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Pause. When I try to explain architecture, I frequently come up with the same analogy to provide an easier understanding of my role as a designer. As designers and architects, we are responsible for the organization and coordination of a complex machine. Much like the human body, architecture consists of many unique parts that need to work together to function properly. Our role as designers is to create a solution that allows these parts to work together as one coherent system. Any design, whether it be a be a habitat, structure, or space, is able to bring forth emotions and create a strong, unexplainable connection with people. Architecture is capable of improving the quality of life. This ideal pushes me forward to come up with the best solution for any design challenge.

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Education

08/ 2005 - 05/ 2011

Oklahoma State University Bachelor of Architecture Architectural History and Theory Minor GPA: 3.075

Activities & Honors

2011 2011 2007 - 2011 2008 - 2011 2010 2008 2008 2005

Dean’s Honor Roll Acceptance into Arch 5100 “Architecture Without Borders” American Institute of Architecture Students AIAS Class Representative President’s Honor Roll 3rd Place_ Acme Brick Design Competition Honorable Mention_ US Stone Design Competition 11th Place_ TSA National Finalist in Architecture

Technical & Design Proficiency

R y a n S c o t t B e a t t i e 78 Olive St. Apt. # 309 New Haven, CT 06510 Tel: 469.525.1332 ryan.beattie@okstate.edu

Autodesk 3ds Max Design AutoCAD Architecture Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator) Graphic Design Maxwell Render Microsoft Office Revit Architecture Rhino 4.0 Trimble SketchUp

Work Experince

07/ 2013 - current 03/ 2013 - 07/ 2013

Designer, Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects | New Haven, CT Tel: 203.777.2515 | www.pcparch.com

07/ 2011 - 03/ 2013

Intern Architect, VOA Associates Incorporated | Beijing, China China Tel: 011.86.010.5969.5853 | www.voa.com

Associate, VOA Associates Incorporated | Beijing, China China Tel: 011.86.010.5969.5853 | www.voa.com

References

Richard H. Fawell | AIA, NCARB, IIDA | Principal, VOA Associates Incorporated rfawell@voa.com | 312.453.7554

Christopher Groesbeck | AIA, NCARB, LEED AP | Principal, VOA Associates Incorporated cgroesbeck@voa.com | 312.453.7577

Nan Zhou | AIA, NCARB, LEED AP | Associate Principal, VOA Associates Incorporated nzhou@voa.com | 312.453.7634

Paolo Sanza, RA | Assistant Professor, Oklahoma State University paolo.sanza@okstate.edu | 602.330.2542

Jerry Stivers | AIA LEED AP | Assistant Professor, Oklahoma State University jerry.stivers@okstate.edu | 405.744.6043


This portfolio will showcase selected projects during my two years in Beijing, China with VOA Associates and also a few projects during my time at Oklahoma State University. Allow this body of work to give you insight into my creative process and programmatic solutions. Let this experience help you determine who I am as a designer.


001 007 017 027 035 037 045 049

PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

HAINAN BAOTING HILTON HOTEL | TREE HOUSE

CITIC MASTER PLAN | ARCH SCHEME

ANJI MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT

BIOMIMETICS

DEUBLIN SD | PHASE I

A FAMILY MEMORIAL

TOWER HOUSE


Pedestrian Bridge

Duration: March 2011- April 2011 | 5 weeks Team: Ryan Beattie, Karina Cisneros, Alex Heffesse, Professor Paolo Sanza, Rachel Vincent 5th Year Design Studio

Project:

Our team had the pleasure to collaborate with Antonio Cinotto of FFWD Architetura, an Italy based architecture firm. We entered in a professional competition to design a pedestrian bridge located in the Italian commune of Ponte nell Alpi. The bridge would create a stronger public connection while also promoting outdoor activities and exercise.

Concept:

The design solution focuses on providing enjoyable alternative means of pedestrian travel. The goal is to provide a connection that allows pedestrians to comfortably cross the bridge while enjoying the scenic views and having adequate space for biking and walking. The bike path incorporates light sensors that respond to the speed and weight of those riding by. The light sensors create a pulse of light that stretches across the length of the bridge ahead of the biker. This pulse of light indicates to pedestrians that someone is coming through. These light sensors become a safety measure for those walking on the path and doubles as an exciting nighttime feature that can be seen from a distance.

001 Pedestrian Bridge


Pedestrian Bridge 002


East Elevation

West Elevation

Site Plan 003 Pedestrian Bridge


The waiting shelter at the south entrance is an additional feature that provides a shaded space to rest and relax. The composite shelter folds to provide a covered waiting area while also wrapping underneath the bridge to provide structural support.

Pedestrian Bridge 004


Personal Connection:

The conceptual phase is where I personally feel the pedestrian bridge gained strength and momentum. Discovering ways to solve programmatic issues with solutions that really added to the overall architectural character of the bridge was personally very gratifying. Our team spent a great deal of time and effort figuring out the best ways to provide both a bike and pedestrian path on the bridge while still maintaining a strong level of safety. This is when features like the light sensors mentioned earlier were incorporated. Features such as the light sensors and the waiting shelter became unique ways of merging form and function. Each subtle feature of the bridge and every unique form was ultimately a function driven solution that had a specific purpose to the overall design. My specific role on the team after the conceptual phase was developing the planning and section details of the bridge. Programs used during the project development were AutoCAD Architecture, Autodesk 3ds Max Design, and Adobe Creative Suite.

005 Pedestrian Bridge


Pedestrian Bridge 006


Hainan Baoting Hilton Hotel | Tree House Duration: October 2011- March 2012 | 12 weeks Team: VOA Beijing, VOA Chicago All material is credited to VOA Associates Incorporated

Project:

VOA was given the opportunity to develop world class five star Hilton resort hotel located Baoting, Hainan Island, China. Hainan Island China’s southernmost province and is located the South China Sea.

a in is in

The resort includes 350 hotel guest rooms, private villas, and public spaces including conference and recreational spaces. My specific task was the schematic design of two unique hotel towers that we dubbed ‘the tree houses’.

Concept:

The tree houses were designed as a way to give guests the option to stay in a unique room above the heavily wooded site granting unobstructed views of the scenic landscape. Our design solution evolved from studying the structural and functional qualities of trees. This heavy use of symbolism molded our design into what became a ninety meter tall tree house hotel.

007 Hainan Baoting Hilton Hotel | Tree House


Hainan Baoting Hilton Hotel | Tree House 008


009 Hainan Baoting Hilton Hotel | Tree House


Hainan Baoting Hilton Hotel | Tree House 010


Typical Floor Plan

011 Hainan Baoting Hilton Hotel | Tree House


Hainan Baoting Hilton Hotel | Tree House 012


Typical Unit Plan

013 Hainan Baoting Hilton Hotel | Tree House


Hainan Baoting Hilton Hotel | Tree House 014


Personal Connection:

‘The Tree House’ was a very special project for me. The design was mainly a solo effort with the help of our Principal Richard Fawell critiquing and mentoring me through the development and design phases. I learned how to really think outside of the realms of typical hotel design and to focus on pushing forward a strong conceptual approach. The goal and purpose of the tree houses was to offer visitors a unique hotel stay up in the air with wonderful views of the island landscape. One of the biggest challenges during this design process was to create a tree-like atmosphere while maintaining structural stability. Our goal was to have the individual units cantilever out beyond the structure so that visitors would appear to be floating in the air. The hours spent working on the structural and circulation challenges, as well as incorporating the needs of the hotel, led to a successful end solution. Working on The Tree House helped strengthen my conceptual and schematic design abilites and showed me how projects are handled from the ground up. Programs used during the project development were Trimble SketchUp, AutoCAD Architecture and Adobe Creative Suite.

015 Hainan Baoting Hilton Hotel | Tree House


Hainan Baoting Hilton Hotel | Tree House 016


Citic Master Plan | Arch Scheme

Duration: June 2012- September 2012 | 12 weeks Team: VOA Beijing, VOA Chicago All material is credited to VOA Associates Incorporated

Project:

VOA was given the opportunity to develop the master plan for a 200,000 SM site located in Beijing’s Central Business District. The site, located on Chang’an Street, is divided into three parcels but was developed as an integrated whole. Our team then divided the site into four east-west zones that would help determine residential and public spaces. The Public Park Zone is a pedestrian plaza space located along the south end of the site and is activated by the Commercial Zone located adjacent to it. The Commercial Zone to the north of the park zone is made of up of Class A office, retail shops, restaurants, and hotel functions. The Boulevard Zone is a transitional area between the residential and public zones, and allows for vehicular circulation to the office, retail, and hotel spaces. The final zone located on the north end of the site is the Residential Zone. This zone provides private lower-rise and high-rise luxury living for residents of the development and surrounds a private residential park.

Concept:

The Arch Scheme was developed as an iconic alternative to the program that would have a long memorable impact to the visitors of the development. The 390 meter tall arch is composed of two office towers connected by a hotel at the top. At the base is a second hotel and retail spaces intended to create a strong pedestrian plaza space at the south end of the site.

017 Citic Master Plan | Arch Scheme


Citic Master Plan | Arch Scheme 018


Parcel B

Parcel C

Parcel A

Parcel A Office Residential Hotel Retail Total

558,200 SM. 359,880 SM. 112,100 SM. 30,000 SM. 1,060,180 SM.

Parcel B Office Residential Retail Total

32,400 SM. 39,600 SM. 11,450 SM. 83,450 SM.

Parcel C Office Residential Retail Total

43,200 SM. 49,296 SM. 17,220 SM. 109,716 SM.

Site Plan

019 Citic Master Plan | Arch Scheme


3D Zoning Diagram

Citic Master Plan | Arch Scheme 020


Arch Section

021 Citic Master Plan | Arch Scheme


Typical Floor Plans

Citic Master Plan | Arch Scheme 022


The curvature of the arch created many design challenges with the structure, circulation, and zoning. Unlike a typical office tower where a core goes straight up through the center of a building, the core of the arch extrudes straight up while intersecting each floor at different points. VOA developed a thinner vertical expression on the facades of the arch as a way to compensate for the core condition. This vertical protrusion allows space for the core to ride up the building, compensating for lost floor area, and creating an overall thinner expression in the exterior form of the design.

Structural Approach

023 Citic Master Plan | Arch Scheme


Structural Approach

Citic Master Plan | Arch Scheme 024


Personal Connection:

One of the most exciting times at VOA was working on the Citic Master Plan Arch Scheme. Our team decided that it would be best to show an iconic option, as well as a traditional option for the project, and allow the client to determine their preference. This was the first high rise mixed use development that I had ever worked on and I was really honored to be a part of the experience. The form of the arch represents a gateway for the city of Beijing. The arch would become an iconic structure and cultural landmark to be cherished by those living in the area and visitors traveling through. My specific roles during the development of the Citic Master Plan Arch Scheme were concept research, site and master plan development, program analysis, sun/shade analysis, and 3D modeling. Programs used during the project development were Trimble SketchUp, AutoCAD Architecture, and Adobe Creative Suite.

025 Citic Master Plan | Arch Scheme


Citic Master Plan | Arch Scheme 026


Anji Mixed Use Development

Duration: November 2012- December 2012 | 6 weeks Team: VOA Beijing All material is credited to VOA Associates Incorporated

Project:

VOA was asked to develop a mixed use development master plan in China’s Zhejiang Provice, Anji County. Our site, with an area of 31,662 SM, is located to the north of a heavily wooded mountain range and south of an existing residential community. The program called for retail, residential, office, and hotel spaces not to exceed a height limit of 100 meters.

Concept:

Our team took a more contemporary approach to the design of this development. A two story retail podium would attract visitors to the development and activate the pedestrian plaza spaces at grade. A private residential park was developed on top of the retail podium adjacent to the north-south facing residential units. The podium gradually slopes down on the east end to give residents privacy but also feel connected to the public spaces below. Located on the west end of the site is a 97 meter tall office and hotel tower consisting of three hotel amenity levels at the base with office and hotel functions above.

027 Anji Mixed Use Development


Anji Mixed Use Development 028


Program Total Site Area Total Construction Area (Including Basement) Construction Area (Above Grade) FAR Green Space Ratio Building Density

31,662 SM. 116,129 SM. 80,969 SM. 2.56 20.00% 41.00%

Above Grade Construction Area Retail Office (9 typ. floors) Hotel (11 typ. floors, 330 bays, 220 keys) Residential (80 Units)

80,969 SM. 20,007 SM. 16,721 SM. 19,200 SM. 25,041 SM.

Below Grade Construction Area Parking Mechanical

35,160 SM. 31,638 SM. 3,522 SM.

029 Anji Mixed Use Development


Anji Mixed Use Development 030


Site Plan

031 Anji Mixed Use Development


East Elevation

West Elevation

South Elevation

Anji Mixed Use Development 032


Personal Connection:

The Anji Mixed Use Master Plan was an important project for me personally because it was mainly developed by Principal Nan Zhou, Claire Ryan, and myself. I had more responsibilities and was able to show more of my specific capabilities as a designer. One of the main challenges during this process was to design a mixed use development without creating a negative impact on the residential community to the north of our site. VOA’s proposed development was to allow a minimum of three hours of direct sunlight per day to the existing community. This sun/shade requirement helped determine overall massing and zoning for the design proposal. I enjoyed working on this project because it helped me gain a stronger understanding of mixed use and master plan design. There was a lot of freedom from the clients concerning the architecture and overall design of the development which made the entire process very enjoyable. My specific roles during the development of the Anji Mixed Use Master Plan were concept research, site and master plan development, program analysis, solar analysis, space planning, and 3D modeling. Programs used during the project development were Trimble SketchUp, AutoCAD Architecture, and Adobe Creative Suite.

033 Anji Mixed Use Development


Anji Mixed Use Development 034


Biomimetics

Duration: August 2009- September 2009 | 3 weeks 4th Year Design Studio

Project:

Incorporate a biological method and system found in nature to the design of a structure. The chosen biomimetic system would then become the conceptual backbone throughout the development of the project.

Concept:

The vessels in a meristele of a bracken fern are used to represent a biological structure due to its strong architectural features and tunnel-like characteristics. The repetitive tunnel form of the cell became a base for the design. Combined with the phenomena of the Fibonacci Sequence, an order was derived and a structural pattern emerged. The Fibonacci Sequence provides a guide for the organization and composition of the biological structure.

035 Biomimetics


Biomimetics 036


Deublin Schematic Design Phase I

Duration: November 2011- December 2011 | 5 weeks Team: VOA Beijing All material is credited to VOA Associates Incorporated

Project:

Our Beijing team was asked to develop a new facility for the Deublin Company in HoffheimWallau, a suburb of Frankfurt, Germany. Deublin Company is the worlds largest manufacturer of rotary unions. Deublin’s operations currently take place in multiple buildings. The design of this new facility would allow Deublin to relocate to one central location. The new facility would be a single story facility at approximately 8,300 SM with an optional mezzanine office level (approximately 750 SM) and the loading/support zone (670 SM). The program calls for 1,720 SM of office, 4,800 SM of manufacturing and 1,720 SM of support and loading areas.

Concept:

Our goal was to design the new facility to LEED certification standards by focusing on using the surrounding environment to lower energy costs during the building’s life span. Another main focus was to design a comfortable work environment using day lighting and having a strong connection to the exterior.

037 Deublin Schematic Design Phase I


Deublin Schematic Design Phase I 038


Ground Floor Plan 039 Deublin Schematic Design Phase I


Optional Mezzanine Level

The facilty’s intensive green roof system provides a natural way to insulate the building and absorb rainwater. The green roof also incorporates a drainage and irrigation system. As the roof collects rainwater, water drains into potable and non-potable rainwater cisterns that are then processed and distributed back into the building or outside for garden irrigation.

Roof Plan Deublin Schematic Design Phase I 040


North-South Section

West Elevation

041 Deublin Schematic Design Phase I


North Elevation

South Elevation

Deublin Schematic Design Phase I 042


Personal Connection:

VOA’s main focus during Phase I of the Deublin SD was sustainability. Our Beijing team consisting of Pricipal Christopher Groesbeck, Sai Yan Chu, Scott Leever, and myself developed a green strategy that would allow our design solution to become energy efficient. Our first step towards energy efficiency was the use of day lighting and proper building orientation so that there could be a strong connection to the exterior. Located along the entire east-west axis of the green roof are operable skylights that control the amount of natural light entering the building. This strong connection to natural light creates a more enjoyable work environment for those working inside. Also located on the green roof are photovoltaic solar panels. These panels would generate electrical power, provide a passive cooling effect during the day, and accumulate heat for the building at night. My specific roles during the development of the Deublin Schematic Design Phase I were concept research, sustainable design analysis, site development, section and elevation studies, space planning, and 3D modeling. Programs used during the project development were Trimble SketchUp, AutoCAD Architecture, and Adobe Creative Suite.

043 Deublin Schematic Design Phase I


Deublin Schematic Design Phase I 044


A Family Memorial

Duration: August 2008- September 2008 | 4 weeks Award: 3rd Place | Acme Brick Competition 3rd Year Design Studio

Project:

Design an open-air memorial on a private family owned island located on a small lake outside of St. Louis, Missouri. The use of brick was to be implemented when designing the memorial.

Concept:

Using emotional words, a scheme was developed that focused on the elements and characteristics of a lighthouse. The concept of a lighthouse was chosen because it symbolizes a safe haven for people to go and feel protected. A direct path was established that would guide visitors to the memorial much like a lighthouse guiding ships to shore.

Personal Connection:

There were three main design goals during the development of the Family Memorial. The memorial needed to implement the use of brick, appeal to the human senses, and offer visitors a peaceful escape from everyday life. The strong linear qualities were designed to provide visual direction to the chapel, repository, and meditation spaces. Stack bond masonry is used to provide a more linear expression in the coursing of the brick. Relating back to sight, touch, and sound became a very powerful way to connect emotionally with those visiting the memorial. As visitors walk down the bridge towards the memorial, tiny waterfalls run off the tops of the brick walls splashing into the lake below. This is a way of incorporating the sound of water in order to calm the visitor and create a relaxing experience.

045 A Family Memorial


A Family Memorial 046


047 A Family Memorial | West Elevation


A Family Memorial 048


Tower House | Concorso di idee Riqualificazione complesso

Duration: January 2011- February 2011 | 6 weeks Team: Ryan Beattie, Karina Cisneros, Alex Heffesse, Professor Paolo Sanza, Rachel Vincent 5th Year Design Studio

Project:

Our team had the pleasure to collaborate with Antonio Cinotto of FFWD Architetura, an Italy based architecture firm. We entered in a professional competition to re-skin an existing residential tower located in Treviso, Italy. Our team saw this as an opportunity to transform the currently unattractive residential tower into an iconic structure that would become a catalyst and landmark for the community. The project consisted of three key design phases. Along with the design of the new skin we also proposed design solutions for the base of the tower and a potential “parasite” lookout space located on the roof.

Concept:

The idea of using the tower to perform a constant social experiment was established very early on in the design process. A mechanical louver system was developed that would be custom designed for each tenant. This would allow the skin of the tower to transform based on the lifestyles of the tenants inside. The tower virtually came to life, becoming a living and breathing representation of the activities taking place within. Due to the heavy use of glass, we developed an algorithm for the glass frit that responds to the solar impact of the sun on each facade of the tower. The sun’s solar strength determines what custom piece of fritted glass to use in each specific square foot of the skin.

Existing Residential Tower

049 Tower House


Tower House 050


Algorithmic Texture

East Elevation 051 Tower House


Southwest Elevation

Northwest Elevation Tower House 052


Terrace

053 Tower House

Tower

Facade


1

1 2

2

3

3

Parasite The form of the “parasite” lookout space is based on the existing tower’s typical floor plan. The wings are twisted and rearranged to create a unique form that has a conceptual connection to the original structure.

Tower House 054


Personal Connection:

The skin system for the Tower House gained strength with the development of the algorithmic texture and adjustable glass panels. What was interesting was how the building’s orientation with the sun could determine the overall expression of the skin system. Most of my time during the development of the Tower House was spent developing the skin and how we could create a system that transformed depending on the weather and everyday habits of the tenants inside. This system allowed us to use the skin as a way to represent the people and culture of Treviso, Italy. The resident’s actions would transform the skin much like a caterpillar morphs into a butterfly. When tenants in the tower desired fresh air or sunlight they could simply open the adjustable glass panels for their specific unit. When opened, the joints of the panels would become illuminated, creating horizontal strips of light across the tower. The opened glass panels would also reveal a personalized pixeated insulation representing each unit’s specific owner. As new residents inhabited the spaces, the pixelated insulation would be updated to represent the new tenants, creating an ever changing tower facade. It was important for the environment of Treviso to play a large role in the development of the skin. The algorithmic texture for the glass frit is a solution that responds to the constant change in natural sunlight around the tower. The system we developed would allow the skin to have one fluid glass frit pattern for the entire facade of the tower as well as an appropriate level of privacy and shade for the tenants inside.

055 Tower House


Tower House 056


Contact: 78 Olive St. Apt. # 309 New Haven, CT 06510 Tel: 469.525.1332 ryan.beattie@okstate.edu


Ryan Beattie | Portfolio  

2013 Design Portfolio

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