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Script Draft Stage Staff hibernation and evacuation management

Introduction Have the rotating globe used in the incident management module with background music and crisis events showing within the globe. If the safety and security situation where you work or live becomes unstable and presents an increased level of risk to you, your family and your work colleagues you may need to hibernate in the local area, or evacuate from the immediate area, region, or indeed country. Increased safety and security risks may result from manmade threats such as violent demonstrations or protests, political instability, tribal or intra-state conflicts, ethnic and religious fighting or persecutions, terrorist or militancy attacks, or from military conflicts. The requirement to hibernate or evacuate may also result from natural hazards such as flooding, storms, forest and bush fires, pandemics, volcanic eruptions, or from the effects of a major earthquake. Hibernation and evacuation situations can apply everyone, whether they were born and raised in the country, or whether they are visitors or longer term residents. No everyone will respond to an emergency situation in the same way. Who they are, what supporting social and community relationships are available to them, what work or public infrastructures will support them, and the specific risks they face as individuals or groups will determine how they respond to a manmade or natural threat. In addition, under some circumstances their age, religion, gender, cultural and political beliefs, ethnicity and any special health conditions may also influence how they respond to an emergency situation or threat. Hibernation and Evacuations Fly through a number of different country city scenes and focus in on buildings, stop at buildings and use after effects to have buildings glow green (safe) before moving again to another building and repeat the process for different country scenes. It is important to understand that you may have the opportunity to remain where you are, or you may need to leave the area. Evacuations do not always require people to leave their work or homes, sometimes it is safer to remain where you are until a threat or hazard has passed. An evacuation may be conducted in stages where it may be safer to remain in a safe place for a period of time, or leave when certain conditions make it too dangerous to remain where you are. Understanding when to stay and when to leave is very important. It is also important to understand that the opportunity to evacuate may be short lived and that any decision to evacuate must match pace with the threats which could prevent you, your family and your loved ones from escaping from an area subject to manmade or natural threats. Rotating around a home and office building A hibernation situation is where you, your loved ones, or your work colleagues find a safe location which will protect you from any threats which may be occurring. This may be a home, office, 1|Page Š 2010. Concepts by RSM Consulting LLC www.rsmconsulting.us


Script Draft Stage Staff hibernation and evacuation management

government building, conference centre, hotel or guesthouse, a friend’s or relative’s home, or worksite which is occupied until the risk conditions stabilize. Have a city scene have routes indicating moving from one building in the city to another building at least half a mile away. If the risk conditions in the area in which you work or live are too dangerous, or are likely to be subject to serious threats in the immediate future then you may need to evacuate. This may be moving several blocks from a demonstration, protest, fighting, flooding or fire, or it may be to the other side of a town of city which is experiencing more widespread problems. If a larger area is affected you may need to move to another town or village, or under extreme conditions you may need to leave the country. Progressive and Rapid Deteriorations Have a management meeting with people looking at a map with areas going from green, to yellow, to amber to red… glowing areas – protests / rallies on the screens of the laptop and someone pointing to the map. Have a risk barometer slowly going from green to red while the meeting is taking place. Have newspapers, TVs, radios fading in and out to indicate reporting. Have a calendar on the side with red glowing dots appearing next to date. The need to hibernate or evacuate my result from a number of situations, whether manmade or natural. A progressive deterioration which is where a known calendar event such as a contentious election, or a religious holiday or planned demonstration may indicate the need to take sensible safety and security precautions. Additional situations may result from alerts such as storm, fire and flood warnings which can indicate possible increases in risks which may lead to hibernation or evacuation decisions being initiated. Increasing tensions, growing political instability, embassy warnings, media reporting or intra-state conflicts and regional instabilities may also provide time for hibernation and evacuation measures to be initiated in a well-planned and staged manner, before the threat occurs. It is important to ensure that decisions are made in a timely manner to provide you with the time to procure goods for a hibernation situation, or to implement an evacuation decision before it is too late. Have the same management meeting but the risks shoot from green to red immediately and pictures of an earthquake are on the boards. A rapid deterioration is where the situation deteriorates so quickly that hibernation and evacuation measures must be instigated immediately and without a staged approach, such as an earthquake, tsunamis or a sudden and unexpected increase in violence such as the outbreak of war of a revolution. 2|Page © 2010. Concepts by RSM Consulting LLC www.rsmconsulting.us


Script Draft Stage Staff hibernation and evacuation management

Nationality Considerations Have a group of people, most are yellow, a 2 greys to indicate locals (grey) internationals (yellow) Citizens of the affected country and international visitors may respond both in similar and very different ways to a hibernation and evacuation situation. It is important to understand that the response reflects the different risks each different group faces, as well as what support is available to them. The welfare of individuals is equally important and sensible responses are required to protect people during periods of increased risk. Grey people speaking to family members, listening to the radio, calling the police, and blending in with a crowd. Have them getting into a car and driving from one city to another – show also on a map with a background animated scene in the corner of a vehicle driving as a dotted line goes from one city to another. The citizen of a country often has a very strong family and social infrastructure in their home country. They also speak the language and will more easily blend into the local culture, and so may be less at risk in terms of understanding what is occurring, communicating with other people, and using their family and social networks to help them respond to hazards. In addition, citizens are eligible to use their countries public services, but may not be eligible to use foreign diplomatic resources during an emergency evacuation. If foreign diplomatic resources are available they will commonly not extend to the family members if a foreign government offers support. In some instances a national evacuation, especially by road, could present higher risks to locals than staying with friends and family, or travelling out of a threat area independently. In addition, many people do not own passports and so may find it more difficult to leave their own country. Evacuation insurances also often do not cover local national staff if a foreign company is employing them. Same scene but change colours to yellow – yellow people speaking to family members with a glowing red cross next to each point shown… listening to the radio, calling the police, and blending in with a crowd. Have them getting into a car and driving from one city to another – show also on a map with a background animated scene in the corner of a vehicle driving as a dotted line goes from one city to another. International visitors or workers often have no family in the country, and more limited social or community networks than those who live in that country. They may be able to speak the language, but may not be fluent and so may struggle to communicate and monitor dynamic situations quickly, especially during highly stressful conditions or disagreements, or where they may be at risk from crowds or hostile persons or groups. Foreigners may also be conspicuous within a community and so may be more vulnerable to targeting during an emergency. Expatriates will however be eligible to diplomatic assistance from their home country, but may not be able to utilize a host nation’s infrastructures and resources. Expatriates also have passports and so can leave the country, and are often covered under evacuation insurance policies. 3|Page © 2010. Concepts by RSM Consulting LLC www.rsmconsulting.us


Script Draft Stage Staff hibernation and evacuation management

Safe Havens Person looking at a map and green glowing dots appear within the city, then to other cities. As part of individual hibernation and evacuation planning it important to identify several safe locations outside of your home or office which might be used should you need to relocate locally, or leave the city or town you are working or living in. These are known as Safe Havens and you should mark these on a map. You should ensure that family members and managers understand where your Safe Haven is located should you need to leave quickly, but are unable to inform them of your plan to evacuate, or your destination. Safe Havens may include the homes of relatives, friends or work colleagues, or hotels and guesthouses, employee or partner office locations, or government or diplomatic buildings.

Routes and Border Crossing Points Use an evacuation map and upgrade the graphics – after effects. It is useful to mark on a map the likely routes used for an evacuation, as well as any border crossing points which may be used, whether these are land crossings from one country to another, or maritime ports used for a sea crossing. You may wish to colour code any routes and number border crossing points and provide a copy to a relative or work colleague so that you can more easily indicate how you will leave a country.

Emergency Contact Numbers Rotating mobile phone and laptop images It is important that you have captured important contact details before a hibernation or evacuation situation occurs so that you can communicate quickly and effectively with people. Hibernations and evacuations are often stressful and potentially dangerous situations and being unable to find important contact details can be frustrating and may place you at risk. These details should be contained within your mobile phone or laptop, or written down in a safe place and may include the telephone numbers for relatives, embassies, government agencies or services, security focal points, and company managers, both for the country and for international points of contact.

4|Page Š 2010. Concepts by RSM Consulting LLC www.rsmconsulting.us


Script Draft Stage Staff hibernation and evacuation management

Hibernation and Evacuation Resources Flying through the streets with fuels, food, flashlights, medical supplies flashing as an after-effect on the screen. It is important to ensure that you have the right resources available for a hibernation or evacuation situation. Often shops will close and certain resources will quickly become unavailable if either a progressive or rapid deterioration occurs. Ensuring that critical resources are bought while they are still available is very important. Protecting these resources is also important as others may seek to steal these if they are desperate. Stills of items discussed. Use storms, floods and hurricane scenes. If you believe a hibernation situation is likely to occur you may wish to fill your bath, sinks and other containers with water. You may also wish to buy several days or weeks of dry or canned foods, an outdoor cooker with extra fuels, spare batteries and flash lights, candles and matches, ropes, jerry cans with extra gasoline, sleeping bags and warm weather equipment, and extra medical supplies. You may also want to buy spare mobile phone batteries and credit for mobile phones and even invest in a satellite phone. You should also buy additional supplies of any medicines or prescriptions. If you have a generator at your home or office you should buy additional fuels for this equipment. Have a rotating person with a bag and the images fading in and out. If you believe you may need to evacuate then you should ensure you have a grab bag which contains critical items needed for a rapid departure. This may include your passport available with any visas which may be required for the country you may travel to. You should also ensure you have packed your credit card and several hundred dollars in cash, important documentation, a map and compass, a global positioning system, a knife, a flashlight and spare batteries, a water bottle and food, a small medical kit, your mobile phone and charger, some toilet role, warm clothing and a sleeping bag, and any prescribed drugs and glasses or contact lenses. You should ensure you have any emergency contact details loaded into your mobile phone and inform friends, relatives or work colleagues of your intentions. Have a rotating vehicle with the images fading in. If you believe that you may need to travel some distance in a vehicle during an evacuation then you should prepare your vehicle well in advance of any evacuation. This may include checking the engine oil levels and buying additional oils. Ensuring that the fuel tank is full and spare jerry cans and fuels are loaded into the vehicle, and ensuring the vehicle has breakdown equipment and a jump lead. 5|Page Š 2010. Concepts by RSM Consulting LLC www.rsmconsulting.us


Script Draft Stage Staff hibernation and evacuation management

You may also wish to pack a flashlight and spare batteries into the vehicle, drinking water and food, blankets and warm clothes, spare tires, a medical pack, maps and a compass, a tow rope and a car jack.

Hibernation and Evacuation Stages Have a person with their family and a white board – writing Stage 1, 2 and 3 on the board. When considering hibernation and evacuation situations it is useful to consider them in stages – each requiring specific actions to be taken during either a rapid or progressive deterioration. This will provide confidence and structure to how you respond to a hibernation and evacuation situation. This information can be discussed with family members and work colleagues so that your family or team understands what they should be considering or doing at each stage. The stages will require different responses and actions from different people. It is important to select those measures which are appropriate to your situation, and dismiss those which are not relevant. These strategies can also be used to prompt you to consider approaches and solutions which may not be contained within this strategy to hibernation and evacuation situations. Stage 1: Preparation Animation: The first stage is where you believe a hibernation or evacuation situation may occur and you have identified the need to start preparing ahead of the potential emergency event. The following considerations apply to both local citizens and expatriates:  You may wish to withdraw cash funds from your bank. It is also advisable to carry some cash in both local and US dollars or Euros.  You should collect all important papers and documents, such as passports; birth, marriage, divorce, and naturalization certificates, inoculation cards; insurance policies and bank books.  Each family should have a pre-packed suitcase with a maximum weight of 66lb. Packs or suitcases should contain warm clothing, one pair of heavy shoes or boots, underwear and socks, raincoats, a warm hat and jacket, eye glasses and special medicines or dietetic food. You should also bring two blankets or a sleeping bag for each person. This bag should allow you to leave within 10 minutes.  If you have children you may wish to consider packing a limited supply of toys, games, books and snacks to keep them occupied during a hibernation or evacuation situation.  You should maintain a full tank of gasoline in your vehicle and consider buying a jerry can with extra fuels.  You should store plenty of drinking water and canned or dry food in case you cannot leave your home or office for several days. A minimum 10 days supply is recommended. 6|Page © 2010. Concepts by RSM Consulting LLC www.rsmconsulting.us


Script Draft Stage Staff hibernation and evacuation management

 It is suggested that a stock of candles, matches or lighters, and flashlights with spare batteries are bought.  You should consider buying camping cookers or a BBQ set should the electricity and gas be turned off to your residence or office.  It is important to charge mobile phones and computers, and to procure extra batteries and credit for mobile phones to ensure you can continue to communicate if the power supplies are interrupted.  You should ensure you have documents required for local travel stored and ready for a rapid departure.  It is useful to monitor the local television and radio to track events and assess the situation, as well as any embassy channels for alerts and instructions. Expatriates may have further considerations, including:  Ensuring that you have documents that may be required for international travel safely stored and ready for a rapid departure.  If your current passport is not valid you should contact your embassy immediately and seek a replacement or passport extension.  It may be necessary to book flights in case you should need to leave rapidly.  You may need to make arrangements with local friends for safekeeping of valuable items such as TVs, stereos, videos and any objects of art.  If pets cannot be evacuated then you may need to make arrangements for local friends to care for them. If you cannot find care for them then you should leave them outside.  You should monitor the local media, Voice of America, Cable News Network such as CNN and the British Broadcasting Corporation, as well as watch for announcements or instructions from the local government or the U.S. Embassy.

Stage 2: Hibernation The second stage is where you have decided to implement the hibernation protocol. The following considerations apply to both local citizens and expatriates:  Locking all doors and windows to the grounds and the building.  Moving to rooms away from those facing main streets.  Do not leave the building unless it is safe to do so.  Keep home or office lights low, especially for street facing windows.  Monitor the radio and television in order to track events. 7|Page © 2010. Concepts by RSM Consulting LLC www.rsmconsulting.us


Script Draft Stage Staff hibernation and evacuation management

 Charge phones and computers to maintain communications should the power go off.  Move vehicles and possessions indoors, or inside the grounds of a facility to secure them.  Inform work colleagues and friends of your situation.  Use texting should the power go off to extend the period you can communicate.  Ensure you are prepared for a rapid departure.  Conserve water and food resources.  Plan different evacuate routes and inform other people of the actions you may take if you need to evacuate quickly.  Confirm which safe havens you may use with friends, work colleagues or hotels as an alternative location should you need to evacuate. Expatriates may have further considerations, including:  Booking or holding flights and being prepared to leave while airports are still operating.  Consider land crossing points should airports be closed.  Inform the embassy of your personal details, status and location.  Tracking evacuation alerts and instructions from the embassy – and being prepared to follow these.  Preparing for a long term departure from the country – and as such preparing household effects, goods, and pets for a protracted absence.  Gathering critical work related information and material and either email, carry, delete or destroy sensitive information. Stage 3: Evacuations The third stage is where you have decided to implement the evacuation protocol. This may be over a short distance to other cities or regions, or indeed out of the country. The following considerations apply to both local citizens and expatriates. If the decision to evacuate has been made, you may need to consider:  Implementing an evacuation quickly and while there is sufficient time to leave safely.  Consider the dangers which may be presented along any routes used to evacuate and selecting the safest options available.  Informing a trusted person of your plan, which routes you are using and your intended destination.  Leaving a note of your plan if communications are not working in an obvious place in your residence or office.

8|Page © 2010. Concepts by RSM Consulting LLC www.rsmconsulting.us


Script Draft Stage Staff hibernation and evacuation management

 Closing all curtains, disconnecting all appliances, turning off lights, locking your door and giving your keys to a trusted person with a copy of inventory of personal items left at your home.  Proceeding to any embassy or work evacuation point without delay, ensuring you arrive early if it is safe to do so.  If your vehicle is not needed to reach the evacuation point then you should leave it in a garage, parking lot of in the grounds of your facility.  You should bring all important papers and materials with you, as well as only one suitcase.  If possible you should bring enough food and water for each family member to last between two to four days.  It is not usually advisable to bring firearms or alcohol.  Place your pets with neighbors. If you cannot take them with you then you should leave them outside. Expatriates may have further considerations, including:  Each individual is to have with them a ‘Grab Bag’ only. It is essential that the grab bag is no larger than a day sack and that it does not contain any flammable items that may be considered ‘dangerous cargo’ and could prevent you from boarding a flight.  Consider the risks that may be along an evacuation route, or at a departure point, whether this is an airport, port or border crossing point.  Inform the embassy of your plan and status.  Inform a trusted person when you arrive at your destination. Closing Remarks Hibernation or evacuation situations can be stressful and frustrating, especially if you have loved ones with you, if you are unfamiliar with the region, or uncertain as to what is occurring. By having a simple but effective personal safety and security plan in place, and by ensuring you take sensible steps at the right time you can significantly reduce personal risks and proceed with greater awareness and confidence during periods of heighten risk.

9|Page © 2010. Concepts by RSM Consulting LLC www.rsmconsulting.us

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