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ba event week 14-21 Jan 2011

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

LSA BA Event Week 2011 Welcome to the first LSA BA event week 2011. The event will run from Friday 14 to Friday 21 January 2011 and there are 20 original and creative workshops for you to choose from. The objectives of the LSA event week are • To foster a strong sense of identity within the BA course with students working in cross year team • To introduce students to specialists working within the field of architecture • To introduce students to skills not necessarily taught within the core curriculum • To create links between LSA and practise The objective of this week is to introduce you to new skills and ideas within the practise of architecture. The event weeks will also foster the strong studio culture we have here at LSA and reflect our goals to create a studio for the future where we see studio not merely as a place but as a landscape of events. Each event will comprise of a series of workshops, with the final crit being held within the final workshop session. We encourage students to attend the crits of workshops other than their own. A series of lectures will accompany the workshop events. Students can attend any of these lectures, although priority will be given to those students registered in the workshop. The event month is a requirement of the studio programme for first, second and third years. Each student will have to sign up for a number of workshops and should keep a record of their event month work in their portfolio in a number of portfolio sheets. This work will be considered during the grading process. Students will be able to register online and you will be informed of the date during term 1. Any student who has not registered by the given time will automatically be assigned a workshop. The timetable for the event week workshops will be posted by individual staff on blackboard and in the Architecture hub which will act as the centre for the event weeks and will also be emailed to you. During the event week there are no other classes. University regulations state that a full week requires 40 hours of effort. Therefore we are expecting you to work on the event at least this number of hours. Attendance will be taken and any student who does not attend will have their final grade for the year adjusted accordingly.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week Queries before and during the event should be directed to – Programme Leader - Eileen McGonigal – emcgonigal@dmu.ac.uk Architecture Hub manager – Rob Sheen – rsheen@dmu.ac.uk Following is a list of the events which will be offered, the staff running the events and the number of available places. We hope you have a really exciting week and look forward to exhibiting the work. Eileen McGonigal Associate Head of School

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Events: 1

Painting for architects - Chris Watts

2

Sketching - Chris Watts

3

Forgotten Spaces - Neil Stacey

4

1:1 - Neil Stacey

5

Discovering Place - Ian Henderson

6

A ‘Killer’ Section! - Ian Henderson

7

Reading Between the Lines - Sara Shafiei and Ben Cowd

8

Digital Garden - Johan Voordouw

9

Sand Box - Johan Voordouw

10

Portfolio Crash Course - Tom Morgan

11

Leicester 2211 - Tim Brindley

12

Pavilion 2011 - David Dernie

13

Move - Sam Causer

14

Super - School - Eileen McGonigal

15

Space, time, fictions - Geraldine Dening

16

Ceci n’est pas un Pissoir - Doug Cawthorne

17

First Aid for Architects - Doug Cawthorne

18

Environmental Engineering - Adrian Robinson

19

Five Architects - Five Postcards - Jamileh Manoocherhi

20

Movement and Space - Jamileh Manoocherhi

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


1

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Chris Watts Painting for architects This event helps architecture students to extend their knowledge and skills for painting in the design process. It is open to students of any previous experience and responds to individual requirements. Various water-based painting techniques are considered in the context of architectural practice and digital imaging software, including Photoshop and Piranesi. Practical work investigates painting for: • Response to site (analysis and disposition) • Exploring design concepts • Visualising interior and exterior spaces Aspects considered include: • Choosing and preparing painting surfaces • Brushes, sponges and other applicators • Pigments: water colour, gouache and acrylic • Gum arabic and other additives • Generating line work by hand, CAD and scanning • Colour theory and mixing • Tone and colour studies • Washes, wet-on-dry, wet-in-wet and backruns • Masking techniques • Lifting out, modifications and corrections • Scanning, printing and presentation Material and equipment requirements will be kept to a minimum and can be shared in small groups.

Watercolour by Steven Holl

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


2

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Chris Watts Sketching This event provides students at any stage of the course with opportunities to develop their freehand sketching skills for use in design work. Sketching techniques are considered in relation to typical stages of studio assignments: • Analysing existing structure, form and space • Exploring design concepts • Investigating design solutions Aspects considered include: • Equipment and formats for sketching • Parallel and perspective projection • Sketching remembered and imagined scenes • Line and tone; Surface and edge • Representing light and shade • Showing materials and textures • Depth cues for space and distance • Entourage: People, trees and vehicles • Scanning and printing from originals.

Raymond Gindroz

Andrew Tesoro

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


3

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Neil Stacey Forgotten Spaces This introduction to urban design aims to extend knowledge of how urban design requires a different mindset to that required in architectural design, yet can provide a ‘model’ interpretation of a site – a model that can steer and inform architectural design exploration. Working in small groups of 4 or 5, students will consider a small area of the city. Having established a basic understanding of its urban morphology, each group will develop proposals to extend, develop or re-structure the area; a series of 3d massing, stratification and void + pedestrian realm diagrams will be presented.

We Made That - www.architectsjournal.co.uk, Forgotten Spaces RIBA Competition.

The production of simple, effective diagrams to communicate key site ‘forces’ and issues will lead to simple, effective diagrams to present a 3d reading of the site and the opportunities it presents. Each group will conclude its work with a ‘Charette’ design competition. An architectural proposal, or set of ideas, will be presented in a given/ prescribed format. Programme: Friday: Briefing; site visit; delegation of urban analysis tasks; Friday to Monday: urban analysis; Monday: each group to consolidate analysis and develop diagrams Tuesday: Review – further development of urban analysis Wednesday: Design research into spatial opportunities - Design Charette Thursday: Review - complete design work Friday morning: Pin-up Friday afternoon: Review and peer marking Introduction: Tutored Review 1: Tutored Review 2: Completion:

Friday 14th January 2011 Tuesday 18th January Thursday 20th January Friday 21st January

Resources needed:

None of note

Atelier Architecture + Design www.architectsjournal.co.uk, Forgotten Spaces RIBA Competition.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


4

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Neil Stacey 1:1 Drawing architecture at 1:1 leads to a better understanding of the connection between making (construction) and drawing. Scenario: The studio is to be extended in order to provide a small number of individual working ‘cells’. Each cell must present an exceptional working environment worthy of the rent that will be charged to students who wish to use it. It is envisaged they will prove most popular in the week before hand-ins and therefore each cell must provide the opportunity for intermittent sleep during ‘all-nighter’ sessions. Each cell must be compact. Daylighting of the main studio space must be maintained. Working in small groups of 3 or 4 students are required to develop a ‘cell’ proposal. The proposal is to be modelled in section at 1:20. Elements of the design might be modelled at 1:1. A 1:1 section drawing is to be drawn on completion of the model. This drawing is to be completed using a projected image of the 1:20 section model; the image is to be ‘traced’ onto a series of lining wall-paper rolls. Colour and texture are required. Sample materials might be added. These drawings will be best viewed from a distance. Programme: Friday: Friday to Monday: Monday: Tuesday: Thursday: Friday morning: Friday afternoon:

Briefing; 1:20 figure making; scale model of ‘site’; initial model and sketch proposals at appropriate scales; Review and finalised schema – establish research agenda; 1:20 section model; Wednesday: Review and final amendments and adjustment to1:20 model; 1:1 outline drawing using projected image technique; Completion of 1:1 drawings; Review and peer marking

Rintala Eggertsson: V&A ‘1:1 - Architects Build Small Spaces’ Exhibition, www.vam.ac.uk/

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


4

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Ultra Ruin C-Laboratory: V&A ‘1:1 - Architects Build Small Spaces’ Exhibition, www.vam.ac.uk/

Introduction: Tutored Review 1: Tutored Review 2: Completion:

Friday 14th January 2011 Monday 17th January Wednesday 19th January Friday 21st January

Resources needed:

Grey card for 1:20 models (to be supplied by students); Brown packaging card for 1:1 (supplied by School or sponsor); Lengths of 2 by 1 SW (supplied by School or sponsor) Xno. Portable projectors for Thursday (supplied by School)

Studio Mumbai (extract of image): V&A ‘1:1 - Architects Build Small Spaces’ Exhibition, www.vam.ac.uk/

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


5

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Ian Henderson Discovering Place As students of architecture you are learning to observe the world through architect’s eyes. We use many ways of recording our impressions of a city, place or space. Common methods used for documenting our feelings, impressions and understanding of the places we visit are through sketching, drawing, painting and photography. One form of media not regularly used to explore a sense of place is film. Filming presents us with the opportunity to explore a place in a way that cannot be achieved through other methods. Filming can allow us to explore and record different attributes of a place quickly and creatively. Film allows us to capture movement, changing environmental conditions, changing light, acoustics as well as the physical attributes of a place at different times of a day. The aim of this event is to explore a place of your choice through the lens of a video camera and produce a short film that represents a unique view of the built environment. The main emphasis of this event is to develop your understanding of ‘place’ as well as enhancing your technical skills in the production of a short film. You will require access to a video recorder (digital or analogue) and ensure you have the required leads to be able to connect to a PC to download the footage. For this event you may work individually or in pairs and should begin to think about what ‘place’ you might explore before arriving at the Event Week Workshop. The skills learnt during this event could later be applied to your own design work or submissions for other modules.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


6

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Ian Henderson A ‘Killer’ Section! The aim of this event is to take an existing project and to have the luxury of spending an entire week developing a key section into a ‘killer’ drawing. The main emphasis will be on developing your graphical skills using Photoshop to produce a beautiful section drawing that illustrates the spatial qualities of your design. A section is one of the most powerful drawings you can produce to illustrate the spatial qualities and spatial relationships of a building. We will focus on developing individual representational techniques and graphical styles by taking into account the following: • Materiality • Light & Shadow • Texture • Colour • Line weights • Text • Composition • People The purpose of this event is to concentrate on developing your technical skills in Photoshop whilst adopting a non-destructive workflow to enable rapid editing and precise adjustments. This event is open to only 2nd and 3rd year students as it deals with advanced Photoshop techniques.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


7

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Sara Shafiei and Ben Cowd Reading Between the Lines “A newspaper is lumber made malleable. It is ink made into words and pictures. It is conceived, born, grows up and dies of old age in a day. Jim Bishop “The secret of a successful newspaper is to take one story each day and bang the hell out of it. Give the public what it wants to have and part of what it ought to have whether it wants it or not.” Herbert Bayard Swope Brief The typical daily travel begins with a pick up of the free metro. We carry it in our bags and briefcases, under our arms and in our hands; our first glimpse at the day ahead around the globe. We read of stories from Britain to Baghdad written through the night by the noc¬turnal infrastructures of the media. While we sleep thousands of journalists carve the direction of our day ahead, affecting the world during what we consider to be “unoccupied time”. They fill every page with stories of cor¬ruption, deceit and exclusive stories; secrets and lies “leaked” to the general public. Newspapers have become the symbol of freedom of expression in the modern world; a new medium of communication for whistleblowers. Election battles are won and lost with slogans and advertise¬ments printed in the free press; “Tony Blair’s devil eyes have become as powerful an advertising weapon as the “Hello boys” Wonder bra campaign featuring Eva Herzigova’s bosom.” Ideation The newspaper will be the starting point of all our further en¬deavors, as it reflects the 24-hour global time scale. The news¬paper is a global product, a cut-off in time reflecting a vast and complex nocturnal infrastructure that spans from the event to its recording, the processing and the technology of printing and supplying. This soft and tangible network called news is constructed from a myriad of players and has reached large complexity a soft apparatus including the journalist, the blog¬ger, top-down reporting or bottom-up political movements. For us every day of our studio will start with the result of a night’s work. Students will be asked to pick up the newspaper of every day and respond to it. They can read, draw, fold, cut, burn, slice, tear, do an instal¬lation with, mark, build a house with, accumulate, glue, regis¬ter, line up, colour, collage, trace, stitch, blacken, duct tape, project onto, decorate with, insulate, write on, wrap, press, dress, light, photograph it. They may choose to analyze and extract stories or headlines or use the material qualities of the printed-paper itself.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


7

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Methods Students are asked to work with the product of the night, re¬flecting its story, the making and infrastructure of the newspa¬per, the materiality and its translation into a spatial engage¬ment. We have formulated a couple of simple rules in order to engage into the idea of the nocturnal production, the unseen world of a newspaper: 01 Every project of the day must relate to the previous day. This can’t be a reproduction but must be a successive related it¬eration following a string of ideas that constantly transforms in relation to the new day. This allows the build up of the continu¬ous model, reflecting the event as an architectural element. 02 The newspaper and its actual and virtual materiality is our main medium. It can be used in an unlimited ways but will need to conclude within a series of models/ installations/draw¬ings reflecting the event character of the newspaper and its nocturnal character, but as well the dichotomy between virtual media and the actual physicality of the newspaper. 03 Use everything to explore your ideas - projections of a para¬graph and glue a wall of ink or drill a hole in a mountain of headlines. Don’t be limited in your explorations and investi¬gate the nightly production for our global understanding of the next day. Outcome Understanding of design as a dynamic process rather than a fixed entity oscillation between actual and simulation. Learn to investigate event based phenomena and their translation into spatial architectonic reflections. The use of paper as a tec¬tonic material and its qualities in architecture representational translations and process driven methods. Examples The following images includes some examples to illustrate the variety in scale and use of the newspaper and its translation.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


8

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Johan Voordouw Digital Garden Purpose: To teach students skills in a number of digital computer programs whilst exploring new spatial constructs Themes: The digital interface, spatial integration, formal narratives, digital to physical dualisms, loaded spatial programmes The digital garden is a constructed space but it retains an element of the wild. Students will design a garden pavilion, which merges the space of the intervention into the surrounding ‘scape’ – merging the digital into the verdant copse. Students, in response to how they want to express the digital spaces, have to determine whether they respond to the strongly constructed space of the renaissance garden, the naturalistic control of the English landscape or the wild personal expressions of an individual such as Edward James. Architecture’s relationship with nature and the surrounding landscape is a tentative one – but for converse reasons. We either claim inspiration but remain formally metaphorical, rarely delving into the loaded undergrowth exposing our latent fear and anxiety of nature, the lurching voyeurism of ‘the wild’ or we curdle at its superficiality, the light frivolity that was garden-life in the courts of Europe, its masked politeness and potent choreography overlaying the politics and silent diplomacy that marked such activities – ultimately the garden remains something that is “out there” something that rarely integrated into architecture in a sophisticated manner. The garden can dualistically represent civilisation at its most heightened and controlled or, as its downfall to dereliction – this pavilion will have to take a stand as to what the garden represents and the mode through which it gets enjoyed and explored. Programs to be used: 3DS Max, rendering in 3D Max, Photoshop With an introduction into manufacturing: Rapid Prototyping & Laser-cutting

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


8

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Schedule: Day One: Morning – lecture and an introduction of the Brief Afternoon – Selection of the site and an analysis of the characteristics to be embedded into the pavilion with initial sketch ideas Day Two: Morning – 3DMax Tutorial Afternoon - Work Day Three: Morning - Work Afternoon – V-ray Tutorials Day Four: Morning – Rendering Afternoon – Photoshop Day Five: Morning – Printing Afternoon – Presentation / Viewing of work

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


9

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Johan Voordouw Sand Box Rain Makers, Time Catchers, Wind Organs and Sun Shifters Purpose: To teach students skills in poetic architectural constructions, model-making and pencil drawing Themes: Poetic Narratives, materials and construction, architectural poetics The sandbox is a project which seeks to construct a community of small poetic follies. Each folly will have an inherent poetic that determines its form and purpose. These constructions seek to find a new formal and material expression for the pervasive and immaterial aspects of our surrounding environment. They indicate time through rust, they collect puddles of rain and reconstruct sunlight during the waning hours of the day. The sandbox is for serious play – to develop an architectural language Schedule: Friday morning: Afternoon:

Receive the brief Construct the sandbox

Monday morning: Afternoon:

Sketch and purchase supplies Start constructions

Tuesday:

Construct and draw

Wednesday:

Construct and draw

Thursday morning: Afternoon:

Construct and draw Model Photographs

Friday:

Exhibit

Materials to be used: Plaster, Wood, Metal and canvas Bockingford paper pencil and ink

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


10

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Tom Morgan Portfolio Crash Course An excellent portfolio is essential for both academic assessment and future job interviews. To achieve portfolio perfection a portfolio should collate a wide variety and format of work in a coherent and unified document. Without additional explanation a good portfolio should reflect not only the work but the skills, thinking and approach of the designer to their best ability. The workshop will be spread throughout event week and is intended to give students confidence in presentation, awareness of portfolio types and refresh presentation skills in-time for end of term hand-ins. The event will consist of: • Presentations of existing high quality portfolios to give you an idea of what to aim for and explanations of format, techniques and media. • Portfolio surgeries in which you can bring existing portfolios along to identify areas of improvement. • Skills refreshers in: Scanning, Photoshop and In-design • Photographing models • Hints and tips on layout, quality, cost saving, and organisation.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


11

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Tim Brindley Leicester 2211 Imagine a city in a century’s time – imagine Leicester in 2211. Is it Antonio Sant’Elia’s fabulous city of 100 years ago in the Manifesto of Futurist Architecture, La Cittá Nuova? Or is it William Morris’s dream of a utopian society, June Eternal in News from Nowhere? These two extraordinary visions of the future, which divided 20th Century urbanists, still shape the debate on the future of the city, but today they are joined by a third vision, that of the ‘eco-city’. Your task is to take a leading vision of the future city – from an architect, writer, artist, filmmaker or other creative thinker – and apply it to our home city of Leicester to create your own vision of Leicester 2211. It won’t be an entirely new city, but it will be a radically transformed city. What will it look like? The outward appearance of the city might be relatively unchanged, but with dramatic changes in technologies and the use of the built environment; or the city might be unrecognisable in today’s terms, with strange new forms alongside the remains of the old. Presentation You will present your vision of Leicester 2211 as an A1 poster, portraying theory, forms and details in a striking visual composition. Read Jane Alison & Marie-Ange Brayer, Future City: Experiment and Utopia in Architecture, Thames & Hudson 2007.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


12

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

David Dernie Pavilion 2011 This event will result in the actual construction of a pavilion on campus (May 2011). If you are interested in this project, there are three stages you will need to be committed to: a. Event week 1 (Jan): the design process, b. Event week 2 (April): construction details c. Construction (May), (between portfolio hand in, and the end-of-year show). You will work with leading theatre director Andrea Cusumano (Goldsmith’s and Central St. Martin’s, London) an architect from multi award-winning Eva Jiricna’s practice (London), Prof. David Dernie and researchers from the Institute of Creative Technologies (DMU). The theme of the design will combine space and performance. This is a prestigious project and will represent the LSA in the national press. It’s potentially a great addition to your portfolio: your designs will be fabricated and, following portfolio hand-in, you will engage in the erection of prefabricated elements on site. The pavilion will be opened with a site-specific performance, directed by Andrea Cusumano, and then it will house an exhibition of the BA studio. The structure will be the showcase for the RIBA’s visit to the School in 2011. We are looking for students with the highest level of design skills to be committed to the whole design process and construction of this project. This workshop will have: 9 places for year 3 students 2 places for year 2 students 2 places for year 1 students If you are interested please apply by e-mail to emcgonigal@dmu.ac.uk, stating briefly why you’d like to do it and what key skills you’d bring to the project and your best design image.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


13

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Sam Causer Move Architecture is about the relationships of bodies (indissoluble unities of body and mind) and their movement in space; from the most banal daily rituals of passing in a corridor and queuing for a bus, to more elaborate and sophisticated expressions, thoughts and gestures. Choreographers throughout the history of dance have been fascinated with space and how we inhabit, respond and create them. This workshop will give us the opportunity to work with Alice Tatge and Carlos Maria, both dancers, performance artists and choreographers, to explore a creative inhabitation and thinking of space through our bodies. Through the use of our bodies, the way we perceive them and those of others we will look at how different spaces affect the way we move and feel about moving. We will also look at how specific materials used within these environments choreograph the way that we move. Alice Tatge

Occupacion Barrio Policarpa, Colombia 1973

Tatge’s recent choreographic works include performances at the Royal Festival Hall and Barbican Arts Centre. She’s currently working with Xavier Le Roy and Mårten Spångberg in their new work production for the exhibition Move: Choreographing You at the Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London. The work will also be shown at the Haus der Kunst in Münich. As a choreographer, her practice juxtaposes pure dance and the emotional and physical content that it evokes with other forms of art, often creating installation environments with a combination of video, live music and dance. Her work is usually collaborative, always site-responsive and often object-based and of a durational nature. Tatge is interested in the different perceptions of space and temporalities - loops and traces, past, present and future, forward and in reverse ultimately building towards a cohesive overarching narrative: a voyage through a series of thought associations, visual imprints, sound and movement traces in an all-immersive environment.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


13

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Carlos Maria Maria’s indisciplinary art work takes the form of poetic choreographic installations dealing with ethnology, the political place of the artist in society, and a strong audience engagement as a necessary part for completing art appropriation. His performances are concerned with the in/materiality of art-history, chronology, sociology, gender studies, architecture and sculpture. His interest lays particularly in the collapsing-into-each-other traditions of visual and performing arts. He is strongly convinced about the revolutionary importance of form (more than content) in the world and the reflection about language in the construction of thinking and communication. Maria also works as a dance curator and a cultural engineer. He studied Government and International Affairs, followed by Dance and Choreography between Colombia and Germany. Currently he takes part in the Interdisciplinary Master Studies in Live Art and Theatre at the National University, Bogotá, is a tutor in the Performing Arts Department of Javeriana University, and is the artistic director of the Universities Festival for Contemporary Dance in Bogotá. Since 2009 he leads the organization www.tiempoespacioespectador.org.

Jacky Kennedy’s tour of the White House for CBS, 1962

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


14

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Eileen McGonigal / Laura Jones Super - School This workshop aims to celebrate what the Leicester School of Architecture has become and what you, the student body have achieved. We want to showcase your work and put LSA back on the architecture catwalk. Over the past 2 years, LSA has undergone a massive reorganisation programme, redesigning courses and identifying a new vision for the school with specialisms in all programmes. The school now has a strong identity which is being strengthened daily through the strong work of its students. We believe that this new identity should be celebrated both in catalogues and exhibitions. The workshop will have 3 objectives 1. To collect and format images of the best student work in order to create an image library 2. To collect work and begin design work on a catalogue of student work to be published for the degree show. 3. To work on the design and installation of the BA degree show exhibition in May 2011. This year our degree show will be twice as large, with an entire studio showcasing the best of the BA work. Much of this work will also be shown at the RIBA visit in November. 4. To design an admissions presentation showcasing the best of BA work and describing the programme. This workshop is open to year 3 students only and students interested should apply to emcgonigal@dmu.ac.uk

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


15

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Geraldine Dening / Tai Shani Space, time, fictions Places and spaces are bursting with stories – homes to ghosts of memories, vessels for dreams, sites of experiences, and sources of tantaiising potential futures to be imagined. Space, time, fictions will be exploring the narative potential of spaces though the construction of a performance. We will be exploring the history, architecture, and formal aspects of a local site, as well as personal anecdotes and intuitive responses, to create narratives, props, sets and costumes in collaboration with the performance artist Tai Shani. Tai Shani (1976) is an artist living and working in London. Fantastical and televisual, Tai Shani’s performances and films contain cartoon props and extravagantly costumed large casts of archetypes and pseudohistorical characters drawn from popular culture and counterculture mythologies. Referencing early science fiction, Greek tragedy and theatrical spectacle they are accompanied by voice over soundtracks reminiscent of radio plays that alternate between familiar fictional styles or narratives and self-reflexive texts that examine the mechanics of simulatory channels and their agency. Often dramatizing or mimicking historical phenomena, Shani’s work exists in the gap between history and myth. Chaotic and non-linear in form, Shani’s work explores fictional strategies, the cinematic corruption of memory as well as conflicting temporal structure in the ‘real’ and the mediated. Recent Tai Shani exhibitions and performances include: ICA, London / The Barbican, London / The Herzeliya Biennial, Israel / The Royal Academy, London / The Victoria & Albert Museum, London / Spike Island + Arnolfini, Bristol / Whitechapel Gallery, London / ARTIS Centre for Fine Arts Hertogenbosch, Stedelijk Museum Hertogenbosch / Liverpool Biennial 08 / Artprojx at Rio Cinema, Dalston. She also writes and performs music as Cherry Mash Cherry.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


16

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Doug Cawthorne Ceci n’est pas un Pissoir Phenomenological perceptions often overlook the instrumental potentialities of the “the immediacy of human experience”. As Peter Zumthor claims “mythological qualities for moments in the spa” may these too be found in the similarly corporeal and immediate contexts of the art of public convenience and the public convenience of art? This workshop will discuss issues surrounding the techné and Poïesis of utilitarianism in relation to the concept of public lavatory. An approach of ethical instrumentalism within a framework of analytic philosophy will form a starting point from which further positions may flow. Draft programme: Friday 14th January: Monday 17th January: Tuesday 18th January: Wednesday 19th January: Thursday 20th January: Friday 21st January, pm:

Brunch introduction and interlocution. Field-trip, mappings and afternoon tea. Structured reading (recliners optional). Collegiate discourse followed by individual autodidactic evening seminars / cocktails. Workshop - “Diagramming the Dunny” Art show (Dress formal)

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


17

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Doug Cawthorne First Aid for Architects Design projects can suffer from poor health particularly at this time of year. Don’t let yours go into decline and suffer serious career threatening conditions later. Bring your design project to the free Design Projects Clinic (DPC) where your design project will recieve a thorough all-points health check from a fully qualified Doctor of Architecture. All design projects are welcome from any module or year and will receive caring and sensitive evaluation of their symptoms and underlying conditions. A range of free treatments are available from simple prescriptions to radical surgery and are structured over a one week period to bring your design project back to an appropriate level of wellness. We recognise that as your project’s architect your wellbeing is as important as that of your design project so we offer a Well Architect Clinic (WAC) which provides pastoral advice to help with your own emotional and intellectual relationship with your design project. Come to the Design Projects Clinic - where it’s more than just a sticking plaster. Remember a design project is for life, not just for Christmas. Can only aid as part of an intellectually, architecturally and philosophically diverse diet. Read the label. Not for under 18’s. Resurrection of dead projects will not be undertaken.

Draft programme: Friday 14th January: Monday 17th January: Tuesday 18th January: Wednesday 19th January: Thursday 20th January: Friday 21st January, pm:

“The Doctor is in”: Project triage and wellness evaluation. Diagnosis and intervention - treatments of serious conditions. Structured reading (recliners optional). Surgery in studio - getting to the heart of the matter. “Know your project” - self diagnosis and Well Architect Clinic. Recovery and aftercare of your design project.

Note: This event is open to 1st and 2nd year students only.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


18

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Adrian Robinson Environmental Engineering Aims Learning about the key drivers for sustainable architecture and creation of a well tempered building environment that is fully integrated with an architectural design concept. During the event week there will be key talks by specialists in environmental engineering design on key environmental aspects, a building study exercise where you will be guided on improving your skills in developing environmental design strategies, and guidance on detailed methods and analysis of environmental systems. The ultimate goal is to identify the factors that shape the environmental performance of a building, to integrate these into the building concept that is efficient and appropriate for future energy use scenarios. Key presenters will include: Rob Atherton – Practitioner and Building Environment designer Prof. Dean Hawkes ‐ Leading academic in environmental design Dr Ahmad Taki – Environmental Analyst Adrian Robinson ‐ Architectural technologist

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


19

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Jamileh Manoocherhi Five Architects – Five Postcards In this event, you’ll explore architectural language through the study of the work of five architects of your choice. You’ll analyse the dominant formal language of the architect and produce a ‘portrait’ that expresses your findings. The final images will be presented on separate postcard size drawings. While light-hearted, this exercise aims to distil the visual and formal elements that we identify with each architect and allows for a creative re-telling of your finding in a personal way. You may use colour, black and white images, etchings or photomontages. One restriction is that they should all be postcard size.

Archi-tetes series of drawings by the Cartoonist, Louis Hellman

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


20

BA L S A 14-21 Jan 2011 BA Programme Event Week

Jamileh Manoocherhi Movement and Space Oskar Schlemmer used ‘the human figure in space, its moving and stationary functions, sitting, lying, walking, standing’ as the main themes of his work. In this workshop we’ll explore the relationship between the human figure and space through understanding its scale and movement. The human scale determines how we experience the physical world around us. In order to highlight its significance, we’ll record and study movement and scale through exaggerating and accentuating their elements in a number of everyday social activities – dining, walking, etc.

LSA BA programme 2010/11

Eileen McGonigal


BA Event Week