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HALL PRICES DOWN IN N O V E M B E R ol 1965 it was announced by the Halls of Residence committee that Hall fees would be raised by 5/- per weeki this rise to take effect from August of this year. The aim was to eliminate a deficit in the reserve funds of £1200. It would have brought the fees in Southside up to £81 p.a. The University of London has decided, however, in view of the Prices and Incomes freeze, that such increases cannot be made. (The University being a Government financed body.) The fees thus remain at the level decided in 1962/63, e.g. Southside £75, New Beit £68 p.a. T h e s a m e freeze a p p l i e s t o a l l r e fectory charges w h i c h w o u l d p r o b a b l y have risen t o keep up w i t h i n creased t a x a t i o n a n d other charges. D r . K e n W e a l e said that the Selective E m p l o y m e n t T a x w o u l d h a v e to be p a i d f o r a l l t h e c l e a n i n g a n d r e f e c t o r i e s staff b u t , s i n c e t h e U n i o n i s a c h a r i t y , the tax w o u l d later be r e funded. N o t e : Because o f the current credit squeeze H u l l , E x e t e r a n d some other Universities have announced cut-backs i n their b u i l d i n g programmes. Its effect o n 1 C i s a s y e t u n k n o w n .

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CARNIVAL £1001 4s 7d was the sum handed over to the Notting Hill Housing Trust (last year's charity) by the IC Carnival this month, despite the statement to Union Council by last year's president Adrian Fletcher that it had raised £1,500. T h i s p o o r s h o w i n g puts C a r n i v a l back to 1961, w h e n the C h a r i t y w a s O x f a m , since w h e n over £1000 has been raised every year, c u l m i n a t i n g i n £2,417 i n 1965 ( a l s o f o r t h e N o t t i n g H i l l Housing Trust). Chris Hocking, last y e a r ' s C a r n i v a l C h a i r m a n , w h e n asked to c o m m e n t o n Fletcher's figure o f £1,500 said that the f a l l w a s d u e t o s h o r t a g e o f staff, c h o o s i n g t h e s a m e c h a r i t y t w i c e , a n d w e n t o n t o suggest I " that the a m b i g u o u s c o m m e n t s m a d e at t h e b e g i n n i n g o f t h e y e a r p r o b a b l y d i d n o t h e l p . " ( F o r t h e benefit of Freshers, last year's c h a r i t y w a s chosen amidst a lot o f ill-feeling. T h e Carnival Board and Union Executive effectively t o l d the U n i o n to c h o o s e the I m p e r i a l C a n c e r R e s e a r c h F u n d ,

—the third candidate being the F a m i l y Planning International C a m paign, proposed by the H u x l e y Society). W i t h the f a i l u r e o f the a p pointed C h a i r m a n of Carnival C o m mitee f o r this year, the outlet f o r C a r n i v a l is c l o u d y , b u t i t i s suggested this week that R a l p h C o r n f o r t h , (of W o o d e n H o r s e C l u b fame) should take over the C h a i r m a n s h i p . This, together w i t h the clarification o f the constitutional p o s i t i o n o f the C a r n i v a l C o m m i t t e e ( f o r m e d e i g h t y e a r s a g o as an offshoot o f the L o n d o n Students' C a r n i v a l , which went into liquidatio n last y e a r ) m a y p e r h a p s h e l p I C ' s C a r nival to regain its lost ground. BOOK SALE T H E C & G U N I O N w i l l be organi s i n g a text b o o k sale o n T u e s d a y t h e 11t h O c t o b e r a t 1.00 i n M e c h . E n g . People i n G u i l d s w h o w i s h to, m a y leave t h e m i n t h e entrance o f M e c h . E n g . d u r i n g the l u n c h h o u r o n T h u r s day, F r i d a y a n d M o n d a y . T h e r e is n o charge f o r this service. T h i s s a l e w i l l b e o f p a r t i c u l a r benefit t o 1st Y e a r s s o d o n o t r u s h o u t a n d buy a l l y o u r books before Tuesday.

RECTOR DIES O n Wednesday, 2 1 s t September, S i r Patrick Linstead was suddenly taken i l l a n d was rushed to S t . Georges Hospital. H i s death occurred late o n Thursda y night. It was thought that he was i n excellent health and his death came as a complete surprise to the College. T h e pro-Rector, Sir O w e n Saunders, w i l l handle the essential affairs, such as Freshers' D a y , for the college, A M e m o r i a l Service is to be held, and details will be a n nounced later. See Page 5 .

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Danish success for Dram soc D R / V M S O C W E N T o n l o u r this year f o r a fortnight to D e n m a r k . W e a r r i v e d by tr ai n i n Naestved o n t h e m o r n i n g o f S u n d a y t h e 291'. A u g u s t , having persuaded t w o girls o n the t r a i n t o a c c o m p a n y us t o D e n m a r k . W e were met by t w o members o f the " Njestved A m a t o s c e n e , " whose m e m bers p u t us u p f o r t h e first w e e k . O r g a n i s e d t o t h e " n " t h degree o u r s t a y i n v o l v e d visits to a castle, the l o c a l newspaper a n d glassworks a n d a civic reception. O n Thursday and Friday nights we performed " A n Inspector C a l l s " b y J . B . Priestley, i n the Naestved s e c o n d a r y s c h o o l . T h e p l a y w a s w e l l r e c e i v e d b y b o t h press a n d audience. A f t e r the performance o n T h u r s d a y t h e P r e s i d e n t o f t h e Naestved A m a t o r s c e n e presented the society w i t h a really b e a u t i f u l vase. O u r stay c u l m i n a t e d o n S a t u r d a y w i t h a splendid party, at w h i c h we were each g i v e n e n g r a v e d glasses.

O n Sunday we moved to Nykaebing a town 40 miles South of Nx^tvcd, where we were entertained b y the English Club. H e r e again w e were met by an intelligent audience w h i c h gathered o n Tuesday i n the N y k o b i n g grammar school.

Incredible audience O n Wednesday the 8th ot Septem ber we travelled by train to C o p e n h a g e n . W e p l a y e d here b e f o r e a n i n credible audience o f over 600 people in the most moder n theatre i n D e n mark. A l t h o u g h apprehensive the cast p e r f o r m e d w e l l a n d w a s f a v o u r a b l y received. O u r three days were fully employed sightseeing i n C o p e n hagen i n c l u d i n g T i v o l i G a r d e n s a n d he C a r l s b u r g B r e w e r y . W e left f r o m C o p e n h a g e n o n S a t arday, 11th September, h a p p y but shattered.

They are i n The Observer every Sunday, yet

Are these the eyes of a madman?

These are the eyes of Michael Frayn. F o r seven years now, week in, week out (apart from 4 weeks' paid holiday a year), first in The Guardian, then in The Observer, Frayn has had to write an article. 700 words 3 times a week for The Guardian; 900 words once a week in The Observer. He has also written two novels, T h e T i n Men and The Russian Interpreter. Appeared regularly on Granada T V . Wrote for T W 3 . Contributed to The Age of Austerity. H e is also married, with two daughters. Yet there is still virtually no evidence that Frayn has been affected by this. However a growing number of people read The Observer every Sunday for this reason alone. T o be actually there, on hand, when he does finally — well — snap.

Rumpus over £m. ' Money lost' - reports T H E R E W A S N O question of a treasury loan of ,000,000 being lost, said London University in a statement during the vacation. The statement followed suggestions in the national daily press that the money was lost—the newspapers got their story from the Second Report of the Committee for Public Accounts, published last month. The loan to the University was towards the cost of buying property in Bloomsbury. The Committee said that the purchase of the Bloomsbury Estate No. 2 was financed by an Exchequer loan of £lm. issued in 1950, a grant of £250,000 from the L C C and £336,000 from the University's capital resources. The loan was to be converted into grants as the property was brought into purposes. use for University Though this was basically a book transaction, the intention was to give the Treasury, the Department of Education and Science, and the U G C (University Grants Committee) added control over the development of the property. B E L A T E D STEPS In July 1965, the balance of the fund, after repayment of the University's original contribution, was announced as £608,000. It was subsequently shown that £499,000 of this was temporarily lent to O T H E R University funds. " W e were i n f o r m e d that neither the T r e a s u r y n o r the D e p a r t m e n t o f Education a n d Science h a d made use of the f u n d over t h e years; t h e matter h a d completely b e e n lost sight of. T h e c o m m i t t e e r e p o r t states : " T h e University Grants Commith a d recommended grants f o r tee b u i l d i n g d e v e l o p m e n t s o n t h e estate i n c o m p l e t e ignorance o f the existence of the a m o u n t o f m o n e y i n i t . " " B e l a t e d steps " t o see t h a t m o n e y was used f o r the purpose i n t e n d e d

were w e l c o m e d b y t h e C o m m i t t e e , w h i c h censored the departments concerned for disregarding their previous w a r n i n g i n i n 1953. T h e University e x p l a i n e d that the f u n d w a s still e a r m a r k e d f o r its o r i g i nal purpose. A l t h o u g h the cash balance h a d been t e m p o r a r i l y diverted t o finance o t h e r c a p i t a l e x p e n d i t u r e , it w as " c o v e r e d " by a bank l o a n arrangement, a n d was always available o n d e m a n d .

PARLIAMENTARY CONTROL ? T h e University's statement does n o t deal w i t h the P . A . C . ' s c h i e f c o m p l a i n t , that responsible G o v e r n m e n t departments " entirely lost sight o f the existence a n d purpose o f t h e f u n d . " T h i s resulted i n grants b e i n g m a d e f r o m the Exchequer, w h i c h s h o u l d have been financed f r o m the fund. N o r does the statement deal w i t h the P A C ' s c o m m e n t that t h e a m o u n t o f g r a n t s m i g h t h a v e b e e n affected i f t h e Grants Committee h a d known of the fund's existence. O n e possible consequence is a f u rt h e r step t o w a r d s t i g h t e n i n g P a r l i a mentary control o f the U n i v e r s i t i e s — l i k e l y to be t a k e n w h e n t h e V i c e C h a n c e l l o r ' s c o m m i t t e e presents e v i dence before t h e P . A . C . The ViceCh an c ellors were asked to appear i n J u n e after the U . G . C . ' s discussion o f the m a t t e r i n , M a y . F u r t h e r m o r e , t h i s m a y affect U G C s f u t u r e g r a n t a s s i g n ments to the University.

Elliot i n E S R O space project W I T H A G R A N T o f £188.000 P r o fessor H a r r y E l l i o t t , head o f the Space a n d C o s m i c ray section is p r o d u c i n g thfee e x p e r i m e n t s — a magnetometer a n d t w o c o s m i c r a y telescopes, to be mounted i n a n E S R O satellite. T h i s satellite n a m e d H E O S (highly eccentric o r b i t satellite), is shared w i t h other E S R O c o u n t r i e s a n d is t o be l a u n c h e d f r o m C a p e K e n n e d y i n 1968. T h e launcher is a thrust augmented T h o r - D e l t a rocket, w h i c h w i l l put the 10 K i l o g r a m s a t e l l i t e i n t o a n o r b i t w h i c h h a s a n e c c e n t r i c i t y o f 100 a n d a n a p o g e e o f 1000 K m .

INTERESTED I N : OWLS O C C U L T I S M OR A T O R Y

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WHAT'S ON AT I C M O N D A Y 10 Wellsoc. Lecture/demonstration b y T . G . W a r n e o n H y p n o t i s m . 7.30 p . m . i n R o o m 408 E E . C h r i s t i a n U n i o n . T a l k " D o e s science make G o d unnecessary?" by D r . W . S. W o o l c o c k . 1.10 p . m . i n 266 A e r o . T U E S D A Y 11 Conservative Society to hold a Freshers' sherry party i n the J u n i o r C o m m o n R o o m Southside. Speaker is W . R . van Stroubenzee, M . B . E . , M . P . A l l welcome !

e s n . e t . t e e M O N D A Y 17 Wellsoc. Lecture o n " Possibilities f o r the A r t i f i c i a l C r e a t i o n o f L i f e , " b y D r . N . A . M i t c h i s o n , H e a d o f the E x p e r i m e n t a l B i o l o g y D i v i s i o n . 7.30 p . m . i n R o o m 408 E E . Christian U n i o n . D r . O . R . Barclay t a l k i n g o n " Is R e l i g i o n a R e t r e a d ? " 1.10 p . m . i n 266 A e r o . T U E S D A Y 18 Mines U n i o n meeting at 1 p.m.

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team champions

IN J U N E T H E IC team, captained by Darshan Pandya, became Champions of the Quiz International League. Last year the League consisted of teams from IC, U C , Q M C , L S E and Kings, each played the other four colleges and the top four teams

IMPERIAL

then played a knockout to find the winner of the series. T h e r e were t w o series last year, I C w o n the second. In J u n e a m a t c h was h e l d between t h e t w o colleges a n d I C were declared champions. T h i s y e a r a n e w series b e g a n w i t h the c o m p e t i t i o n open t o a l l f o r e i g n

champions s t u d e n t s f r o m the a b o v e five c o l l e g e s and also B e d f o r d and S O A S . S o tar I C have played a n d beaten both of these c o l l e g e s . T h e p h o t o g r a p h s h o w s M c D o n a l d Hobley with the teams; f r o m left t o right, P . V a n der P u i j e, D . Pandya, I. C u r n m i n g and from U C E n g — S o o n Tay, J . Litchfield a n dI Zain.

COLLEGE

COMMEMORATION DAY

C o m m e m o r a t i o n D a y celebrates the v i s i t t o t h e C o l l e g e i n 1945 o f t h e l a t e K i n g George V I , accompanied b y Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, at the centenary o f the R o y a l C o l l e g e of C h e m i s t r y , the oldest f o r e r u n n e r o f Imperial College.

Thursday 27th Oct. R o y a l Albert H a l l 3 p m ,

T h i s year's celebration w i l l be h e l d o n T h u r s d a y , 28th October i n t h e Royal Albert H a l l at 3 p.m. A n A d dress w i l l be g i v e n b y t h e s p e c i a l visitor The R t . -Hon. L o r d Beeching, Fellow o f Imperial College. An inter-denominational service w i l l be h e l d at 1.30 p . m . i n H o l y Trinity church, Prince Consort R d . ; T h e Rt. Rev. E . R . W h i c k h a m , Bishop of M i d d l e t o n will preach.

R S M o n view

After the ceremony i n the R o y a l A l b e r t H a l l the w o r k a n d b u i l d i n g o f the R o y a l S c h o o l o f M i n e s w i l l be o n view to visitors.

Tickets

T e a f o r present students w i l l b e i n the Main Refectory, Southside. T i c k e t s a r e a v a i l a b l e free f r o m t h e U n i o n office.

FREE


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Imperial College U n i o n Prince Consort R d . L o n d o n , S.W.7 Internal 2881/2799 Telephones : K E N 2963

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E D I T O R C. G . H A R R I S O N Assistant E d i t o r V A C A N C Y Sports E d i t o r A l a n Robbins P h o t o g r a p h i c E d i t o r N i g e l Shindler Features E d i t o r V A C A N C Y News Editor V A C A N C Y B u s i n e s s M a n a g e r Peter Shelley Advertising Manager V A C A N C Y

Advertising Agency E d u c a t i o n a l P u b l i c i t y (Partners) L M

Production Manager V A C A N C Y S a l e s M a n a g e r R i c h a r d Davies A s s . S a l e s M a n a g e r J u d i t h Pearson Secretaries Freda Cawson VACANCIES Sub-Editors V A C A N C I E S R e p o r t e r s Stewart Barnes VACANCIES Photographers V A C A N C I E S Cartoonists V A C A N C I E S

b y the editor Proud Record T h e f u l l measure of the late Rector's effect o n the College d i d not become apparent u n t i l this week. W h e n the members began t o consider what he h a d accomplished i n only eleven years, they found a p r o u d record. In h i s preface to the current U n i o n H a n d b o o k he wrote : " this College is by general consent the leading College of Science and Technology i n the country." It became so as a result of h i s brilliant administration and foresight. T h e College w i l l long have cause to be grateful to h i m and to admire his achievements.

Chance of a lifetime O n e i d e a w h i c h w i l l b e t h r o w n a t t h e F r e s h e r s i n these f i r s t t e w d a y s i s : " Y o u must strike a happy balance between w o r k a n d p l a y — b o t h B y the time y o u have heard this f r o m the President are i m p o r t a n t . " ( W h i c h one was he?) a n d y o u r tutor ( R e m e m b e r h i m w e l l , he m a y never see y o u a g a i n ) y o u m a y w e l l w o n d e r (a) w h a t t h e — d o e s i t m e a n a n d (b) what are they t r y i n g t o sell? T h e U L U h a n d b o o k d e s c r i b e s I C as h a v i n g a h i g h l y i n d e p e n d a n t u n i o n — t h i s is i n d e e d t r u e . B e i n g s u c h a l a r g e c o l l e g e i t c a n offer m a n y facilities i n its o w n u n i o n f o r w h i c h smaller institutions must l o o k back to U L U . I t i s also o n e o f the f e w colleges n o t affiliated to the N a t i o n a l U n i o n o f S t u d e n t s a n d h a s o n o c c a s i o n s a c t e d as a n i n d e p e n d e n t v o i c e f o r s t u d e n t s , e.g. t h e l o a n s l o b b y o f P a r l i a m e n t l a s t M a y . I C U n i o n has a n advantage over most other Universities i n that it is a m e d i u m - s i z e d b o d y c o m p r i s e d o f t h r e e s m a l l e r b o d i e s a n d i t s e l f p a r t o f a large b o d y . T h e large b o d y is U L U a n d the three s m a l l e r ones th e " constituent college unions " — n o t e that phrase, it is a l o c a l cliche. It can thus provide opportunities f o r people o f a l l abilities. T h e a m b i t i o u s m a y find their n i c h e i n the c o r r i d o r s o f . M a l e t Street ( U L U ) , those content w i t h a smaller sphere o f influence w i l l find a m p l e opportunities to display their talents i n the c o r r i d o r s , stair-cases a n d liftshafts o f I C . F o r those w h o prefer a n even tighter k n i t c o m p a n y , the constituent college u n i o n s have many f l o u r i s h i n g a n d influential organisations. A s for striking a h a p p y balance this o b v i o u s l y means different things t o different p e o p l e . S o m e c a n be a P r e s i d e n t o f a s o c i e t y a n d get a F i r s t , others c a n d o n o t h i n g a n d s t i l l f a i l . I n y o u r first w e e k s e x p e r i m e n t , find out what you c a n allow f o r w o r k ! Seriously though, it's n o good h i d i n g away a n d saying y o u w i l l enjoy yourself after y o u g r a d u a t e — n o w is the time of opportunity. Y o u w i l l n o d o u b t h a v e j o i n e d some o f the seductive societies y o u saw o n F r e s h e r s ' D a y . P o s s i b l y y o u r a t t i t u d e w a s " I w a n t t o j o i n t h e F o l k S o n g C l u b because I l i k e to listen to f o l k m u s i c . " or " I f I j o i n the P h o t o graphic Society 1 c a n use their d a r k r o o m s . " W h i l e n o t u n c o m m e n d a b l e , these are n o t t h e best r e a s o n s f o r j o i n i n g . A n y k i n d o f s o c i e t y d e p e n d s f o r its success o n t h e a c t i v i t y a n d i n v o l v m e n t o f i t s m e m b e r s — p l e a s e get i n v o l v e d ! D o n ' t i m a g i n e y o u c a n step i n t o a s o c i e t y >as P r e s i d e n t ( V i c e President possibly) b u t y o u c a n give y o u r ideas, help a n d t i m e r i g h t f r o m t h e start. T h e r e is n o need to be a f r a i d o f b e i n g t u r n e d a w a y as a " F r e s h e r " — y o u a r e o n l y a F r e s h e r a s l o n g a s y o u a c t as o n e . T h e r e a r e n o closed s h o p s — a l l doors w i l l open i f y o u p u s h h a r d e n o u g h — a n d i t is t i m e a few people d i d start p u s h i n g : the sweet d r u g o f a p a t h y m a y easily overcome this fertile college. 1

O b v i o u s l y y o u k n o w best w h e r e y o u r i n t e r e s t s l i e , b u t d o n o t n e g l e c t to broaden y o u r o u t l o o k — y o u r r e a l talents m a y still be latent. T h e r e are opportunities f o r everyone, b o r e d o m s h o u l d be a n i m p o s s i b i l i t y .

Top of the U n i o n I N T H E U N I O N we have the m a k i n g s o f a successful a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . U n d o u b t e d l y the p o w e r lies w i t h President T o n y D u k e . H e has already shown himself capable of employing his powers a n d directing it to useful p u r p o s e s . A t t h e t i m e o f w r i t i n g (28th) I s u s p e c t h e h a s s o m e s c h e m e s f o r m a k i n g large changes i n the U n i o n affairs. D a v i d M c B a i n , Vice-President, is a hard-work ing diligent officer. A l r e a d y h e h a s m a d e efficient u s e o f h i s l i m i t e d t i m e ( h e i s a t h i r d y e a r engineer) to i m p l e m e n t the r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s o f the C o u n c i l d e c i s i o n o n notice boards. Secretary B r e n d a n P a r k e r is another h a r d - w o r k i n g m e m b e r o f D u k e ' s staff. H e w o r k e d h a r d under Fletcher last year t o gain this post a n d n o doubt learned m u c h f r o m this teacher.

Beginning. K Âťs wiui a aeep sense of loss that we start the year after the sad death of the Rector, Sir Patrick Linstead. Although he was an eminent scientist and administrator he will be remembered by the Union for the interest he snowed in student affairs. At this time it is vital for us to maintain the high standards in the life of the College of which we are proud. We must show that we are a strong and united Union by our sense of loyalt; and responsibility. We must try to do this without dampening cor spirits. We are a rare example of a self-governing Union, we must not lose any of the advantages which this gives ns. As an executive one of our main difficulties is one of communication. In a college of this size it is difficult for us to keep in touch with the ordinary members. We do our best through F E L I X and Union meetings, and! the notice boards. The Union caters for most interests but it is up to yon as the ordinary member to make the effort to get to know what is going on and where. In conclusion, may I welcome yon all to the start of the new session,.and from now on it's all yours! Tony Duke President I C U

Mike Sir, D u r i n g the past year I have been responsible f o r the construction o f M I K E , I.C.'s new mascot. I w o u l d n o w l i k e t o express m y personal thanks to the u n d e r m e n t i o n e d m e m b e r s o f t h e c o l l e g e staff, w i t h o u t whose help the construction o f rfeither t h e m a s c o t o r i t s p l i n t h w o u l d have been possible : — Maintenance : M r . Lewis, M r . Shurety, M r . Deering a n d M r . Fred Cox. Mech. E n g . :Johnny Morgan, G o r don Stabin, B o b G a r m o n and Arthur Dowden. C i v . E n g . : M r . Branan, Dept. Supt. Stan C o o k , carpenter ; M r . Scott, workshop. Elec. E n g . : M r . Green, workshop. R o y a l School of M i n e s : M r . Harris, Dept. Supt.; Bert West, workshop ; a n d , o f course, M a c , i n the f o u n d r y . M y t h a n k s a l s o go t o t h e f e w s t u dents i n v o l v e d : R o g e r Cross, J i m McLeod, Dick Conn, Paul Ward and Peter M a s o n . R. N . C O R N F O R T H .

That Crowd Again! Sir, A t the e n d o f last t e r m , a private party was held i n the I C W A lounge. A t 11.15 p . m . ( c l o s i n g t i m e ) , t h e p a r t y was invaded by over twenty people, m e m b e r s o f w h a t c a n be t e r m e d t h e bar-crowd. T h e rowdiest a n d most objectionable were asked without success t o l e a v e . After about a n hour, s o m e o f the gatecrashers created a disturbance a n d a brawl broke out i n w h i c h f u r n i t u r e w a s sent flying a n d glasses a n d b o t t l e s s m a s h e d . Afterw a r d s , , o n e o f t h e i n v i t e d guests, w h o h a d t r i e d t o s t o p t h e fight a m o n g s t t h e gate c r a s h e r s , w a s t a k e n t o h o s p i t a l . H e h a d three stitches p u t a b o v e his eye a n d w a s f o u n d t o h a v e a b r o k e n nose. Perhaps the m o s t a p p a l l i n g aspect this affair i s that i t was not a n isolated incident. Throughout the whole o f l a s t y e a r , a c o n t i n u o u s series of complaints were made through similar incithese c o l u m n s a b o u t dents i n v o l v i n g the " b a r - c r o w d " — the b r e a k i n g u p o f parties, destr u c tion of U n i o n a n d H a l l property, a n d v a n d a l i s m i n general. A s yet, despite the frequency w i t h w h i c h these i n c i d e n t s o c c u r , n o o f f i cial action has been taken. Is the U n i o n completely powerless t o act i n these c a s e s — o r m e r e l y u n w i l l i n g ? J. P. P O Y S E R .

Obituary Sir, I doubt i f y o u w i l l have heard of t h e d e a t h o f M i k e N e v i l l e - P o l l y last m o n t h i n Z a m b i a . H a v i n g o n l y left college last C h r i s t m a s there w i l l be m a n y of M i k e ' s friends still i n I . C . w h o w i l l not have heard o f this tragedy either. M i k e t o o k a degree i n M e c h a n i c a l E n g i n e e r i n g b e f o r e c o m i n g t o us i n M i n i n g f o r a D I C by research. He had a wide n u m b e r o f friends i n b o t h parts o f the college, w h o , I a m sure, w i l l miss h i m greatly. H e w e n t t o Z a m b i a a s a- M e c h a n i cal E n g i n e e r at C h i n g o l a m i n e i n t h e New Year. M i k e died i n a r o a d accident when returning f r o m a rugger m a t c h at C h i n g o l a one afternoon. T h e i r small sports car h i t a horse w h e n d o i n g more than 50 m.p.h. T h e a n i m a l was t h r o w n over the bonnet a n d t h r o u g h M i k e w a s severely the windscreen. concussed with internal bleeding a r o u n d the brain. H e died i n h o s p i t a l a f t e r b e i n g u n c o n s c i o u s f o r five weeks. H i s c o m p a n i o n escaped v i r tually unharmed. I a m sure he w i l l be missed b y m a n y i n the college. Y o u may rem e m b e r h i m as a p a s t c a p t a i n o f I . C . Boxing Club. J. H . S H I L L A L S E R

A S I N T H E P A S T the E d i t o r will be pleased to receive letters f o r publication. However the right t o withhold f r o m publication such letters, either i n part o r entirely, is reserved. T H E E D I T O R does not necessarily agree with the opinions o f advertisers, columnists o r correspondents.

   

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FELIX

THE LATE RECTOR SIR P A T R I C K L I N S T E A D , C B E , F R S , who died suddenly on the 24lh of September, had guided Imperial College through a crucial period of its history. A graduate of the College, he was a member of the Chemistry department staff until 1938, and gained an international reputation in organic Chemistry. He was then successively Professor at Sheffield and at Harvard, Deputy Director of Research at the war-time Ministry of Supply, and Director of the National Chemical Laboratory. He returned in 1949 becoming head of the Chemistry department and Dean of the R C S ; and was appointed Rector in 1955. H i s scientific attainments a n d contributions to the development o f University education, (which included membership o f the R o b b i n s C o m mittee), are well known. In South Kensington he will also be particularly remembered f o r his personal influences o n the nature and quality of the massive expansion o f the College, which had been initiated under his predecessor, A i r C h i e f M a r s h a l Sir R o d e r i c k H i l l . Steering through the c o m plications caused by the retention o f the Queen's Tower he sought to ensure that the large new academic buildings were modern and functional but would not " astonish our neighbours and clash with the pleasant legacies W i t h i n them he successfully fostered the development o f of the past." new departments a n d fields o f study, and of interdepartmental collaboration. O n e of his earliest decisions was that residential expansion should have equal priority with academic building, and f r o m this sprang the redevelopment o f Prince's Gardens, which will eventually accommodate more than one thousand students. H i s concern f o r the nurturing o f a University environment was also shown b y the opening o f the Playfair and Haldane Libraries, i n the expansion of the Harlington sports ground, by his active encouragement o f the G e n e r a l Studies programme, and i n the project to build a swimming p o o l and squash courts o n the N o r t h side of Prince's Gardens, w h i c h is now under way. T h e Rector was closely interested i n the activities o f the U n i o n , (" that beneficient o r g a n i s a t i o n " ) a n d of its many clubs a n d societies. T h e addition o f two storeys to the original U n i o n building was carried out i n the first years o f his rectorship. Subsequently he designated as " U n i o n Areas " m u c h space i n South Side and i n the College Block, (which is soon to be built); and he had prepared the ground for the necessary strengthening of the U n i o n financies to accompany this growth. H e gave strong support to such new enterprises as the Exploration B o a r d and, with L a d y Linstead, attended many social functions i n the U n i o n . H i s urbane after dinner speeches o n these occasions were enlivened b y many adroit shafts o f humour, w h i c h were usually proceeded b y a speculative glance at the ceiling. H e was always accessible for consultation with the President o f the U n i o n , and maintained excellent relations with successive generations o f student officers.

5

Sir Patrick was a humane man of wide sympathies and interests. H i s long experience o f the College enabled h i m to graft the new onto the healthiest elements of the old, and it is sad that he has not lived to see the complete fulfillment o f the design. Those who knew him feel his passing as a personal loss. Dr. K . E . W E A L E .

THE WELLS CENTENARY T H E C E N T E N A R Y of the gories as painting, sculpture, music, birth of H G . Wells is comme- robots, inventions, science f i c t i o n â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in fact almost anything will be con morated by a variety of public sidered provided that the entry is a and college events. In December work of art inspired b y science, i n Lord Snow is to give a special corporating scientific apparatus o r scientifically. Centenary lecture in the Huxley produced A l o n g list of distinguished scientists Building when he will speak and artists has been invited to judge about Wells die literary pioneer the entries, each taking o n a n a p propriate category. T h e y will collaband scientific educator. orate i n judging any entries w h i c h do Earlier this Autumn the B B C not fall into a listed class. For a broadcast a documentary televis- special predictions category, the enion programme on Wells entitled tries will be buried, and twenty years hence the then Rector w i l l be invited 'Whoosh'. In this three mem- to judge which forecast has been most bers of Wellsoc appeared briefly. nearly fulfilled. T h e winner will then receive his prize. T h e biggest event i n Wellsoc's a u tumn timetable is the Wells Week orWellsoc is again offering a full p r o ganised i n honour o f H . G . W e l l s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; gramme o f weekly meetings. As one o f IC's most celebrated alumni. usual the first meeting i s a crowdT h e m a i n feature o f this week will be drawer, being a lecture with demon" a n A r t o f Science E x h i b i t i o n , " but strations o n hypnotism., T h i s is f o l there w i l l also be a dinner attended lowed i n later weeks by a discussion by Wells' son, G . P . Wells, and showo f the possibility o f creating life, H e r ings o f four films based o n H . G . mann B o n d i o n cosmology, a lecture Wells' books. o n brain-washing a n d voodoo, a n d T h e A r t o f Science E x h i b i t i o n is several other intriguing topics. to be held f r o m 7th to 11th N o v e m T h e Society's special study groups ber a n d is organised by C o l i n P h i l set u p last year to investigate flying lips, r o o m 637 T i z a r d H a l l . All saucers and ghosts will continue. T h e U n i o n members may enter using the latter group will become affiliated to forms available around the college. the society for Psychical Research. Entries are invited for such cate-

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6

FELIX

U L U Fresher's Three days of festivities Not to be missed A s should be clear f r o m t h e discouraging comments i n Imperial C o l l e g e U n i o n Y e a r b o o k , the U n i v e r s i t y o f L o n d o n U n i o n a n d its b u i l d i n g c o m e i n f o r considerable abuse at I C . Y e t last year I C p r o v i d e d o n a hi b a s i s , m o r e o f U L U ' s officers a n d e x e c u t i v e t h a n a n y o t h e r g college, a n d more absolutely than a l l b u t o n e o f them. T h e reason f o r this a n o m a l y is that, u n f o r t u n a t e l y , m a n y I C students d o n o t " m a n a g e " t o get t o U L U o n o n e o f t h e t h r e e F r e s h e r s ' e v e n i n g s , k n o w n o t h i n g a b o u t U L U except f r o m hearsay, a n d thus b e c o m e s t u b b o r n l y a n t i - M a l e t Street. O f t h o s e w h o d o find t h e i r w a y t h e r e , d e s p i t e t h e i g n o r a n c e o f t a x i d r i v e r s , b u s c o n d u c t o r s a n d p e d e s t r i a n s , m a n y l i k e w h a t t h e y see, b e c o m e a d d i c t e d a n d s t u b b o r n l y p r o - U L U . C e r t a i n l y a b a l a n c e b e t w e e n these t w o e x t r e m e s exists. However, i f y o u d o manage to travel b y L o n d o n Transport f r o m I C t o U L U , a t t h e r e a s o n a b l e c o s t o f o n e s h i l l i n g , y o u w i l l find a t h r i v i n g organisation. O n e w h i c h provides a magnificent s w i m m i n g - p o o l , squash, b a d m i n t o n a n d g y m n a s i u m facilities, as w e l l as a choice o f over one h u n d r e d student s o c i e t i e s — c o m p l e m e n t a r y t o those o f I C U .

How to get there Get to U L U : b y b u s : N o . 14 f r o m t h e V i c t o r i a & A l b e r t M u s e u m , or : N o . 73 f r o m the A l b e r t H a l l , by tube : P i c c a d i l l y to Leicester S q . a n d then N o r t h e r n L i n e t o Goodge St. Station. F r o m G o o d g e St. i t is necessary t o cross the r o a d , w a l k d o w n beside Heals and' along Torrington Place. T h e U L U building is o n your right opposite D i l l o n ' s U n i v e r s i t y B o o k s h o p . N o t e t h a t t h e buses r e t u r n t o I C f r o m a stop i n G o w e r Street, outside R A D A . A guide to t h e societies, a n d the l o c a t i o n o f their stalls i n U L U d u r i n g the Freshers' evenings i s given below. I f y o u j o i n a n y societies o r even i f y o u don't, keep i n touch w i t h their activities t h r o u g h the F E L I X U L U What's O n column.

Don't which check before

miss the stall interests you— its location, you go there.

L'LU Freshers' days, Mondav, Tuesday & Wednesday. 10th, Ilth. 12th.

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For a plan of the building see your U L U Handbook: Societies' stalls are distributed as follows:— Ground floor lounge 1. Men's University Sports Committee (Men's sports clubs) 2. Union Short (for t es scarves, diaries etc.) 3. Women's University Sports Committee (Women's sports clubs) 4. SENNET—the U L U newspaper 5. U L U Entertainments Committee ;

Ground floor assembly hall entrance 6. Drama Society 7. French Society 8. U L U Film (the U L U film club) 9. Youth Council 10. Sub Aqua Club First floor asssembly hall foyer 11. Gilbert and Sullivan Society and Opera Group 12. Youth Hostels Association 13. Chess Club 14. Church Society 15. Historical Society 16. Debates Society First floor landing 18. Folk Song Club First floor—room IB 19. Psychological Society 20. Lancastrian Society 21. Winks Society 22. Catholic Society 23. Geographical Society 24. Polish Society 25. Ice skating Club 26. Cuaker Society 27. Archeological Society 28. Pakistan Society 29. Marxist Society 30. Wine and Food Second floor landing 31. Tape Recording Group Second floor—room 2B 32. Flying Club 33. Natural History Society Second floor—rooms 2D- E & F 34. India Society 35. Presbyterian-Congregational Society

36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45.

Bobsleigh Society Welsh Society Hellenic Association Ballroom Dancing Society Scout and Guide Movement Jewish Society Socialist Society and Labour Club Liberal Federation Conservative Association European Society

Music Roost 40, Cfton) yjciaiy 4'/. itevue * 48. U n b u r n ! 4y. A « i ^ M i c o n 50. btfcpaniu Society 51, M;U!<xiist Society jk lish Folk Dance Society I, M m a n Society V, USSR Society itlifti Boor—room 3C H , Chinese Society Si. Socialist Medical Association 58. .Christian Science Organisation 59. Scottish Dancing Society 60. Humanist Society 6!, Inter-Faculty Christian Union 62. Arab Society Third floor—Badmington Court Monday 6.00-9.00 pm Badminglon Club Tuesday 6.00-9.00 pm Fencing Club Wednesday 6.00-9.00 pm Scottish Dancing Society

Swimming pool 6.00-7.30 pm Swimming Club (Diving. Water displays) 7.30-8.30 pm Sub-Aqua Club

Polo & Swimming

(Demonstrations)

Gymnasium Monday 6.00-7.30 pm Sports Club Training 7.30-9.00 pm Boxing Club, Athletic Club Tuesday 6.00-7.15 pm Women's Athletic Club 7.15-9.00 pm B-sketbaH Trials Wednesday 5.30-6.30 pm Netbal! Club 5.30-9.00 pm Judo & Trampoline Clubs. The snack bar on the fourth floor is open only until 8.30 pm, and the Bar closes at 10.00 pm, so be warned.

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The Marconi Company Limited MARCONI HOUSE. CHELMSFORD.

ESSEX, E N G L A N D

LTD/X5I


FELIX

1

SOUTH KEN PLEASE!

T h e traffic intersections i n the shopping centre, on the left is F u l h a m Road and on the right the station buildings.

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S O U T H K E N . is s o m e t h i n g o f a " n o - m a n ' s l a n d " b e t w e e n K e n s i n g t o n p r o p e r a n d C h e l s e a . It is b o u n d e d r o u g h l y b y t h e a r t e r i a l C r o m w e l l R o a d a n d the F u l h a m R o a d . A t t h e w e s t e r n e n d it m e r g e s w i t h the b e d - s i t r e a l m s o f E a r l s C o u r t , w h i c h is t h u s w i t h i n w a l k i n g d i s t a n c e o f the C o l l e g e . It is a f a i r l y u n d i s t i n g u i s h e d area a n d can c l a i m no s o r d i d c r imes o r b a t t l e s t o its f a m e . F l a t s o f v a r y i n g rent a n d q u a l i t y a b o u n d i n its n u m e r o u s s q u a r e s a n d c r e s c e n t s a n d t h e i r r e s i d e n t s are the p r i n c i p a l p o p u l a t i o n o f m u c h o f the d i s t r i c t . T h e s h o p p i n g a r e a a r o u n d the T u b e s t a t i o n is u n u s u a l i n its c o n s t r u c t i o n . T h e site appears to be a n o v e r - g r o w n c o l l e c t i o n o f " c o r n e r - s h o p s . " Cafes a n d r e s t a u r a n t s t o c a t e r f o r a l l tastes a r e p l e n t i f u l a n d w h a t e v e r the U n i o n h a n d b o o k i m p l i e s the f o o d i n m a n y o f t h e m is g o o d a n d I h a v e n e v e r e n c o u n t e r e d s u r l y s e r v i c e . O n e r e s t a u r a n t j u s t o u t s i d e t h i s c l u s t e r i s the S h a n g r i - L a i n B r o m p t o n R d . — h i g h l y r e c o m m e n d e d b y the T i m e s but d o n ' t go d o w n s t a i r s w i t h o u t £ 2 ! Bookshop's, r e c o r d shops, ticket agents, h a i r d r e s s e r s — a l m o s t a l l r e q u i r e m e n t s a r e c a t e r e d f o r e x c e p t t h a t t h e r e is a l a c k o f a g o o d g r o c e r . T h e nearest o n e is i n G l o u c e s t e r R o a d . A l o n g e s t a b l i s h e d f i r m is the B e l g i a n P a s t r y S h o p i n F u l h a m R o a d . T h i s h a s b e e n p r o d u c i n g its fine p a s t r i e s f o r o v e r t w o h u n d r e d y e a r s . T h e K i n g ' s R o a d , the f a m o u s C h e l s e a m e c c a f o r a l l the " i n - c r o w d , " l i e s b e y o n d Fulham Road. It w a s s o c a l l e d b e c a u s e i n e a r l i e r t i m e s i t w a s f o r t h e It is a fine s h o p p i n g a r e a e x c l u s i v e use o f the K i n g a n d h i s guests. w i t h its d o z e n s o f a n t i q u e a n d o l d f u r n i t u r e s h o p s , gift s h o p s , dress s h o p s a n d f o o d s t o r e s . A t t h e e a s t e r n e n d is S l o a n e S q u a r e w i t h i t s l a r g e stores. T h e n e a r e s t d e p a r t m e n t s t o r e t o t h e C o l l e g e is H a r r o d ' s i n K n i g h t s b r i d g e .

F o r those seeking flats, cars, tuition i n F r e n c h or indeed almost anything Best time to look is notice boards such as this one are a good start. Monday when they are changed.

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MIKE U N T I L 1964 ICU'S mascot wag a brass eagle called Phoenix. This was 'Lost' under very dubious circumstances, namely a drunken mascot officer, at the end of that year and there followed an unofficial adoption of Queen's Tower (c.f. University College). But this was generally felt by the more active members of Wooden Horse to be a retrograde step, giving those whose mascots had been stolen by I.C. no chance to retaliate. So " M i k e " was born and it is solely due to the organisation and practical ability of Ralph Cornforth that the ideas have become reality. He found himself the sole person interested after being let down by several people who had promised designs and assistance.

Beginnings T h e first t e r m o f l a s t y e a r w a s s p e n t purely i n organisation a n d i n the c o l lection of material. M i n e s evinced a w i l l i n g n e s s t o cast t h e f r a m e , i f sufficient brass were s u p p l i e d . T h e R S M rep. o n the project, J i m M c L e o d , being a member of I . C . rifle club supplied the answer i n the f o r m o f a h u n d r e d a n d fifty p o u n d s o f s p e n t c a r t r i d g e s . H e t h e n spent m a n y h a p p y h o u r s m e l t i n g these d o w n i n t o i n g o t s r e a d y f o r the actual casting.

9

Meanwhile overtures had been made to v a r i o u s carpenters w i t h i n the c o l l e g e t o m a k e a p a t t e r n f o r the c a s t ing of the f r a m e . T h i s was a t r i c k y job, f a r beyond the capabilities o f a n y of the students c o n c e r n e d, but a superb job was done by Stan C o o k of the C i v E n g workshop. I n the m e a n t i m e R a l p h C o r n f o r t h h a d r e d e s i g n e d the m i c r o m e t e r ! t o enable i t to be m a d e m o r e easily. F r o m m o s t o f the m a j o r d e p a r t m e n t s (Physics, C h e m E n g , C i v E n g ) , but m a i n l y M e c h E n g c a m e steel b a r a n d tube. T h i s was m e l t e d a n d used to cast the f r a m e i n the R S M . f o u n d r y . I t c a m e o u t n e a r p e r f e c t t h e first t i m e and w o r k was immediately begun c l e a n i n g it u p . R a l p h m a c h i n e d the frame a n d spindle himself, the finishi n g being d o n e i n the C i v i l a n d E l e c E n g workshops. T h e o r g i n a l i d e a was to m o u n t the masterpiece o n the window-ledge i n the c o n c e r t h a l l , b u t t h i s w a s e v e n t u a l l y discarded a n d the l o w e r lounge Maintenchosen. H e r e the college

a n c e D e p a r t m e n t w a s f o u n d t o be m o s t h e l p f u l â&#x20AC;&#x201D; t h e y p r o c e e d e d t o cast a t o n o f c o n c r e t e i n the l o w e r l o u n g e w h i c h was then f o r m e d i n t o the plinth. T h e mounting and alarms required the c o n s t r u c t i o n o f a safe d o o r a n d f r a m e â&#x20AC;&#x201D; t o be cast i n t o t h e t o p p a r t A l l these j o b s w e r e o f the p l i n t h . d o n e b y the W o o d e n H o r s e c l u b w i t h m u c h assistance f r o m the M a i n t e n ance D e p t . T h e e n g r a v i n g o n the assembly was added by C i v E n g , being g r a d u a t e d i n d i v i s i o n o f .8in^ (The U n i o n meeting decided M i k e should b e g r a d u a t e d i n degrees.) C h r o m i u m plating was done by B.J.S. E l e c t r o P l a t i n g C o . U n d e r great secrecy d u r i n g the l o n g v a c a t i o n t h e e l a b o r a t e safety m e a s u r e s w e r e finished a n d i t w i l l certainly take very considerable resources to crack or o u t w i t M i k e . S h o u l d it ever happen that h u m a n e r r o r a l l o w s M i k e t o be k i d n a p p e d t h e n I . C . s h o u l d m o u r n the loss o f L o n d o n ' s most sophisticated mascot.

PAM J O H N S T O N is the new Union messenger, replacing Stan Branker w h o left this summer after a six year stay. She took up residence i n the tiny office only last week, and so is unfamiliar with the routine. V i v a c i o u s P a m adds a welcome t o u c h o f g l a m o u r t o the s o m e w h a t monastic U n i o n . She admits to a great interest i n art a n d , a c c o r d i n g to V i c e - P r e s i d e n t D a v e M c B a i n , is liable to be s k e t c h i n g o n t h e w a l l s . A l t h o u g h she w a s b o r n i n L o n d o n , most o f her l i f e has been spent i n C a n a d a a n d she s t i l l r e t a i n s a s l i g h t C a n a d i a n accent. While in Canada P a m worked m a i n l y in Vancouver. H e r r e t u r n to E n g l a n d w a s m a d e i n 1962 a n d she s p e n t t h e y e a r a f t e r her arrival " travelling a r o u n d . " Since t h e n she h a s h a d v a r i o u s s e c r e t a r i a l posts i n c l u d i n g o n i n a n E a s t e r n e m bassy. P a m was offered the post after a n s w e r i n g a n a d v e r t i s e m e n t , t h o u g h at that t i m e she d i d not k n o w the exact nature o f the job. W e w i s h h e r the best o f l u c k i n t h i s o f t e n t r y i n g j o b . CROSSWORD T h i s year the crossword puzzles are to be r u n o n the lines of a competition. A cash prize o f 10s. will be paid to the creator o f the best crossword puxzle submitted each issue. The entries will be judged b y our staff a n ' ' their decision is final. T h e right is reserved to omit the C r o s s wo rd i f there is insufficient space.

1


FELIX

Crossword for Freshers

â&#x20AC;˘

Down

Across

1

i

TO LET


FELIX

11

S IN A L A S T desperate attempt to beat the currency restrictions and push our razor-edged economy over the brink, I.C. Athletics team exported itself to Germany. The regulations of the Civil department committed many of onr best men to field courses; but what we lacked on the track wc were determined to make up lor it. S e t t i n g off o n t h e first S a t u r d a y m o r n i n g of the v a c . w e made f o r Cologne where w e collected o u r mini-bus a n d started l o o k i n g f o r s o m e w h e r e to stay t h e n i n h t. T h e Captain's organisational ability reache d even greater heights t h e next d a v who" drove t o meet o u r hosts i n F r a n k f u r t a n d discovered that 1500 hrs i s n o t t h e s a m e as f i v e o ' c l o c k . However, d>'d find o u r a c c o m o d a t i o n a n d s e v e r a l glnsses o f t h e l o c a l b r e w restored confidence. B o t h ovir s t a y i n F r a n k f u r t a n d t h e m a t c h itself w e r e m a r r e d b y w e t team a n d w e were not allowed a n y hrst p l a c e s , t h o u g h D a v e Downie (Mines' one-man athletic team) c a m e closest t o o n e . H e b l a m e d h i s f a i l u r e on having broken a life-long rule and trained t h e d a y before. N e x t to M a n n h e i m w h e r e w c m e t all o u r o l d friends f r o m Sports D a y . H e r e e v e r y t h i n g w a s l a i d o n f o r us i n c l u d i n g sunshine a n d sightseeing. They cunningly arranged the match f o r t h e last d a y so t h a t a f t e r t h r e e days of G e r m a n hospitality a n d beer c o m b i n e d w i t h a c r a c k - o f - d a w n start they w o n b y more than t h e t w o points victory o n Sports D a y . A m o n g o u r most successful events i n that match were the 1500m wonby H o w a r d D i c k s o n a n d t h e relay w h e r e i n spite o f o n l y h a v i n g three r e g u l a r sprinters w e w o n t h e relay b y a c o m fortable margin. O f course they d i d drop the baton. On, then, the match against T u b i n g e n w h o , again some of us h a d met previously i n L o n d o n . H e r e too we were w e l l entertained a n d only w i s h e d w e were there f o r more than t w o days. T h e c o m p e t i t i o n w a s o n e most enojyable w i t h a really friendly spirit a n d D a v e at last o v e r c o m i n g his

The I.C. pair, Hobson and Dickson, keep in close contact wuh the opposition during the 1500 m at Mannheim.

S Howard Dickson breaks the tape in the 1500m at Mannheim. Photos by Ian Winship t r a i n i n g a n d w i n n i n g a v e r y tense high jump competition. T h e match was f o l l o w e d b y a succession o f wettings-swimming, punting a n d drinking. T h e last f e w days o f t h e t r i p w e r e l i v e d out i n K a r l s r u he where w e took part i n a many-cornered competition. Starse o f this m e e t i n g w e r e A b e r d e e n University w h o i n spite of t w o days t r a v e l l i n g w i p e d t h e floor w i t h e v e r y body. If w e were outclassed o n t h e sporting side w e more than h e l d o u r o w n o n t h e 'sport' side at t h e reception that e v e n i n g . Altogether it w as a very enjoyable tour i n w h i c h w e made m a n y friends a n d s p r e a d t h e i m a g e o f .C. a b r o a d — b u t it should recover.

F. D. Hobson

Athletics I N T H E recent Britain v S w e d e n athletic match, competing i n the h i g h j u m p , w a s L.eon H a l l , w h o h a s just g r a d u a t e d f r o m t h e P h y s i c s D e partment. L e o n c l e a r e d just b e l o w 6 ' 5 -}", b e l o w B r i t a i n ' s , h r s t s t r i n g Fairbrother. T h e t w o Swedes cleared over 6 ' 9 "

UNDERWATER WITH THE I.C. CLUB mn U N D E R W A T E R C L U B p e Underwater Club, one of o e rstuvw x styz {v| yu q foremost y suby yu y y }s ~ } € u aqua q s{{|u y.t‚| q z {s tqƒs e open p q p „ n o e watern  vƒt, an Easter ‡ ny n Sout of e s open to … q † q „ ˆ v{| n{v| ) and at least one major exŠ‹ Œ ŒŽ  ‰ mn . yt } € ‘’ “”“• “–  e Clubs s q s e a van r —v{|| r and a r as well as aquaq  ˆ yt| y y }st‚| ~ {t , ƒ| q {˜s — t n (mask. ~rs‚ v{€s { , ™š› ‡ ny n q œ n be q d ) t at Ÿ ¡¢£ . ž m p ~{‚ yttyt‚ v ƒ yt yt‚ |u ƒvu yt‚ at o un e |{|| yrt yt }s€{ n ~ ƒ q of term s{| —{ yƒ}}s }{ u sv{| n{v vs{|bot . s are y and q … q ‡ {} r { q  . ˆ v{| n{v | nrs} ‡ vyu s e to y d p un Interested v u v e ¤ {q { ƒ y ¥„ a o e ¦pt rn u r§~ƒ{qk or attend at 1.15 on 6t n ¨q n v ˆ y} r „y} Rm.| n253 Aero ©ª«n a | r t  ‡ l r‡ t

be

.

TO NORWAY WITH BOOTS A MINI-BUS, a 1948 car, 219 man-days of dehydrated food and 12 members of the Rover Crew were some of the items shipped on board the " L e d a " at Newcastle on June 25th. yt‚ mn v | nrv e q r||‡ ny to Norway was t n u nƒ  and |¬­ ®¯ , q was more n œ n €vyz yt‚ ƒy „ n Norway. d for our mbe n p }y z {ny }{ made 5000 rft. o ep qn  ytue yb pq s n{ƒ v u {t o¶·e o e ° qm o t of yu n n µ uuy u ² ³´ ´ ‡ rs ‚ { t‚ s t more ƒ ƒn ± a ¸¹ºº¸ e steamed{yvzup. A base ‡qny p n ƒ|| ~ q was set up at » }y u from we were{ƒ able to b at least a dozen q  n ‡ yu ny q peaks n a day and a ƒ separate was ¼ ½¾¿ ÀÁ¿ þÀ q p ny set n pup at n from ‡rvuqn{v o e two ny‚ {| rstu ƒyt t  s „n Ä}yuu {vu ynt Europe. ƒ}€nr——y‚ { d (8.000 Å Å }yn ~and {€ q  ft.), }uwere . rstu ƒyt nrs‚ n p s were  o e  }Æy ‚ €y|u ƒt deserted, we were „ n ‡ ƒ t qe of {yz ƒ|| ~ » u ƒ and Noryt} we met many p u ƒs ‚n ‡ {‚ yƒt| ,  y|rt students, t Ç €ƒto { ‚ rv‡ {‚ yƒ q s and nu vy{ s uand Èus Ä n un {ƒ { n return we d to r q m some r of ourspto‡our nr} q  n amusement. epwe were fortunate to On o e rstu ƒyt be " lost " „n rtƒ o e  yu n sp and yet ÉÊËÌ ‡ qt o e Norl make q ‡ {‚ yƒt| .

G R E E T I N G S T O A L L the new members of the club, and to present members playing another season with us. The committee hopes the freshers, especially, will settle down as soon as possible. To begin with, the club is affiliated to the Middlesex F . A . , from whom we get two Cup Final tickets. T h i s year seven teams w i l l b e i n t h e U . L . l e a g u e s , a n d also i n t h e C u p competitions. T o ensure a n excellent chance of doing well, w e want to e s t a b l i s h s e t t l e d t e a m s as soon as p o s sible, whilst preserving the opportunity f o r players o f merit t o 'move u p ' . O f c o u r s e , this m e a n s t h a t s o m e p l a y ers, w h o a r e ' o f f f o r m ' w i l l h a v e t o forfeit their places If a l l players are n o t lackadaisical in their approach t o t h e game, t h e committee assures y o u t h a t i t w i l l b e d o i n g its best t o m a k e y o u satisfied w i t h the c l u b , a n d the t w o games p e r week y o u w i l l get. Apart from p l a y i n g . soccer a l l season, there is t h e social aspect t o lie considered a n d next W e d n e s d a y , after t h e matches, w e have t h e ' p i e and mash supper' to b e held i n t h e U n i o n : details from the notice board. In January a n d F e b r u a r y , t h e C l u b Dance a n d the annual dinner are held w i t h g r e a t success I hope y o u r interest h a s been caught a n d that y o u w i l l endeavour to s h o w keenness throughout t h e season.

J. Garratt

BANG! F O R T H E S E C O N D year running the college rifle club B' team won the University league. The University full-bore and p'stol championship were also won by club members. The ' A ' team, however, slipped one p o t i o n further and ended up third. T h i s year the c l u b w i l l be using the r a n g e at C h e l s e a Barracks which should lead to a n improved standard It w i l l a l s o be p o s s i b l e of shooting. for more people to shoot m o r e frequently a n d the club hopes to e n courage more beginners to shoot. I n t h e past f e w y e a r s the a c t i v e m e m b e r s h i p o f t h e c l u b h a s been d e c l i n i n g o w i n g t o the difficulty o f a l l o c a t i n g range time t o others than team m e m ber s. Details o f the club's activities a n d meetings c a n be f o u n d o n the notice board.

I M P E R I A L C O L L E G E UNION

COMMEMORATION BALL AT

QUAGLINO'S

Thursday 27 October D a n c i n g f r o m 9pm to 2am


FELIX

12

D E

FELIX Mascot Ready M I K E , G I A N T sized micrometer built in such secrecy last year as mascot for I C U , is to be inaugurated (or should it be dedicated) at the first IC Union General Meeting of the year, on November 3rd. The secrecy has been maintained by the 'Wooden Horse' organisation (ICs movement for mascotry of all kinds) under the leadership of Ralph Cornforth. This task was all the more important because after IC's successful 'snatches' of mascots from Kings, City University (then Northampton College) and SOAS they would have appeared highly ridiculous if they had 'Lost' IC's own mascot before it was even complete. They also undertook the entire design, manufacture and installation of 'Mike'.

Old Buildings

M i k e r a n k s u n d o u b t e d l y as o n e o f the finest e x a m p l e s o f s t u d e n t i n g e n u i t y i n the c o u n t r y — n o t o n l y is he f u l l y o p e r a t i o n a l , but he has a defence mechanism w h i c h according to " W o o d e n H o r s e " c an never be penet r a t e d . I t s 170 l b s . o f steel a n d brass w i l l l i e o n a H ton concrete plinth i n t h e U n i o n l o w e r l o u n g e , a n d is p r o tected f r o m a n y m a r a u d e r s by c l a m p s a n d safes, a n d a h i g h l y c o m p l e x e l e c t r o n i c a l a r m grid. I n fact, the U n i o n a s k s us t o m a k e i t c l e a r t h a t i t c a n accept no r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r m i s a d v e n ture to any a m a t e u r mascot pirate. A l t h o u g h " M i k e " w i l l be p e r m a nently o n show i n the U n i o n B u i l d ing, he w i l l be brought into U n i o n G e n e r a l Meetings a n d other occasions as m u c h a s p o s s i b l e . Imperial C o l lege h a s a m a s c o t t o be p r o u d o f , a n d w h i c h should enliven the recently r a t h e r d u l l L o n d o n m a s c o t scene.

Failures B y g e n e r a l assent l a s t y e a r w a s a g o o d y e a r i n the U n i o n , h e n c e i t w a s perhaps inevitable that there s h o u l d be a l a r g e c r o p o f f a i l u r e s . The exams have claimed victims f r o m a l l parts of the U n i o n ; large sections of D r a m s o c and Ents. C o m m i t t e e have f a i l e d to r e t u r n . The Carnival organisers, J i m M u r r a y a n d Peter Jones, h a v e b o t h f a i l e d , as h a s the c h a i r m a n It seems of Ents., B r i a n C o m p t o n . p r o b a b l e that K e i t h G u y , last year's C h a i r m a n of S C C an d unsuccessful candidate f o r the presidency w i l l be n o m i n a t e d b y C o u n c i l as C h a i r m a n of Ents. F E L I X has lost a l l of its m o s t exp e r i e n c e d staff a n d b e g i n s t h e y e a r w i t h its y o u n g e s t e v e r E d i t o r . N o t e : D a i H o w e l l set u p a r e c o r d last year. It w a s the first t i m e h e p a s s e d a y e a r t h e first t i m e !

Sir W i l l i s in the News

New H a l l

V e r y m u c h i n the news is S i r W i l l i s J a c k s o n , H e a d of the E l e c t r i c a l E n gineering Department. E a r l i e r this s u m m e r he w a s a p p o i n t e d P r e s i d e n t o f the B r i t i s h A s s o c i a t i o n . A s h e is o n l y just t a k i n g o n this post he has n o t yet a n n o u n c e d a n y intentions a n d w i l l not d e l i v e r his P r e s i d e n t i a l a d dress u n t i l n e x t s u m m e r . H o w e v e r i t i s reported that m o r e t i m e w i l l be given at f u t u r e m e e t i n g s t o s y m p o s i a w h i c h w i l l b r i n g a number of disciplines together to discuss matters of c o m m o n interest. O n O c t o b e r 31st S i r W i l l i s i s t o c h a i r o n e o f t h e 1966 G r a n a d a G u i l d h a l l lectures. T h e speaker is Sebastian de F e r r a n t i , whose subject w i l l be " Technology and power." On November 5th, S i r W i l l i s is to receive an h o n o r a r y degree o n the o c c a s i o n of the i n s t a l l a t i o n o f t h e P r i m e M i n i s t e r , M r . W i l s o n , as t h e first C h a n c e l l o r o f the University of B r a d f o r d .

W I T H I N T W E L V E h o u r s o f the a n n o u n c e m e n t of the Selective E m p l o y m e n t T a x , the college received requests f r o m contractors w h o s e tenders were under consideration for review or even w i t h d r a w a l of their tenders. T h e s e i n c l u d e d the c o n t r a c t f o r the n e w h a l l development i n Eastside. T h e s i t u a t i o n was c r i t i c a l because a s t i p u l a t i o n o f the a n o n y m o u s benefactor was that w o r k s h o u l d begin bef o r e 21st M a y . O n l y b y i m m e d i a t e negotiations was it possible to retain the p l a n n e d starting date o f the 16th of M a y . W o r k is n o w c o n t i n u i n g s m o o t h l y a n d the h a l l is d u e f o r c o m p l e t i o n f o r the S u m m e r t e r m o f 1968. It is r e p o r t e d t h a t d u r i n g the S u m m e r t h e w o r k c o m p o u n d has been b r o k e n into at n i g h t , p o s s i b l y b y s t u d e n t s .

FELIX This year F E L I X finds itself with a decimated staff. What it r >eds N O W are people to give a hand. T o give you an idea, there are vacancies for : reporters, photographers, sub-editors, salesgirls, business organisers and cartoonists. Literally scores of people are required, especially Freshers. F E L I X holds meetings in the Press room at the top of the Union on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 12.45 p.m. If you cannot get to these visit one of the editorial staff in his room— at least you'll get some coffee! (96, Beit for the Editor)

S M A L L ADS. Published by

C . G . H a r r i s o n o n b e h a l f o f the F E L I X

B O A R D , Imperial

C o l l e g e , S . W . 7 , a n d p r i n t e d b y W E S T L O N D O N O F F S E T C O . , 86 R o a d , S . W . 6 (tel F U L 7969).

Lillie

Citroen Light 15 1953 for sale price £60. Sound condition and good body-work. Contact I. Cummings Elect Eng P.G.

http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1966/1966_0234_A  

http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1966/1966_0234_A.pdf

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