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HE

N E W S P A P E R

Friday

No. 144

GvF

I M P E R I A L

February !2tK

C O L L E G E

UNION

1960

4d

P R E S I D E N T I A L V E W P O I N T C.E.M. kioked off and almost immediately I.C. were penalised for one of their centres being o f f s i d e . F o r some unknown reason the referee had the kiok taken from the point of p l a y rather than where the infringement had taken place. Hanoook's kick was wide. Randal Peart out I.C. ahead, b. a penalty from the C.E.M. twenty five, a few minutes later. This soore gave I.C. a lead of 6-0 at half time. In the seoiud half I.C, played a l i t t l e better, and we saw some good l i n king up by the forwards.; Dai Howell, John Bridges, and Kris Tronski were ever prominent, the l a s t two, sometimes seen charging from the line out with several C.E.M. players clinging to them. From the f i r s t r e a l three quarter movement o f the game Randal Peart came into the l i n e and scored a very fine try. His own kick at goal failed. Some i n t e l l igent kicking by the centres gave J . Egan several good runs, but unfortunately he always had too many men covering him, to make the tine.

The attitude of the IC Executive to the Evening Standard's venture was recorded i n the last issue of Felix. The deoision not to give information to the paper has been adhered to, but behind any deoision that was taken was the idea, that as soon as they published UL news in a l l editions we would give the Standard information. For under these circumstances i t i s a venture worth supporting. It was hoped that oonoerted action by the College Unions and by ULU would change the Standard supplement to That i s why at ULU a suitable form. Presidents' Council I tabled a motion urging the Colleges to give no help to the Standard u n t i l i t was clear that their UL supplement was serving the University a useful purpose. IC Council on Monday evening supported the actions taken by the Executive. Acting on the Bxeoutive decision I refused Mr John Clarke permission to write his front-page story on IC last week, t e l l i n g him that only when the news was given in a l l editions would we support the venture. Mr Clarke invited me to lunch to hear the reasons i n f u l l , an opportunity whioh I took on Monday 8th February. At the reopening yesterday of tha adjourned Presidents' Council I withdrew my motion i n favour of a ULU Executive one that "ULU recommends to the Evening Standard that i t discontinues i t s UL s l i p edition". I spoke to this motion and urged other colleges to follow IC's lead by refusing information. The .notion was carried by 16 votes to 10. It appears though, that the other big oolleges intend to get what they can from the scheme, f o r they voted against the motion. m

R U G G E R H A N C E O F

C L U B G I V E I.C. T R I P L E

came over Mike fire kiok last

The f i n a l score came when Pat Bruce up very quiokly on to a loose b a l l the C.E.M. l i n e and touched down. Bregaiszi, who had led his team with and vigour added the points with a which brought back memories of the Cup game against Kings.

C R O W N

Not a great game, nor even a memorable one other than f o r the faot that i t put I.C. onoe again into the f i n a l of the U.L.U. Cup. Prom start to f i n i s h the game was scrappy, being broken up by spasmodio three quarter movements, which inevitably f a i l e d to reach the winger. In the loose the College forwards were undoubtedly superior to their opposite numbers and had the potential to dominate the play. In the l i n e outs and the tight I.C. were again superior, particularly striking being the jumping of John Bridges and the hooking of Dai Howe l l . In the second hal f I.C. lost only two of the set sorums which gave an ind-* ication of their superiority i n the tight.

In the closing minutes. C.E.M. pressed hard and we saw some good running by their backs, but the I.C. l i n e remained intact, and the f i n a l score was 11-0. The f i n a l i s on Saturday Feb. 20th. and we would l i k e as many people as possi b l e to help beat Vets at Motspur Park on that day. Make a note oj Feb. 20th; T.G.King.

C O N G R A T U L A T I O N S

• At half back I.C. did not get going u n t i l the. second hal f and even then.both half backs were slow i n their movements, Their slow servioe of the b a l l gave the centres, who were very closely marked bj the C.E.M. backs, l i t t l e room i n which to move and neither winger had a clear run after the b a l l had travelled the three quarter l i n e . The baok row onoe again showed their value to the side and a l l three played a great game. Otto Gilbert now seems to have regained his previous form and a break of his from the l i n e out i n the second half l e f t both his own team and the opposition standing.

Also at the Presidents' Council i t was agreed i n view of a letter of apology from Mr Spellman that the suspension be l i f t e d from midnight on Sat 13th Febj which means Council has i n the space of the same meeting agreed to his suspension An and then l i f t e d i t almost at onceI action which I'm afraid w i l l look like a olimb down by the Executive, since they proposed that suspension be l i f t e d . It waa also agreed, by a narrow majority, that ULU only have observer status at NUS in future and not delegate status. The wearisome Presidents' Council dragged on over two days f o r 10| hours, of whioh at least Vi hours concerned merely the problem of Spellman, after the S.Africa acycott and the Standard embargo. I am thinking of i n i t i a t i n g a Presidents' Council boycotts Les Allen - 10th Feb 1960.

S T O P

P R E S S

I.C.A.FC. TROUNCE VISITORS MANNHEIM BEATEN

F e l i x would like to offer i t s congratulations to Miss Hilary Tompsett *nd Mr Guy Hawkins on their engagement.

6-2

I C B B C DEFEAT CENTRAL-Y.M.C.A. 43-38


FELIX Tn these s t o r i e s he captures the weaknesses and e c c e n t r i c i t i e s of h i s c h a r a c t e r s d i s p l a y i n g them w i t h g r e a t s k i l l i n scenes r a n g i n g from pathos i n one extreme t o h i g h comedy i n the other.

C A L U S

T O R R B E

Aa Amerioa i s the apparent " l e a d e r " o f the western w o r l d , i t s s o c i o l o g i c a l problems are obwiously o f i n t e r e s t and importance t o i t s " f o l l o w e r s . " Vance Paokard has j u s t r e c e n t l y brought out another book on American s o o i o l o g y . His f i r s t book, "The Hidden Persuaders" d e a l t w i t h h i s country's methods o f m o t i v a t i o n a l a d v e r t i s i n g w h i l e his second "THE STATUS SEEKERS," 21/-, i n v e s t i g a t e s American c l a s s behaviour. There a r e , as s o c i o l o g i s t s have d i s c o v e r e d over the whole world, f i v e d i s t i n c t i v e o l a s s e s i n Amerioa. These are the R e a l Upper, Semi-Uppen L i m i t e d Success, Working and R e a l Lower o l a s s e s , w i t h a notable cleavage between the t o p two and the remaining t h r e e . T h i s cleavage, we are t o l d , i s almost e n t i r e l y t o do w i t h eduoation. T h i s , o n l y o o l l e g e graduates can hope t o aohieve the success r e q u i r e d t o p i t them i n the top two o l a s s e s . Without the help o f advanced eduoation one i s l e f t s t r u g g l i n g a g a i n s t an insurmountable b a r r i e r . American s o c i e t y i s a l s o s t r a t i f i e d on r a c i a l l i n e s . F o r i n s t a n c e , a torn American Jew o r Negro i s o f much lower s t a t u s than a top B r i t i s h American. So Amerioa, whioh i s thought t o be the most o l a s s l e s s s o o i e t y i n existenoe i s , i t appears, as c l a s s conscious as Great B r i t a i n was f i f t y years ago. Thi s country has been g r a d u a l l y l o s i n g i t s c l a s s r i g i d i t y i n the present century but i t i s s t i l l evident . I f America i n f l u e n o e s B r i t a i n i n i t s a t t i t u d e to s t a t u s as much as i n many other t h i n g s we s h a l l r e t u r n t o our o l d ways. P a r a d o x i o a l l y , the upper c l a s s e s i n the U n i t e d S t a t e s tend t o oopy o l d w o r l d B r i t a i n . T h i s stems from the f a o t t h a t the e a r l y B r i t i s h s e t t l e r s were of h i g h e r c l a s s than the other s e t t l i n g n a t i o n a l s . Thus, an upper o l a s s Amerioan s t r i v i n g f o r s t a t u s w i l l buy a faded f a m i l y p o r t r a i t from an antique d e a l e r and show i t t o guests aa "one o f my B r i t i s h a n c e s t o r s . " Coach l a n t e r n s on the gate-posts and o l d f a u l t y window panes a l s o g i v e the r i g h t impressio n t o v i s i t o r s . A q u i s i t i o n o f antiques i s not the only symbol o f s t a t u s . Another one, e q u a l l y as p o t e n t , i s w e a l t h . T h i s has been r e c ognised f o r Sissi time and i s shown by comp l e t e l y unnecessary gadgets, 3uoh as a i r c o n d i t i o n i n g , 30 f o o t t e l e v i s i o n masts and l a r g e r c a r s . T h i s o l a s s s t r i v i n g has become so apparent r e c e n t l y t h a t a d v e r t i s e r s are spending a c o n s i d e r a b l e amount o f money on r e s e a r c h t o f i n d out 'how t o a d v e r t i s e a produot t o make i t d e s i r a b l e as a h i g h s t a t u s symbol. The main p o i n t , however, seems tu oe t h a t t h e author c o n s i d e r s t h a t lower o l a s s c h i l d r e n do not have s u f f i c i e n t o p p o r t u n i t y f o r h i g h e r education and so the n a t u r a l t a l e n t of c l e v e r o h i l d r e n i n the lower s t r a t a . g o e s t o waste due t o the r i g i d i t y o f the c l a s s system. He c o n s i d e r s t h a t a modern s o c i e t y cannot a f f o r d t o t o l e r a t e 3uch waste.

The themes are r e a l l y a p l e a s u r e t o f i n d : one, o f a poor l i t t l e w e a k l i n g o f a man whose l i f e i s d i s r u p t e d by the murder o f a p r o s t i t u t e i n an adjacent f l a t ; another o f the b u l l f i g h t organised t o r a i s e money f o r the Spanish R.S.P.C.A.; and y e t another of the unhappy Czech Amerioan w i f e , who t r i e s t o s o l v e her problem o f a f r i g i d husband w i t h the a s s i s t a n c e o f a T.V. p s y c h i a t r i s t . Each s t o r y i n i t s e l f i s h i g h l y e n t e r t a i n i n g and the complete product i s one o f the b e s t books o f short s t o r i e s published reoently. The author i s a rraduate o f P e n n s y l vania S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y and has a Masters Degree from Columbia. He has worked f o r a Boston newspaper, the A s s o c i a t e d Press and s e v e r a l magazines. He became i n t e r e s t e d i n human behaviour e a r l y i n h i s c a r e e r and has p u b l i s h e d the two books mentioned w i t h great success. (The f i r s t has a l r e a d y been t r a n s l a t e d i n t o nine languages). He has been on s e v e r a l l e c t u r e t o u r s around Kurope and the U.S.A. and i s an a s s o c i a t e member o f The Amerioan S o c i o l ogical Society. Mr. Packard a t t a c k s the present o l a s s system i n Amerioa throughout) the book and f i l l s i t f u l l o f i n t r i g u i n g s o c i o l o g i c a l d e t a i l s ranging from c l a s s a t t i t u d e s i n sex behaviour t o choosing a house. One, however, i s c o n s t a n t l y aware o f the f a c t t h a t the author i s only t e l l i n g you about the t h i n g s whioh help h i s case. He e i t h e r has t r i e d t o c o l o u r h i s book w i t h s l i g h t sensatiosialism , always q u o t i n g the extremes from h i s r e f e r e n c e s , o r he has tended t o d i s c o v e r o n l y what he wants t o d i s o o v e r . In e i t h e r case, one oould go t o Amerioa, and not be able to f i n d a t r a c e of those t h i n g s which he abhors .

F E L I X

o n

t h e

S P O T

Onoe again F e l i x has broken new ground. As our f i r s t photograph shows, our renowned Editor has reached the bottom at last,accompanied by a l l the F e l i x s t a f f . Illuminated by a soft ned light,Mike Barron worked late into the night and w i t h each, word the hole he has dug for F e l i x sank deeper. At l a s t , i t was ao deep that, only by climbing up a lampost oould the bottom be seen. The bottom has now disappeared along with s i i members of the F e l i x staff and one disgusted lampost. What Gad Brough i s doing no-one seems to know but hopes ran high that he might be, joining the Foreign Legion; but unfortunately this was not so. Tou,too,can come and work in the F e l i x hole. Contact our renowned Editor,Mr. Troglodyte Barron,Hole 123,Prinoe Consort Rd. S.W.7.Telephone No. OLE 759-

The book i s w r i t t e n i n an easy s t y l e , f a r b e t t e r than h i s f i r s t book which was a t r i f l e ponderous, and i f read w i t h r e s ervation i s h i g h l y e n t e r t a i n i n g , informa t i v e , and w e l l worth r e a d i n g . "ADD A DASH OF PITT" p r i o e 15/- i s a r e c e n t l y p u b l i s h e d book o f e i g h t s h o r t s t o r i e s by P e t e r Ustinov.

S T A N D A R D

R E V I E W

Up to the time of going t o p r e s s o n l y three i s s u e s o f the Evening Stan dard " U n i v e r s i t y of London S p e c i a l " have been printed,, y e t these and other columns have been f i l l e d w i t h t a l e s of c a b a l s , I n t r i g u e s and the type of p o l i t i c a l manoeuvering t h a t one gets used t o i n Union a f f a i r s . So f a r I have been d i s a p p o i n t e d t h a t the c r i t i c i s m s expressed by I.C. students have missed the main p o i n t . They are concerned w i t h the f a o t t h a t l i t t l e mention has been made of I.C. A glance a t the i s s u e s w i l l show that sooner o r l a t e r we w i l l take our t u r n i n the " C o l l e g e Close - ups" on the f i r s t page. But t o me the whole matter hinges on whether the supplement i s d i r e c t e d t o wards students o r towards the p u b l i c . I f the l a t t e r were the oase then •one of us oould have any s e r i o u s objection. But the course of events seems to p o i n t to the former. Information on the c i r c u l a t i o n and d i s t r i b u t i o n of the supplement seems t o be confused whioh does not s u r p r i s e me i n view o f t h e nebulous and evasive answers I r e c e i v e d from a man who purported to be i n charge of the d i s t r i b u t i o n department. When I asked him whether the i s s ues were on s a l e i n p l a c e s other than the C o l l e g e Unions he r e p l i e d t h a t some were s o l d i n the West End. He r e f u s e d to g i v e the p r o p o r t i o n s s o l d to students

and t o the p u b l i c Being a l r e a d y somewhat embarrassed by my questions he r e erred, me t o Berwick, the A s s i s t a n t Ma a g i n g D i r e c t o r of the newspaper, wnof b r a i n c h i l d the supplement i s . He t.a out and unobtainable. I t seems i n view of the r e t i c e n c e of the Evening Standard that the schema i s intended p r i m a r i l y t o get more students t o buy c o p i e s , and not t o provide ,' an i n f o r m a t i v e and mature comment on the';! U n i v e r s i t y f o r the g e n e r a l p u b l i c . I n jjf t h i s case we must d i s a g r e e w i t h the vent u r e . The premature d e c i s i o n a l r e a d y f taken by The King's C o l l e g e Union i n support of the supplement and of S p e l l man was motivated p r i m a r i l y no doubt by the u n i n s p i r e d a r t i o l e i n the second i s s u e which f e a t u r e d them. I f e a r that the s p o t l i g h t d i r e c t e d suddenly upon them has so d a z z l e d them that they cannot see the audience before whom they stand - not a credulous p u b l i c but t h e i r own u n i v e r s i t y c o l l e a g u e s . The Supplement i s s o a r o e l y a t h r e a t to the c o l l e g e newspapers f o r I f e e l t h a t students w i l l q u i c k l y r e a l i z e i t s worth. I t cannot hope t o perform the f u n c t i o n of Sennet and i t adds n o t h i n g to the U n i v e r s i t y . L e t ' s keep i t o u t s i d e the gates. Norman B. Greaves.


Logue and are s e t t o music by Tony Kinsey The whole t h i n g i s and B i l l Le Sage. b r i l l i a n t l y produoed by L i n s a y Anderson.

AROUND

THE

TOWN

\

The h i s t o r y of the B r i t i s h "musical" has so far. been one of a s e r i e s of u n i n s p i r e d " t o n i o " productions o o n s i s t i n g of a t h i c k s l i o e of one aspect of B r i t i s h l i f e oovered w i t h a l a y e r of c l o t t e d sentimentality. Except f o r Osborne's "World of a P a u l S l i o k e y " whioh oould not i n any way be o a l l e d a success, t h i s has always been the case. The curren t prod u c t i o n a t the Royal Court "The L i l y White Boys" may, I hope, be the f i r s t of many to break away from t h i s t r a d i t i o n . T a r t , Cosh k i d and Wide boy decide t h a t crime does not pay, t h a t i t i s the r e s p e c t a b l e that are comfortable and they set about seeing how they might j o i n t h i s , to them, e l i t e group. P s y c h o l o g i c a l l y improbable, maybe, but t h i s i s of no importance to Harry Cookson, the p l a y w r i g h t who develops the s i t u a t i o n w i t h a b i t i n g s a t i r e whioh i s c o n t i n u a l l y present (perhaps too much s o ) . The l y r i c s , which are o n l y used when necessary, are by C h r i s t o p h e r

E N G I N E E R S

A l s o r e c e n t l y opened, i n the West End i s another very f i n e p l a y - John Mortimer's "The Wrong Side of the Park". It i s extremely d i f f i c u l t to say something b r i e f l y about t h i s p r o d u c t i o n , the b a s i c complexity of whioh i s added to by the presence of s e v e r a l i m p l a u s i b i l i t i e s . The s i t u a t i o n i s t o begin w i t h t h i s : the Lee f a m i l y , i n c l u d i n g parents and s i s t e r - i n - l a w l i v e i n a l a r g e house f u l l of V i o t o r i a n gloom and t y p i o a l l y over ornate. I n t o the house comes a lodger, who evokes i n Mis. E l a i n e Lee memories o f he f i r s t husband. E l a i n e , played w i t h b e a u t i f u l o o n t r o l by Margaret Leighton , i s a n e u r o t i c , nervously overwrought and drawn between the a o u t a l r e a l i t y of her present husband and the i d e a l i s a t i o n of her former husband i n the lodger, both of whom she i s i n e v i t a b l y comparing. Richard Johnson t a o k l e s very s u c c e s s f u l l y the d i f f i c u l t p a r t of E l a i n e ' s husband w i t h f i n e suppnfct from Robert Stephens and Wendy C r a i g . Peter H a l l d i r e c t s . Riooi.

B A L L

The evening of F r i d a y , January 30th saw a remarkable d i s p l a y of d i n n e r jackets, white s h i r t s and p r e t t y g i r l s . The occasion was, of course, the Engineers' B a l l , claimed by C. & G. to be the l a s t word i n I.C. s o c i a l f u n c t i o n s . C e r t a i n i t i s that the d i n n e r was e x c e l l e n t , but not more so than the speeches. J o l y o n Nove, C. <jb G. P r e s i d e n t , opened the a f t e r d i n n e r a c t i v i t i e s when he p a i d t r i b u t e to Mr. Manton's long s e r v i c e to G u i l d s Union as Honorary Treasurer. He presented Mr. Manton w i t h an i n s c r i b e d tankard and s a l v e r . Mr. Manton r e p l i e d by s a y i n g t h a t he had enjoyed d o i n g the job and t h a t i t i n v o l v e d very l i t t l e work. I t i s very d i f f i c u l t t o b e l i e v e t h i s l a s t remark f o r Mr. Manton has put i n an immense amount of work and the Union r e a l l y i s v e r y g r a t e f u l t o him. The Dean, P r o f e s s o r Saunders, then proposed the h e a l t h of tbÂť Union and J o l y o n Nove r e p l i e d . Tim Wadsworth proposed the h e a l t h of the guests i n a very w i t t y manner w i t h r e f e r e n c e s t o the past of the guest of honour, Monty Holbein , these caused a great d e a l of l a u g h t e r , e s p e c i a l l y from Mr. H o l b e i n . The other guests, i n c l u d i n g the C h i e f P e r c o l a t o r of the Instan t Coffee Warming Amalgamation, the P r e s i d e n t s of t.C. and Mines, and s t e p p i n g i n f o r a s l i g h t l y jaundiced John F o r s t e r , the S e c r e t a r y of R.C.S., were a l s o w i t t i l y welcomed. Monty H o l b e i n then rose,and gave oodles of advice t o a l l the young l a d i e s present on how t o marry an engineer and a l l that. This was r e a l l y uproarious and was w e l l r e c e i v e d by a l l .

F A S H I O N

S H O W

I.C. w i l l be represented by f i v e members of I.C.W.A. i n the U.L.U. Fashion They w i l l be making t h e i r Competition. f i r s t p u b l i c appearance i n the semif i n a l to be held a t Goldsmiths' C o l l e g e on Thursday 18th February. Under the theme of "Student Fashions" the models w i l l wear t h e i r own c l o t h e s and w i l l be judged on t h e i r s u i t a b i l i t y and on the team p r e s e n t a t i o n .

The b a l l was very good, the bar and c o f f e e p i t w e l l p a t r o n i s e d , and a good time so to speak was had by a l l . I t h i n k c o n g r a t u l a t i o n s are due t o the G u i l d s Entertainments' Committee, and e s p e c i a l l y to Tim Wadsworth, who organised the whole a f f a i r v e r y competently.

Miss C h r i s t i n e B r a g i e l w i l l show the more c a s u a l wear worn d a i l y by s t u dents; on a more formal note Miss Pamela Gray w i l l model a r e d wool a f t e r noon dress; the s h o r t evening dress i n a p r i o o t f i g u r e d brocade w i l l be presented by Miss dheenagh Wallace. Night a t t i r e and s p o r t s o u t f i t w i l l a l s o be modelled, by the other two members. An added a t t r a c t i o n of the evening w i l l be M. La Barron's commentary on the models appearances.

COMING EVENTS

This i s the f i r s t time t h a t I.C. has entered and t h e r e f o r e support from i t s members would be more than welcome.

February

12th

Huxley S o c i e t y "World Government"

February (see n o t i c e s )

February 16 t h F i l m Show "Le Mans, 1955" Room 266, Aero. 5.45 p.m.

19th

Mines C a r n i v a l "Eskimo H e l l " or %&Âť and Sploe 25/-

double.

9-0 p.m.

to 3-0

a.m.

G A R D E N E R S As many readers w i l l probably know, jazz at Imperial College i s i n a very h e a l t h y s t a t e . At t h i s time of year the u s u a l spate of j a z z competitions appears on the scene, and t h i s y e a r I.C. w i l l probabl y be b e t t e r represente d than ever. J a z z competitions g e n e r a l l y tend to be r a t h e r poor a f f a i r s f o r the musicians t a k i n g p a r t . They are u s u a l l y organised by people who' know v e r y l i t t l e about musia and musicians and are o f t e n judged by people who know even l e s s l The u s u a l s t a t e of a f f a i r s i s w i t h about t e n bands and one stand - that means ten drum k i t s , ten basses and about f i f t y musicians, and one stand. About f i v e minutes p l a y ing time i s allowed f o r each band (how can a band p o s s i b l y show i t s c a p a b i l i t i e s i n two Bhort numbers?),and probably t w i c e as raich i s allowed f o r changing bands over. The time spent by the judges i n the bar c o n s t i t u t e s a l a r g e p r o p o r t i o n of the evening. Needless t o say c o n d i t i o n s are somewhat shambolic - one might even say c h a o t i c . Then why do we enter - you might say Obviously the thought of winning completely overshadows any thoughts concerning the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . Then there i s p r e s t i g e ; a l l the other b i g o o l l e g e a a r e going to e n t e r . We have bands whioh can outplay a l l of them put together. So .we e n t e r . Ken Gibson's t r a d i t i o n a l band has r e c e i v e d w e l l deserved p r a i s e from a l l s i d e s . Formed o n l y a few weeks ago, they have now b u i l t up a l a r g e r e p e r t o i r e and are p l a y i n g a b e a u t i f u l l y relaxed s t y l e of t r a d i t i o n a l jazz.This group has been entered f o r the WUS Competition organised by N.E.C. and they r e c e i v e d f a v o u r a b l e comment from the judges o f the p r e l i m i n a r y round. They are a l s o entered f o r the I n t e r U n i v e r s i t i e s J a z z Competition a t Reading on Feb. 17th. May I w i s h them the v e r y best of l u c k - they deserve i t . The J a z z Gardeners comprising Messrs. Rushton, Farnsworth and P r i t chard oontinue to r e o e i v e h i g h p r a i s e f r o m a l l q u a r t e r s . T h e i r p l a y i n g at hops i s always attended by an appreo i a t i v e audience and c o n g r a t u l a t o r y remarks j u s t f l o o d i n . T h e i r progress seems continuous - a wonderful r e c o r d ing s e s s i o n i n the Pye - N i x a s t u d i o s and the prospects of a commercial r e c o r d are among t h e i r l a t e s t achievments. Many high hopes are pinned on the J a z z Gardeners f o r the I n t e r - U n i v e r s i t i e s Competi t i o n a t Reading. I n c i d e n t a l l y , a coaoh i s being run to Reading on Wednesday 17th. Feb., and a quick a p p l i c a t i o n to Mr. Rushton may secure you a p l a c e . Rims hot.


Bat

R E

FELIX

Dear S i r o r Man,

L e t t e r Bono*

F r o m

BARRON.

R I C C I

V « u

W R O N G

Dear S i r ,

circulation

Editmdai

1300

Comment

"Not a bad i s s u e , " " a b e t t e r F e l i x than u s u a l " . Comments l i k e these f l o a t e d around WE our ears when the l a s t i s s u e appeared. We a r e t o blame,of course. That you, t h e Union, d i d p r a c t i c a l l y n o t h i n g worth p r i n t i n g ; t h a t you WROTE p r a o t i o a l l y n o t h i n g worth p r i n t i n g ; t h a t you presumably had n o t h i n g worth w r i t i n g ; a l l these are minor" p o i n t s compared w i t h our d r e a d f u l e r r o r i n producing a F e l i x , whioh i n your e s t i m ation,"wasn't up t o standard." But w h i l e you crumbled, even then you d i d not bother t o ;>ick up a pen and say, " I t h i n k t h a t such and such an a r t i c l e i s s t n p i d . Why not ?" We can o n l y p r e sume t h a t you are f a r b u s i e r than i s good f o r you, o r t h a t you are s c i e n t i s t s o f the type r e f e r r e d t o b y the eminent S i r Bruce White. " S c i e n t i s t s s h o u l d be on t a p , not on top." F e l i x i s the p u l s e o f student o p i n i o n . We would o n l y be t o o p l e a s e d t o p r i n t y o u r v i e w s , and you ought t o be a b l e t o read o t h e r s . As i t i s , the o n l y views you ever r e a d are those o f the F e l i x board, togethei w i t h the h a n d f u l o f o u t s i d e ( H o s t e l ) s t a l w a r t s ; because these are the o n l y people who ever w r i t e t o F e l i x . The d e c l i n e o f the power t o w r i t e among s c i e n t i s t s i s a grave i l l . The p r o f e s s i o n has never been noted f o r i t s o r a t ors; t h u s l i t e r a t u r e i s i t s b e s t way of s e l f e x p r e s s i o n . Now, when the s c i e n t i s t i s o f more importance t o the w o r l d than ever b e f o r e , he i s becoming i n a r t i c u l a t e , a p a r t from the l i m i t e d p e r f e c t i o n he can achieve i n h i s so c a l l e d s p e c i a l i s e d t e c h n i c a l papers and r e p o r t s . The r e a s o n i n g v o i o e o f the s c i e n t i s t , the man who knows, i s seldom heard i n the c l a t t e r and babble of p o l i t i c a l f u r y which sweeps over the w o r l d ; but a t I.C. i t i s d i f f e r e n t . The a u t h o r i t i e s , i f they a r e w i s e , pay attenti o n t o t h e w i l l o f the students. The WILL o f the students o o u l d be expressed through F e l i x . That i s why i t e x i s t s .

I f you pay your fourpenoe every f o r t n i g h t , that h e l p s t o keep F e l i x independent. We a r e n o t s u b s i d i s e d , •md we are not o b l i g e d t o p r i n t auv t h i n g we don't want t o p r i n t . NeKSter are we s u b j e c t t o c e n s o r s h i p . B u t these advantages whioh your fourpence manages t o h o l d secure , a r e not much use i f you do n o t s u p p l y us w i t h somet h i n g t o p r o c l a i m our independence and TOURS. Important news comes r a r e l y ; and we f i l l a good d e a l o f our space w i t h f e a t u r e s , some u s e f u l , some f a i n t l y humorous. Here we r e l y on you. I f the m a t e r i a l i s t h e r e , we w i l l p r e s e n t it. I f the enthusiasm i s t h e r e , we w i l l r e f l e c t and a m p l i f y i t . I f a p a t h y , i s t h e r e , we can o n l y weep.

R I M S H O T

SV/C

PNE

I am u s u a l l y prevented f r o m w r i t i n g t o your newspaper by t h e one f a c t that SC muoh has aroused my i r e t h a t I wouldn't know where t o s t a r t . Today however I was roused by one t h i n g above a l l e l s e and so w i l l conc e n t r a t e on t h i s . I r e f e r t o the l e t t e r by your C r i t i c " R i c c i . " Having n o t h i n g whatsoever t o do w i t h the dramatic s o c i e t y as d i d your p r e v i o u s correspondent, Mr. S h i p l e y , p r e f a c e my c r i t i c i s m w i t h an apology. R i c c i appears from h i s l e t t e r , b o t h through i t s form and the views expressed t h e r e i n , t o be an I n t e l l e c t u a l , Long Haired, n i t . I am aware t h a t my d e s c r i p t i o n i s r e p e t i t i v e . A man who cannot s o r t h i s ideas out b e t t e r than R i c c i does should not be allowed t o c r i t i c i s e , f o r the essence of. c r i t i c i s m i s s u r e l y a balance of pros and cons. I f the pro s are g r e a t e r than the cons then the c r i t i c i s m i s f a v o u r a b l e and v i c e v e r s a . How does R i c c i attempt t o separate " t e l l i ig a story' from " i n v e s t i g a t i n g a s i t u a t i o n . " Without a s i t u a t i o n t h e r e can be no s t o r y and i n t e l l i n g the s t o r y the s i t u a t i o n must be c l a r i f i e d , which presumably i n v o l v e s the i n v e s t i g a t i o n of f a c t o r s i n f l u e n c i n g the s i t u a t i o n . Sometimes the i n v e s t i g a t i o n i s deeper than o t h . r s but t o separate and d i v i d e as R i c c i does b r i n g s us back t o the o l d argument of which came f i r s t , the Chicken or the Egg. (Can any expert on evolution help?)

L i k e t h i s Rimshot i s a j u v e n i l e i n s i z e 10 b o a t s . I n h i s ( ? ) f i r s t a r t i c l e he gave a l u c i d , i n t e r e s t i n g aocount o f t h e h i s t o r y o f j a z z i n 1959 from temporary v i s i t s t o permanent e x i t s . Then i n h i s l a s t ( I hope) a r t i c l e a sad c o n t r a s t ; t h a t John S t a c c a t o i s the g r e a t e s t i s not f o r me to judge b u t one can hope t h a t he w i l l not l a s t . A normal c h i l d when i n t r o d u o e d t o swinging musik w i l l o f t e n express h i s enjoyment by p i p i n g i n a h i g h p i t c h e d tenor " I l i k e i t , Daddy." Now imagine a b e a t n i k j u v e n i l e i n a s i m i l a r p o s i t i o n , i f you can f i r s t imagine suoh a person e n j o y i n g a n y t h i n g , and you w i l l get something so - " L i k e i t swings, Daddy-o,"growled i n a g r a v e l l y bass. Is t h i s what Rimshot i s a n t i o i p a t i n g : i s he a worn out D.J. from some f a r o f f i s l a n d whose e i g h t d l s o s have ceased t o e n t h r a l l him, o r i s he a r e i n c a r n a t i o n g i v i n g us a t a s t e o f the f u t u r e . L i k e I'm hoping t h e seoond a r t i c l e was a l a p s e i n s t y l e . Bagshot. With a p o l o g i e s t o no one.

M A T H S

M A D N E S S

1

B a s i c a l l y I b e l i e v e that p l a y s , s t o r i e s and poems were w r i t t e n o r i g i n a l l y f o r entertainment on the one s i d e and p r o f i t on the o t h e r . The e x p r e s s i o n o f a w r i t e r ' s feelings w h i l s t doing t h i s i s u s u a l l y subconscious i f the p l a y i s t o become a r t a t a l l , and i t w i l l only become g r e a t a r t i f these f e e l i n g s touch on the fundamental experience s of l i f e . Let us be e n t e r t a i n e d f o r then we w i l l l i s t e n and l e t us c r i t i c i s e a c c o r d i n g l y . I t i s an o l d p l a t i t u d e t h a t S e c r e t s w i l l out, but I am happy t o say t h a t so w i l l a r t w i t h o u t your pet (mon)goose R i o o i d e l v i n g i n and l o o k i n g f o r i t . lours

faithfully,

Dear S i r , For how much longer . w i l l Imperial C o l l e g e , the most important s c i e n c e c o l l e g e i n B r i t a i n , labour under the r i d i c u l o u s burden of possessin g no s e p a r a t e l y c o n s t i t u t e d department f o r t e a c h i n g mathematical p h y s i c s . Those of us who i n our T h i r d Year attempt t o become the t h e o r e t i c i a n s of the f u t u r e have t h e extremely irksome arrangement of t a k i n g our l e c t u r e s commonly w i t h the mathematics second o r t h i r d year. E x c e l l e n t - though these l e c t u r e r s a r e , t h e i r i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of the m a t e r i a l s i s l i a b l e t o be d e f i n e d more from the p o i n t of view of the r i g o r o u s mathem a t i c i a n than from the s t a n d p o i n t of the p h y s i c i s t , who i s more i n t e r e s t e d i n the use of mathematical t o o l s than i n the a n a l y t i c a l d i s c u s s i o n of these t o o l s . For my p a r t , I f i n d that l i v i n g t h i s "double l i f e " between the maths, and p h y s i c s b u i l d i n g s has c r e a t e d innume r a b l e F r e u d i a n complexes which can o n l y be r e s o l v e d by the u l t i m a t e f a t e of us a l l - madness! Yours i n Bedlam,

John R. Looms.

F r e d iloberts.

F O X H U N T E R

?

Physios £21

Dear S i r , I should l i k e t o tak e t h i s opportu n i t y o f b r i n g i n g t o your n o t i c e the f o x l i k e b e h a v i o u r o f a c e r t a i n person who, i t would appear, i s a g a i n s t f o x h u n t i n g . The I.C. R i d i n g Club decided t o g i v e a t a l k on f o x h u n t i n g t h i s term and was v e r y k i n d l y g i v e n a l e c t u r e r from the B r i t i s h F i e l d Sports S o c i e t y p a n e l . A p o s t e r was put up o f the I n t e r n a l Union B o a r d , a d v e r t i s i n g t h i s meeting but w i t h i n a few days i t had been t o r n down. T h i s l e t t e r was h e l d back i n the hope t h a t the persons who were a g a i n s t f o x h u n t i n g would aopear a t t h e meeting b u t t h e i r t a c t i c s seemed t o exclude honourable methods o f approach. Yours f a i t h f u l l y , Tony G i l l h a m , P r e s . R i d i n g Club.

FREE FOR

ALL

JABS UNDER

40

A M e d i c a l U n i t w i l l v i s i t the College t o give P o l i o vaooination on Wednesday, 24th February. T h i s i s a v a i l a b l e t o s t a f f and students under 4 0 . The .vaccinatio n i s g i v e n i n 3 stages and those who r e c e i v e d t h e i r «econd v a c c i n a t i o n more than 7 months ago are p a r t i c u l a r l y asked to attend.

F u l l d e t a i l s w i l l be posted on Notice-Boards i n the Union and i n Departments.

WEDS. 24TH.

FEB.


FEMX,

E X P L O R A T I O N

The e x h i b i t i o n was opened b y the R e c t o r on Monday and, d e s p i t e the r a i l w a y s t r i k e , about twenty r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s from f i r m s attended the opening. At the opening the R e c t o r announced t h a t he had r e c -

W E E K *

M O T O R I N G

T H E

L a s t week, Mr, Oheeney's e x c e l l e n t p o s t e r s t o l d u s , was E x p l o r a t i o n Week at I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e . Now i t ' s a l l over we Why can l o o k back and ask o u r s e l v e s why. h o l d an e x h i b i t i o n ? Why p u b l i s h a review? The reastoi3 are s e v e r a l . F i r s t and p e r haps foremost, i s t h a t we've had a l a r g e number of e x p e d i t i o n s i n reoent y e a r s , some o f them bad, some mediocre b u t most of them good. Not many people r e a l i s e d what had been done on these e x p e d i t i o n s and so the E x p l o r a t i o n Week gave them a chance t o l e a r n . I n a d d i t i o n t o t h i s many f i r m s and s e c t i o n s o f i n d u s t r y had supported these e x p e d i t i o n s , b o t h f i n a n o i a l l y and i n k i n d , and thds was t h e i r chance t o o , t o see the r e s u l t s of t h e i r support. A t h i r d , and e q u a l l y good r e a s on, i s t h a t i f the present h i g h standard of e x p l o r a t i o n a t I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e i s t o c o n t i n u e , new b l o o d and ideas must enter the f i e l d from o u t s i d e , and new people become i n t e r e s t e d .

F O R

S P E C I A L I S T

The I n s t i t u t e of Advanced M o t o r i s t s was formed three years ago, w i t h Government h e l p . I t s aim was t o improve the standard of d r i v i n g i n t h i s country by means o f t e s t s and l e c t u r e s . At present i t t e s t s about 8.000 people a y e a r , of whom about 50 per cent pass. The I n s t i t u t e a l s o organizes s o c i a l and s p o r t i n g rvents f o r i t s members.

During the t h r e e y e a r s , the I n s t i t u t e ' s t e s t s have r e c e i v e d much p u b l i c i t y and the standard i s g e n e r a l l y accepted t o be v e r y h i g h . I t i s not c o n s i d e r e d a d i s grace t o f a i l . Application f o r a test i s iade on a form p r o v i d e d by the I n s t i t u t e , which i n c l u d e s questions on d r i v i n g experience, age, occupation and type o f car, e t c . The f e e i s £2 b u t a f u r t h e r £1 has t o be sent w i t h t h i s as a year's subs c r i p t i o n f o r membership. A t e s t i s u s u a l l y arranged about 6 t o 8 weeks a f t e r the form i 3 r e c e i v e d .

This summer my f a t h e r took the t e s t and passed. He then suggested t h a t I should take i t and v o l u n t e e r e d t o pay for me. He wished t o show, by my passing, how low the standard r e a l l y was. I had been d r i v i n g f o r only 3 y e a r s , and, he claimed, c o u l d not have reached a v e r y high standard. Because I wis f r e e to accept a t e s t a t any time o f day d u r i ,g the next month, I was a b l e t o f i x an appointment w i t h i n t h r e e weeks of malting an a p p l i c a t i o n .

I a r r i v e d f o r my t e s t r a t h e r n e r v o u s l y because n o t only had a l o t of people taken an i n t e r e s t i n my b e i n g t e s t e d , but my c a r was 3 years o l d e r than T and l a c k e d many of the improvements a modern c a r has. The examiner met me and i n t r o d u c e d h i m s e l f , lie wnrned me t h a t the t e s t would cover a l l types of road but t h a t there would be no "catches." He expected a v e r y h i g h standard of d r i v i n g b u t s a i d he would not ask questions on the Highway Code, a l t h o u g h I must not break any o f i t s r u l e s .

A f t e r t h i s b r i e f i n t r o d u c t i o n we moved o f f . Immediately he gave me a v e r y steep h i l l 3 t a r t . I managed t o do t h i s q u i t e w e l l and.acquired some confidence. The r o u t e was over about 35 m i l e s o f mixed roads, i n heavy and l i g h t t r a f f i c . The examiner gave v e r y c l e a r i n s t r u c t i o n s as t o the r o u t e and we s t a r t e d t o d i s c u s s the r e l a t i v e m e r i t s of d i f f e r e n t makes of c a r s . He d i d not once mention my d r i v i n g although he o f t e n c r i t i c i z e d the d r i v i n g of other road u s e r s we saw. He commented on the good c o n d i t i o n of my c a r , s a y i n g t h a t i f a l l c a r s had as much a t t e n t i o n p a i d t o them as mine, t h e r e would be fewer a c c i d e n t s .

At one p o i n t he asked me t o d e s c r i b e the l a 3 t r o a d s i g n passed, o b v i o u s l y t o check on my o b s e r v a t i o n . I r e p l i e d t h a t I was not sure, but expected t h a t i t w.as a "Road Harrows" s i g n , because the road had j u s t reduced i n w i d t h and T was t a k i n g care t o g i v e room t o v e h i c l e s coming the other way. He seemed q u i t e s a t i s f i e d . With t h i s r e p l y . L a t e r he asked me t o do two s p e c i a l t e s t s . The f i r s t was t o t u r n the c a r round i n a very harrow road; he t o l d me afterward s t h r t he wished t o see i f I knew the s i z e o f my car and d i d not l e t i t h i t the kerbs. The o t h e r was to r e v e r s e round a s m a l l t r i a n g u l a r i s l a n d which was on a steep s l o p e , and t o keep as c l o s e i n as p o s s i b l e the whole way rand . I had. t o f i n i s h w i t h the oar parked by the kerb f a c i n g up the h i l l .

e i v e d a telegram o f b e s t wishes f o r the E x p l o r a t i o n Week from the present c o n t i n gent o f f i v e I.C. men a t present w i t h F.I.D.S. i n the A n t a r c t i c . A very t h o u g h t f u l and t i m e l y gesture . To c o i n c i d e w i t h the e x h i b i t i o n , a p u b l i c a t i o n , "The I.C. E x p l o i t a t i o n Review" was brought out. The e d i t o r , N i g e l C l a r k , and h i s s t a f f are t o be c o n g r a t u l a t e d on the h i g h standard o f t h i 3 review, especi a l l y as none o f them had had any p r e v i o u s experience of p u b l i c a t i o n . On Tuesday and Thursday a t lunchtime Or, C o t t and Mr. iXincan Carse l e c t u r e d on A f r i c a anfl the A n t a r c t i c r e s p e c t i v e l y . B o t h l e c t u r e s were b e a u t i f u l l y i l l u s t r a t e d and were g e n e r a l l y enjoyed. The ''IxplOBation S o c i e t y Dinner was h e l d on Wednesday, and i t was p l e a s i n g t o see t h a t q u i t e a number o f people brought guests. F i n a l l y , what was the g e n e r a l impre s s i o n o f t h e week? Host people seemed p l e a s e d w i t h the e x h i b i t i o n , and many people from o u t s i d e seemed t o have a t t ended. F i v e hundred c o p i e s of the r e v i e w have been s o l d , and the l e c t u r e s wers q u i t e w e l l attended. I n a l l , the r e a c t i o n has been encouraging.

L a t e r he asked me t o g i v e a running co:,ment6xy on my thouc;ht3, whioh was r a t h e r d i f f i c u l t . L u c k i l y I had expected t h i s and p r a c t i s e d a l i t t l e b e f o r e . I rememb e r e d t o mention the t r a f f i c c o n d i t i o n s behind and w e l l i n f r o n t and t o canment on p e d e s t r i a n s . A f t e r about two minutes he s a i d I c o u l d s t o p . T h i s was the hardest p o i n t of the t e s t as I tended t o t h i n k a t the same r a t e as I was t a l k i n g .

"»'/e f i n i s h e d back at the s t a r t i n g p o i n t a f t e r about an hour and a h a l f , and he then c r i t i c i z e d my d r i v i n g . I had been over cautious., but t h i s was probably because I was under t e s t . I had t o r e a l i z e t h a t the I n s t i t u t e r e q u i r e d a v e r y h i g h s t a n d a r d and i t was no d i s g r a c e to f a i l . However, I had p a s s e d i ! He went on t o compliment seme p o i n t s of my d r i v i n g and s a i d t h a t my techni-jue on roundabouts was the b e s t he had seen f o r a l o n g time. I was v e r y s u r p r i s e d t o have passed because I made mistakes on the t e s t t h a t I do not normally make, b u t he must have put these down t o nerves.

The t e s t has had no r e a l e f f e c t on my d r i v i n g . Immediately a f t e r p a s s i n g I drove v e r y c a u t i o u s l y as I f e l t the " H e s p o n s i b l l i t y " of b e i n g an "Advanced M o t o r i s t . " However, t h i s phase 300n wore o f f and I drove nor l a l l y again, I now no longe r t r y t o prove myself a good d r i v e r , but J e t my f r i e n d s l o o k a t the badge on the f r o n t o f my c a r i n s t e a d . The f a c t t h a t I passed, not only proves my f a t h e r ' s p o i n t t h a t the standard o f the t e s t i s not so high, but as h a l f the candidates t h a t take the t e s t f a i l , the g e n e r a l standard of d r i v i n g on the roads to-day must be v e r y low.


B O Y C O T T Dear S i r . Even i f spaoe p e r m i t t e d we would not here t r y t o convince you and your readers of the h o r r o r s and inhumanities of A p a r t h e i d as p r a c t i s e d i n the Union o f South A f r i c a . Any o f them who b o t h e r t o r e a d t h i s l e t t e r must by now have t h e i r o p i n i o n s one way o r the other. But we f i n d i t i m p o s s i b l e t o understand those who c l a i m t o be a n t i a p a r t h e i d and y e t seem t o be e m p h a t i c a l l y a n t i - b o y c o t t . With one b r e a t h they say t h a t the non-European3 should be g i v e n more r i g h t s and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s , and w i t h the next t h a t they are t o o i r r e s p o n s i b l e t o know what i s good f o r themselves. The b o y c o t t these people say w i l l only harm the non-Europeans. But s u r e l y they thems e l v e s are the b e s t judges of any harm t h a t they may s u f f e r and i n f a c t every South A f r i c a n non-European o r g a n i s a t i o n o f any a p p r e c i a b l e s i z e has asked us t o support the b o y c o t t . I f you support the underdog i n h i s s t r u g g l e f o r freedom then when the time comes t o show your support i n the way he a s k s , so not hide behin d excuses. And one must admit t h a t some o f the excuses put forward are somewhat l u d i c r o u s ! ' "We cannot b o y c o t t South A f r i c a n goods because we have not boycotted those from Hungary and China." Even i f the cases were s t r i c t l y comparable t h i s i s s t i l l a negative approach. I n the South A f r i c a n case the suppressed thems e l v e s have asked f o r a b o y c o t t , a r e f u s a l i s a s i g n o f support of the A p a r t h e i d and Baaskap p o l i c i e s . We t h e r e f o r e echo Hr. B u s t ' s words; there i s too much apathy, too much c r i t i c i s m w i t h a c t i o n . Here i s a chance t o sfcow your f e e l i n g s a g a i n s t A p a r t h e i d . Support the B o y c o t t . We would l i k e t o take t h i s oppo r t u n i t y of a s k i n g those who are organi s i n g the proposed South A f r i c a n S o c i e t y when t h i s S o c i e t y w i l l be h o l d i n g a meeting t o decide p o l i c y . We f e e l sure t h a t t h e r e are many more tbki,t&e75 s i g n a t u r e s r e f e r r e d t o by Mr. Buet who are a c t u a l l y pro-boycott . A f t e r a l l the aim3 o f the S o c i e t y were s t a t e d t o be, s i m p l y , t o b r i n g t o g e t h e r those students who have an i n t e r e s t i n South A f r i c a - Here was no r e f e r e n c e to the b o y c o t t . L a s t l y we understand t h a t the n o t i c e was not s t o l e n , as Mr. Buet accuses, but removed by the S.C.C. Chairman a f t e r t h e time p r o s c r i b e d which i t was h i s duty t o do. Yours C. A h o l i c k W. E. Maomillen D. B. Kristmanson.

H O W

T O

faithfully, S. K. Subbaroyan J . W. Smith

B E C O M E

P R E S I D E N T or To Be o r Not To Be Students a s p i r i n g t o the P r e s i d e n o y may c a r e t o r e a d the f o l l o w i n g h i n t s p i c k e d up from l o n g eaperience a t I.C. There are t h r e e main methods of a c t i o n , the s p o r t i v e , the s o c i a l , and, the most s u c c e 3 f u l i n r e c e n t y e a r s , a weighted combination of both. Let us take the l a s t one f i r s t . The p o i n t t o remember i s t h a t you mustn't be too good a t your chosen s p ^ r t , o r i f you can't h e l p b e i n g good at i t , have an argument w i t h the management. This w i l l always h e l p by g e t t i n g the sympathy o f t h e mob. Next, don't be t o o o b v i o u s : i . e . never be c a p t a i n o r s e c r e t a r y , because y o u ' l l t r e a d on a l o t o f peoples* t o e s and probably f i n i s h up by not wanting to be P r e s i d e n t anyway. L a s t l y , don't d r i n k too much beer, your ojm o r anyone else^a. T h i s l e a d s t o e x c l u s i o n from I.C.W.A*, the surest way t o s o c i a l success i n this College.

On Thursday, 4 t h . Feb., i t i s supposed t h a t the newly-formed Beer and Song S o c i e t y had an emergency g e n e r a l meeting i n order t o amass f o r c e s a g a i n s t the motion d e v i s e d t o poke i n t o t h e i r paunchy sanctuary. The I.C. Debating S o c i e t y , under the d e l i g h t f u l c h a i r womanship of Miss Tompsett, had the

The second speakers wen. ... h i g h e r than u s u a l standard and thoughtsreturned to/ the gay b i t o f f l u f f d e l i c a t e l y s k i p p i n g over the body-strewn f l o o r f o r d a i l y Guinness , The f l o o r speeches were spasmodic, faoes t e n d i n g t o the - "Whose rouhd n e x t ? " - e x p r e s s i o n . The exB r e s i d e n t o f Debates, r e j o i c i n g i n h i s newly found p l e b i a n freedom, shed h i s apathy, and t w i c e attempted t o add a touch of c l a s s t o the proceedings, w i t h some success i t must be added. I n the f i n a l speech, John Cox r e t u r n e d t o h i s more u s u a l form, and added a touch of s e r i o u s ness, which might have caused one o r two people, t o t h i n k c a r e f u l l y o f t h e i r own p o s i t i o n , i f not o f the motion. A l lin a l l , a d i s a p p o i n t i n g debate, r a r e l y r e a c h i n g the standards t h a t one s h o u l d expect from t h i s C o l l e g e o f Science and Technology. The motion, by the way, was defeated, w i t h more,abstentions than votes for.

motion that ' t h i s house b e l i e v e s that a l l members o f the union and t h e i r guests should be a l l o w e d i n t o the I.C. bar,' b e f o r e i t , and sparks were expected. John Cox, p r o p o s i n g , gave a f i n e d i s p l a y of brinkmanship, i n e f f e c t i v e l y r e v i e w i n g e v e r y t h i n g from a p a r t h e i d t o to-morrows 'Worker' e d i t o r i a l . J . C a r t e r , ( J i m , i n case you don't know) opposing, t o s s e d out a s e l e c t i o n o f h i s more c o n t a i n e d j o k e s , r e s o r t i n g t o h i s well worn technique o f never t a l k i n g t o the p o i n t . "You come here w i t h a pre-determine< mind, i n any case, not r e a l l y t o l i s t e n to mej" Perhaps some p r i n c i p a l speakers a t I.C. w i l l some day r e a l i s e t h a t most people a t t e n d debates i n o r d e r t o hear the p r i n c i p a l speakers speak tei the motion,

In the s o c i a l sphere, you must always be ready t o accept o f f e r s of c o f f e e , e s p e c i a l l y from I.C.W.A. T h i s i s most important. I t i s not necessary t o g i v e c o f f e e y o u r s e l f , o r even t o d r i n k the f i l t h y s t u f f i n your own room, b u t never, I.C.W.A., never, r e f u s e an i n v i t a t i o n . r e a l i s i n g t h e i r p o s i t i o n as a r b i t e r s o f s o c i a l success, and having the c a s t i n g v o t e , as i t were, i n the P r e s i d e n t i a l e l e c t i o n s , w i l l damn you out of hand i f you. r e f u s e t o be bored over c o f f e e , o r t r y to be independent. So, make a l o t of r a t h e r s u p e r f i c i a l f r i e n d s among our women, but don't on any account f a l l i n l o v e w i t h one. This gives r i s e to, what might be p o l i t e l y termed, d i f f e r e n ces o f o p i n i o n , on the t h i r d f l o o r . Now f o r the s p o r t i n g method. There i s o n l y one way t o make a s u c c e s s ^ f u l attempt i n t h i s manner, and t h a t i s to be a Rugby Club c h a r a c t e r , par e x c e l l ance. I n t h i s way, you make hundreds . of enemies, but a l s o hundreds o f drunkeji buddies who w i l l say " I t ' s about time we had a decent b l o k e as P r e s i d e n t , i n s t e a d o f t h i s l o u s y shower o f - ". The - i n d i c a t e s some s u i t a b l e e p i t h e t . A f e e l i n g then a r i s e s among the sportsmen t h a t something mu3t be done, and abusive a t t a c k s are made on C o u n c i l , from which you of course, stand a l o o f . You then become accepted as a n a t u r a l candidate by the boozers, and the o n l y reasonable boozer by the h o i - p o l l o i . This c o u l d work w e l l , but has not, I b e l i e v e , been successful. L a s t l y we come t o the s o c i a l t e c h n i q u e , t h i s i s the most d i f f i c u l t o f them a l l , and r e q u i r e s a l o t o f nerves, g u t s , and the a b i l i t y t o speak i n debates. I would not suggest t h i s method t o anyone except an obvious candidate. Now you know how t o become Presi*> dent, and i f you succeed, you can l o o k forward t o a y e a r o f absolute h e l l , beoause those who wanted t o be P r e s i d e n t i n your y e a r , those who want t o be P r e s i d e n t ilext y e a r , a motley c o l l e c t i o n of s t i r r e r s , and your S u p e r v i s o r , w i l l all-combine t o make you l o o k an i d i o t . Coed luck f r i e n d s , you need i t .

N I C E

B Y

A R R O W S

?

I C W A . for the election of Mr ICWA

1960

This w i l l take p l a c e on February 29th. A l i s t of prospective candidates f o r this, m e r i t o r i o u s post i s on the main Union n o t i c e board. Proposers w i l l be expected to ext o l l the s p e o i a l v i r t u e s , o r otherwise , which b e f i t t h e i r candidate s f o r the p o s t , before a f u l l meeting of the A s s o c i a tion. This w i l l be f o l l o w e d by an a b s o l u t e l y democratic p l e b i s c i t e a f t e r which the s u c c e s s f u l candidate w i l l be e l e v a t e d w i t h due pomp and ceremony t o the c h a i r of o f f i c e .

C O M M I T T E E T O

R O O M ' X ' B E

CLOSED Committee Room "A" w i l l be c l o s e d f o r a l l purposes as from March 1st u n t i l a f t e r Kay 7 t h . The Committee Room w i l l be used d u r i n g t h i s p e r i o d as the o f f i o e Of the I.C.U. C h a r i t y Carnival.


7

C R O S S

C O U N T R Y

E X P L O R A T I O N I N

T H E

T R O P I C S

by Dr. Hugh B. Cott aa p a r t o f the

I.C.

E x p l o r a t i o n Week. I t i s r e f r e s h i n g l y r a r e t o f i n d an s x p l o r e r , who does not t a l k about h i s Last, o r l a s t but one e x p e d i t i o n , but 3an put over t o an audience some o f the looumulated experience which he has gained h i r i n g a l i f e t i m e of e x p l o r a t i o n . Br. high B. C o t t , the d i r e o t o r of the U n i v i r s i t y Museum o f Zoology, Cambridge has this a b i l i t y , and as a r e s u l t the l e c t u r e rhich he gave as p a r t o f the g e n e r a l studies programme on Tuesday was one o f the best l e c t u r e s on e x p l o r a t i o n we have yet heard a t I.C. Dr. C o t t s t a r t e d by s a y i n g he was l o t an e x p l o r e r , but merely a t r a v e l l e r and a n a t u r a l i s t . As h i s l e c t u r e p r o oeeded i t beoame obvious tha t t h i s was not q u i t e the t r u t h . Many of the c l o s e up shots o f w i l d animals which he showed r e v e a l e d not o n l y a standard o f photography o f the h i g h e s t t e c h n i o a l e x c e l l e n c e but a l s o a v e r y obvious d i s r e g a r d o f p e r s o n a l danger. H i s comment t h a t . .. "when photographing w i l d animals, i n o r d e r t o get a good photograph, one shouldn't j u s t p o i n t the camera a t i t , but get c l o s e enough so t h a t i t f i l l s the r e f l e x screen"... s u r e l y puts him i n t o the c l a s s o f an explorer, i n t h i s p a r t i c u l a r f i e l d at l e a s t . In the f i r s t p a r t o f h i s l e c t u r e , Dr. C o t t compared t r o p i c a l w i t h o t h e r types o f e x p l o r a t i o n . He p o i n t e d out t h a t the amount o f equipment needed in the t r o p i a s i s s m a l l by comparison w i t h , say, a p o l a r o r a h i g h mountain e x p e d i t i o n , and t h a t a t r o p i o a l ex p e d i t i o n can v e r y e a s i l y l i v e o f f the land. F u r t h e r t h a t p o l a r e x p l o r a t i o n is more l i k e l y t o be concerned w i t h g e o p h y s i c a l or g e o g r a p h i c a l e x p l o r a t ion, and t h a t i n the, t r o p i c s a t t e n t i o n I s n a t u r a l l y fooussed more on the immense v a r i e t y o f b o t h animal and p l a n t l i f e whioh e x i s t s t h e r e . Dr. C o t t moved next t o photography, a s u b j e c t e v i d e n t l y c l o s e t o his. h e a r t , and p o i n t e d out t h a t basi c a l l y t h e r e were two techniques. One c o u l d e i t h e r be prepared and t r y to get photographs as the o p p o r t u n i t y arose, or one oould w a i t f o r the subj e c t and p l a n any g i v e n photograph. F i n a l l y , t o end h i s t a l k , Dr. Cott s a i d t h a t even an e x p l o r e r oould not be on the move and working a l l the time, and t h a t a hobby was e s s e n t i a l . He then showed a s e r i e s of s l i d e s o f pen and i n k sketches done d u r i n g h i s spare moments i n A f r i a a . At t h i s j u n c t u r e Dr, Cott showed h i m s e l f to be not only a f i r s t rate photographer, but an a r t i s t of quite exoeptianal t a l ent. Indeed, these f i n a l sketches l e f t the audienoe with suoh a v i v i d i m p r e s s i o n o f their eubjeot, t h a t p h o t o g r a p h , even of Br. Cott's high standard, o o u l d no where near equal them.

S T A N D A R D

S A F A R I

The second team was unlucky t o l o s e by only h a l f a p o i n t t o U n i v e r s i t y C o l l e g e i n a league f i x t u r e h e l d a t Mitcham on Wed. 27th. I n the same matoh KiJig's C o l l e g e and L.S.B. were e a s i l y defeated. The I.C runners were w e l l spread out a f t e r the s i x m i l e r u n : Huntley ( 3 ) , Hammonds (5) and B u t l e r (8) were t h e f i r s t t h r e e home.

B E A U T I C W A R I A N

N * 7

On the same day another second team h e a v i l y d e f e a t e d Brentwood School by 29 p t s . t o 49 a t Petersham. Bernard was f i r s t w i t h B e r b e r (2) and Yi'arren (3) f o l l owing some way behind.

A f i r s t team t r a v e l l e d t o Aylesbury on the f o l l o w i n g Saturday t o run a g a i n s t the V a l e o f Aylesbury A t h l e t i c Club. The match was very c l o s e and r e s u l t e d , i n a narrow v i c t o r y f o r I.C. by 27 p t s . t o 28. The course was heavy and times were c o r r e s p o n d i n g l y slow. C o l l i n s (2) finished f i r s t f o r I.C. w i t h Bernard (3) not f a r behind. At the same time a second team e a s i l y defeated B a n c r o f t ' s School i n Essex. With 6 runners i n the f i r s t seven p o s i t i o n s the f i n a l score was I.C. 2nd, 13 p t s . B e n o r o f t ' s School 29 p t s . Notable performances were those o f George Turner, vrtio won, and Hoger Hedge, our new up and coming s t a r who was f i f t h .

C A R O L Y N

R U S S E L L

S Q U A S H The U n i v e r s i t y C o l l e g e Annual I n v i t a t i o n Race was h e l d at P a r l i a m e n t H i l l F i e l d s on Saturday 6 t h Feb, A strong Oxford T o r t o i s e s team won w i t h 88 p t s . f o l l o w e d by I.C. f i r s t team w i t h 90 p t s . The and Southampton U n i v e r s i t y 121 p t s . second team were 8 t h b e i n g the f o u r t h London C o l l e g e team t o f i n i s h . John C o l l i n s was 2nd w h i l e Larkum (10), Bernard (12) B a r b e r (16) and Warren (21) put up very good performances. Roger Hedge was the t h i r d 2nd team runner t o cross the l i n e .

I N

T H E

O F

The 1 s t team have continued i n t h e i r winning v e i n over the l a s t f o r t n i g h t , b e a t i r i r Keble C o l l e g e . Oxford ( 3 - 2 ) , ".Vestminster H o s p i t a l ( 4 - l ) , L e i c e s t e r Univers i t y ( 4 - 1 ) , S t . Catharine's C o l l e g e , Camb r i d g e ( 3 - 2 ) , but u n f o r t u n a t e l y they went down t o London H o s p i t a l , w i t h a much weakened team ( 3 - 2 ) : we hope t o r e v e r s e t h i s d e c i s i v e l y on the 16th l eb. when they oome t o p l a y a t I.C. The v i o t o r y a g a i n s t L e i c e s t e r was v e r y p l e a s i n g , s i n c e they were one o f the t h r e e s i d e s t o b e a t us l a s t term. ?

F O O T S T E P S

B A R B A R A

Lands End - John 0 ' G r o a t s Relay.

T h i s i s a r e l a y race on a p o i n t t o p o i n t b a s i s i n which a team of 8 runners (and two r e s e r v e s ) t r y t o cover the d i s tance i n as s h o r t a time as p o s s i b l e . The u s u a l method i s t o run the d i s t a n c e i n t e n m i l e stages but other v a r i a t i o n s have been used.

At present Birmingham U n i v e r s i t y h o l d the record, w i t h a time o f under 93 hours; o t h e r U n i v e r s i t i e s t o have com-, p l e t e d are Oxford ( t h e o r i g i n a t o r s ) , Cambridge and E x e t e r w h i l e an attempt by B r i s t o l was defeated by l a s t summer's hot weather.

I t had been hoped t h a t an I.C. team should make an attempt but i n s t e a d the team w i l l now be drawn from the whole U n i v e r s i t y . Even so i t i s l i k e l y t h a t the major support w i l l be from t h i s C o l l e g e .

The two r e s e r v e s are taken so t h a t i f one o f the team breaks down the whole attempt can continue u s i n g a replacement. These two a l s o a c t as oooks, d r i v e r s , e t c . but even so s e v e r a l others w i l l be needed to complete the E s c o r t P a r t y , and anyone i n t e r e s t e d i n t a k i n g p a r t i s asked t o contact J . H. C o l l i n s through the Union Rack - I t should be p o i n t e d out t h a t the a c t u a l running i s one of the lesser problems compared w i t h a r r a n g i n g E s c o r t v e h i c l e s and meals and s l e e p i n g o f the Runners.

U n f o r t u n a t e l y everyone was e l i m i n a t e d from the U.L. Cup i n the 1 s t and 2nd rounds. B r i a n A v i e n t went out t o Mike K i n g s t o n , the U n i v e r s i t y C a p t a i n , f i n d i n g i t d i f f i c u l t t o ^ g e t used t o t h e f a s t c a s t s a t S t . Mary's. P e t e r O d e l l l o s t t o Tim Goodwin, U.L. S e c r e t a r y . Hans E s p i g t o Gazadar, ex-U.L. C a p t a i n and P a k i s t a n i i n t e r n a t i o n a l ; they c o u l d h a r d l y have p i c k e d b e t t e r opponents S B r i a n Haywood l o s t t o Tony C h i g n e l l i n a v e r y good match, but he found t o h i s oost t h a t the e f f e c t s o f t o o much Christmas "pud" were s t i l l w i t h him. No news has been heard from U.C. concerning the i n t e r c o l l e g e 3-a-side c o m p e t i t i o n , so i t l o o k s as though we may have a w.o. i n t o the 3 r d round.

The 2nd Team's r e c o r d i s not q u i t e SO good and they have had t o put up w i t h a. number of c a n c e l l a t i o n s , but we hope they w i l l manage t o make a b e t t e r f i n i s h t o the season.

Next week the 1 s t Team has a busy time w i t h f o u r matches on hand. The Escorts (H) on Monday, King's C o l l e g e (H) on Tuesday, Ashstead (A) on Thursday, and Yiueen' s ' C o l l e g e , Cambridge (H) on Saturday. E s c o r t s and Ashstead were two of the three c l u b s which beat u3 l a s t year, out o f about 30 p l a y e d , and Quern's beat us (0-5)' l a s t term; we s h a l l have a hard task on hand i f we are t o beat a l l three.

The run i s planned f o r the week a f t e r E a s t e r ( A p r i l 19th - 26th) when i t i 3 hoped t h a t weather c o n d i t i o n s w i l l hot be too unfavourable John H.

Collins.


F E L I X

S W I M M I N G

T R I U M P H R W I C H O C K E Y

& S O C C E R

T E A M S

For the seorid year in succession I.C. have reaohed the F i n a l round of the Q.L. Soccer Challenge Cup tournament. As cup-holders and with a well-balanoed distribution of University and Sidomian footballers i n the side they must now be favourites to retain the sup against Goldsmiths College on February 27th. However, as thooe who nacohed the 2nd round match against L.S.E, and the amusing semi-final game against M , 10 days ago are aware, the path to the f i n a l has not seen easy- The tremendous excitement of the f i r s t semi-final game with U.C. i n which I.C. took a 4-1 lead and then allowed their opponents to level at 4-4 was not repeated in the game at Motspur on Feb. 6th, when I.C. demonstrated their superi o r i t y by winning 5-0. I.C. with Austin and Payne r e t urning t o the side and U.C. with a new left-winger were well-matohed for the f i r s t 20 minutes although I.C. already had a t e r r i t o r i a l advantage. The very strong U.C. forward line was well held during t h i s period by quick tackling and good covering. The two Steves, (Fisher and Pick) at full-backs and James our Welsh international at centre-half played coolly and i n t e l l i g e n t l y using the long b a l l well so as to cut the TJ.C. forwards out of the game as much as possible. Our f i r 3 t goal came mid-wa,, through the f i r s t half f o l l o w i n g a corner-Kick and this turned out to be the oruoial point i n the whole match, U.C. up to t h i a goal were well i n the fight but having made suoh a tremendous recovery i n the previous game i t seemed that they had not the physical and mental aeserves to do i t again. I.C. now had the adge a l l the time and although U.C., true cupfighters that they are, never cracked or save up trying goals were bound to acta® Towards the end of the f i r s t half Colin Harris made i t 2-0 the sides changed ends at this soore.

R U G E Y

F I V E S

A f i r s t meeting o f the Rugby F i v e s Club has been arranged f o r 5.15 «i Monday 15th Feb. i n Committee Room A i n the Unioj to e l e c t o f f i c e r s and arrange a c t i v i t i e s f o r the r e s t o f t h e year. I t i 3 t o be hoped t h a t a l l . t h o s e who have signed the l i s t i n the union w i l l t r y to attend and. anyone e l s e i n t e r e s t e d . A supplementary grant has been put i n t o the A.C.C., and a few p a i r s of g l o v e s and b a l l s w i l l be purchased when the c o u r t s a r e ready.

R E A C H

F I N A L S

The I.C. Forwards by t h i s time were p l a y i n g extremely w e l l and t o them c h i e f ionours must go f o r t h i s great v i o t o r y . The three i n s i d e - f o r w a r d s worked f u r i o u s l y t a c k l i n g back w e l l and o a r r y i n g danger i n t o the U.C. pena l t y a r e a every time they'moved forward. The wingers who had e x c e l l e n t s e r v i c e made good use of i t , George Wenk on the l e f t g i v i n g J i m Whetton the U n i v e r s i t y f u l l - b a o k the most w o r r i n g game he must have had f o r a l o n g time. The t h i r d anu best goal of the match was scored by H a r r i s w i t h an e x c e l l e n t 20 y a r d shot. The chance b e i n g given t o him by a piece of very quick t h i n k i n g by Mousset-Jones. The f o u r t h g o a l was scored d i r e c t from a corner by Wenk,.and the f i f t h a t y p i c a l o p p o r t u n i s t goal by F i n n e y . I t was a t t h i s stage o f the game t h a t c a p t a i n F a u l k n e r made the b i g g e s t faux-pas the I.C. team made a l l a f t e r noon, when, hearing the r e f e r e e ' s w h i s t l e and t h i n k i n g i t was a l l over he began t o give the oheers f o r U.C. The r e f . however d e c i d e d that he had w h i s t l e d f o r a f o u l and that there waa a f u r t h e r 10 minutes t o play....such was the tension In the gaiue, and suoh was the r e l i e f of n a / i h g won through t o the f i n a l when the f i n a l w h i s t l e blew. We thank our supporters who t r a v e l l e d t o Motspur and hope they w i l l come together w i t h many more t o cheer us t o v i o t o r y i n the f i n a l on Sat. Feb. 27th, We w i s h the Rugby Olub success i n t h e i r s e m i - f i n a l so t h a t I.C. w i l l be r e p r e s s ented i n a l l the three U.L. Cup F i n a l s .

H0CKBT By scoring 15 goals to 3 goals against i n 3 matches Imperial College have reaohed the f i n a l of the U.L.Cup The matches were: 1st round v Wye College 5-0 2nd round v L.S.E. 7 - 2 Semi f i n a l v St.George's Hosp. 3 - 1 The f i n a l i s to be played against Battersea who we defeated i n the cup l a s t year. However, those with lo»g memories w i l l remember the only other occasion when I.C. reaohed the f i n a l , they were defeated by Battersea. Thus this match K i l l undoubtedly, be keenly fought with good hockey on both sides. St. George's Hospital, gave a good account of themselves iTi the semi f i n a l and certainly at one stage of the game I.C. didn't laok l i k e scoring. Thegame opened with a direct attack from St. George's, in whioh they were unlucky not to soore. However, I.C. settled down and the game developed into a battle between the I.C. forwards and the St. George's defence. At half time the score was 0-0 mainly due to the i n a b i l i t y of the I.C, forwards to make proper use of the chances offered. St. George's sprang back to the offensive i n the 2nd half with a superb goal from their l e f t wing. This was i n deed a slap i n the face f o r I.C.+who repl i e d by forcing a succession of corners, from one of these Mick M i l l e r scored and then the I.C. team started to play the class of hookey expected from them, 2 more goals being scored before the f i n i s h F i n a l soore; I.C. 3 - St. George's 1. The lesson learned from this match i s 'Never to underestimate your opponents Published by FELIX BOARD, Imperial Collt^ Union, S.W.7

I.C. Swimiiing Club oontinues t o b e v e r y good a t w a t e r p o l o , and t e r r i b l e a t e v e r y t h i n g e l s e . The f i r s t team, l i k e l y candidates f o r t h e U.L.U. championship, defeated S t . B a r t a H o s p i t a l i n a league match 7 - 2, a good v i o t o r y . The 2nd. and 3rd. teams are a l s o i n a w i n n i n g mood so f a r t h i s term, and a l l i n a l l , some reasonable p o l o has been played. L a s t F r i d a y B r i s t o l came t o p l a y us and although the I.C. team had t h r e e r e s erves .playing, won c o m f o r t a b l y 7 - 2. However, the men3' swimming match was l o s t , and l.C.W.A. , combining w i t h U.C. l a d i e s , a l s o l o s t , d e s p i t e some v a l i a n t U.C. e f f o r t s .

B A S K E T B A L L

The I.C. B a s k e t - b a l l Club has c o n t i n u e d i t s r u n o f success and s i n c e the l a s t r e p o r t the 1 s t team have p l a y e d 8 matches, w i n n i n g 7 o f them. The only d e f e a t was t o a s t r o n g P o l y t e c h n i c team onaie f i r s t day o f term when the e f f e c t s of a w e l l - s p e n t v a c a t i o n became apparent. 4'e remain second t o B a t t e r s e a i n the U n i v e r s i t y League, having beaten Goldsmiths 45-34 and Woolwich 56-46. The match a g a i n s t Goldsmiths was harder than the score 3. ggests s i n c e we were t r a i l i n g 17-24 a t h a l f - t i m e . Up t o t h i s p o i n t we were p l a y i n g a^zciie defenoe a g a i n s t a f a s t moving a t t a c k w i t h a f r e e - s c o r i n g p i v o t who had s c o r e d 14 p o i n t s i n the h a l f . On the resumption I.C. ohanged t o a man»to-man defenoe - p l a y e d f o r the f i r s t time t h i s season - and had c o n s i d e r a b l e success, winning t h a t h a l f 25-10 and cona'equently tljg_match. Mike Barron'3 s e t shots were as e v e r and he scored 24 p o i n t s - 18 i n the second h a l f . Don P a r k e r (10 p o i n t s ) a l s o p l a y e d w e l l i n a t t a c k and Jack ttr^fjr and Tony H i n d gave safe performances i n defence.

In the London League - D i v i s i o n I I , I.C. a r e unbeaten a f t e r p l a y i n g 11 o f the soheduled 16 matches. We completed the f i r s t h a l f o f the season l a s t term b y d e f e a t i n g Holloway (80-43) and. House U n i t e d ( 4 2 - 2 9 ) . The l a t t e r match was more r e m i n i s c e n t o f Twickenham r a t h e r than a B a s k e t - b a l l Court and the l e a s t s a i d about i t the b e t t e r . So f a r t h i s term we have p l a y e d Borough Road, H u n t i n g f i e l d and Kingston Y.M.C.A. d e f e a t i n g them 59-36, 57-27, 67-27 r e s p e c t i v e l y .

The

K i n g s t o n match eaw some e x c e l l e n t defensive p l a y b y F r y e r and Wickenden as the h a l f - t i m e scare o f 30-5 suggests. Our main s c a r i n g shots were t h e s e t ones o f Barron (27 p t s ) and Mathews (20 p t3 ) w i t h A l e x Termanis (13 p t s ) w a i t i n g f o r t h e l o o s e ones under the basket.

The 2nd team have had tw- matches t h i s year. They drew 31-31 w i t h B a t t e r s e a I I i n a f r i e n d l y matoh and defeated Woolwich I I 92-42. i n the U.L.U. League - D i v i s i o n I I . In t h i s match the main s c o r e r s were Sam B o r e n s t e i n w i t h a remarkable 42 p o i n t s , Bob Ralph w i t h 28 and Dave Masson w i t h 18 p o i n t s .


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