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BEECHING Commemoration

WARNS

Day

Address Scientists t e n d not to b r a n c h a w a y f r o m scientific o c c u p a t i o n s — t h i s was one c o n c l u s i o n r e a d i e d b y L o r d B e a c h i n g , D i r e c t o r of I m p e r i a l C h e m i c a l I n d u s t r i e s , i n h i s a d d r e s s as t h e S p e c i a l V i s i t o r a t C o m m e m o r a t i o n Day. L o r d Beeching's speech was the finale to ICs annual pomp and circumstance. T h e celebration, h e l d i n t h e R o y a l A l b e r t H a l l , b e g a n w i t h i n a d j a c e n t fields o f k n o w l e d g e , u n t h e c o l o u r f u l e n t r a n c e o f t h e s t u d e n t t i l e v e n t u a l l y h e is ' l i k e l y t o t a k e Presidents, Readers, a n d W a r d e n s , interest i n the o v e r a l l effectiveness P r o f e s s o r s a n d t h e p r i n c i p a l officers w i t h w h i c h s c i e n c e a n d technology o f t h e G o v e r n i n g B o d y . T h e p r o c e s - is a p p l i e d w i t h i n o u r s o c i a l a n d s i o n w a s e f f e c t i v e l y p e r f o r m e d to a e c o n o m i c s t r u c t u r e . b a c k g r o u n d of 'Gaudeamus igitur' ' i V i s l e d h i m to a visual representsung by the I C M u s i c a l Society ation of the d i s t r i b u t i o n of science Choir. graduates a n d social science and A n u n p r o g r a m m e d e v e n t w a s a arts g r a d u a t e s i n ' t h e jobs... filled b y men'. The diagram brief speech by Lord Sherfield, well-educated C h a i r m a n of the G o v e r n i n g B o d y , of was difficult to f o l l o w b u t b y caret h e r e g r e t o f t h e C o l l e g e at t h e d e a t h f u l c o n s i d e r a t i o n i t c a n be s e e n to of the late R e c t o r . H e spoke of the | represent t h e situation. H e d e s c r i b e d m o v i n g address b y L o r d F l o r e y at a rectangular display in which the M e m o r i a l Service a n d of the "scientists" are represented b y black t r i b u t e s i n t h e P r e s s . T h e C o l l e g e , spots a n d " a r t i s t s " b y crosses, w h i l e h e s a i d , has lost a s y m p a t h e t i c a d - those job f i l l e d b y n o n e graduates are m i n i s t r a t o r , t h e U n i v e r s i t y a s t a u n c h m a r k e d w i t h c i r c l e s , | M o v i n g across m e m b e r a n d a l l w h o h a v e c o m e i n - t h e d i a g r a m f r o m l e f t t o right t h e t o c o n t a c t w i t h hind h a v e l o s t a g o o d s c i e t i f i c c o n t e n t of t h e jobs i n c r e a s friend. es, c l i m b i n g u p t h e diagram the Deputy-President David M c B a i n o r g a n i s a t i o n l e v e l a n d d e g r e e of i n was the S t u d e n t O r a t o r a n d gave a fluence increase. L o r d B e e c h i n g c o n d i g n i f i e d r e n d e r i n g o f t h e O p e n i n g c l u d e d t h a t b l a c k spots w o u l d c o n Proclamation. gregate i n the l o w e r left corner a n d T h e r e a d i n g w a s f o l l o w e d b y t h e s p r e a d u p w a r d s m o r e o r less v e r t i c spread presentation of Associateships a n d a l l y ; t h e crosses w o u l d b e D i p l o m a t e s t o a n a c c o m p a n i m e n t b y across t h e - l o w e r r i g h t - h a n d s i d e b u t m o v e s i d e w a y s as t h e y rose. these the orchestra, the orchestra w i n n i n g by several lengths. L a s t l y t h e six ' A t t h e v e r y t o p l e v e l s o f t h e d i a g r a m , the levels of most w i t h | representing n e w Fellows were presented influence, their Parchments b y L o r d Sherfield. | powerful a n d widespread w e se a l o t o f circr'es, a l o t o f c r o s ses, b u t v e r y f e w b l a c k spots'.

Lord

Beeching

giving

his

address

on

Thursday.

:

1

The Address

T h e Special Visitor's, Address foll o w e d ' T l i e C l e r k of O x e n f o r d ' f r o m the Canterbury Pilgrims b y Geoffrey Chaucer and sung by the Choir. L o r d Beeching's Speech touched o n one o f t h e v i t a l issues o n e m i g h t have expected from such a distinguished industrialist. Its c o n t e n t was m u c h more relevant to I C a n d quite uncontroversial L o r d Beeching, w h o is a D i p l o m a t e o f I C , d e v o t e d t h e first q u a r t e r o f h i s A d d r e s s t o a n e x p l a n a t i o n of h o w h e h a d c h a n g e d since l e a v i n g the C o l l e g e . H e justi f i e d t h i s as a w a r n i n g , t h a t , as a n observer and commentator "I am biased by m y o w n particular experiences". M o v i n g on to his m a i n subject h e postulated the average graduate starting out 'pursuing a career... within the confines o f (his) own speciality'. T h e n later i n life findi n g himself 'increasingly interested

Our

fault

H e expressed regret at the situation but p o i n t e d o u t t h a t i t is p a r t l y t h e " s c i e n t i s t s " f a u l t a n d arises f r o m a viscous circle w h i c h w e can do m u c h to break. T h e r e is a n o p i n i o n , h e s a i d , t h a t " s c i e n t i s t s " a r e less v e r s atile t h a n "artists" a n d the conclusion w a s d r a w n t h a t t h i s is d u e t o i n a b i l i t y . I n f a c t i t is a r e s u l t of t h e e x cessive d e m a n d / s u p p l y ratio a n d the r e l a t i v e q u a l i t i e s of arts a n d s c i e n c e teachers. T h e graduate of "s c ien c e" is less r o u n d e d t h a n a n " a r t s " m a n . I t is o u r j o b , h e c o n c l u d e d , t o t h i n k o f o u r s e l v e s 'as h i g h l y i n t e l l i g e t , w h i c h y o u a r e ; as w e l l - e d u c a t ed people, w h i c h you should be; a n d never hesitate to b r o a d e n y o u r experience'. T h e t w o hour ceremony finished w i t h the C h o i r leading the A s s e m b l y in ' G o d Save T h e Queen'.

Memorial

Service-

glowing L o r d F l o r e y p a i d s l o w i n g t r i b u t e to S i r at t h e M e m o r i a l S e r v i c e f o r the l a t e R e c t o r . c a t e d a n d s y m p a t h e t i c p e r s o n at the h e i g h t o f m o s t h a d a d r e a d o f b e i n g i n c o m p e t e n t he we should not f a i l . Following his appointment as R e c t o r i n 1955, h e b e c a m e i n v o l v e d i n d i s c u s s i o n s at G o v e r n m e n t l e v e l o n education and research. F r o m then o n h e d e v o t e d the finest y e a r s o f h i s l i f e t o the C o l l e g e a n d it is d u e to h i s great a d m i n i s t r a t i v e a b i l i t y t h a t the C o l l e g e o w e s i t p r e s e n t p o s i t i o n . Its students w i l l h a v e cause to be g r a t e f u l to h i m a l l t h e i r l i v e s . T o a c h i e v e a sufficient, c o n t r o l o v e r the C o l l e g e , another m a n m i g h t have been r u t h l e s s l y efficient, b u t u n d e r S i r P a t r i c k one sensed a h a p p y a t m o s phere about the C o l l e g e . It w a s a l w a y s his a i m that a l t h o u g h the p r i n c i p a l task w a s to p r o d u c e s c i e n tists, the products should be " r o u n d e d " scientists. L o r d F l o r e y pointed out that S i r P a t r i c k was a v c r v h u m a n p e r s o n a n d e n j o y e d his h o m e d i f e . W i t h o u t the great h e l p g i v e n b y L a d y L i n s t e a d the success w o u l d not h a v e been a c h i e v e d . A t the R o y a l S o c i e t y S i r P a t r i c k and L o r d F l o r e y w o r k e d together ; o n L o r d F l o t t j y ' s e l e c t i o n to P r e s i d e n t he was t o i J lie was l u c k ) to h a v e S i r P a t r i c k there to k e e p h i m s t r a i g h t . In j u d g e m e n t a n d a c t i o n he was s u p e r b and made a delightful colleague.

tribute P a t r i c k I . i n s t e a d i n his a d d r e s s T h e C o l l e g e h a d lost this d e d i his powers. In a period when stood out a n d d e t e r m i n e d that

L o r d F l o r e y e n d e d w i t h the r e m i n d e r that S i r P a t r i c k L i n s t e a d was a scientist o f great d i s t i n c t i o n a n d a splendid friend. Lord Flory. who is P r o v o s t of Q u e e n s C o l l e g e , O x f o r d , was a great f r i e n d o f the late R e c t o r a n d the e m o t i o n he felt at the loss was r e a d i l y d i s c e r n i b l e i n h i s speech. A m o n g the m a n y d i s t i n g u i s h e d v i s i tors present w i t h L a d y L i n s t e a d w e r e m e m b e r s o f the G o v e r n i n g B o a r d ; Lord i Sherfield. Sir Charles Cunningham, D r . D . H . Follet. Lord S t a m p : a l s o present w e r e T h e M a y o r o f K e n s i n g t o n a n d C h e l s e a , the L o r d M a y o r of Westminster, S i r E d m o n d and L a d y Playfair, Sir Solly and L a d y Z u c k e r m a n ; and i n . i c . J a veritable host o f d i g n i t a r i e s . T h e y w e r e seated i n the n a v e w i t h t h e s e n i o r m e m b e r s o f the" U n i o n . T h e s e r v i c e w a s s i m p l e a n d lasted o n l y h a l f an h o u r . T h e lesson w n a s r e a d by P r e s i d e n t T o n y D u k e a n d this p r o g r e s s e d af te r p r a y e r s led by the Rev. Cleverly F o r d , to L o r d Florey's address. T h e blessing v,js given by the B i s h o p o f L o n d o n a n d the l . C . c h o i r then s a n g .


2

FELIX

General

Z

Studies:

E

h i m was the sight of a m n n suitermg f r o m t h e effects o f l y n c h i n g . F r o m Florence Leonardo went to Milan w h e r e h e m a d e h i s n a m e as a l u t e player, d o i n g little p a i n t i n g but d e signing a number of buildings includi n g a b r o t h e l w i t h c o n c e a l e d doors, and a for embarrassed customers, stable w i t h a n automatic feeding system. T h i s p e r i o d also brought a n u m b e r of designs f o r machines w h i c h h a d many usefuLaccesspries, but he d i d not find a p r a c t i c a l means to p r o p e l them. These included a 5 0ton " h a n d powered" tank, a steam cannon a n d wings for men, . Before leaving M i l a n h e painted the famous "last supper". H i s m e t h o d was to work for periods u p t o 2 4 hours without stopping f o r food o r rest a n d t h e n t o w o r k o n s o m e t h i n g else b e f o r e h i s n e x t s t i n t d a y s l a t e r .

After Tynan, Gascoigne, G i l l i a t t . . .

Ronald Bryden Why? H o w ? What's it like? RONALD BRYDEN w a s b o r n i n T r i n i d a d a n d w e n t t o s c h o o l in Canada. H eproduced

shows there. W h e n his college

p u t o n 1066 And All That h e p l a y e d t h e D e c l i n e a n d F a l l o f the R o m a n E m p i r e . D o w e have here the first, distant stirrings . . . ? C a m b r i d g e . B r y d e n w a s a t C a m b r i d g e f r o m 1951 t o 1 9 5 5 , where

incidentally

he wrote

theatre

notices

forthe

C a m b r i d g e R e v i e w . W h e n he went d o w n he wrote for T h e Spectator,

moved

o n to become

dramatic critic. It was

the N e w

Statesman's

t h e success o f his w o r k

here—

intelligent, witty, l i t e r a r y — t h a t led t o his being chosen b y The Observer. F u l l m a r k s for homework.

Being The Observer's

theatre

c r i t i c i s h a r d w o r k . H e h a s t o see a l o t o f p l a y s , o b v i o u s l y . It t a k e s r e s e a r c h . B r y d e n w a s the o n l y L o n d o n c r i t i c t o

find,

t h e n r e a d , a c o p y o f L o p e d e V e g a ' s La Fianza Satisfecha,

t h e o r i g i n a l o f O s b o r n e ' s A Bond Honoured. ( T h e G u a r d i a n

N

Such is the drawing power o f B e n n y G r e e n that t w o o r three h u n dred people gathered i n M e c h E n g rec e n t l y t o h e a r t h e first t a l k i n h i s G e n e r a l Studies lecture o n " Aspects of Jazz." In this talk G r e e n e x a m i n e d t h e music o f the contemporary players, Louis A r m s t r o n g a n d B i x Beiderbeche, a n d c o m p a r e d t h e differences i n t h e i r m u s i c w i t h t h e differences i n their environments. Whereas L o u i s is the e p i t o m e o f the negro j a z z - m a n , . having dragged himself u p from p o v e r t y t o the p i n n a c l e o f a c c l a i m as a trumpet player, B i x was the middle-class white man w h o " made g o o d " ' i n t h e Jazz w o r l d and, as Benny G r e e n demonstrated w i t h r e c o r d s , t h i s d i f f e r e n c e i n class a n d u p b r i n g i n g i s reflected i n t h e i r m u s i c .

o O n T u e s d a y 18 O c t o b e r ' i n t h e G e n e r a l Studies course " T h e T w o Cultures" the Rev. Gordon Phillips, Senior C h a p l a i n t o t h e University, Rave the r e c o r d o f his discourses o n L e o n a r d o d a V i n c i . H e set out a n d . in his own brilliant way, succeeded to give the most important events i n the life of L e o n a i d o a n d to connect these events w i t h aspects o f this most interesting personality. L e o n a r d o recievecl o n l y a basic e d u c a t i o n , first i n t h e p e a s a n t h o m e of his m o t h e r a n d then later i n t h e more luxurious Florentine home of his father. H e spent his a p p r e n t i c e s h i p w i t h V e r r i c c h o w h e r e h i s stvle o f ' o v e r n e a t " p a i n t i n g s a n d sexless subiects emerged. It w a s at this t i m e that h e w a s chareed with, and cleared of sodomv. A n o t h e r event of this p e r i o d w h i c h , a c c o r d i n g t o M r . P h i l l i p s , obsessed

Y

H e then travelled to M u n t u a b e f o r e r e t u r n i n g t o F l o r e n c e . T h e r e , as w e l l as painting a n d designing, h e researched into the natural w o r l d . H e began b y disecting and drawing of h u m a n bodies, a n d t h e n h e " p r o gressed" to examining the animal and botanical worlds. H e continued his w o r k u n t i l his d e a t h o n M a y 2 1519 a f t e r .a s t r o k e . T h e conclusions d r a w n b y M r Phillips were that L e o n a r d o w a s brilliant but odd. H e mostly painted the natural, the old, the innocent o r the horrific. H e h a d unusual views o n sex, w i t h h i s p a i n t i n g o f sexless m a d o n n a s a n d s t a t e m e n t s t h a t sex w a s beneath m a n a n d h a d a n ability to unite " m i r r o r w r i t i n g " exemplified A s boys, both were m u s i c a l l y a d i n h i s 7,000 pages o f notes, t h e vanced a l t h o u g h i n different direcoriginal source of most of this i n - tions. L o u i s was b o r n with jazz i n formation. his soul, while Bix's music was i n i t i a l l y guided a l o n g most " respectable " lines. T h e social pressure o f the d a y prevented B e i d e r b e c h e f r o m p l a y i n g i n p u b l i c w i t h t h e better musicians o f the period, w h o were m a i n l y negro, so his records are, as B e n n y l O r e e n s a i d , " i n d i f f e r e n t {rec ordings w i t h o n e r e d e e m i n g feature 6 7 % of Minesme n turned out to O n e t h e other welcome Chris M o l a m and his E x - — B i x B e i d e r b e c h e . " hand, A r m s t r o n g was able to record e c u t i v e back to college for w h a t looks w i t h top-class jazz-men, a n u n c o m like being the best year E V E R for m o n example o f social inequality. Mines. B u t , after hours, t h e t w o frequently M o l a m managed to bulldoze his p l a y e d together a n d such w a s t h e i r way through the more important m u t u a l respect t h a t B i x c a l l e d L o u i s business o f the m e e t i n g , despite the " t h e greatest t r u m p e t e r t h a t e v e r l i g h t - h e a r t e d efforts t o d i v e ; ' , t h e a t l i v e d , " w h i l e L o u i s c a l l e d B i x " the t e n t i o n o f t h e masses b y t h e E n t e r greajest t r u m p e t e r t h a t e v e r l i v e d . " t a i n m e n t s officer a n d h i s m o t l e y c r e w . L a p e l bages, w i t h M i n e s c r e s t s, H o w e v e r , w h i l e A r m s t r o n g ' s forte we being ordered a n d should b e was improvisation, Beiderbeche h a d availably b y Christmas. T h i i d year a s t r o n g sense o f h a r m o n i c v a l u e s a n d and' P . G . students w e r e i n v i t e d to bet o w a r d s the e n d o f his short l i f e was come Associate members of t h e e x p e r i m e n t i n g a n d t r y i n g to b r i d g e the R S M A a n d as su ch they w o u l d e n gap between jazz a n d classical m u s i c , joy the f u l l advantages o f the R S M A . w i t h l i t t l e success. Armstrong has T h e financial s i t u a t i o n o f M i n e s n o w expanded his horizons and be* _ n i o n i s s t i l l h e a l t h y ; assets n o w c o m e perhaps more o f a n entertainer t;tal £300. I n t h e opinion of t h e than a jazz musician. Senior Treasurer they could have So, B i x Beiderbeche died early o f amounted to £400 had it not been harmonic insecurity; L o u i s A r m s t r o n g for o ve r s pe n di n g b y the R u g b y C l u b entertains o n , a n d B e n n y Green a n d g e n e r o u s gifts t o ' a m b a s s a d o r s ' w i l l undoubtedly return t o p l a y out his w h o v i s i t e d foreign m i n i n g schools series o f l e c t u r e s t o t h e s a m e a p p l a u s e on behalf of R S M . T h e Rugby C l u b as he s t a r t e d t h e m . was reprimanded by t h e Treasurer for the slipshod w a y in w h i c h they T h e first ' M i n e s N i g h t ' o f t h i s sesh a n d l e d their finances. T h e I F M M S congress (reported i n sion w i l l b e the evening o f M o r p h y F E L I X " at " t h e e n d ^ f k r t ' t e n n P h S J * * ^ u s n * l this V 5 E . b e e n a g r e a t success. B o b S l a t e r , t h e L o n d o n branch chairman, thought the ^ - P r e s i d e n t m a d e a p l e a f o r betF e d e r a t i o n c o u l d b e o f p a r t i c u l a r use ^ » v i o u r t h a n o n die last s u c h i n attracting intelligent y o u n g m e n occasion, itne R e s i d e n t w o n t be "' ^ into the M i n i n g a n d M e t a l l u r g i c a l industries. ><- -

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h a d started a r u m o u r that it d i d n ' t exist.) S t i l l not bored. A f t e r m o r e t h a n 1,000 p l a y s B r y d e n h a s s t i l l not been bored. W h a t e v e r the reason for this, it seems t o result i n not being b o r i n g . R e a d h i m i n T h e Observer every Sunday. Y o u may

agree.

Bryden • The Observer • Every

Sunday

H " Y o u h a v e t o b r i n g i t h o m e t o t h e possessed a g r e a t d e a l o f p o w e r i n t h e average U n i o n m e m b e r that the beer U n i o n seemed to escape t h e m . isn't g o i n g t o b e turned off w h e n a H e was p a r t i c u l a r l y c r i t i c a l o f the student p o l i t i c i a n takes o v e r , " d e - p o l i t i c a l societies at I . C . T h e y w e r e clared K e i t h C a v a n a g h president o f always talking, he said, b u t never R.C.S. A t t h e t i m e , l a s t M o n d a y r e a l l y d o i n g a n y t h i n g . ( H e gave t h i s e v e n i n g , h e w a s a d d r e s s i n g a w e l l - as h i s r e a s o n f o r l e a v i n g S o c S o c a t t e n d e d m e e t i n g o f the S o c S o c o n s o m e y e a r s ago.) t h e t o p i c o f " S t u d e n t P o l i t i c s at I . C . " It also transpired i n the course o f H e spoke profusely o n h o w t h e his talk that h e is i n favour o f I . C . s tu de n t p o l i t i c i a n (as o p p o s e d t o j o i n i n g N . U . S . a n d o f a t r u l y d e m o the c l o w n i n g , beer s w i l l i n g u n i o n cratic election o f the president o f I.C. official) c o u l d m a k e h i m s e l f most T h e meeting then closed after t h e H e d i d ,e l e c t i o n o f three n e w c o m m i t t e e m e m effective i n t h e u n i o n . h o w e v e r , e m p h a s i s e t h a t s o m e c l o w n - bers. i n g w a s necessary f o r s o m e p e o p l e committee There w a s a special were actually bored b y l o n g disserta- meeting held afterwards t o decide tions o n politics. what action should be taken i n supH e regretted that so m a n y students p o r t o f Battersea Soc. Soc., w h i c h has at I . C . s e e m e d u n a w a r e a n d u n i n t e r - b e e n c l o s e d d o w n a f t e r s o m e d u b i o u s ested i n w h a t w a s h a p p e n i n g p o l i t i - m a n o e u v r i n g b y the president o f cally o n a nationwide basis. T h e y Battersea U n i o n . T h r e e members o f w e r e i n t e r e s t e d o n l y i n w h a t affected B a t t e r s e a S o c . S o c . h a d c o m e t o t h e m p e r s o n a l l y , a n d r e g a r d e d t h e a p p e a l f o r h e l p i n t r y i n g t o get t h e i r U n i o n as a society f o r o r g a n i s i n g society reinstated, hops a n d socials. T h e fact that they


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G G u i l d s U n i o n h e l d t h e first o f their usual r o w d y meetings o n t h e 20lh. October. T h e meeting began and Ian Gledhill, t h e secretary, promtly refused to read t h e minutes o f t h e last m e e t i n g o f last t e r m i n any other language than English.

Last Thursday R.CJS. became the twenty-first Student Union to realise that the Rent Acts can help students just as much as other tenants.

M o r p h y D a y plans were outlined by P h i l M a r s h a l l , V i c e - P r e s i d e n t , of w h i c h t h e essential feature w a s h i s >o!e a s d i i c i l o r o f o p e r a t i o n s f r o m a convcient treetop. T h e President then mentioned the I . C . C a r n i v a l a r rangements and appealed for volunteers t o enter a p e d a l c a r race next S p r i n g . T h e election for G u i l d s R e p on I.C. C o u n c i l , a position vacated by 1 ony Duke's relhemot to I . C . Prcsidiiii followed; neithei of the two candidates appeared to know m u c h about the position they were seeking, i.everliitiess l o n y L i m n was duly ek'cted. â&#x20AC;˘) After a mention of G u i l d s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; M i n e s Carnival, to b e held o n N o v . 25th., t h e floor w a s h a n d e d o v e r t o J e r r y Stockbridge w h o refused to take a n y responsibility for the R e v u e w l i i c h followed.

B r i e f l y , a l l r e n t s o f u n f u r n i s h e d flats are n o w frozen until a " F a i r R e n t " h a s been fixed. P r e m i u m s , K e y m o n e y a n d excess i v e c h a r g e s f o r fixtures a n d fittings are n o w illegal. A s a tenant, y o u c a n apply to y o u r l o c a l F a i r Rents Officer f o r y o u r rent to be reduced. I f y o u o r y o u r l a n d l o r d d o n o t like h i s judgement, y o u r Assessment r e n t goes t o t h e R e n t C o m m i t t t e . T h i s h e a r s b o t h sides a n d t h e n fixes t h e r e n t f o r t h r e e y e a r s , a t a fair level. Scarcity is n o t considered as a factor. O n l y the a c c o m m o d a t i o n itself is v a l u e d . S o i f y o u r rent i s a r t i ficially h i g h b e c a u s e y o u ' r e i n a n " ex>pensive a r e a " i t w i l l p r o b a b l y be greatly reduced. F u r n i s h e d tenants c a n go t o t h e local Furnished Rent Tribunal. Y o u get s i x m o n t h s s e c u r i t y a u t o m a t i c a l l y â&#x20AC;&#x201D; e v e n i f y o u are under notice to quit. T h i s is also the place t o g o i f y o u a r e in digs. Leeds U n i v e r s i t y U n i o n encourages members to apply f o r a rent reduct i o n , a n d a l s o p r o v i d e s free l e g a l a d v i c e o n t h e m e r i t s o f e a c h case. This scheme has bean w o r k i n g f o r over a year. I asked Vice-President Jack Straw some questions : Q. W h a t h a s been the overall ect? A. A n u m b e r o f students have d t h e i r rents r e d u c e d . M a n y more ve bargained w i t h their l a n d l o r d s , d got reductions b y threatening to

w t e

Q. D o landlords discriminate ;ainst students a s t r o u b l e m a k e r s ? A. N o more than usual, a n d o u r 'dgings b u r e a u h a s n ' t n o t i c e d a n y lange. F. F U C H S

F O L L O W I N G the short article o n the i,ondon T e c h n i c a l Colleges C o n f e r ence M r . F r a n k F u c h s g a v e a n i n t e r e s t ng i n t e r v i e w t o F E L I X . H e e x p l a i n e d ;hat the L T C C w a s i n n o w a y a 'backdoor" to N U S a n d that the Conference w a s n o t directly l i n k e d w i t h N U S . It i s a f o r u m s p o n s o r e d oy N U S w h e r e t e c h n i c a l c o l l e g e s , b o t h members a n d non-members o f N U S c o u l d meet a n d discuss matters o f D o m m o n interest. Mr. Fuchs, w h o knows several members o f N U S C o u n c i l , said that h e w o u l d l i k e t o yuggest t o H C S C o m m i t t e e that they send observers However along to an L T C C meeting. since he h a d n o t heard from the C h a i r m a n C h r i s M i l l e r , President of the Borough Polytechnic, f o r some time, he was doubtful o f the outcome. W h e n asked w h y he intended to suggest this to R C S rather than Union, he explained that 1C there h a d n o t been the opportunity t o present it to C o u n c i l and also that he felt h e k n e w R C S U n i o n . b e t t e r than C o u n c i l , of which he is a member. He felt that there w o u l d b e n o serious objections to considering j o i n i n g as i t w o u l d , p r o v i d e a n i m portant meeting p o i n t f o r N U S a n d n o n - N U S technical colleges i n L o n * don. T h e Conference w o u l d be keen f o r us t o j o i n as t h i s i s s u c h a n i m portant college.

That's always the difficulty with choosing a career; you can't get much idea what it's really like from the outsideâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which is why Unilever is giving you a chance to getan inside view. Next vacation, from Jan 2-4, we're holding an Introduction to Industry Course in London; it's designed to cover every essential aspect of industry; talks, discussions, a visit to a factory are all on the programme. Accommodation is in a hotel, and all expenses will be met. For obvious reasons, places are limited.So if you're interested, ^nd in your final year, get in touch with your Appointments Officer as rapidly as possible. He'll give you an application form and all relevant details. Or write direct to:â&#x20AC;&#x201D;    

 C. R. , ,  ,   l   Unilever  , Unilever   , London, E.C.4


FELLX Imperial College U n i o n Prince Consort R d . L o n d o n , S.W.7 Internal 2881/2799 Telephones : K E N 2963

EDITOR C. G. H A R B I S O N

Acting Asst. E d i t o r : N i g e l Shindler Sports E d i t o r : A l a n R o b i n s Business M a n a g e r : R i c h a r d D a v i e s Sales : C h r i s P a l m e r , Peter M u n d y Asst. Sales M a n a g e r : J u d i t h P e a r s o n Advertising Manager : R o b i n H a l l Cartoonist : B o b Russell What's O n Editor : K e n Simpson

Advertising

Agency:

A l s o : Stuart Barnes, Colcutt, Roger Cooper, David Cooper, Adam Gawronski, Paul Heath, Les Johnson, Geoff Lockwood, Frank Morris, Dave Ormiston, D a v i d Potter, P a u l Smith, D a v i d Sullivan, M . K . Y u , Stephen Walter, Ian Williams.

Educational

P u b l i c i t y (Partners) L t d .

C H A 6081

by the editor

This Sporting Life . . . " difficult years for the Exec' ' . . "clean up Freshers' Dinners" Murphy Day: Public v I C . "

. . . "

S u c h topics were u p f o r discussion last year, indeed they have come u p f o r m a n y years ; this year they arise y e t a g a i n i n t h e first w e e k s o f t e r m , n o w w i t h a n added urgency i n the v o i d f o l l o w i n g the death of Sir Patrick Linstead. W h a t do w e want f r o m U n i o n life? A r e we to be a l l pokerfaced, serious'-minded intellectuals s h o u l d e r i n g t h e cares o f the C o l l e g e , the c o u n t r y a n d t h e c o s m o s ? O r s h o u l d we disregard o u r responsibilities a n d enjoy o u r freedom i n drinking a n d rough-houses? I n the last f e w weeks there have been several " incidents " created b y inebriated members w h o are out for some fun. O n one occasion following an R C S Freshers' Dinner a Theta bearer h a d h i s r o o m ransacked b y M i n e s m e n â&#x20AC;&#x201D; n o serious damage w a s done and n o one was h a r m e d but it was an ugly situation f o r a few minutes. O n 9 November comes M o r p h y D a y , that " t r a d i t i o n a l " day f o r m o c k fighting a n d general horseplay. This is a n e x c e l l e n t o p p o r t u n i t y f o r a l l boisterousness t o be r u n off a n d directed into harmless channels.

be the r e s u l t ? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a s C o l c u t t p o i n t s o u t a n e w R e c t o r o r the S e n i o r W a r d e n m i g h t decide to take matters into h i s o w n most capable, most responsib'e, most restricting hands. So w h y prescribe the limits o f U n i o n behaviour too strictly; isolated " incidents " w i l l happen a n d it w o u l d take a restrictive policy t o stamp them out completely. L e t us leave i t to C o l c u t t to s l a m whoever deserves slamming a n d allow the U n i o n to continue its t r a i n i n g process.

COLCL W i t h the B o a r d o f G o v e r n o r s o f I C n o doubt deliberating ifie appo i n t ment o f a successor t o S i r P a t r i c k L i n s t e a d , it m i g h t be as w e l l to take a q u i c k l o o k a t t h e r e c e n t events a t L S E w h i c h h a v e h i t t h e h e a d l i n e s . L S E U n i o n , h o m e o f s u c h lost causes as C N D f r o m t i m e i m m e m o r i a l , h a s g i v e n a n u l t i m a t u m to t h e Director-designate o f L S E , D r . W a l t e r A d a m s , d e m a n d i n g that he answer c e r t a i n charges l a i d against h i m b y a n e x t r e m i s t ( a n d j u d g i n g f r o m their p a m p h l e t , i n a r t i c u l a t e ) g r o u p o f students. If D r . A d a m ' s answers are unsatisfactory, then the U n i o n w i l l oppose h i s appointment. Several points o f interest arise f r o m this s i t u a t i o n . F i r s t , the U n i o n meeting c o n d e m n i n g D r . A d a m s appears to h a v e been b a d l y conducted, a l l o w i n g v i r tually n o defence of his reputation. Second, the charges m a d e against h i m (tolerance o f G o v e r n m e n t oppression o f academic freedom, i s o l a t i o n f r o m s t u d e n t s a n d staff, i n e f f i c i e n c y a n d i n d e c i s i o n ) a r e a l l v e r y p o o r l y s u b s t a n t i a t e d and most p r o b a b l y totally untrue. H i s past h i s t o r y clearly shows h i m t o be a champion of academic freedom a n d the very apotheosis of a racialist. B e s i d e s , i n t h a t great b a s t i o n o f f r e e d o m o f p o l i t i c a l t h o u g h t , i s a n a c a d e m i c a p p o i n t m e n t t o be o p p o s e d o n p o l i t i c a l grounds ? T h e charges of i s o l a t i o n f r o m s t u d e n t s a n d staff a r e b a s e d o n a n u n p u b l i s h e d r e p o r t , t h e a u t h o r o f w h i c h was very q u i c k to dissociate himself f r o m the happenings at L S E . A s regards, i n d e c i s i o n o r inefficiency, s u r e ly t h e B o a r d o f G o v e r n o r s a r e i n a ÂŁar b e t t e r p o s i t i o n t o j u d g e D r . A d a m s ' p e r s o n a l q u a l i t i e s as a n a d m i n i s t r a tor than the long-haired, weirdie trouble-makers o f L S E U n i o n . This b r i n g s m e t o t h e t h i r d a n d final p o i n t â&#x20AC;&#x201D; e s p e c i a l l y r e l e v a n t t o I C a t t h e moment. T h e a p p o i n t m e n t o f D i r e c t o r o f L S E as o f R e c t o r o f I C i s a m a t t e r f o r t h e B o a r d o f G o v e r n o r s to decide, a n d , w h i l s t i n t h e case o f c o n t r o v e r s i a l appointments, n o doubt a reasoned U n i o n v i e w w o u l d be listened t o , the U n i o n has n o part to p l a y i n the d e c i s i o n - m a k i n g , a n d s h o u l d have none. Q u i t e apart f r o m the fact that the B o a r d is i n a f a r better p o s i t i o n to judge potential nominees, academic appointments a r e quite simply outside the r e a l m o f the U n i o n ' s j o b . Imagine the furore i f the B o a r d attempted t o v e t o the election of a particular U n i o n President. A s L o r d Bridges, C h a i r m a n o f the L S E B o a r d , wrote to " T h e T i m e s " a week a g o , i t is " . . . neither necessary, n o r indeed proper, that a n y reply s h o u l d b e made b y L S E . . . . " T h e power of L S E U n i o n has been immeasurably weakened b y this hysterical outburst. L e t u s h o p e that I C is a little m o r e g r o w n - u p t h a n its b a b y sister i n H o u g h t o n S tr e e t . T h e letter p u b l i s h e d j n this issue f r o m R o a r e r R e d m a y n e is t y p i c a l o f several c o m p l a i n t s I have h e a r d about m y last article. I d i d not i m p l y that U n i o n o f f i c i a l s w e r e u n a w a r e o f M u r r a y a n d C o m p t o n s ' f a i l u r e t o r e t u r n , a n d I agree. M u r r a y w a s about C o l l e g e just p r i o r t o this t e r m , b u t as regards Ents., h e s e e m s t o h a v e b e e n less t h a n h e l p f u l , as a p p a r e n t l y n e i t h e r t h e E x e c , n o r K e i t h G u y were given a n y i n d i c a t i o n o f w h a t has been done a n d w h a t h a s n o t . M i n u t e s , b o o k s d i d n o t a p p e a r t o e x i s t . I agree t h a t b o t h M u r r a y a n d C o m p t o n d i d a l o t o f g o o d w o r k last year, b u t to say because o f this they a r e a b o v e c r i t i c i s m is analagous t o s a y i n g that because t h e N . C . B . does a g o o d j o b i n g e n e r a l , m i n o r i n c i d e n t s s u c h as A b e r f a n m a y b e o v e r l o o k e d . If M r . R e d m a y n e , bless h i m , i s u n a b l e t o d e c i d e w h e t h e r I a m h i m o r h e r , w h y c a n ' t h e b e l i k e everyone else a n d just say " i t . " -

I w a s t o l d the other d a y that R . H a y f o r k a n d His W o o d e n are m a k i n g G u i l d s a n e w , l i g h t w e i g h t M i n i - s p a n n e r .

Spoon

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9

Shameful !

S o m e

" . . . indebted to h i m a l l their lives " was the phrase used b y L o r d F l o r e y at t h e M e m o r i a l S e r v i c e t o d e s c r i b i n g t h e respect a n d g r a t i t u d e d u e t o t h e late R e c t o r . Y e t less t h a n fifty s t u dents t u r n e d u p a p a r t f r o m t h o s e i n vited i n d i v i d u a l l y . T h e service w a s widely publicised o n College and U n i o n notice boards. T h e last lecture o f the m o r n i n g w a s cancelled so that undergraduates could attend w i t h o u t m i s s i n g studies. I t says m u c h f o r the responsibility o f the students t h a t less t h a n 2 p e r c e n t o f t h e u n d e r g r a d u a t e s m a d e t h e effort t o a t t e n d ; perhaps we are t o o complacent, t o o T h e " s p o r t i n g " events a r e a c o m m o n feature o f U n i o n life a n d w h y ready t o accept o u r g o o d fortune, w h i c h i s d u e t o t h e efforts o f t h e l a t e s h o u l d there n o t be s o m e l e v i t y , s o m e Rectorâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or simply too lazy. horseplay among undergraduates? T h e products of a U n i v e r s i t y : doctors, lawyers, scientists, chartered engineers are respected m e m b e r s o f society, r e INTERESTED I N : sponsible, dependent members of a w o r l d w h i c h is less k i n d t h a n t h e QUOTATIONS p r i n c i p a l i t y o f S o u t h K e n . T h e under.graduate life is the ideal situation to QUIZZES learn responsibility by trial and e r r o r â&#x20AC;&#x201D; i f y o u get d r u n k , w h o w o r r i e s ? QUAKERS Better to e r r n o w than learn the hard w a y i n the outside w o r l d ; the C o l l e g e T h e n come to the is y o u r t r a i n i n g g r o u n d . H o w e v e r let us n o t forget o u r p u b lic image. A U n i o n of unreliable, irresponsible drunks could not w o r k f o r l o n g a n d w o u l d n o t be p e r m i t t e d for long. T h i s s p o r t i n g l i f e c a n be extremely enjoyable f o r a l l concerned b u t s h o u l d i t s c o n s e q u e n c e s be i n f l i c ted o n t h e g e n e r a l p u b l i c ? Is i t n ec es13 P r i n c e s G a r d e n s sary t o litter the pavements with for a b o o k about i t . b r o k e n glass, h o l d a t o l l - g a t e a c r o s s E x h i b i t i o n R o a d i n the rush-hour or attempt t o play football i n K e n H i g h Street? T h i s k i n d of levity brings O p e n 1 1 - 7 p m . d a i l y (11-5.30) c r i t i s c i s m o f t h e C o l l e g e , n o t speMonday & Wednesday cifically the U n i o n , a n d what might

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I N T H E L A S T I S S U E of F E L I X an article w a s published desribing the r u n n i ng of the Freshers' H o p a n d this c o n t a i n e d references t o M r . J i m M u r r a y , e x - C h a i r m a n of E t s . C o m mittee. I n particular i t w a s stated that the bass-guitarist a n d t h e singer of the g r o u p ' S o m e O t h e r G u y s ' w e r e with Mr. personally connected Murray. M r . Murray emphatically denies a n y s u c h c o n n e c t i o n . I t w a s also stated i n several places that M r . M u r r a y h a d failed his F i n a l exams; in fact he obtained' h i s A R C S a n d m e r e l y f a i l e d t o return to t h e C o l l e g e a n d t a k e u p h i s a p p o i n t m e n t as Carnival Organiser.

S

T h e article w a s based o n information obtained from responsible a n d s u p p o s e d l y r e l i a b l e sources and in ignorance of the facts stated b y M r . M u r r a y . T h e E d i t o r regrets these e r rors a n d a p o l o g i s e s t o M r . M u r r a y for a n y embarassment t h e a r t i c l e m a y have caused. T H E E D I T O R does n o t n e c e s s a r i l y agree w i t h t h e o p i n i o n s expressed by advertisers, columnists o r correspondents.

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Addenda

E

R Sir, A t t h e first R . C . S . U n i o n m e e t i n g t h i s session a m o t i o n w a s p a s s e d , t h a t " a l l s t u d e n t s " i n flats s h o u l d a p p l y to t h e r e n t t r i b u n a l . I t w a s s a i d t h a t t h i s w o u l d p r o d u c e a p o o l of l o w fixed r e n t s . I believe that this w i l l not h a p because students form too pen, small a proportion of the flat-dwelling p o p u l a t i o n of L o n d o n . It w o u l d b e naive for a student b o d y t o t r y a n d f o r c e rents down w h e n i t is i n s u c h a m i n o r i t y . T h e o n l y effect o f s u c h a m o v e w o u l d b e to create a " s t u d e n t b a r " m a k i n g it i m p o s s i b l e f o r s t u d e n t s t o f i n d flats at a l l . L a n d l o r d s a n d t h e i r estatea g e n t s w o u l d s o o n n o t i c e t h a t flats rented to students w e r e b e i n g c o n sidered by the Rent Tribunal. T h e estate-agents w o u l d b e u n w i l l i n g to send client such tenants a n d w o u l d veto a l l students. If a student feels that his rent is excessive h e c o u l d a p p l y i n d i v i d u a l l y to t h e t r i b u n a l . A register o f rents fixed i n t h e area is o p e n f o r inspecti o n a t t h e l o c a l a u t h o r i t i e s offices, so i t is easy t o c h e c k i f a n a p p l i c a t i o n is w o r t h w h i l e . A t e n a n t i s g i v e n s i x months security of tenure, after tlie tribunal's decision, after w h i c h time the tenant c a n a p p l y for a n extension. T h e tribunal c a n limit the securi t y t o as l i t t l e as s e v e n d a y s a n d e v e n if a longer p e r i o d is g r a n t e d the landlord can apply to have it reduced i f the tenants' behaviour has been unsatisfactory. F o r example, if he has not c o m p l i e d w i t h the terms of his contract. It s e e m s a p i t y t h a t w h e n L o n d o n colleges are expanded little or no government money is d i r e c t e d t o wards student accommodation. S.E. Bames

Sir, O n the evening o f W e d n e s d a y 26th O c t o b e r c e r t a i n m e m b e r s o f the U n i o n s a w fit t o t a m p e r w i t h t h e u n c o m pleted m i c r o m e t e r M I K E o n its p l i n t h in the lower U n i o n lounge. In spite o f a n o t i c e t o t h e effect t h a t i t w a s u n finished they thought it w o u l d be c l e v e r to d i s m a n t l e p a r t o f i t a n d l e a v e m o s t o f t h e p i e c e s as e v i d e n c e of their supreme intelligence. I personally h a d never thought that even students o f f C w o u l d sink so l o w a s to d a m a g e t h e i r o w n m a s c o t .

Sir, Y o u are p u b l i s h i n g a n advertisement on the V i e t n a m w a r today. O n a recent visit to t h e U n i t e d States, I h e a r d of 60 U S C o n g r e s s m e n or Senators w h o have p l e d g e d support f o r t h e p o l i c y o f w i t h d r a w a l of' U S troops. S e n a t o r M o r s e is t h e b e s t know among them. A mother whose s o n w a s fighting i n V i e t a m a n d w h o carried a sticker i n her car reading 'Support the Fighting m e n i n Vi e t n a m r e v e a l e d to m e t h a t w h i l s t o u t w a r d l y she w a t s a l l s u p p o r t g i v e n to the A m e r i c a n C o m m i t m e n t , at the ballot box she w o u l d vote for a p o l i c y advocated b y the above 60. Peace c a n only come by political action a n d this makes the a d v e r t i s i n g y o u h a v e p u b l i s h e d so i m p o r t a n t . Paul Eisenklam

It h a s m a d e i t a p p a r e n t t o m e t h a t M I K E needs p r o t e c t i n g m o r e f r o m t h e lower, d r u n k e n elements o f f C U t h a n f r o m a n y external college, ft has also m a d e m e d o u b t w h e t h e r t h e effort p u t i n t o t h i s p r o j e c t by s o m a n y p e o p l e was really worthwhile, or rather whether the students of I C are w o r t h y of it. R. N . Conforth.

n Sir, Not only rubbish, but anonymous r u b b i s h ! It c o u l d n o t p o s s i b l y be considered the responsibility of J i m M u r r a y or B r i a n C o m p t o n to have continued the arrangement of the Freshers' h o p . O n failing their exams â&#x20AC;&#x201D; w h i c h failure can be largely att r i b u t e d to t h e i r w h o l e h e a r t e d efforts f o r I C U n i o n a l l last y e a r â&#x20AC;&#x201D; t h e y p r e s u m a b l y h a d jobs to take u p , w h i c h , even if i n L o n d o n , w o u l d presumably occupy their whole w o r k i n g day. Further, Colcutt's implication that U n i o n officials w e r e n o t n o t i f i e d i n advance of their absence d u r i n g the c o m i n g session a p p e a r s to b e e r r o n e o u s as I s a w J i m M u r r a y i n t h e U n i o n buildings over a week before h e start o f t e r m . T o u s e h i s ( h e r ? ) o w n w o r d s , i t is typical of the malaise that runs through m u c h of C o l c u t t that a large part of his c o m m e n t s h o u l d be devote d t o s l e i g h t i n g t w o of t h e U n i o n ' s hardest workers w h o are not n o w i n a position to reply. Roderick J. Redmayne E d . ; M r . R e d m a y n e has requested that ' O n failing their exams' be a m e n d e d t o O n f a i l i n g to r e t u r n .

A CAREER IN

n s . s s e g n

W E

n h

w o n ?

Sir, In view of the statement apparentl y m a d e a t t h e last G u i l d s U n i o n M e e t i n g a n d also i n the almost n o n existent I C U n i o n H a n d b o o k to t h e effect t h a t G u i l d s w e r e t h e w i n n e r s of t h e ' t o w p a t h ' event at M o r p h y D a y last y e a r , I w o u l d b e p l e a s e d i f y o u c o u l d a l l o w m e to m a k e use of your c o l u m n s t o state t h a t i n f a c t R C S w e r e i n possesion of t h e p u s h b a l l for the w h o l e of the event except t h e first t e n m i n u t e s a n d t h u s t h e r e is n o q u e s t i o n b u t t h a t t h e y a n d n o t Guilds were the winners. R.D.

i AS

WELL

lames

S

S S

A S

f l

l

s

Sir, 1 should strongly like to recomm e n d to whoever was i n charge of the C a r n i v a l s q u a d on S a t u r d a y t h e 2 2 n d O c t o b e r t h a t , i f i t is a b s o l u t e l y necessary to use t h e tennis courts f o r cleaning bill-boards on, that i n future he comes to some arrangement w i t h the tennis c a p t a i n over reserving the courts in Princes G a r d e n s . A s I b e l i e v e these b o a r d s were being taken over to the Chemistry Dept. M i g h t I suggest they be cleaned on the car park w h i c h , is r e l a t i v e l y free o n S a t u r d a y s a n d w h e r e t h e mess c r e a t e d w o u l d be free to r u n into t h e p u b l i c d r a i n s . I believe the C h e m i s t r y D e p t . has running water so t h a t t h e hose w o u l d pose no problem. R.P.

Ibbitt

d d y y n d y CITY * C U I L D S F E B . 15.

PHYSICS D E P T . JAN. 27.

C H E M I S T R Y / M E T A L L U R G Y J A N . 30.

d r t ,

L

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M A T H E M A T I C S F E B . 20.


FELIX

VIETNAM The war in Vietnam has meant untold suffering for the country's 31 million inhabitants. Peace can only be achieved by the implementation of the 1954 Geneva agreement. This, necessitates an immediate cessation of the bombing of North Vietnam by U.S. aircraft. Britain, as co-chairman of the Geneva Conference, must work for the carrying out of the Geneva agreement. We therefore urge the British Government to :â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1. Cease support for the U.S. presence in Vietnam. 2. Intensify its efforts to reconvene the 1954 Geneva Conference. 3. To accord the N . L . F . (Vietcong) full status as an independent negotiating body at such a conference. 4. Work towards the complete implementation of the 1954 agreements, including the reunification of Vietnam.

Dr. J . P. Astbury

M r . A . E . Lowe

M r . N . C. Barford

Miss P. R. Martins

Dr. I. Butterworth

Prof. P. T . Matthews

Mr. K . Cavanagh (Pres. RCSU)

Dr. C . W . A . Newey

M r . R. Conn (Vice-Pres. RCSU)

Mr. B. Parker (Hon. Sec. ICU)

M r . R. G . Davies

Mr. S. P. Patience

Dr. S. Doniach

Dr. S. Raimes

Mr. A . Duke (Pres. ICU)

Dr. J . L . Robinson

Dr. A . R. Edmonds

Dr. S. Rose

M r . H . Fail-brother

Dr. K. H . Ruddock

Mr. J . A . Gee

Mr. A . G . Siel

Dr. J . S. R. Goodlad

Professor J . T. Stuarf

Mr. A . D . Greenwood

Dr. D. L . Thomas

Prof. W . K. Hayman

Dr. R. J . ThreffaM

M r . J . C . de C. Henderson

M . J J . Warren (Hon. Sec. RCSII)

Dr. H . H . Hopkins

Mrs. D. E . C. Wedderhurn

Dr. T . W . B. Kibble

Mr.

R.

Wilkius


FELIX

TOP

PEOPLE

7

Tony

Duke-

President

S i r Owen Saunders -Ac t i n g Rector T h e sudden d e a t h of the late Rector S i r Patrick L i n s t e a d leaves a gap at t h e h e a d of I m p e r i a l C o l lege's a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . T h e g a p has filled b y Sir O w e n Saunders, P r o R e c t o r at I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e since 1964, and now appointed A c t i n g Rector. Sir O w e n Saunders, has a distinguishe d r e c o r d b o t h i n t h e a c a d e m i c field a n d i n an administrative capacity, i n various academic bodies, inside a n d outside the C o l l e g e . B o r n i n 1904 he w a s s c h o o l e d at E m m a n u e l S c h o o l and Birkbeck College, London. He entered Trinity College, C a m b r i d g e as a n u n d e r g r a d u a t e a n d t h e r e b e c a m e a Senior Scholar. H i s l o n g association w i t h Impe r i a l College began w h e n be was a p p o i n t e d to a L e c t u r e ship i n A p p l i e d M a t h e m a t i c a l Physics in 1932. A c a d e m i c a l l y his w o r k has been centred on A p p l i e d T h e r m o dynamics a n d i n particular heat transfer. M a d e Professor of M e c h a n i c a l E n g i n e e r i n g a n d H e a d of t h e Department in 1946. he b e c a m e D e a n of C i t y a n d G u i l d s College i n 195S. W h i l e t h e f u n c t i o n of S i r O w e n S a u n d e r s a p p o i n t m e n t is to b r i d g e ' gap before a p e r m a n e n t a p p o i n t m e n t is m a d e , h i s task is n o t a l i g h t o n e , a n d t h e C o l l e g e is g o i n g t h r o u g h a stage of vast d e v e l o p m e n t a n d r e organisation. H e sees t h i s t a s k as maintaining the m o m e n t u m of the change a n d the policies i n t r o d u c e d b y the late' Rector. It w o u l d be disastrous, a n d ill-fitting too, to the memory of S i r P a r i c k L i n s t e a d , t o a l l o w t h e p a c e of t h e C o l l e g e ' s p r e sent d e v e l o p m e n t t o l a g . T h e A c t ing Rector compared himself to a caretaker G o v e r n m e n t , a n d w h i l e his hands are not b o u n d , not a great deal can be initiated i n the interim p e r i o d b e f o r e a n e w R e c t o r is a p p o i n t e d . H i s j o b is t o see t h a t t h e p r e s e n t d e v e l o p m e n t is c a r r i e d t h r o u g h w i t h vigour. In particular, the Sports Centre, the n e w College Blockboth started i n October 1964—and the n e w H a l l s o f Residence w i l l be a d v a n c e d to c o m p l e t i o n . Sir O w e n ' s v i e w of I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e is t h a t i t has a ' t w i n r o l e ' t o f u l f i l l . It is a n i n s t i t u t e t o p r o d u c e specialists, specialists that a t e c h n o logically based c o m m u n i t y requires, a n d f o r t h i s it m u s t be a c e n t r e o f academic excellence, holding a special, if not unique, position i n British training a n d research. I n a d d i t i o n , d i e C o l l e g e must' p r o v i d e a 'University E d u c a t i o n ' — i n the broad sense c f the t e r m — t o p r o d u c e f u t u r e l e a d e r s of i n d u s t r y a n d b u s i n e s s w h o m a y m o v e completely outside their o w n specific d i s c i p l i n e . It c o n t a i n s a b r o a d s p e c t r u m of d i s c i p l i n e f r o m the P u r e to t h e A p p l i e d — M a t h e m a t i c to E n g i n e e r i n g — a n d to h e l p to a c h i e v e this latter role, greater contact between the departments, between

the groups w i t h i n the departments a n d a m o r e fluid m o t i o n o f i d e a s b e t w e e n these groups m u s t b e a i m e d at. T h e b r o a d e n i n g o f I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e can be a c h i e v e d , too, b y i n corDorating n e w schools w i t h i n the College. I n t h i s sense, t h e A c t i n g R e c t o r w i l l c o n t i n u e t o w o r k , as S i r P a t r i c k ^ i n s t e a d d i d , for a n a m a l g a m ation with the School oi the Architectural Association. m r e p l y to t h e s u g g e s t i o n t h a t m a n y u n d e r g r a d u a t e s treat i m p e r i a l (-.ouege as a n e d u c a t i o n a l i a c t o r y , rather than participatin g more fully i n t h e l i t e or t h e C o l l e g e , S i r O w e n thought that there w e r e three ways t o r e m e d y t h i s ; m u c h of w h i c h is a l r e a d y p r o v i d e d . T h e H a l l s of R e sidence must be expanded, eventuall y to a b s o r b m o r e s t u d e n t s . R e s i d e n c i a l l i f e w i l l t h e n be t h e c e n t r e of tne C o l l e g e outside a c a d e m i c affairs. T h o s e l i v i n g i n digs w i l l t h e n n a t u r a l l y g r a v i t a t e to t h e R e s i d e n c e s for a corporate cultural a n d social life. Secondly, Imperial College provides a n d s h o u l d p r o v i d e a w i d e r a n g e cultural facilities; of social and w h e t h e r t h e s t u d e n t uses t h e m is another matter. A l l that can be done h e r e is t o see t h e y exist a n d t o h e l p t h e m flourish. T h i r d l y a greater contact with other Colleges of L o n d o n University c o u l d be a c h i e v e d . L o n d o n U n i v e r s i t y as a w h o l e p r o v i d e s a v a s t r a n g e of a c t i v i t i e s . A general complaint of British U n i v e r s i t i e s is t h a t t h e u n d e r g r a d u a t e courses a r e t o o s p e c i a l i s e d , a n d r e strikted .directly to their own discipline. T h i s , i n p a r t i c u l a r , is a p r o b l e m at I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e w h e r e a high academic level must be a c h i e v e d w i t h i n a ,3 y e a r u n d e r graduate course. Sir O w e n w o u l d like t o see t h e u n d e r g r a d u a t e courses b r o a d e n e d so t h a t s t u d e n t s m a y d e f e r t h e i r d e c i s i o n to s p e c i a l i s e in a g i v en d i r e c t i o n t i l l the e n d of t h e i r first y e a . S o m e d e p a r t m e n t s are a n x i o u s to see t h i s c h a n g e a l t h o u g h others fear a l o w e r i n g of s t a n d a r d s . -

In general, the A c t i n g Rector des c r i b e d h i m s e l f as a l i b e r a l . H e w o u l d l i k e to m i n i m i z e c o m p u s i o n on s t u d ents b u t a t t r a c t t h e m b y s t i m u l a t i o n . A b o v e a l l I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e is a c o l lege of a university, containing a w-ide r a n g e o f s c i e n c e s w h i c h s h o u l d interlock w i t h a n d stimulate each other. It c o n t a i n s postgraelnates a n d undergraduates, mutually depent : a l a r g e r a t i o o f p o s t g r a d u a t e s is n e c e s sary to achieve a h i g h academic standard, but without the undergraduate the C o l l e g e w o u l d degenerate into a Research Institution.

of

ICU

T o n y D u k e w a s elected President of I C U in June of this year. A t the time the reaction of many people was ; " W h o ? " E v e n now his genial features are none too well known, though most evenings he can be found in Southside b a r — " I'm trying to get to know the people." D u r i n g the s p e c u l a t i o n last y e a r c o n c e r n i n g possible candidates it was p o i n t e d o u t as a g u i d e t h a t t i l e P r e s i d e n t u s u a l l y c a m e f r o m the l o w e r ranks of C o u n c i l . Tony came in f r o m q u i t e a d i f f e r e n t d i r e c t i o n so let u s trace h i s r i s e t o t h e P r e s i d e n c y . H a v i n g g r o w n up i n a rough area o f P l y m o u t h h e a r r i v e d at I C w i t h an impressive sporting record. At school he was C a p t a i n of S w i m m i n g a n d h e p l a y e d R u g b y f o r the s c h o o l ( P l y m o u t h College) a n d the country. A t I C h e w e n t s t r a i g h t i n t o the 1st X V i n w h i c h he still plays. His other social activities have included beijig L e a d e r o f the C h u r c h Society and o w n i n g (and bending) sports cars, the present one being a n M G T F . It is n o w f o u r years since T o n y a r r i v e d a t I C as a-» F r e s h e r i n C i v Eng. F o r t h e p a s t t h r e e y e a r s (Uvo undergraduate and one postgraduate) he has been a Y e a r R e p o n G u i l d s ' C o u n c i l and w o u l d this year have been GuildsV R e p on I C C o u n c i l . A k n o w l e d g e of C o u n c i l procedure he c o n s i d e r s t o be " n o t e s s e n t i a l " ; w h a t d o e s m a t t e r is t h a t h e h a s a great ' u n d e r s t a n d i n g o f the g e n e r a l l a y o u t — • p r o b a b l y best o b t a i n e d f r o m o u t s i d e . T o n y c o m e s t o the P r e s i d e n c y w i t h a n o p e n m i n d , p r o b a b l y as a r e s u l t of not w o r k i n g previously on C o u n cil w h i c h can have a restricting i n fluence. T h e a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s of the U n i o n a n d its p r e s e n t state h e finds s a t i s f a c t o r y b u t h e feels t h a t t h e r e is a lack of p r i d e i n the U n i o n , a n i n sufficient l o y a l t y t o i t . T o h i m it seems t h a t t h e r e are f a r t o o f e w a c t i v e m e m b e r s ; a l l t h a t is n e e d e d is f o r e v e r y o n e to s u p p o r t o n e o r t w o c l u b s or organisations really actively and t h e r e w o u l d be a great i m p r o v e m e n t i n the U n i o n ' s strength. P r o b a b l y this from support could come equally undergrads and P . G S . — t h e latter could help greatly by b r i n g i n g i n their experience a n d responsibility while the f o r m e r h a v e g r e a t s c o p e a v a i l a b l e to t h e m . T h i s is a d i f f i c u l t y e a r f o r the E x e c , the P r e s i d e n t sees d a n g e r to the Union's freedom from " empire b u i l d e r s " a n d fears t h a t a n e w R e c t o r m i g h t be less p e r m i s s i v e t h a n w a s the late S i r P a t r i c k L i n s t e a d . It i s a y e a r f o r t h e U n i o n to d e m o n s t r a t e its solidarity and responsibility, " t h o u g h I don't m i n d a little horsep l a y . " Whatever happens T o n y D u k e feels t h a t the U n i o n w i l l r u n h a p p i l y .


CROSSWOR Clues Across I A l m o s t a giggle f r o m the goose! (6) 4 Does the pianist play this by ear? H a r d l y ! (5) 7 S p o i l a most singular planet. (3) 8 A profit o f 501-6-500? Put an end to it then. (8) 9 Set loose f o r nothing . . . (4) 1Z . . ., as the R o m a n s used t o say. (5) H e tops the bill each night. O n l y 14 one,- though ? (4) 16 D o n ' t work o n this one. (7) 17 A sporting arbitrator. (7) 18 P a c k in a suitable place. (4) 20 Brewer is muddled, as yet, but g r o w i n g ! (5) 22 Estimate a measure o f speed. (4) 25 " E i n e K l e i n e Nachtmusi'k," by C h o p i n ? N o , but the right idea! (8) 26 Equipment f o r a small cat, c o m monly. (3) 27 A n heraldic wave-top, perhaps. (5) 28 M a k e certain of getting this one. (6) Clues D O w n 1 B u b small particles roughly i n the fireplace ? (5) 2 T h e perfect cure f o r headaches? H o w c u t t i n g ! (10) 3 E x p e l six in a headless sect. (5) 4 Birds do this to stop getting ruffled. (5) 5 Subtract and almost infer. (6) . . . 6 7 10 II 13 14 15 18

A second string ?

19 20 21 23 24

C o l o u r f u l fruit at point blank range. (6) M a n y get the wind u p in this ) vessel. Ill-treatment i f y o u make the short sailor use it. (5) Fifteen ? C o u l d be, but certainly conscious. (5) A point from twenty across. (4)



R t f N 235

Certainly n o t !

(6) It's a mistake to cover a lady's hands. (4) C o o k those changed r o t a s ! (5) T h e Spanish b o w — i n the a r m . (5) In a L a t i n test I need inspirat i o n ; the appendix, perhaps ? (10) H o w to direct an o x . (5) O n this ? L u o k out then ! (6) It's still f o u n d f r o m attics i n c o n fusion. (6)

T h e 10/- for the best Crossword goes this week to S . D . W a l t e r of Maths. T h e Crossword is judged b y the Editorial B o a r d , whose decision is 1. final. T h e Board reserve the right to hold over to a succeeding issue any Crossword submitted. Entries must be received b y t h e Wednesday before publication.

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M A R T I N S B A N K L I M I T E D


FELIX

IC Folk Concert Featuring T h e Young Tradition. 3/-, 5/- and bar. Upper Refectory, 19.30. THURSDAY 3 F E L I X 12.45 Press Room. Rover Crew : Safety on Mountains, 303 Mines, 12.35. Union Meeting. 13.15.

Concert

Wells Soc. A r t of Science. Exhibition. Judging of Music entries. Room 220, Mech Eng. 19.30. Anglican Chaplaincy, Eucharist, 08.30. Concert Hall. T H U R S D A Y 10

Hall,

G l i d i n g Club 254 Aero, 17.45. Dancing Club : Beginners Ballroom, 19.30 to 20.45. Upper Refectory International Relations Club/Political Societies Council. The American Political System : D a v i d Moore. Physics Building, 20.00. FRIDAY 4 Films. Hitchcocks " T h e B i r d s " and " C o n q u e r i n g the World's Highest Peak," 19.30 Concert H a l l .

F E L I X Staff meeting. 12.45 Press Room. General Studies. It there a limit to progress (contd.) (arranged by Wells Soc.). Trades Unions within the Modern State. Fuels, Brains Trust arranged by I C Chemical Engineering Society.

Folk and Square Dancing : Snack Bar 19.30 to 22.30, Beginners welcome. Selkirk Party. 20.00 onwards. Wine, beer, spirits, women, free. SUNDAY 6

Wells Soc. Is there a limit to Progress, by M r . E . F . Schumacher, Lecture 2 13.30. Films, Things to come, the first men in the Moon. R o o m 220, Mech Eng, 19.30 Tickets, 1/- members, 2/6 non members from Committee.

Catholic Students Mass followed by social. Little Oratory, Cromwell Road, 07.30. Anglican Chaplaincy. Eucharist, 09.00. Evensong, 19.30, Queen's Gate. MONDAY 7

St.

Rover Crew. Crew Summer activities 1966. 12.35 303 Mines.

Augustines,

C N D Neocolonialism in Vietnam by Malcolm Caldwell. M a i n Botany Theatre, 13.15. Dancing Club, Beginners Ballroom, 19.30 to 20.45, Upper Refectory. Gliding Club, 254 Aero, 17.45.

Christian U n i o n . Colossians 1, T h e Supremacy of Christ. Rev. K . H . Hooker. Room 266 Aero. 13.10. Joint Christian Societies. The Coloured Community. Rev. Wilfred Wood. 303 Mines 13.10.

Corsrr-'r^'T

Rt. H o n .

FoiK and Square Dancing, Snack Bar, 19.30 to 22.30. Beginners welcome. Wells Soc. A r t of Science Exhibition. Wine and Cheese Party. Will enable exhibitors to meet the judges, 19.30. Tickets, 7/6 from Committee. S A T U R D A Y 12

Dancing Club. Beginners Ballroom. 19.30 to 20.45. Beginners Latin American, 20.45 to 22.00 Concert Hall. TUESDAY 8

Organisation for Social Service. Work party for weekend, 12-13 N o v . See notice Southside. S U N D A Y 13

F E L I X Staff meeting. 12.45 Press Room. General Studies. Across T w o C u l tures 5. Music and the T w o C u l tures ? T h e Logic o f the Emotions.

Catholic Students Mass followed by social. 07.30, Little Oratory, C r o m well Road. Anglican Chaplaincy. Eucharist, 09.00. Evensong, 19.30 St. Augistine's Queen's Gate. M O N D A Y 14 Christian U n i o n . D o A l l Roads Lead to God? by E d Reis. Room 266 Aero 13.10. Joint Christian Societies, Mrs. Parry,

Catholic Society Mats. 12.35, 11 Princes Gardens. Wells Society. Is there a limit to progress? by M r . E . F . Schumachen. 13.30 First of two lectures. Films : War of the Worlds, The Time •Machine. Room 220 Mech E n g . 19.30 Tickets 1/- members, 2/6 non members from committee. Railway Society. Professor E . R. Laithwaite, Presidential address. Room 554, Mech. Eng, 17.40.

" Teilhard de Chardin " 303 Mines. 13.10 Joint Chaplaincies Dinner Southside Refectory, 19.30. Dancing Club. Beginners Ballroom,

Dancing Club. Intermediate Ballroom. 19.30 to 20.45. Intermediate Latin American. 20.45 to 22.00 Concert Hall. WEDNESDAY 9 Engineering Soc. Visit B B C t.v. Centre, 13.15 Methodist Society. Communion Service, Main Botany Lecture Theatre, Rev. Neville Ward, all Christians welcome. 13.15.

Society,

Quintin Hogg, O C , M . P , Kensing.»p Town Hall, 20.00. F R I D A Y 11

Wells Soc. Dinner, Union Upper Refectory. Lounge Suits, 19.00 .Tickets from Mrs. V . Burdess E . E . P . G . and Committee.

1CWA Sherry Party, I C W A Lounge, 18.00 A l l Icwariam welcome.

Folk Club

WHATS ' ON

WEDNESDAY 2

1C

Methodist Soc. Debate " T h i s House Wishes That G u y Fawkes Had Succeeded. 16.30 Hinde St. Methodist Church, Manchester Sq., W l . Presbyterian and Congregational Soc. Christianit yand Medicine by D r . P. Backus Whitefields Memorial Church, Tottenham Court Road, W l . 16.00. Catholic Chaplaincy. Social Evening. I l l Gower Street. 20.00. MONDAY 7 Flying C l u b U L U 19.30. TUESDAY 8 Fencing Club Trials. U L U Badminton Court 18.30. Inter Faculty Christian Union. G e n eral Committee Meeting, Council Room U L U 19.00. WEDNESDAY 9 English Folk Dancing Soc. School of Pharmacy Brunswick Sq. 19.30. North America Club Films of some of the U.S.A.'s National Parks. 19.30 at U C . T H U R S D A Y 10 Christian Science Organisation. Room 3A U L U 20.00. Folk Song Club. Peggy Seeger and

19.10 to 20.45 Beginners Latin American, 20.45 to 22.00. Wells Soc. After the Moon by Prof. Sir Harrie Massey. Room 408 Elec. Eng. 19.30. T U E S D A Y 15 F E L I X Staff meeting, 12.45 Press Room. General Studies, Across T w o Cultures 6. Prehistoric Anotolia. Aspects of Jazz. Catholic Society Mass, Princes Gardens.

12.35,

11

Exploration Society Travelling with the News, Room 303 Mines 17.10 Dancing ,Club. Intermediate Latin American 20.45 to 22.00 Concert Hall. W E D N E S D A Y 16 Folk Concert featuring Nigel Denver, 4/-, 3/- and bar. Upper Refectory 19.30. Anglican Chaplaincy, Eucharist 08.30 Concert Hall. Conservative Society. Commonwealth Comm. Guest Sneaker, Sir Alec Douglas-Home, at U L U . T H U R S D A Y 17 F E L I X Staff Meeting. 12.45 Press Room. " G u i d e Working P a r t y " by a Guide Commissioner Rover Crew 303 Mines 12.35. General Studies. Collective Bargain ings Response to Automation's Challenge. Conservative Society. Annual Dinner,

Ewan M a C o l l . Members members 5/-. Middlesex Medical School. Cleveland South side of G P O tower. F R I D A Y 11

University of London Natural History Soc. Nov. 11/12/13 Trip to Gibralter Point Nature Reserve. Lines. Leader J . S, Harrison. Numbers limited.

Union Dining Hall, 7 for 7.30 p.m. Tickets, 25/-. Gliding Club. 254 Aero, 17.45. Dancing Club. Beginners Ballroom, 19.30 to 20.45 Upper Refectory. F R I D A Y 18 Folk and Square Dancing, Snack Bar, 19.30 to 22.30. Beginners welcome.

John Clifford Soc. Annual Weekend Conference. St. George's Place Baptist church Canterbury. Speaker Rev. Michael Walker. " T r e n d s in modern Theology." SATURDAY

ULU

Inter Faculty Christian Union. Missionary Conference. Bedford College 16.30 S U N D A Y 13 C of E in University of London, Christ the King Church. Gordon Sq. 08.00 Holy Communion, 09.30 University Eucharist and Sermon, 19.30 Evening Service and University Sermon, 20.30 Evening E u charist.

WEDNESDAY 2 English Folk Dancing Society. School of Pharmacy, Brunswick Sq. 19.30. THURSDAY 3 Marxist Soc. The English Revolution. Ian MacCalman. L S E 13.00. Debating Society. Assembly Hall

selling" M r . Anthony Mann. Hinde St. Methodist Church, Manchester Sq. W l . 16.00. Catholic Chaplaincy. Literature and Society by Terry Eagleton. |111 Gower St. 20.00. Presbyterian and Congregational Soc. F i l m of a visit to the Holy Land. Regent Sq. Presbyterian Church, Wakefield St. W C 1 . 20.00. M O N D A Y 14 Bridge. Duplicate Pairs Contests. U L U games room, 18.15. Flying Club U L U 19.30. T U E S D A Y 15 'History of the .Mormon C h u r c h " at North America Club, U L U 19.30 Humanist Soc. " The Handicapped Child " M r . Peter Henderson. W E D N E S D A Y 16

19.30 " T h e r e is two much litter in literature and sin in the cinema." Hellenic Soc. General Meeting. U L U 19.30. Christian Science Organisation. Room 3A U L U 20.00. FRIDAY 4 John Clifford Soc. Group Discussions Bloomsbury Central Baptist Church Shaftesbury Ave. W C 2 19.00. F i l m Soc. " G i g i " 19.15 U L U . Inter Faculty Christian Union Eastern Lecture, 19.30 Alliance Club. SATURDAY 5 Hop. Malet Street 3/6d. 19.30 to 23.00. Inter Faculty Christian Union. Bible Reading, Rev. H . M . Carson. Bedford College 19.30. SUNDAY 6 C

of E In University o f London. Christ the K i n g Church, Gordon Sq. 08.00 Holy Communion 09.30 University Eucharist and Sermon. 119.30 Evening Service and University Sermon. 20.30 Evening Eu* charist.

3/- non Hospital St.. W l . 20.00.

English Folk Dancing Soc. School of Pharmacy, Brunswick Sq. 19.30. T H U R S D A Y 17 Debate. " J o h n Bull's Term of Office in Northern Ireland Must be Terminated." Assembly Hall U L U 19.30. Christian Science Organisation. Room 3A U L U 20.00.

F O L K A T STUDENT PRICES!

Imperial

Irish The McPeake family, a traditional Irish folk group, brought a new and enjoyable tvpe of music to I.C. when they were the guests at the first Folk Song Club meeting. Despite only half of their normal complement of six being able to appear, they gave a varied, and, judging by the applause, an extremely well received performance. The combination of an original presentation of Folk Music seasoned by traditional Irish wit, produced splendid entertainment for the Club. Martin Beer, a new member of the Folk Club introduced the evening, followed by an older resident. Steve Grant, whose songs varied from the unaccompanied traditional to those of Derek Hall. Unabashed by their lack of numbers, the McPeake family conA n Irish tinued until the interval. harp and Killien pipes—a form of Irish bagpipes played with bellowsand operated by the elbow—produced a novel sound for two instrumental, while cuitar and banio were used to accompany traditional songs. Locai College talent resumed the evening after the interval. The While City Ramblers moved through some well known melodies, followed by Ivor Grayson-Smith, in good form after his illness. Sheila Henrywood and Steve Grant. The McPeake family returned to complete the evening; their repertoire extended by tin-whistle and bones (a traditional form of spoons). Both their traditional songs and instrumental produced loud applause, to the extent that the end of their performance was protracted by overwhelming encores. A n excellent start to the term was undoubtably produced for the Folk Club. For those unfortunate to miss it, the next concert will feature the Young Tradition.

Pooh: a chump? The Pooh Club, on its fourth E x puotition, wont to the Ancient Roman City of Verulainium in search of a National Poohsticlcs Bridge, and was declared to be "the Biggest Load of C h u m m I've ever seen" l)v a selfappointed spokesman for the local Residents Assoshiation. Notwithstanding, it was a Good Game, T h e match was won by the ex-officio chairman, who dropped his last stick at 5.30 p.m., by the light of tlie Cat's well buttered Mini.

e Y O U C A N advertise free of charge in Felix, subject to certain conditions. Our W H A T ' S O N column is open to everyone at Imperial College, though particularly to club organisers, to advertise events to which any student of IC may go. Private individuals may take advantage of this service only at the discretion of the edtloral board, under whose scrutiny all wording must pass. Please address to What's On, delivered to (he Felix pigeonhole in the Union rack by Tuesday week before publication.

College

Elecra Records, in association with Folk Directions Limited, present presents

Y

S

ROYAL ALBERT HALL

S TOM

N O V E M B E R 4th, 7.30 p.m.

by J.Whiting

Dec

6-9

at7.30|

Tickets: 12/6, 10/-, 7/6, 5/-, 3/6 Tickets : 4/6, yfe

N

From R . A . H .

T e l . K E N 8212 and Agents il College Dramatic Society.

2,000 seats at 5/-

Society


FELIX

10

GUILDS

- C Z E C H

WOW R

ASTORIA CHARING C R O S S R O A D ;

E X C H A N G E

achieve w h a t w e set o u t t o d o . I n fact, i t d i d mean a great deal i n terms o f personal friendships m e m bers o f o u r g r o u p established. W e d i d get t h e u n i q u e opportunity of ed a n d showed t h e m a great deal of s e e i n g t h e C o m m u n i s t c o m m u n i t y at our institution. After L o n d o n t h e work and play. Language diffcultiee Czechs were taken to Cardiff where were enormous a n d certainly made they saw t h e Steel C o . of W a l e s . a l o t o f difference i n the s t a n d a r d of This industrial visit w a s of special intellectual conversation. What we interest t o the C z e c h s since they were. discoveied o n the w h o l e was that the all engineering students. E x . G u i l d s Czechs were friendly people, b u t President D a i Howell, w h onow lacked humour. T h i s is s o m e t h i n g works there, used h i s influence w h i c h w e hope w e gave them i n to obtain trantlators a n d afterT h i s y e a r s a w the first i n t e r n a t i o n d i v i d u a l l y a n d c e r t a i n l y as a g r o u p . wards tea. This was followed a l e x c h a n g e v i s i t o r g a n i s e d b y the I a m certain that w e made more a tour of the countryside by C. & G . Union. friends than enemies. a n d a b e a u t i f u l d a y b y t h e sea n e a r Ten C z e c h students a r r i v e d i n I have been asked a great deal the Gower. F r o m W a l e s w e went t o L o n d o n i n J u n e f o r t h e first p a r t o f a b o u t f u t u r e t r i p s a n d t h e costs o f Coventry where we saw the the trip. T h e s t u d e n t s (7 g i r l s , 1 3 'hese visits. O n this m y o p i n i o n is Cathedral a n d Community Centre. boys) w e r e l e d b y Senior L e c t u r e r s purely personal. These exchanges are This was followed b y trips to i n C i v i l E n g i n e e r i n g . A l l efforts w e r e i n v a l u a b l e ; b u t e i t h e r a) l e a r n t h e i r Stratford-on-Avon and Oxford m a d e t o familiarise the C z e c h s w i t h l a n g u a g e , o r b) g o t o c o u n t r i e s w h e r e University. the En gl i s h w a y of life from the very E n g l i s h is spoken e.g. S c a n d i n a v i a beginning of the trip. T h e majority ana U.S.A. Finance—the trip c a n of the p e o p l e h a d never b e e n out o f cost a great deal—we contributed their c o u n t r y a n d the ones w h o h a d personally f o r t h e visit a n d I think travelled h a d been only t o Russia. w e c o u l d slightly increase this c o n T h e r e f o r e this t r i p h a d v e r y special t r i b u t i o n , a n d also g e t m o r e h e l p significance. from Industry. F i n a l l y , these trips ought to have a definite timetable printed w e l l ahead of the trip, disSeven o f o u r students then w e n t a n d agreed b y the two cussed to Czechoslovakia—the trip was very Universities involved. I a m fully i n s i m i l a r i n p l a n t h o u g h t h e i r ideas w e r e favour of such visits p r o v i d e d the a b i t different. D u r i n g o u r stay w e financial b u r d e n b e shifted f r o m the saw a gieat deal of the country a n d Union to Inunstry. met very many students—we saw In c o n c l u s i o n , o n b e h a l f of the E x some very interesting plays u s i n g President a n d members of t h e exrather advanced drama techniques change, I w o u l d like to, thank C a n d w h i c h t o the best o f our k n o w l e d g e T h e visitors w e r e shown a r o u nd G Union. Centralians, I.C. U n i o n for had not reached L o n d o n . L o n d o n extensively b y members of their k i n d h e l p a n d trust i n u s to the C o l l e g e . T r i p s included sightIt i s v e r y diffcult t o accurately a s c a r r y t h r o u g h t h e first, a n d I h o p e seeing, s h o p p i n g , theatres a n d visits sess t h e s i g n i f i c a n c e o f s u c h a n e x - n o t t h e l a s t , e x c h a n g e w i t h a f o r e i g n t o D u b s T h e staff k i n d l y c o - o p e r a t change H o w e v e r , i t d i d almost University.

by Tidu Malni

Czechs in England

Guilds goes abroad

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Circle : 2 0 / - 15/6 Stalls : 12/6 10/6 7/6

A .PAUL CZINNER

PRODUCTION

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. MARGOT FONTEYN

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DAVID

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BLAIR

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KENNETH MACMILLANI Scenery and Costumt

NICHOLASl 6 E O R G I ADISJ

The Orchestra of trie Royal O p a r t Hows* Covant Gar

Produced and Diracted toy PAUL CZINNER

SPECIAL CONCESSIONS POR PARTIES O f as OR OVER

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FELIX

11

L T TO L Y K Fireflies and wind at the Welsh Harp.

Winners And... T H E C O L L E G E made news in the field of sailing, during the summer, by winning National Firefly Week, held at Felixstowe Ferry Y . C . John Pattissou, an eighteen -year-old 1st year, sailed the College's new 5Vfk. II Firefly, "Petnla," to gain four wins during the week—thus taking the maximum number of points and producing the most overwhelming victory for years. Beginners T H E C L U B H E L D its p r e l i m i n a r y trials o n Saturday, 15th October i n bright s u n a n d good w i n d , w h i c h is rather u n u s u al f o r t h e W e l s h H a r p . E i g h t e e n people, m o s t l y F r e s h e r s , s a i l e d i n f o u r races d u r i n g t h e m o r n i n g , and s h o w ed great p r o m i s e . T h e standard of racing was unusually high f o r such a n event, a n d there appeared to be n o o n e w h o h a d n o t raced previously—• though some were hampered b y u n f a m i l i a r i t y w i t h Fireflies a n d the " H a r p . " T e a m racing practices w i l l be held o n Saturdays, a n d the club hopes to be able to field some very strong teams. S a i l i n g lessons f o r novices w i l l be h e l d o n W e d n e s d a y s , thus g i v i n g t h e club even more talent, i n the future. T h i s Easter a cruising h o l i d a y o n the N o r t h Sea is planned—details w i l l be a p p e a r i n g o n the notice board, i n the near future.

I.C. Sharp Commodore

I.C.S.C.

PURPOSE T h e chief purpose at h i s page is to give a n overall picture of t h e C o l lege sporting scene. This may be somewhat dominated b y the'big' c l u b s , b u t t h e r e is r o o m f o r e v e r y one,—so reports etc. w i l l b e greatly appreciated.

PROJECT N t x t issue there w i l l b e a f u l l page report on the Underwater Club's summer exhibition—mainly r e l y i n g o n p i c t o r i a l c o n t e n t . I t is h o p e d to r u n similai articles o n other 'big events.

I.C.4 — QJE.C. 0

Spot the ball as I.C. attack.

N N TO

C

I.C. 7 : N O R T H E R N P O L Y T E C H N I C 4. Scorers for I . C . : Easteel 3 Hopwood 3 Sauire 1. " O V E R C O N F I D E N C E IS T H E ally of defeat." T h i ; was certainly true at Harlington last Saturday when I . C . stumbled to the brink of defeat, only just managing to scramble back from the abyss and go through to the second round of the U . L . U . C u p Competition. T h e d i f f e r e n c e b e t w e e n t h e t w o t e a m s w a s o n l y a p p a r e n t i n fitness, f o o t b u i i w i s e n e i t h e r h a d a n y t h i n g t o o f f e r — w h e n t h e t e a m s t r i e d t e n goals w e r e s c o r e d i n f o r t y m i n u t e s , i n c l u d i n g fifteen m i n u t e s o f b l i n d m a n s b u l l i n near darkness. T h e g a m e s t a r t e d oft i n a s c r a p p y f a s h i o n , a n d c o n t i n u e d i n a s i m i l a r v e i n f o i t h e first h o u r ; t h e o n l y r e a l -iit'orts, f o r I . C . , c o m i n g f r o m T a y l o r , at h a l f h a c k . N o r t h e r n P o l y t e c h n i c o p e n e d t h e s c o r i n g w h e n s l a c k m a r k i n g b y the l . C . defence allowed o n ' inside f o r w a r d to scramble to ball home. i n the T h e e x h a u s t e d state o f t h e o p p o s i t i o n s l o w l y b e g a n t o s h o w s e c o n d h a l f , as I . C . g r a d u a l l y b e g a n t o p r e d o m i n a t e . E v e n t u a l l y flashes o f a b i l i t y f r o m E a s t e l l p r o d u c e d t h r e e g o a l s i n as m a n y m i n u t e s , p u t t i n g I . C . in the lead. T h e t h i r d goal, from thirty yards, b u l g e d the back of t h e net before t h e keeper h a d m o v e d . It s a i d m u c h f o r t h e c o u r a g e o f t h e N o r t h e r n P o l y t e a m t h a t i n t h e last four minutes they c a m e back f r o m near defeat a n d forced I . C . to extra time. T h e college defence w a s again easily p i e r c e d a n d the m a t c h entered a half hour extra time w i t h t h e score three a l l . T h e g a l l a n t N o r t h e r n t e a m c o u l d n o t s u m m o n u p t h e reserves o f e n e r g y o f s p i r i t t o b e a t t h e i r s u p e r i o r s i n fitness, a n d I . C . s c o r e d f o u r m o r s g c i i l s in extra time, c o m i n g f r e m H o p w o o d , Eastell a n d Squire, to the opponent's one. I . C . w i l l i n d e e d b e r e l i e v e d t o g e t t h r o u g h t h i s r o u n d a f t e r c o m i n g so c ' f w e t o i g n o m i n i o u s d e f e a t . F i r m e r c o n t r o l is n e e d e d i n m i d f i e l d , b v t h e w i n g halves a n d inside forwards—someone with the ability to read the game woulH be welcome. T h e fighting s p i r i t a n d t h e w i l l t o w i n a t a l l c o s t is n e c e s s a r y i n e v e r y game, w h e n I . C . l e a m a n d practise this thev w i l l b e n better t e a m

A F T E R A N H O U R of -hockey, eleven exhausted Icwarians staggere d v i c t o r i o u s l y f r o m t h e field, h a v ing beaten Q . E . C . 4-0. T h i s w a s the first g a m e o f t h e s e a s o n , a n d as training matches were only ten minutes each w a y , t h e tiredness w a s not s u m r i s m g . T h o u g h t h e game w a s somewhat untidy, the victory was very worthwhile. T o c o m b a t t h e l a c k o f fitness, t h e intensity of training it t o b e doubled, and c o u p l e d w i t h t h e arrival of several p r o m i s i n g f r e s h e i s , t h e season s h o u l d be q u i t e successful. W h a t about a supporters' club ?

FELIX S m a l l Ads F E L I X small ads. f r o m 8d. per line. F o r more details contact A d m a n R o b i n H a l l v i a F E L I X rack.

M . Paluch

! Apologies to the R u g b y C l u b for the truncation of your report— n o r m a l s e r v i c e w i l l b e r e s u m e d as soon as possible. A c t u a l l y t h u o g h , i y was a Printers' error over w h i c h I have little, or n o control.

A . Robins

When the pressure's on, strange things can happen. Photographs by D. Cooper Report by R. Grundy


FELIX

2

FELIK

L P T h i s year's C a r n i v a l B o a r d intends to hold a " gigantic c o n c e r t " next M a r c h , i n the Albert H a l l , lerry Stockbridge, the Car n i v a l C o - o r d i n ator has contacted the manager of the h a l l a n d is c o n f i d e n t t h a t t h e p r o p o s a l is p r a c t i c a b l e . If this were to c o m e off. C a r n i v a l w o u l d h a v e t h e c h o i c e o f either a concert o f classical m u s i c w h i c h involves hiring a n orchestra and charging h i g h ticket prices o r a pop c o n c e r t w h i c h w o u l d c e r t a i n l y a t t r a c t m o r e s t u d e n t s b u t w o u l d need i n s u r a n c e a n d e x t r a staffing i f a b i g name group were obtained. According to estimates s u p p l i e d b y the R . A . H . , a pop c o n c e r t m i g h t p r o d u c e t a k i n g s o f £2,400 a t n o r m a l p r i c e s — i.e. m a x i m u m o f 1 g u i n e a . It i s h o p e d that the concert w i l l be h e l d i n e a r l y March.

Professor Sir Willis Jackson

e o B y 1 9 0 8 i t is p r e d i c t e d t h a t f o r t h e first t i m e i n recent history, the number of scientists r e q u i r e d i n Britain will b e greater than the n u m b e r o f e n g i n e e r s . T h i s is o n e o f the conclusions of the Jackson C o m mittee report o n M a n p o w e r Resources w h i c h w a s p u b l i s h e d r e c e n t l y . The committee was reporting a comprehensive survey of the deployment of technically qualified people. T h e committee, w h i c h was headed b y Professor S i r W i l l i s J a c k s o n , H e a d of E i e c . E n g . , a l s o p r o d u c e d t h e first s t u d y o f tire e m p l o y m e n t o f t e c h n i c a l s u p p o r t i n g staff. T h e figures f o r 1 9 6 8 a r e b a s e d o n t h e results of e n q u i r i e s m a d e t o i n dustry on their requirements a n d are, as » u c h , o n l y e s t i m a t e s . T h e o u t p u t of scientists f r o m u n i v e r s i t i e s f o r t h a t year w o u l d have to b e 14,000 w h i l e 12,000 e n g i n e e r i n g graduates are r e q u i r e d . T h i s is 2 4 % i n excess o f t h e foreseeable numbers a n d c o u l d only be met b y redeployment f r o m other sectors. A n o t h e r r evealing fact produced i n t h e r e p o r t is that a l t h o u g h d u r i n g t h e p e r i o d 1 9 6 3 - 6 6 , there h as b e e n a n increase of 3 5 % i n the numbers of engineers e m p l o y e d i n t e a c h i n g at university l e v e l , at s c h o o l level, w h e r e students are choosing their c a r e e r s , t h e r e h as b e e n o n l y a 5 % increase i n the n u m b e r of engineers employed. O n t h e same d a y , the S w a n n C o m m i t e e R e p o r t on M a n p o w e r Param e t e r s s h o w e d that f r o m t h e 4 , 0 0 0 e n g i n e e r s a n d 9 . 0 0 0 seientists w h o g r a d u a t e d i n 1 9 6 5 . 19.6"', o f t h e e n g i n e e r s a n d 3 4 . 2 % o f t h e scientists w e n t o n t o I l i g h i T studies a n d r e s e a r c h . 5 . 1 % o f the scientists left t h e c o u n t r y , as d i d 5 . 9 % o f t h e e n g i n e e r s . T i i e committee, of w h i c h Professor M . M . Swann, Principal of Edinburgh University, was chairman, c r i t i c i s e d t h e present s y s t e m i n w h i c h

C a r n i v a l W e e k w i l l be M a y 6 — 1 3 , the p o s s i b i l i t y o f h o l d i n g i t i n M a r c h was discussed—a F E L I X survey, last y e a r , s h o w e d t h a t the e n d o f t h e E a s ter T e r m w a s t h e m o s t p o p u l a r p e r i o d for C a r n i v a l — b u t this has been r e j e c t e d i n v i e w o f the p r e s e n t p o l i c y to extend C a r n i v a l over t h e w h o l e y e a r a n d use C a r n i v a l W e e k as t h e last fling b e f o r e e x a m s . In keeping w i t h t h i s p o l i c y i t w a s proposed t h a t film s h o w s , c o n c e r t s , etc., be h e l d i n M a r c h a n d the Easter term i n general w h i l e still r e t a i n i n g i m p o r t a n t events s u c h as t h e C a r n i v a l H o p a n d t h e fete u n t i l . M a y . It is u n l i k e l y t h a t a C a r n i v a l Profession w i l l be allowed t h i s y e a r as a r e s u l t o f a b y e - l a w f o r b i d d i n g processions.

S Y t h e " s t u d e n t t e n d s to enter u n i v e r s ity already convinced that research is t h e g o a l w o r t h s e t t i n g h i s h e a r t o n " . I t w a s this v i e w w h i c ' i P r o f e s sor L a i t h w a i t e a t t a c k e d at a r e c e n t meeting of the E n g . Soc. In his opinion graduates needed for res e a r c h w e r e b e i n g lost t o i n d u s t r y w h e r e their talents w e r e wasted. Jackson Committee Report on M a n power Resources for Science a n d Technology H . M . S . O . 5/6d. Swann Committee Report on M a n power Parameters for Scientific Growth. H . M . S . O . 3/-.

D

Phil Marshall, Vice-President of G u i l d s , is t r y i n g t o o r g a n i s e a n a u c t i o n t o be h e l d i n t h e U n i o n . He w a n t s a r t i c l e s s u c h as c a r s , t a p e - r e corders, r e c o r d - p l a y e r s , i n fact, a n y t h i n g o f r e a s o n a b l e v a l u e . T h e a i m is to sell t h e a r t i c l e s — i f n e c e s s a ry w i t h a reserve p r i c e — f o r the students. C a r n i v a l t a k i n g a p e r c e n t a g e as c o m m i s s i o n f o r the service. C o n t a c t h i m at G u i l d s U n i o n Office o r I . C . R a c k .

S D T A n O.S.S- w o r k i n g party recently completely redecorated one r o o m o f a n e l d e r l y c o u p l e ' s flat. T h i s w a s t h e first w e e k e n d p r o j e c t c a r r i e d o u t b y O . S . S . , the n e w l y - f o r m e d c o l l e g e s o ciety w h i c h arranged f o r bands o f volunteers to undertake projects i n the K e n s i n g t o n and Notting Hill areas. T h e project arose i n a f a i r l y t y p i c a l T h e need f o r r e d e c o r a t i o n , way. w i t h its a t t e n d a n t b o o s t t o m o r a l e , w a s first n o t i c e d b y a n o r g a n i s a t i o n f o r s o c i a l w o r k , a n d they passed t h e r e quest o n t o O . S . S . The Ministry of S o c i a l S e c u r i t y p r o v i d e d the n e c e s sary e q u i p m e n t a n d materials a n d everyone concerned gave t h e i r services free. Similar projects will continue t h r o u g h t h e session a n d a n y o n e w i s h i n g t d offer h i s o r h e r services w i l l be welcome. A s projects are arranged, lists t o b e s i g n e d b y v o l u n t e e r s w i l l appear o n the O.S.S. notice board, w h i c h m a y b e f o n d at b o o t l e v e l near the lower refectory. South Side.

L o o k i n g at t h e stars w i t h o u t a telescope! Professor B o n d i i n h i s lecture to W e l l s Soc. presented a n d e x p l a i n e d s o m e of t h e b a s i c t h o n e s Oi tlio U n i v e r s e .

Y o u c a n help O.S.S. to help others by being involved yourself.

Speaking to a very large audience, he showed h o w from a f e w classical physics' concepts the modern m o d e l o f t h e U n i v e r s e is b u i l t u p : h o w the elements w e r e f o r m e d a n d w h y t h e i r n a t u r a l d i s t r i b u t i o n is a s it i s . T h e c o n c e p t o f t i m e as seen b y c l a s s i c a l p h y s i c s ( t i m e is r e v e r s i b l e ) a n d as s e e n b y t h e r m o d y n a m i c s ( t i m e n o t r e v e r s i b l e ) a n d h o w these concepts fit into t h e p i c t u r e of the U n i v e r s e as w e s e e i t ; t h e r e a s o n w h y a g y r o s c o p e k e e p s a set p o s i t i o n w i t h r e s p e c t t o t h e d i s t a n t stars a n d h o w i t is p o s t u l a t e d t h a t t h e d i s t a n t stars a r e m o v i n g a w a y f r o m u s a t a speed proportional to their distance.

I n r e p l y to a question o n t h e i d e a of a n e x p a n d i n g U n i v e r s e , h e s a i d this w a s really a misnomer. I t is t r u e t h a t t h e d i s t a n t stars a r e r e c e d i n g at tremendous speeds b u t n o t into a void. This w o u l d contradict one of t h e basic ideas of t h e U n i v e r s e w h i c h states t h a t i t is c o m p l e t e l y u n i f o r m . T h i s shows h o w difficult it is t o p i c t u r e t h e m o d e m i d e a o f t h e Universe. However, Professor Bondi was extremely clear i n his presentation of the complex ideas liehind modem cosmology w h i c h l e d to a stimulating discussion after his lecture.

P G A t the S o c i a l C l u b s C o m m i t t e e m e e t i n g o n O c t o b e r 2 5 t h , it w a s d e c i d e d to w i n d up S C R U T I N Y , t h e Committee's magazine. T h e reason g i v e n f o r t h i s w a s that i t w a s i m p o s s i b l e t o o b t a i n sufficient a d v e r t i s i n g : i t w a s suggested that the l i t e r a r y geniuses o f S . C . C . s h o u l d a p p l y t h e i r talents to P H O E N I X , w h i c h at t h e m o m e n t has n o e d i t o r t o a c c e p t o r reject their efforts. Apparently P H O E N I X has p l e n t y o f a d v e r t i s i n g b u t " c o u l d use m o r e cn]>\ ' i n v i e w o f these facts, the m o t i o n to w i n d u p S C R U T I N Y w a s passed b y a c o n siderable majority.

T H E P O O R A T T E N D A N C E at this year's Safety Lecture w a s extremely d i s a p p o i n t i n g , o n l y a b o u t fifty o f a l l the undergraduates, postgraduates, t e c h n i c i a n s a n d staff o f t h e c o l l e g e bothering to attend. E v e n despite the poor publicity, considering the t h e f a c t t h a t t h e w o r k s h o p s a n d laboratories of the college contain n o fewer d a n g e r s t h a n a m o d e r n f a c t o r y , a greater a t t e n d a n c e w o u l d h a v e b e e n expected. T h e lecture, entitled " Seeing the Risk," was given by D r . R . B . B u z z a r d , w h o s a i d that m o s t a c c i dents a r e cause b y lapses i n c o n c e n t r a t i o n a n d n o t b y s l o w reflexes as h a d o n c e been t h o u g h t . Extremes of

P u b l i s h e d b y C . G . H a r r i s o n o n b e h a l f o f the F E L I X BOARD, Imperial College, S.W.7, a n d printed by W E S T L O N D O N O F F S E T C O . . 86 L i l l i e R o a d , S. ,V.6 (tel. F U L 7 % 9 ) .

h e a t o r c o l d a n d even p r o l o n g e d c o n stancy o f temperature are l i k e l y to cause c o n c e n t r a t i o n t o flag a n d i n crease t h e l i k e l i h o o d o f a c c i d e n t s . H o w e v e r , i n m a n y cases, m a c h i n e r y c a n be b u i l t t o c o n c e n t r a t e the a t t e n t i o n o f the o p e r a t o r o n i m p o r t a n t i n struments o r o n dangerous parts o f the m a c h i n e r y to h e l p stop the m i n d wandering from them. M u c h w o r k r e m a i n s t o be d o n e o n the subject, which is i n c r e a s i n g l y more i m p o r t a n t as m o r e complex m a c h i n e r y is i n t r o d u c e d i n t o i n d u s t r y , b u t a t a n y rate, as D r . B u z z a r d i n f o r m e d us I . C . has a safety r e c o r d to be p r o u d o f (despite the a t t e n d a n c e at his l e c t u r e ) .


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