q u e t o n t h e s m o o t h grass. must have been magnificent on sunn y summer afternoons w i t h frock coated butlers serving w h i s k y a n d long cool concoctions made from gin... B u t p u s h on into the woods a n d a l o n g a n a r r o w p a t h , past r u i n e d chicken coops a n d occasional botany experiments to the m a i n road, a n d there—joy!—.is ' T h e C a n n o n ' . Inside, i t is a l l r u r a l E n g l a n d w i t h t h i c k a c cents; h a i r c r o p p e d close at b a c k a n d sides u n k e m p t o n t o p ; r o u g h l y c l o t h e d workers, p l a y i n g dominoes o n a long table, their hands, sundarkened a n d h o m y , a r o u n d pints of b e e r — g o o d beer here, a n d a peaceful cigarette w h i l e g a z i n g o u t of t h e p u b w i n d o w towards the woods that hide the house. F r o m the woods one comes u n expectedly upon the house, suddenly to b e p l u n g e d a g a i n i n t o t h e last c e n t u r y . I t is r a i n i n g , a n d n o - o n e e(se is a b o u t ; t h e g a r d e n is f r e e f o r t h e w a l k i n g a n d s a v o u r i n g o f its eace a n d c a l m . T o o b a d about the uts a n d m o d e r n t o u c h e s , t o o b a d . . . In t h e afternoon, after l u n c h , w e gather again where w e started, a n d sum u p . T h e conclusions w e have r e a c h e d are a l l r e m a r k a b l y u n i f o r m — great minds..., o r d o a l l scientists tend to conform ? Still, the return to L o n d o n a n d r e a l i t y is a t r i p h o m e f r o m a s p a , rejuvenated a n d refreshed.

E


FELIX

7

A n Open Letter to Congregation of Oxford University and Cambridge University Senate... Sirs, In the n a t i o n a l interest I m u s t u r g e n t l y ask y o u t o a b a n d o n this year's B o a t R a c e a n d a l l t h e others t o c o m e . T h e r e ' s n o n e e d to p u t J o h n Snagge or the rosette-sellers out o f b u s i n e s s . A l l I w a n t y o u t o d o is otter t b e r a c c i t o L i v e r p o o l a n d M a n chester Universities on the M e r s e y , E x e ' e r a n d B r i s t o l on t h e S e v e r n o r some to Y o r k and Lanr^ster on s t r e a m o n t h e Y o r k s h i r e m o o r s (it just m e a n s u s i n g s m a l l e r b o a t s ) . M y o w n c h o i c e is a r a c e b e t w e e n Edinburgh and St. Andrew's on t h e F i r t h o f F o r t h b e c a u s e t h e r e are strong offshore currents and the n a t i o n l i k e s its b o a t s t o s i n k at least o n c e i n a g e n e r a t i o n . I see n o v a l i d reason w h y these t w o u n i v e r s i t i e s — or the others I l i s t — s h o u l d h a v e to continue to depend solely on their fine a c a d e m i c r e c o r d s f o r t h e i r i m a g e in the w o r l d . Y o u know, gentlemen, the importa n c e of h a v i n g a n i m a g e t o d a y . B u t Oxford and Cambridge have more than an image. T h e y have a legend, a m y t h w h i c h o f t e n has n o t h i n g to do w i t h t h e facts. A n d I t h i n k its g e t t i n g out of c o n t r o l .

The Oxbridge Myth by Joshua O'Keefe Take this t e r m . O n e Saturday m o r n i n g the B B C ' s 2 a.m. news bull e t i n t o o k it f o r g r a n t e d t h a t l i g h t housekeepers, nightshift workers a n d a n y o n e else s t i l l a w a k e w o u l d n e e d to k n o w that : ' T h e O x f o r d U n i o n s t i l l h a s a m a n as p r e s i d e n t ' . The following Wednesday they were told that the election h a d been a n n u l l e d and the first-ever girl candidate, Janet M o r g a n h a d a second chance. O n T h u r s d a y , w h e n the suspense o n s h o p floors w a s a s s u m e d to b e n e a r b r e a k i n g - p o i n t , c a m e t h e n e w s that she w o u l d n o t s t a n d a g a i n . N o w gentlemen, you and I k n o w that a w o m a n president wouldn't m a k e a scrap of real difference to the Oxford Union's mainly modern teenagers. T h e O x f o r d Student C o u n c i l quietly elected a splendid girl chair-

m a n t w o years ago. Nevertheless, Miss M o r g a n was given the dramatic i m a g e o f a g i r l s t o r m i n g a k i n d of talkative monastery. O r take the Union mini-skirt debate which a national newspaper columnist found u n w o r t h y of this shrine of great t a l k w h e r e great m i n d s have forged r i n g i n g p h r a s e s a n d u n l e a s h e d w a v e s of w i t o n the issues o f t h e d a y . . . ' E m b a r a s s i n g , isn't it ? Y o u a n d I k n o w that w h e n the U n i o n wants r i n g i n g phrases it i n v i t e s Q u i n t i n H o g g a n d w h e n it w a n t s w i t i t asks M i c h a e l B e l o f t . W e also k n o w t h a t o n l y a h a n d f u l of p e o p l e i n a n y O x f o r d generation are great anythings. T h e rest a r e l e a r n i n g t o b e brilliant, clever, competent, (crooked o r a r r a n t n i n c o m p o o p s at l i f e . T h e

B R I D G E

UNNATURAL NO-TRUMPS T h e U n i v e r s i t y of L o n : ! o n B r i d e e C l u b runs a teams of four competiti o n w h i c h takes plac e between teams f r o m the various colleges throughout t h e y e a r . T h i s c o m p e t i t i o n is d i v i d e d into four divisions w i t h about eight teams i n each division. E a c h team p l a y s a l l t h e others i n its o w n d i v i s ion. A t t h e e n d o f t h e season t h e t o p t w o t e a m s i n e a c h d i v i s i o n are p r o m o t e d , a n d the bottom t w o demoted. This year I C have entered three teams, one i n each of the t o p t h r e e d i v i s i o n s . T h e first t e a m a f t e r their initial d r a w have h a d t w o w i n s , a n d as y e t , b o t h t h e o t h e r t e a m s a l s o remain unbeaten. T h e l a s t m a t c h t h e first t e a m p l a y e d was against Q u e e n M a r y C o l l e g e . T h e f o l l o w i n g h a n d is o n e o n w h i c h 1C m a d e o n e o f its g a i n s i n that match. Dealer West E - W Vulnerable

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W h e n Q M C were the b i d d i n g was W N E S 1H IS 3D — H — 4D — 5D — — —

W h a t I s u g g e s t is t h a t O x b r i d g e is n o w so b u l g i n g w i t h m y t h s t h a t she m i g h t start b e l i e v i n g t h e m h e r s e l f . S h e s h o u l d get r i d o f at l e a s t o n e f a b l ed institution. T h e gift of the B o a t Race, one of the g r e a t p r i m e v a l c l a s h e s o f B r i t i s h l i f e , w o u l d g i v e an e n o r m o u s l e g - u p to a n y o t h e r t w o universities. A n d t h e G o v e r n m e n t w o u l d b e so g r a t e f u l t o y o u t h a t i t m i g h t at last stop muttering about setting up R o y a l C o m m i s i o n s to find o u t w h a t y o u get u p to b e h i n d a l l those m y t h s .

CROSSWORD Clues Across

*

s t i r r i n g o f a g r e a t t a l e n t , in the U n i o n o r at a t u t o r i a l is s t i l l a rare a n d t h r i l l i n g event. B u t w h a t c o u n t s is t h a t p e o p l e believe the m y t h . F o r i m p l a n t i n g this belief I think w e can thank the Boat Race. I h e a r d m y first o n e at the a g e of five a n d i t w a s m a n y y e a r s before I realised that Britain h a d any other universities. B y the t i m e I d i d , I w a s too m e s m o r i s e d to c a r e about t h e m . I h a d g r a d u a t e d to the other Oxbridge myths—Jowett's Oxford, Rupert Brooke's C a m b r i d g e , Christ C h u r c h Meadow. M y brother worried me by coming out of Leicester University w i t h a bettert r a i n e d m i n d t h a n a n y o n e I k n e w at C a m b r i d g e b u t p e r h a p s t h a t w a s just a personal accident.

2.

sitting

T h i s is a s o m e w h a t l a b o u r e d b i d d i n g sequence, a n d one w h i c h certainly lacks imagination. T h e C o n t r a c t of 5 D w a s defeated w h e n South lead a c l u b , since declarer then h a d to lose t w o heart tricks a n d one c l u b trick. A n y other l e a d g i v e s a c h a n c e of e s t a b l i s h i n g the heart suit a n d m a k i n g the c o n t r act. A t the other table the b i d d i n g was of a m u c h m o r e concise n a t u r e . W N E S 1 H IS 3 N T — E a s t has a difficult decision to m a k e after N o r t h ' s o v e r a l l of IS. H i s h a n d t h e n a p p e a r s to h a v e o n l y five l o s e r s , a n d o b v i o u s l y , s i n c e h i s p a r t n e r has o p e n e d t h e b i d d i n g , E a s t w a n t s t o b e i n at least a g a m e contract. T h e d i r e c t b i d of 3 N T e n sures t h a t a safe g a m e c o n t r a c t is r e a c h e d . S o u t h is a l m o s t c e r t a i n to l e a d a spade since N o r t h has b i d the suit, this w i l l then m a k e eight t r i c k s i n E a s t ' s h a n d . W e s t is u n l i k e l y to b i d o v e r ,3 N T u n l e s s h e has a v e r y strong h a n d , w h i c h means that E a s t West may well have missed a slam. If East h a d been dealer then the opening b i d w o u l d have been 3 N T . T h i s is a n A c o l b i d w h i c h s h o w s a l o n g solid m i n o r suit a n d one o u t s i d e e n t r y . 3 N T is o f t e n a v e r y g o o d contract, a n d if partner has n o t h i n g , avid 3 N T is d o u b l e d , y o u c a n a l w a y s take the contract out into 4 C or 4 D . Ian

East-West

Constable

T h e 1 0 / - for t h e best C r o s s w o r d goes t h i s w e e k t o S . D . W A L T E R o f M a t h s . 1. T h e C r o s s w o r d is j u d g e d b y the E d i t o r i a l B o a r d , whose decision is final. h T e B o a r d r e s e r v e t h e right to h o l d o v e r to a s u c c e e d i n g issue any Crossword submitted. Entries must be received by the W e d n e s d a y before publication.

26. H o w

many will

solve this

clue?

(5) 1. F r e n c h w r i t e r of T o s c a m u s i c ? (5) 4. T h i s is a b s o l u t e r u b b i s h I (5) 9. L i g h t i n t h e d a r k n e s s ? N a t u r a l l y ! (15) 10. A n a r t i c l e f r o m t h e N e a r E a s t is d i e c l o s e s t . (15) 11. Spotted this one ? V e r y rash if y o u h a v e . (7) 1 2 . L o o k , o n e has t w o , t o o . (3) 13. A w a r m e n d to September, i t seem* 15. Y o u c a n have a t r y at t h i s — i f y o u t r y , tfiat i s . (5) 16. U s e d u p i n A m e r i c a ' s Pentagon. 1 8 . C r u s h i n g d e m a n d f o r n e w s ? (5) 2 0 . A r e b a c k f o r a t i m e , y o u ' l l find. (3' 2 1 . S e e 2 4 . (7) 22. James B o n d shows n o n e w h e r e S p e c t r e is c o n c e r n e d ! (7) 24. "Italia's no nation". 21 m i g h t see i t d i f f e r e n t l y b e f o r e v o t i n g (15) 25. A car made by the Danes ? S u r e l v n o t ! (5)

Clues Down 1. S o u n d s l i k e a c a t t l e - p e n f o r c h o i r b o y s ! (7) 2 . T h e t r e e is a m p l e a f t e r t h e d o n b a c k s u p . (5) 3. It's c o m p a r a t i v e l y s h o r t . (7) 4. U s e d f o r c o o k i n g v e g e t a b l e s , or a l l at see ? (7) 5. 1 7 u s e d t h i s s h a p e f o r fifteen. (9) 6. R e w a r d f o r f o u l p l a y at 15. (7) 7. C l o t h - w o r k i n g g i r l is a w h i r l ? (8,5) 8. E a g e r l y a w a i t e d b y 18 across. (4.91 14. W e n t s o m e h o w t o G r o o d i n a n E s s e x t o w n . (9) 1 6 . T h e rest o f t h e a f t e r n o o n s i n S p a i n , p e r h a p s . (7) 17. G r o u n d w o r k o n t h e t r a i n e r . (7) 18. H a i r - l i n e d e p a r t u r e . (7) 1 9 . A D a r w i n t y p e . (7) 2 3 . T h e c o n d i t i o n of m a n y parts of A m e r i c a . (5)


8

FELIX

y Despite being advertised under the w r o n g title D r a m s o c ' s C h r i s t m a s p r o luction. " A Penny F o r A Song" by o!m W h i t i n g . manae;ed to attract lur f u l l h o u s e s a n d b e w o r t h y o f iem. Tiie play, w h i c h was produced by m ex-member of I C John W e b b , achieved an excellent balance a n d its between farcical comedy serious m o r a l . R o g e r H a i n e s , a l t h o u g h t e n d i n g to overact at times, gave a magnificently flamboyant interpretation of T i m o t h v Bellboy's, a n eccentric country gentleman, Tohn G o l d e r a n d N i e k C l a r k e , as a t o w n gentleman a n d his m a n servant, c o m b i n e d v e r y w e l l t o fit t h e v a r y i n g m o o d of the olav. w h i l e M a r g a r e t Sibbick a n d M i k e Smith were always c o m i c as d o m i n e e r i n g w i f e a m i h« npecked husband. M a r y M c P h a i l a n d D e n y s B e n n e t t w e r e w e l l cast as Dorcas a n d E d w a r d Steme a n d both p l a y e d their parts w i t h great s y m pathy.

"BULGE ? WOT BULGE ? "

M

Model General Assembly T h e I C d e l e g a t e s t o ,the M o d e l U N General Assembly—representing Kenya, Chile, Sweden, and P e r u — were selected at the I R C meeting o n D e c e m b e r 1st. T h e M G A — o n e o f t h e main functions of the U N Students' Association—is being i gely organised b y the College r

T h e set, w h i l e necessarily b e i n g a little c r o w d e d , w a s w e l l b a l a n c e d a n d realistically s U i d . I n particular, the l o o k o u t tree, iit a l l times o c c u p i e d b y a splendidly gaumless Humpage, (Martin Clarke), w a s a masterpiece i n papier-mache. The production was rounded otlb y c o m p l i c a t e d anel t e c h n i c a l l y g o o d e f fects w h i c h always c c n u r y e d the right impression. R.J.B.

.r/tioto b y D . N o r m a n

C N D Committee; That A d O n 6 November, C N D Committee discussed, a m o n g other things, that Vietnam a d . It was placed i n F E L I X 'to promote discussion a n d ultimately involvementd!), with the Vietnam w ar '. Committee members were concerned that, although parti a l l y effective, the a d h a d n o t w h o l l y a c h i e v e d its aims. Discussion of a change i n the Society's name a n d policy on V i e t n am was postponed until an Extraordinary General Meeting, to be held soon. T h e c h a i r m a n r e p o r t e d t o t h e c o m m i t t e e that h e h a d a n u m b e r of addresses of contacts i n N o r t h a n d b o t h parts of South V i e t n a m . T h i s was i n accordance with the Union decision to contact students in Vietnam. It w a s resolved to b a c k D r . Steven Rose's proposal to send a student peace corps for reconstruction work i n V i e t n a m . D r . Rose has presented the idea to the recent N a t i o n a l C o n vention o n Vietnam.

s

What's O n : IC Representatives o f the Esso G r o u p of Companies will be visiting the University on F e b r u a r y 2 3 r d 1967 M a r c h 9 / U 22nd 1967.

Students interested in asking searching questions about careers in the oil industry today should contact their appointments board.

a

W E D N E S D A Y 14 Anglican Chaplaincy. Communion. 0.8.30 C o n c e r t H a l l . Folk Club. Guest John Renbourne. T i c k e t holders only. Tickets 5/-, 3/-. 19.30 U p p e r Refectory. Literary Society. Poetry b y George Macbeth, T H U R S D A Y 15 General Studies. Films. G l i d i n g C l u b . 17.45 254 Aero. Dancing Club. Beginners Ballroom. 19.30 t o 20.45. U p p e r R e f e c t o r y . Rover C r e w . Last meeting of term. 21.35 3 0 3 M i n e s.

WhatsOn:ULU W E D N E S D A Y 14 E n g l i s h F o l k D a n c i n g Society. 19.30 School of Pharmacy, Brunswick S q . T H U R S D A Y 15 Christian Science Organization. Testimony meeting. 20.00 U L U room 3 A .


FELIX SWIMMING

GALA

9

SOCCER

FOURTH XI E HOME THE

FIRST

GOAL

by half time it was

was not scored until the fourth minute and

only 7-0

to I . C .

A

minute before

the end of

play the 4th's had just celebrated the twentieth goal with the twentyifirst, and

extra-time

Through opposition

A sort of organised chaos, or unorganised order, -but it's all in good spirit, or so we are told.

keeper score

the

now

match

seemed

were clearly sub-4ths

and centre might

have

impossible.

I . C . played excellent

half put up been

standard. any

in

failed

to conceed

goal, started

to look

a

17th,

goalkick

for

R A C E WINNERS: Backstroke Breaststroke Freestyle Butterfly Relays (2) Water Pold

J. Hooke R.C.S. P. Hills C & G . C. Hollier R.C.S. C. Hollier R.C.S. R.C.S. R.S.M.

T h e presidents race t u r n e d out to be somewhat f a r c i c a l — M r . D u k e a n d M r . C a v a n a g h f a i l e d to arrive, their places being taken b y M r . M e B a i n a n d M r . C o n n . A n n e H a y was another n o n - s t a r t e r — e v e n m o r e chaos. T h e expected n u m b e r of l u n ati cs w e r e l e a p i n g i n a n d o u t of t h e p o o l , e n t e r t a i n i n g a l l w h o c o u l d get o u t of the w a y . T h e h i g h t l i g h t of t h e e v e n i n g w a s definitely Steve Motiat's dive f r o m t h e top board. A n o t h e r interesting show was the seperation of M r . C o n n ' s c e r e m o n i a l coat into t w o distinct parts, at the hands ot G u i l d s . T h e usual amount of alcohol was c o n s u m e d — w i t h a w e l l organised h a n d out of d r i n k i n t h e U n i o n B a r . T h i s w a s a c h e i v e d b y a tickets only a r rangement.

Photographs by D . Ormiston Report by R . M . Conn and A . G . Robins.

the be

9, and A t k i n s , at centre

The

Caruthers

4th's now

(away) on January

advance 21st.

Its the early team that gets wet T H E 7 t h X I I S p r o b a b l y tAe m o s t p u n c t u a l o f t e a m s i n t h e S o c c e r C l u b . T o p l a y a c u p g a m e a g a i n s t W e s t H a m , w i t h a k i c k o i l at 11 a . m . S a t u r d a y 1 0 t h D e c e m b e r , t h e p l a y e r s w e r e a s k e d t o m e e t i n t h e U n i o n at 9 . 1 5 . A t 9.00 they w e r e a l l present a n d correct, t h o u g h soaked . f r o m t h e r a i n , a n d t r a i l e d off i n t o t h e r a i n o n c e a g a i n o n t h e i r j o u r n e y to W e s t H a m . However, the game was postponed a n d t h e t h i r d a t t e m p t to p l a y i t w i l l soon occur. T h e i r s p i r i t , if n o t d e d i c a t i o n , to t h e g a m e is a n e x a m p l e t h a t t h e rest o f t h e c l u b s h o u l d n o t e . It's a p i t y t h a t k e e n n e s s does n o t a l w a y s b r i n g i t s ' d e s e r v e d r e w a r d — but p e i h a p s it does, even though it's cleverly hidden.

J. Garrat

A l t h o u g h h a p p i l y active this year, t h e R u g b y F i v e s C l u b is s u f f e r i n g f r o m a d i s t i n c t l a c k of e x p e r i e n c e d players. This has been clearly brought out b y our poor match record of w i n n i n g only one of our s j i fixtures. T o balance the somewhat variable f o r m ot P . E v a n s a n d B . H a l d a n e , J . i i l a c k b u n i has played consistently t h r o u g h o u t . D . M a t n e w , as w e l l as representing I C has a c h i e v e d the d i s t i n c t i o n of p l a y i n g t o r the U L U 1st I V , d u r i n g h i s first y e a r a t c o l lege. It p r a c t i c e can bring d i e s t e a d i n e s s w h i c h is a t p r e s e n t m i s sing, w e have the potential to produce a very g j o d side. Despite the existing poor condition of t h e S o u t h s i d e c o u r t s , t h e e n tnusiasm shown by non-team m e m bers h a s b e e n m o s t e n c o u r a g i n g . R.J. Redmayne

STOATS CLUB

On the point of change-over, in the relay race.

these had to

corner, and B i l l

another job.

RUGBY FIVES T H E S P L A S H O F LIQUIDS

I.C.

the

goal-

it is thought). or

to the quarter-finals, and play U . C . I I I

SWIMMING - FOR S O M E

although

the G u y ' s

However,

content with 21, of which B r i a n H a l l got I.C.

Only

resistence—without

much different.

half, got one valuable goal (the

football,

F O L L O W I . u A M E E T I N G on Thursday 1st. D e c e m b e r , several Stoats w e n t t o w a t c h t h e O x f o r d v C a m b r i d g e r u g g e r m a t c h at T w i c k e n h a m , last T u e s d a y . A f t e r t h e g a m e they retired to a l o c a l house of g o o d cheer-having an excellent, if not memorable, evening. Stoats a r e to f o l l o w t h i s b y t a k i n g a partv of foreign students, w h o a r e at p r e s e n t t h e guests o f R S M , t o w a t c h t h e w r e s t l i n g at the A l b e r t Hall.

SHOOTINGO N TARGET After some eight weeks training, I C Hiiie a n d Pistol C l u b has started the s t r e n o u s a n n u a l p r o g r a m m e o f i n t e r c o l l e g i a t e fixtures. T o date, apart f r o m several Postal L e a g u e M a t c h e s , t w o r o u n d s of t h e vital Engineers' C u p competition h a v e b e e n shot. T h e ' A ' a n d ' B ' teams both w o n t h e i r hrst t w o r o u n d s i n t h i s s h o u l d e r t o - s h o u l d e r c o m p e t i t i o n . T h e "A" t e a m beat Q . M . C . b y 5 6 6 to 5 5 6 a n d K . C . by 5 / 0 to 5 4 3 : the ' B ' team beat L . C . by 5 4 2 t o 531 a n d U . C . b y 545 to 5 4 1 . T h e highest possible t e a m s c o r e is 6 0 0 p e r t e a m . T h e competitions carry on every w e e k u n t i l M a r c h , so i t is t o o e a r l y to m a k e p r e d i c t i o n s , b u t l a t e e n o u g h t o express confidence.

LADIES BADMINTON B e i i e v e it or n o t I C L a d i e s T e a m r e m a i n s u n d e f e a t e d af te r a v e r y s u c cesful term's p l a y . T h e team has h a d g o o d league matches against K i n g ' s , Bedford, Royal Holloway and Queen M a r y College, a n d a friendly match against C h e l s e a C . A . T . T h e s e results are c e r t a i n l y e n c o u r a g i n g , c o n s i d e r i n g there has often been difficulty i n r a i s i n g a t e a m . A n y o n e else i n t e r ested i n p l a y i n g b a d m i n t o n w i l l b e very welcome—please contact M . P a r k e r , A e r o . 3.


10

FELIX

D E

X

s

d n m

R . S . M . U n i o n m a d e a loss of £ 5 0 o n the F r e s h e r s ' D i n n e r s . T h is was t h e b a l d s t a t e m e n t m a d e b y P r e s i d e n t M o l a m w h o cast s o m e o f t h e b l a m e on the G e o l o g y D e p t . for their poor attendance at their d e p a r t m e n t a l d i n n e r . T h e deficit c o u l d have been e x p l a i n e d more fully.

Speaking on 'Federalism—a System of World Government' Russell Johnston (Liberal M P Inverness) said he found it entirely consistent that he was in his lecture apparently advocating a massive centralisation of Government and that next Wednesday (30 November) he was asking to introduce a Bill giving Home Rule to Scotland. T h e s e w e r e b o t h part of F e d e r a l ism, a system in w h i c h a c h a i n of decision m a k i n g bodies dealt w i t h problems w i t h i n t h e i r areas with knowledge, concern and involvment. Problems w o u l d be dealt w i t h by representatives of the people to w h o m they really meant something. The regional authorities and the w o r l d authority w o u l d be equal partners w i t h t h e i r o w n s h a r p l y d e n n e d a r e a of G o v e r n m e n t . T h i s m e t h o d of Government, achieving freedom for individuals a n d groups was a par tic u larly liberal one. It recognised t h e existence of nations a n d c o m m u n i t i e s w i t h i n states, e a c h w i t h its o w n w a y of a c h i e v i n g l i b e r t y a n d justice for its m e m b e r s . T h e r e m u s t o b v i o u s l y b e u n i v e r s a l standards of justice for p e o p l e regardless of race, c r e e d or w e a l t h a n d these must be s a f e g u a r d e d by the W o r l d A u t h o r i t y , h o w e v e r , m a i n t e n a n c e of these standards c o u l d best b e affected b y those w i t h i n t i m a t e k o w i e d g e o f t h e p a r t i c u l a r abuses to w h i c h t h e i r r e g i o n w a s m o s t p r o n e . There is n o easy f o r m u l a for the r e d u c t i o n of f r i c t i o n between states, o r i n f a c t , b e t w e e n n a t i o n s w i t h i n states. S h o u l d a m a j o r b l o c k w i s h to go a g a i n s t t h e rest o f t h e world, it w o u l d still need to be confronted by another large block. T h e r e is, h o w e v e r , t h e c h a n c e t h a t a statutory system of international rel a t i o n s ( s u c h as E E C o r U N O ) d r a w n up i n the presence of t h i r d parties w o u l d be better a d h e r e d to t h a n t h e

'S l s 6 7

s y s 8

n

eixsting a d hoc system of treaties a n d power blocks. Third parties can often see solutions to w h i c h the q u a r r e l l i n g parties are b l i n d .

UNO T h e basis f o r s u c h a n o r g a n i s a t i o n is o b v i o u s l y U N O . T h e f a c t t h a t so many people in Europe have man ag e d t o f o r g e t T'^eir n a t i o n a l i s m t o t h i n k as E u r o p e a n s a n d movem e n t s s u c h as U N O a n d O A U h a v e f o r m e d m e a n s t h a t at last p e o p l e are looking beyond nationalism. Mr Johnston was confident that such a system of W o r l d G o v e r n m e n t w a s feasible w i t h i n two generations.

Wells Soc g W i t h the prize-giving on Friday 9 t h D e c e m b e r , t h e A r t of Science e x h i b i t i o n p u t u p the shutters for a n other 2 0 years, w h e n the "guess the changes" competition w i l l be judged. T h e p r i z e - g i v i n g , a quiet, respecta b l e affair i n M e c h E n g concourse, w a s e f f e c t e d i n t h e m i n i m u m of t i m e a n d f o l l o w e d b y sherry for the 25 p e o p l e present. In converse w i t h the D e a n of R . C . A . , w h o gave away the prizes, it e m e r g e d t h a t a l t h o u g h i m p r e s s e d b y t h e h i g h s t a n d a r d of t h e " A r t " exhibits he thought that on the whole the science-inspired works t e n d e d to w e H e a t h R o b i n s o n a n d untidily executed. T h e exhibit he p i c k e d o u t as b e i n g p a r t i c u l a r l y g o o d was P h i l l i p Painter's p r i z e - w i n n i n g music entry, (ocmposed b y r a n d o m selection from telephone numbers), w h i c h he said was consistent w i t h the modern-art opinion that a r a n d om-process creation was often m o r e b e a u t i f u l t h a n one m a d e b y selective thought. T h a t the p r i z e g i v i n g s h o u l d have b e e n h e l d i n s u c h a n o p e n a r e a a-; M e c h E n g concourse was unfortunate as i t m a d e t h e a t m o s p h e r e v e r y i m personal, b u t otherwise this was a pleasant e n d to W e l l s Society's m e m o r i a l to H . G . W e l l s . R.J.R.

Trickster A w a r n i n g has been received that a confidence t r i c k s t e r is a c t i v e i n London Colleges. Description:— A g e 4 0 - 4 5 , H e i g h t 5' 7 " , r o u n d r e d face, Rhorlesian or South A f r i c a n accent w h i c h m a y be assumed. W e a r i n g a b l u i s h m a c k i n t o s h no hat. H a s pose d as a m e m b e r o f staff f r o m s o m e other C o l l e g e . I n one c a s e , h e s a i d he was a C h i l d Psychologist and " b o r r o w e d " £ 5 for text books.

More Treble Results W i n n e r s for D e c . 10th O n y y two cards obtained the m a x i m u m a g g r e g a t e of 13 g o a l s . T h e s e were N o . 810 and N o . 969 a n d w i l l each receive £3.15.0. The ilness of Carnival's Senior T r e a s u r e r has l e d to a d e l a y i n t h e payout to last week's winners. C h e q u e s w i l l b e f o r w a r d e d as s o o n as p o s s i b l e . F.J. Morris

Vice -President O ' R e i l l y suitably h u m b l e , apologised for the presence of R . C . S . a n d G u i l d s at t h e P r o s p e c t of W h i t b y o n M o r p h y D a y . His humility was quite gone, however, w h e n he t o n g u e - l a s h e d t h e g a t h e r i n g f o r the a p a t h y s h o w n t o w a r d s the collection for the M u s c u l a r D y s t r o p h y Research F u n d . H e urged support s u p p o r t f r o m m o r e t h a n just t h e hard-core w h o a l w a y s support these functions. M i n e s m e n w e r e also u r g e d to s u p p o r t t h e F o r e i g n S t u d e n t s ' v i s i t this week. T h e ' S t e v e n s o n l e t t e r ' w a s r e a d to the meeting a n d M o l a m commented that M o r p h y D a y s h o u l d b e r e t a i n e d "as the o n l y t i m e d u r i n g the year w h e n t h e s t u d e n t s , as a b o d y , c a n let t h e i r h a i r d o w n i n p u b l i c " . C o m ments from the floor substantiated this atti tu de , it w o u l d b e interesting to k n o w the p r i v a t e v i e w s of m e m bers of the U n i o n o n this issue. T h e C l e m . A u c t i o n was squeezed into the r e m a i n i n g part of the meeting, b i d d i n g was sluggish and the highest p r i c e f e t c h e d was 32.6 for one article. I n a l l about £ 1 3 were r a i s e d , t h e m e e t i n g r a n l a t e so t h a t not a l l the items w e r e sold. P.F. Wallum D.I. McKirgan R. H a l l

Another RCS referendum I t seems l i k e l y t h a t as f a r as R C S U n i o n is c o n c e r n e d , t h e N U S issue is dead. D e s p i t e the close result i n last T u e s d a y s ' r e f e r e n d u m , t h e r e is l i t t l e doubt that R R C S G e n e r a l C o m m i t t e e w i l l a c c e p t t h e r e s u l t s as final. T h e referendum was held to decide whether R C S U n i o n should a g a i n a p p l y f o r m e m b e r s h i p of N U S . T h e final v o t e w a s 3 4 9 F o r ' a n d 3 9 2 A g a i n s t w i t h 4 5 a b s t e n t i o n s a n d 10 spoilt papers. This represents a m a j o r i t y o f 4 3 a g a i n s t w h i c h is less than the abstentions. T h e total vote of n e a r l y 8 0 0 s h o w s t h a t o n l y j u s t over h a l f R C S U bothered to vote on t h i s i m p o r t a n t is s u e. T h e general f e e l i n g seems to be t h a t t h i s is t h e e n d o f t h e issue f o r this year. T h e proposers M r . B o o t h man and M r . Fuchs both accepted t h e r e f e r e n d u m v o t e as f i n a l . Mr. F u c h s s a i d t h a t the r e f e r e n d u m s h o w e d t h a t R C S has s o m e i n t e r e s t i n external affairs, a n d that he w o u l d b e t u r n i n g h i s a t t e n t i o n to o t h e r i s sues. S. B a r n e s

P u b l i s h e d by C . G . H a r r i s o n o n b e h a l f o f the F E L I X BOARD, I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e , S . W . 7 , arid p r i n t e d by W E S T L O N D O N O F F S E T C O 86 L i l l i e R o a d , S W . 6 ( t e l . F U L 7969).

A n o t h e r m a s c o t r e m o v e d f r o m its rightful owners in the " A v e n g e M i k e " campaign was that of Battersea Training College. During a convenient H o p a G u i l d s m a n ascertained t h e p o s i t i o n of t h e s e v e n i n c h h i g h eagle w h i c h was later r e m o v e d a n d b r o u g h t back to a safer place. F.J.M.

TheStevenson' letter T h e 'Stevenson letter' referred to in the report on the M i n e s ' U n i o n m e e t i n g c o m e s as a r e s u l t o f M r . S t e v e n s o n ' s v i s i t t o t h e t o w p a t h on Morphy Day. M r . Stevenson, the S e n i o r W a r d e n , is r e s p o n s i b l e for the b e h a v i o u r of I C students w h e n not on C o l l e g e or U n i o n property. H e was extremely annoyed w i t h what h e s a w at M o r p h y a n d at one p o i n t t h r e a t e n e d t h e c o m b a t a n t s w i t h the demise o f M o r p h y D a y i f t h e v c r o s s e d a b r i d g e on t h e t o w p a t h . T h e l e t t e r q u e s t i o n s t h e n e c e s s i t y f o r the battles; however, puttin g the questi o n to a U n i o n m e e t i n g seems u n l i k e l y to p r o d u c e a d e c i s i o n t o a b a n d on t h e m . 1


•II9

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i*i*mM*yr~«TiT-B

NEWS Wednesday, 11+. December 1966

Editors*

S t e w a r t Barnes Alan Saunders

STUDENT-HOUSES AT IC? I n v i e w of t h e f a c t t h a t o n l y a t h i r d of the s t u d e n t s a t IC e v e r spend a y e a r $n one of t h e H a l l s of R e s i d e n c e , a group of s t u d e n t s conducted a surve y a t t h e b e g i n n i n g of t h i s t e r m i n t o the l i v i n g c o n d i t i o n s of s t u d e n t s i n d i g s , f l a t s , etc» The o r g a n i s e r s were c o n c e r n e d about the remoteness and p o o r q u a l i t y of some of the accommodation w h i c h was o f f e r e d t o IC °t"dent - by the l o d g i n g s B u r s a r . They a l s o b o r e i n mind the recommendations of the R o b b i n s r e p o r t i n i t s p r e f e r e n c e s to s t u d e n t s accommodation and H a l l s of R e s i d e n c e . r

The main recommendation o f t h e i r r e p o r t on the s u r v e y was t h a t C o u n c i l s h o u l d i n v e s t g a t e t h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t of student-'houses,, These a r e b u i l d i n g s w h i c h a r e r u n s o l e l y b y s t u d e n t s and m i g h t a l s o be owned by the U n i o n . Student-house s a l r e a d y e x i s t i n London and H u l l , I t woul d c o s t of the o r d e r of £30,000 t o buy and c o n v e r t s u c h a house and i t i s hoped t h a t i t w i l l be p o s s i b l e t o g6t f i n a n c e f r o m o u t s i d e the C o l l e g e t o h e l p y/ith thife. C o u n c i l approved the r e p o r t and a s k e d t h e W e l f a r e O f f i c e r t o l o o k i n t o the f i n a n c i a l s i t u a t i o n , C,G.H. <¥14lWSaBEBS

0? UNION SOCIETIES?

A p r o p o s a l to i n t r o d u c e ' g u e s t ' membership of ICU S o c i e t i e s was d i s c u s s e d a t t h e l a s t U n i o n C o u n c i l m e e t i n g , Mr P r a n k E c h s was c o n t i n u i n g h i s aim of b r i n g i n g about c o - o p e r a t i o n between IC and t h e R o y a l C o l l e g e of A r t , He s u g g e s t e d t h a t c l u b s s h o u l d change an 'Economic' membership f e e t o s t u d e n t s f r o m o t h e r c o l l e g e s w h i c h m i g h t be e q u i v a l e n t t o t h e subsidy w h i c h c l u b s r e c e i v e f r o m the U n i o n . He emphasised t h a t the c o l l e g e s e l i g i b l e f o r membership w o u l d have t o be a p p r o v e d by C o u n c i l - IC would not want t o be swamped by l a r g e numbers o f e x t e r n a l s t u d e n t s . The p r o p o s a l , was d i s c u s s e d a t l e n g t h , b r l n g h g i n r e f e r e n c e t o o r g a n i s a t i o n s s u c h as the D r a m a t i c S o c i e t y o a r t h e Opera Group, w h i c h depend on e x t e r n a l memoers f o r t h e i r productions. The a i m was t o n a t i o n a l i s e t h e p r e s e n t s i t u a t i o n where some c l u b s had u n o f f i c i a l members f r o m o t h e r c o l l e g e s and were u n c e r t a i n of the s t a t u s and l e g a l p o s i t i o n o f these p e o p l e . The p o s i t i o n of s u c h members as r e g a r d s i n s u r a n c e i n s u c h s o c i e t i e s as the Underwater Club was v i e w e d w i t h concern. The m a t t e r w a s • r e f e r r e d t o t h e e x t e r n a l a f f a i r s Committee and i t was up sin ad hoc committee t o i n v e s t i g a t e tn. l e g a l a s p e c t s .

decided to set

G.H,

CARP-CliE3LS There w i l l be r e g u l a r c a r d - c h e c k s i n t h e U n i o n area.6 n e x t term. RCS VICE H?K.snyr;i •> •SIGNS D i c k Conn, RCS V i c e - P r e s i d e n t , r e s i g n e d f r o m h i s post on November 5 t h . was g i v e n t o a RCS g e n e r a l committee y e s t e r d a y , by P r e s i d e n t Cavanagh, Mr Conn was no l o n g e r a r e g i s t e r e d s t u d e n t a t t h e C o l l e g e ,

The news He s a i d t h a t

E l e c t i o n s f o r a new V i c e - P r e s i d e n t w i l l be h e l d a t ohe f i r s t U n i o n m e e t i n g n e x t term. I f t h e r e i s more t h a n one c a n d i d a t e i t was s u g g e s t e d t h a t h u s t i n g s may be h e l d , f o l l o w e d by a b a l l o t the n e x t day. The m e e t i n g was p o o r l y attended,, o n l y f i v i member:, bolrwr p r e s e n t , p r o b a b l y because most members were n o t i n f o r m e d u n t i l Tuesday morning,, 0

The r e s u l t s of the NUS r e p r e s e n t e d a mandate e x t e r n a l a f a i r s j such Committee, P r e s i d e n t i t as a mandate, The s a i d he t h o u g h t t h e s e

b a l l o t we're not c h a l l e n g e d , but Mr F u c h s thought t h a t t h e y t o t h e G e n e r a l Committee f o r i t to i n f o r m RCS-, t h a t about as the R a d i c a l S t u d e n t s A l l i a n c e , and t h e T e c h n i c a l C o l l e g e s Cavanagh, r e f e r r i n g t o the r e f e r e n d u m s a i d t h a t he d i d n o t see r e s t of the committee reemed t o agree. S e c r e t a r y J e f f Warren were m a t t e r s of c o n c e r n f o r IC r a t h e r than RCS,


BR A l l â&#x20AC;˘ CASHING- AFP VOODOO That no normal p e r s o n c a n w i t h s t a n d i n d e f i n i t e l y the methods o f b r a i n w a s h i n g or Voodoo was a l a r g e p a r t o f t h e message i n Dr "'f.W. Sargent's a d d r e s s t o W e l l s o c on Monday n i g h t . He i n t r o d u c e d the mechanics o f b r a i n w a s h i n g b y comparing the r e s u l t s o f h i s own work on war neuroses d u r i n g t h e second world War w i t h e x t r a c t s f r o m John Wesley's j o u r n a l d e a l i n g w i t h h i s methods of c o n v e r s i o n t o Methodism. He t h e n went on t o g i v e n a b r i e f o u t l i n e o f P a v l o v ' s t h e o r y o f p s y c h o l o g y , and e x p l a i n e d the c o r r e l a t i o n between P a v l o v ' s work on dogs and t h e e f f e c t s o f war n e u r o s i s . U s i n g f i l m s and s l i d e s , he demonstrated the v a r i o u s s t a t e s o f b r a i n i n h i b i t i o n p r e d i c t e d b y P a v l o v , p a r t i c l u a r l y w i t h r e f e r e n c e t o Voodoo and C h r i s t i a n R e v i v a l i s m . He showed t h a t the main p r o c e s s e s i n t h i s type o f ceremony- a r e r y t h m i c o x o r c i s o s , t o drums or c l a p p i n g hands, and o v e r b r e a t h i n g . A t t h e same time ho showed examples t o demonstrated t h a t p e o p l e w i t h c h r o n i c m e n t a l i l l n e s s e s were u n a f f e c t e d b y these methods. He l a t e r quoted extreme f a i t h as the e t h e r p r o t e c t i o n a g a i n s t those methods, s a y i n g t h a t a p e r s o n who p o s s e s s e d f a i t h , and c o u l d n e t be angered by the b r a i n w a s h o r , would h o l d out l e n g e s t . Dr Sargant gave i n t e r e s t i n g l e c t u r e w h i c h must have g i v e n the 120 peopl e p l e n t y t o t h i n k about.

present

AMNESTY There have been a l a r m i n g l o s s e s i n c u t l e r y and o t h e r a r t i c l e s f r o m Southsido and t h e U n i o n t h i s term. I t i s n e t s u r p r i s i n g t h e r e f o r e t h a t t h e E x e c u t i v e has e v e n t u a l l y r e q u e s t e d t h a t such p r o p e r t y t h a t has b e e n 'borrowed' bo r e t u r n e d i m m e d i a t e l y t o the r e f e c t o r i e s and b a r s . No d i s c i p l i n a r y a c t i o n w i l l be t a k e n t h i s t i m e . PS

and 'Mike' ?

SIR I t d i s t u r b s mo t o know t h a t , i n a c i t y w i t h such a c r i m e r a t e , even a group o f amateur c r i m i n a l s c a n e n t e r our U n i o n b u i l d i n g , 'work f o r an a p p r e c i a b l e time w i t h a n c x y - a c e t y l e n e c u t t e r and t h e n l e a v e undcte. t e d . S u r e l y the U n i o n should bo a b l e t o a f f o r d b e t t o r p r o t e c t i o n t h a n t h i s f o r t h e b u i l d i n g and i t s c o n t e n t s . B.L.

ME&&INS0N

YHA ACCIDENT ON 3CAFELL The Mountain Rescue o r g a n i s a t i o n was c a l l e d out when a YHA group on a f e l l w a l k i n g e x p e d i t i o n , w i t h a p a r t y f r o m B e d f o r d YH were i n v o l v e d i n a n a c c i d e n t . Twelve p e o p l e s u f f e r e d f r o m shock and minor i n j u r i e s when a l a n d s l i p o c c u r r o d on S c a f o l l Pike. One p e r s o n was h i t by a f a l l i n g b o u l d e r and i s new i n C a r l i s l e H o s p i t a l with a fractured s k u l l . SIR A f o r t n i g h t ago I sent y o u the r e s u l t o f our 'Quiz I n t e r n a t i o n a l ' match a g a i n s t SOAS i n the s e m i - f i n a l . L a s t n i g h t we p l a y e d B e d f o r d C o l l e g e i n the f i n a l o f t h i s BBC W o r l d S e r v i c e programme. I am g l a d t o say we won t h i s match 36 - 30 p o i n t s and so we a r e now champions y e t a g a i n . DARSHAM PANDYA

8 t h Doc. 66

A CAREER IJ^OREKSIC SCIENCES ? V e r y few peoplo b o t h e r e d t o a t t e n d a p h y s i c s department c a r e e r s t a l k on t h e work of the M e t r o p o l i t a n F o r e n s i c Science Laboratory. Those who d i d , wore g i v o n an i n t e r e s t i n g and i n f o r m a t i v e guide t o b o t h the b a s i c t e s t s used and some now techniques. Of p a r t i c u l a r i n t e r e s t , -.Tore Dr W a l l ' s remarks on t h e l a t e s t developments i n typing blood. U s i n g these methods, some b l o o d s c a n be i d e n t i f i e d so c l o s e l y t h a t on average they would o n l y occur once i n s e v e r a l hundred thousands o f p e o p l o . OVERSEAS STUDENTS WlSh nowhere t o go a t C h r i s t m a s when t h e R e f e c t o r i e s c l o s e , a r e i n v i t e d t o see M i s s ffarner, P r i v a t e H o s p i t a l i t y S e c t i o n , B r i t i s h C o u n c i l ^ She c a n a r r a n g e h o s p i t a l i t y o f a l l s o r t s , meals p a r t i e s 11 P o r t l a n d P l a c e , W.l. or v i s i t s . O f f e r s o f h o s p i t a l i t y b y IC s t u d e n t s would be warmly a p p r e c i a t e d

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