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IN THIS ISSUE Helen Willmer - A Deserving Winner Women On The Water My Boat - Azure Skye

SQUADRON

seamanship and fellowship

Quarterly

Vol 27 Issue 2 June 2013 $5.00


ROYAL SOUTH AUSTRALIAN YACHT SQUADRON Patron Commodore Vice Commodore Rear Commodore Treasurer Committee Members General Manager

His Excellency Rear Admiral Kevin Scarce AO, CSC, RANR Paul Bogner Arcadia Peter Cooling Seven Eighty Rae Hunt Mahalo Ian McDonald Rachel Geoff Wallbridge Solace Helen Moody Magic Beach Colin Doudy Circe Wayne Phillips

SERVICE DIRECTORY 161 Oliver Rogers Road, Outer Harbor, SA 5018 PO Box 1066, North Haven, SA 5018 Ph (08) 8341 8600 Fax (08) 8248 4933 Email: rsays@rsays.com.au Web: www.rsays.com.au Office hours: Monday to Friday, 9.00am - 5.00pm Saturday & Sunday, 9.00am - 4.00pm Closed Public Holidays and Easter Weekend RSAYS Foundation Cruising Committee House and Social Committee Juniors Committee Sail Training & Race Support Etchells Fleet Captain Trailer Sailers Seaweed Gardening Group Slipmaster Finance Manager Food & Beverage Manager Chef Member Services Marina Services Accounts Administrator

Gary Read Kingsley Haskett Sue Buckley Debbie Frisby Heidi Pfeiffer Wayne Knill Trevor Hamlyn Robert Henshall Julian Murray Joann Galios Marc Goepfort Greg Velios Annette Hersbach Lisa Hastings Kathy Bernhardt

Dining Room & Bar Hours - Subject to Patronage Food and Beverage Manager

Marc Goepfert

Friday Club Nights, 5.00pm to 10.00pm Meal orders from 6.00pm to 8.00pm

0433 554 274

- Subject to Patronage

0417 878 682 0419 844 772 0417 081 327 0408 851 536 8341 8600 8240 4615 0418 318 644 8332 0889 0414 365 294

Squadron Quarterly Deadline for September 2013 issue is 1st August 2013

Saturday: Lunch orders taken from 12 noon to 2.00pm Dinner orders taken from 6.00pm to 8.00pm

Advertisements, editorial and photographs can be sent to member.services@rsays.com.au or left at the Squadron Office. Material for an e-Bulletin may be forwarded to the Office at anytime.

Sunday: Lunch orders taken from 12 noon to 2.00pm Dining room is open subject to patronage until 6:00pm

Please contact Kathy Bernhardt - phone 8341 8600 or accounts@rsays.com.au

Jimmy’s Bar Hours

Squadron Quarterly Advertising Squadron Quarterly Editorial

Jimmy’s Bar is open during daylight saving season for Twilight Racing on Wednesday evenings from 5:00pm

September 2013: (To be advised.)

Weekend race days from 10:30am to 12:30pm

Articles submitted should be typed as a Word document in font Arial 10 point, 1500 words max. 1500 words plus 2 photos will cover two pages. Photos should be 1) in focus, 2) JPEG format at a high resolution (300dpi) and 3) sent separately and not embedded in a Word document. Articles can be submitted to the office for distribution to the Committee.

At other times as booked or pre-arranged with the Food & Beverage Manager, Marc Goepfort.

Notes for Contributors

Disclaimer Cover: RSAYS General Manager Wayne Phillips swapped his cricket bat for the tiller of Seven Eighty at a Twilight race last season. Photographed ahead of Aikin by crew member Nick Williamson.

With exception of statements made by duly authorised officers, all other statements and opinions in this publication are those of contributors and advertisers. The Royal South Australian Yacht Squadron, its Management and Members accept no responsibility for statements by non-authorised personnel.


June 2013

Vol 27 Issue 2 Published Quarterly ISSN 1037-1133 Print Post Publication No. PP532154/00016

REPORTS

12

CONTENTS

New Members ............................................................6 Staff Profile..................................................................8 Presentation Evening................................................10 Helen Willmer – A Deserving Winner!.......................12 Around The Cans......................................................13 RSAYS Volunteers Acknowledged............................14 Member Profile - John Ellison...................................15 Enchantress' Return To Hobart.................................16 Women On The Water..............................................18 Fringe Event At The Squadron; Eric's Tales Of The Sea .......................................20 Lessons To Be Learned….........................................21 My Boat: Azure Skye................................................22 In Tranquil Waters.....................................................25 St Ayles Skiff.............................................................25 Senior Member - Ion Ullett........................................26 Book Reviews...........................................................28 Reef Watch................................................................30 Sailing In Tasmania; Heading To Port Davey...........32 In The Galley.............................................................34 Peter & Carol’s Cruising Plans..................................35 Marina Berths For Rent.............................................36 Letters To The Editor:................................................36 Marina Berths For Sale.............................................37 Events Calendar........................................................39

Women on the Water 18 - 19

My Boat, Azure Skye 22 - 24

EDITORIAL Isn’t it funny how we may not recognise many Club members, but we’re likely to know them by associating their names with those of their boats! “Oh, so you’re so-and-so from whatever!” we exclaim when we finally put names and faces together, after what could be years of never quite knowing who they were! (*I’m Sally from ‘Emma’, by the way!) But that’s one good thing about being the coordinator of this latest edition of ‘SQ’ – you get to know many ‘boaties’ a whole lot better as you encourage/urge/whip them into submitting a story or photo or sending a report or just filling in some facts. Our new found friendships may indeed have been tested in the process, but getting to know the adventurous people with whom we sail and reading their interesting stories and reports is what this magazine is all about. And this issue is no exception. There’s the story on Helen Willmer, winner of the Eileen Hardy Trophy – what a woman, and what a sailor! And one on the marvellous Mead family, who were recently honoured for giving their best to sailing and the club.

CONTENTS

From the Commodore................................................4 From the Manager’s Desk..........................................5 Club Cruising..............................................................6 House & Social...........................................................7 Racing News...............................................................8 Juniors.......................................................................11

Helen Willmer, Eileen Hardy Winner

What is John Ellison going to do now that he’s decided to retire? More ship-board cruises, John? When are Peter Kelly and his wife Carol setting sail on their big cruising adventure from the Squadron?

Where in Tasmania have two intrepid Squadron boats recently laid anchor?

And why does Ron Stennert think it’s important for us to know about his unfortunate ‘mishap’, near the entrance to the RSAYS?

Pull on your wet-weather gear, resist the rain, and with one hand on the helm and the other holding this latest ‘SQ’, check out these stories and more! (Of course, you may just put on the auto-helm, snuggle up below with a warm ‘toddy’ and finger your way thru’ the following pages, if you prefer!) However, you do it, Winter sailing (and reading this edition!) can both be exciting experiences! Keep warm - Sally

Squadron Quarterly 3


FROM THE COMMODORE

REPORTS

Paul Bogner

following a number of design refinements, the dredge spoil pond’s impact on the amenity of the Squadron should be relatively minor. Thanks are due particularly to Geoff Wallbridge who spent many hours working with Flinders Ports on design.

As you may know by now, I announced at the last Quarterly meeting that I do not intend to stand for election as Commodore for the coming year as convention would have it. While it is a disappointment to many members who have supported me over the years, my increased workload as Chief Information Officer of Beaumont Tiles prevents me from giving as much time as I believe is necessary to the Squadron. I hasten to add, that this does not mean the end of my support for the Committee and the Squadron generally, and I look forward to spending more relaxed time ‘mucking about in boats’. As this is my last Commodore’s Report, it’s pertinent to reflect on the last five years as a flag officer of the Royal South Australian Yacht Squadron. I leave the office with mixed emotions. It’s been exciting, challenging, at times frustrating, but overall, fulfilling. The Squadron evolved through those years in various ways. We saw General Managers and a number of members come and go. It’s pleasing to note that the efforts going in to recruitment and retention are beginning to show signs of increasing membership. The Squadron has maintained around a thousand members through a difficult financial cycle while other clubs are declining. Without the concerted effort of Management Committee member Helen Moody, Coaching Series and Junior Development volunteers, and staff, we would be facing similar declines. It’s a pertinent place to remind ourselves that members are extremely important ambassadors for the Squadron. Recruitment and retention is vital for the long term success of the Squadron and word of mouth is by far the most effective means by which we can reach out to those poor lost souls who have not yet embraced seamanship and fellowship Squadron style. The Management Committee has grappled with a number of big external issues such as the Right of Way, Flinders Ports dredge spoil pond, and Council Rates on marina and hardstand berths. The Right of Way is now in the final stages of administrative finalisation. On completion, the Squadron will finally have a perpetual Right of Way between the basin and the Port River. Although a Right of Way was a condition of sale when the Squadron land and water was purchased, details were not finalised, nor endorsed on the title. This has now been rectified. The Flinders Ports dredge spoil pond is currently under construction. The Squadron had no power to prevent it. Flinders Ports and RSAYS met on a number of occasions and worked collaboratively towards a mutually acceptable outcome for both parties. Despite views to the contrary, and 4 Squadron Squadron Quarterly Quarterly 4

Although not completely resolved, the satisfactory finalisation of the rates issue is in sight. Legislative changes are under way which will enable the Port Adelaide Enfield Council to rate the Squadron as a whole. The application of the minimum rate to individual berths will not apply. Significant remediation works have been completed around the Marina over the last few years. The ‘toblerone’ breakwater on the western boundary was extended to protect the basin against rising sea levels and ensuing increased height and severity of storm surges. Although this may become partly redundant when the dredge spoil pond is completed, it will still protect the basin at the southern end, and has certainly prevented severe damage during storm surges in 2012/13. Additionally, 12 failing piles in Marina stages 1 and 2 have been successfully sleeved, marina flotation repaired, bollards replaced, whalers, hinges and pile guides have been repaired or replaced. These works will extend the life of Marina stages 1 and 2 by many years. Staff, contractors and volunteers worked side by side on this program of work. We are fortunate to have, and indebted to Geoff Wallbridge, Mal Mead and a host of volunteers for their commitment and effort on this substantial project. The proposed changes to the constitution as a response to the awkward relationship between Inc. and Ltd. caused a lot of unnecessary angst in my view. There is a good argument to revert to a single entity, yet the wholesale changes to the organisational structure are not necessary, nor desirable. I think some members would do well to remember that we are a modest sporting club, not a global corporation. In hindsight, the effort expended on this could have been put to much more worthy and constructive causes. Anyway, we are reaching what I hope will be finalisation fairly soon. The Constitutional Drafting Committee: Peter Cooling, Alan Down, Wayne Phillips and I, have been working away in the background to complete a revised constitution that achieves a good balance between tradition and flexibility for the future. On a lighter note, the racing season concluded in a grand way with Presentation Night on the 11th of May. We were privileged to have Sir James, David and John Hardy attend to present the Eileen Hardy trophy to a great yachtswoman, Helen Wilmer. Sir James also introduced a new trophy, the Jubilee trophy. It was a pleasure to host guests from sponsors and the CYCSA. It was not quite so pleasurable to present the Commodore’s Shield to the Geoff Catt, Commodore of the CYCSA. But we really must work hard on winning the Commodore's Shield. Congratulations to the CYCSA but don't expect the shield next year Geoff. As this season passes, another is just around the corner. Standing Committees are finalising their busy programmes for next year. The year book will be published in the A5 spiral bound format following a landslide victory for the format in a member’s survey. The yearbook will be published by early September. I must admit, I’m looking forward to hanging up my number 1 rig for a while, and getting back to enjoying the simple pleasures of sailing. I thank all of those who have supported me as a flag officer over the years including past and present Management Committee members, former Commodores, the General Manager, Staff, the Standing Committees, friends, my crew, and most importantly, my wife. 


FROM THE MANAGER’S DESK

The Squadron’s summer racing season has drawn to a close with the traditional staging of Presentation Night. This is always a tremendous event and this year’s was further enhanced with the attendance of yachting legend Sir James Hardy who was involved with the presentation of the Eileen Hardy Trophy for ‘excellence in seamanship by a female racing sailor’. The way the club recognises the performances of the racing fleet across all categories and divisions confirms the standing of this important facet of Squadron life and we look forward to increased numbers of competitors and vessels during next summer’s racing. Members should be aware of some planned imminent construction works in and around the Squadron basin. There are two specific projects which will be occurring, both of which should have limited impact on the Squadron membership. The first works relate to the construction of the fuel pipeline running

As part of these works there will also be some necessary dredging undertaken which will enhance the capacity of Berth 4, in readiness for the fuel loading/unloading and vehicle movement. Maritime Constructions have been contracted to undertake this project and discussions have confirmed they will be positioning their dredging barge and underwater pipelines in and around the Berth 4 vicinity. The spoil will be transferred to Berth 8 and, as a result, they will need to position some booster pumps to facilitate this transfer. Maritimes are fully aware of the requirement to provide the necessary bunding and location markers to alert all water users and we are confident any disruption will be minimal.

REPORTS

Wayne Phillips

from the bulk liquid storage facility east of Pelican Point Road along the verges of Pelican Point and Oliver Rogers Roads. This pipeline will service the fuel loading and unloading to be undertaken at the soon to be developed Berth 4. We are in discussion with the project management group Aurecon, which has assured us the works to be done in the vicinity of the Squadron’s entry and exit gates, will be done with a view to minimise disruption and we will continue to update the membership as developments draw nearer.

I am sure more will be written in the Cruising report but it should be acknowledged the tremendous event ‘Old Keels and Wheels’ was in mid-April. This event, involving different clubs, brings together such a range of interests and enthusiasm which was confirmed by the numbers in attendance on the day. These types of events allow us to showcase the facilities of the Squadron and provides ongoing opportunities to attract membership and external functions for the betterment of the club. 

Anzac Day at the Torrens Island Quarantine Station.

Photos courtesy of Phil Stump Squadron Quarterly 5


REPORTS

Kingsley Haskett

CLUB CRUISING

Greetings from the Chair and the Cruising Committee. Once again we make our reports to the members of the Squadron and once again, we have had some very successful events. Old Keels & Wheels turned out a real cracker. In conjunction with the Sporting Car Club of South Australia, this is a biennial event and despite quite a poor forecast it came out warm and sunny and a good crowd of people attended to see a vast array of fascinating things. There were seventy two cars, a dozen vintage motorbikes, various pieces of machinery from the Gawler Machinery Club, a lot of small stationary motors running various bits of equipment, and a crawler tractor from days gone by. In addition there were 20 wooden boats, classics of bygone eras, still used by their owners and probably will be for another hundred years. The event was months in the planning by the Cruising Committee, the House & Social Committee and Management with members of the Sporting Car Club. The event was extremely well received. A white three-litre Rover, SA number plate 5000 in pristine condition drew a lot of attention. It belonged to the late Alan Jordan, former member of RSAYS and once owner of the three Squadron yachts Celeste 1, 2 and 3. A painting of the Tumlaren class Celeste, done by Joyce Jordan, was also on display. Beautifully executed, it was set in open ocean, looking like it was sailing the Port Lincoln race. The other was a number of yachts under spinnaker in the river, just entitled ‘The Race’. It would be really good to be able to secure these paintings for the Squadron – something I am determined to work on. The South Australian Governor, His Excellency Rear Admiral Kevin Scarce and Mrs Scarce enjoyed a stroll around the

machinery, cars and boats, accompanied by myself and the Commodore and Mrs Sandee Bogner. This was really a good thing to happen because the Governor is the patron of the Sporting Car Club as well as the Squadron. The day finished well, everyone enjoyed themselves. Expensive autos such as the Aston Martins and Ferraris were not the only highlights but also a Lightburn Zeta utility. (Ed note: The Zeta was built by SA washing machine manufacturer, Lightburn in 1963-5 in Camden Park. Less than 400 were sold). These are part of South Australian history and it was interesting to see it. The next event, the Anzac Day BBQ at the Quarantine Station on Torrens Island was just 10 days later. The weather was possibly iffy but turned out a beautiful day and 38 boats anchored off the Quarantine Station and some 180 people tendered ashore. Squadron and Junior’s tenders, skippered by Peter Cooling and our Treasurer Ian McDonald. A shore party helped people in and out of the tenders. It would be good if the jetty at Torrens Island was rebuilt because there is interesting South Australian history available at the old Quarantine Station which also served as an internment camp in the Great War. The recent cruise to the Birkenhead Tavern has its history as a cruise to the Clubhouse Hotel, which was Bucknell’s place near the Jervois Bridge. There is now just a mound of dirt where the government of the day bulldosed the hotel one Sunday morning. So we cruised to the Birkenhead Tavern, another century old Port watering hole with access to the anchorage in the old swinging basin. In 2000 we had 28 boats anchored off the Birkenhead Tavern, a large BBQ area and apparently 400 meals served. I would suggest this was probably the peak. Now it is a bit harder. We have two bridges to get through and very few people go through the Birkenhead Bridge. While places to go ashore ashore are limited it is an interesting cruise good weather at this time of the year is usual. The next event will be the cruise to Garden Island Yacht Club and for the first time in many years we have good high tides to get around the back of the island, and back in daylight hours. They assure us that they have plenty of marina berths available and a warm welcome when we get there. So come along and enjoy a good weekend. Later on we have talks, probably the most interesting will be about the weather. This is a history of South Australian weather and I have been assured the presenter is very entertaining. 

NEW MEMBERS

The Squadron is pleased to welcome the following New Members and New Boats

Senior Haggis Michael Taylor Senior Polycraft Neil Oakes Senior Sahara Adam Gladwin Crew Alexandre Kolodin Crew Andrew Smiles 6 Squadron Squadron Quarterly Quarterly 6

Crew Crew Crew Crew Associate

Stephanie Thomson Mary Carpenter Carolyn Brereton Carl Revell Lo-Anne Kloke


HOUSE & SOCIAL The Tom Hardy Library – update

For Easter this year the committee decided to do something a little bit different and hired a marquee. We found a local (well relatively local) supplier in Kadina who quoted us a reasonable price for putting up the marquee on Thursday so it would be ready and waiting for us when we arrived. As it turned out this was the right call this year as the weather was a bit fickle with quite heavy rain on Saturday evening. The marquee proved to be a hit with lots of members joining us for Friday night happy hour, the Commodore’s Shout on Saturday morning and we had standing room only for the tapas style BYO dinner on Saturday evening. Unfortunately we didn’t quite get the arrangement of chairs and tables right as some people who arrived later were beaten to seats by the early arrivals and so went back to their boats. I know this was disappointing for everyone and should the Committee decide to go with a similar option next year we will certainly organise trestle tables and more chairs to try to accommodate everyone. This year of course this situation was exacerbated by the wind coming from the northwest and the fact that it rained quite heavily during the evening so we couldn’t spill out in front of the marquee. I do think that this different format was a great success and appreciated by all those members who attended one, or all, of the functions we held in the marquee. When the Committee organises any event we make a judgement on how many people will attend and then balance that with what our budget will allow us to do. Sometimes we get this right and sometimes the response overwhelms us and members are disappointed. We do trust that you will be understanding in these situations and help us adapt the situation as it occurs. The other matter I would like to mention is that we appreciate and welcome constructive feedback from members both positive and negative as this allows us to put on better events. But please be mindful that a lot of effort often by a large number of people goes into putting on many of our and other Committee’s events.

For those members who do not know – we have a library with an interesting range of maritime related books. These books are available for loan to members. We have an honesty system for members to record in a register what books they borrow and when they have returned them.

REPORTS

Sue Buckley

I also wanted to take this opportunity to provide an update on the Library.

We have a Library Taskforce and this small, dedicated team of volunteers has been beavering away over the last few years getting the library into order. They are almost there! We still have a few books to return to alphabetical order and we now have an electronic catalogue of all the books in the library. As we currently don’t have any rigour around the loan process I note that there are a few books that have been on loan since 2007 – one book is on loan to someone who is no longer a member! If you have any books on loan would you kindly return them to the Library by the end of May so we can finalise sorting them into alphabetical order and ensure all the books are accounted for in the catalogue. If you are unsure please either check the loan register in the library or you could call me as I have a copy of the register. We will follow up on those outstanding books during June, as it is our objective to get the library fully operational in June. The Library Taskforce identified a number of issues regarding the library that we have addressed with the Management Committee. One is that as the library is on the western end of the building and the doors are kept closed it gets very hot in this room. The Taskforce suggested we install a ceiling vent however the General Manager’s suggested and has obtained a quote for a split system air-conditioning unit. This quote was presented to the Management Committee for review. However, given the cost, it may be more viable to install a ceiling vent rather than air-conditioning.

So, once we get the books into order, remove the items being temporarily stored there and put a couple of chairs in the library we will be up and running. I strongly encourage you to make the most of the library over the winter months. Come for lunch, get yourself a drink from the bar, spend an hour or so perusing the books and enjoy the winter sunshine streaming in the western windows. Lastly, we could do with a little help with the Library on an ongoing basis. If you are interested and have a bit of spare time please give me a call or send me an email. The Committee is now in the midst of planning next year’s calendar of events so if you have any ideas or suggestions for social activities please contact me. I look forward to seeing you at our next social event. 

Squadron Quarterly 7


RACING NEWS

REPORTS

Scott Mutton

Sir James also presented the Nerida Jubilee Trophy to Lucette (Chris Pratt) for PHS 1st and Vulcan (Jimmy Howell) for IRC 1st. Jimmy and the crew of Vulcan once again did very well in the overall results as did Lucette and Aikin.

The 2012-13 Summer Season concluded with the Inkster Race which was won by Aikin (Caillin Howard) just ahead of Vulcan (Jimmy Howell). It was a very light race and both boats sailed very tactically and very well. The end of season party organised by the House and Social Committee followed this and it was a great day to be at the club. The last few races of the season were mostly very light. The fastest boat (Vulcan) took 15 hours to complete the Kintore Cup (Start- GlenelgOrontes-Finish). Presentation night was held on May 11. It was a great night where skippers and crew get to celebrate their wins and congratulate each other. This year Sir James Hardy was our special guest. Sir James with his brother David and his nephew John presented the Eileen Hardy Trophy for Excellence in Seamanship by a Female Racing Sailor to Helen Willmer. Helen has been involved in organising, participating in and coaching women’s sailing for many years as well as being very active in traditional twilight and Saturday racing. She was a worthy winner.

Presentation Night is also a chance to say thank you to all the volunteers and sponsors who enable racing to be conducted. Once again I thank them all, especially the Race Officers, John Ellison and Langdon Hamlyn and owners of the duty boats, Robert Henshall, Brian Sutherland and Mario Minuzzo. John and his wife Helen have decided to retire from race management duties as has Robert Henshall. In appreciation of their efforts over the years Andrew Waterman presented them with pictures with plaques of Miss Robyn and Luna Blue respectively. We cannot thank them enough for the efforts they have made. The annual Skippers and Crew Meeting was held on Friday 17 May and the program for season 2013-14 was reviewed with positive feedback. At the conclusion of this meeting Ron Parker, John Hardy and myself retired from the Racing Committee. I would like to thank Ron and John for their efforts as well as the rest of the committee of Andrew Waterman, Peter Vincent, Steve Martin and Iain McDougall. Special thanks to Roger Oaten for all the work he does. I would like to personally thank all club members for supporting me in my role. Chris Pratt, Bob Schahinger and Chris Mandalov were elected to fill the vacant positions. I wish the new committee the best of luck. The Racing Committee meets each month and I am sure they would welcome any feedback or ideas you may have to improve the management of racing. 

STAFF PROFILE Heidi Pfeiffer – Sailing Officer

Heidi has been Sailing Officer for the RSAYS since February this year. She is excited to hold this position. Previously she has been working on a casual basis in various outdoor educational roles: sailing with Pembroke and St Peter’s College at their outdoor education camps on the River Murray; bushwalking with Youth at Risk in the Flinders Ranges on Operation Flinders; Corporate team building activities and instructing outdoor activities with various school groups at Mylor Baptist Camp Heidi was introduced to sailing when on an outdoor education programme at school. She comes from Lameroo, where her family owns a diversified farm, she is new to water sports. She further developed her sailing skills when instructing in Canada on a summer 8 Squadron Squadron Quarterly Quarterly 8

camp during her Gap year. Her sailing has mainly been on 420s on which she started, and has also done some sailing in Canada and on 21’ ketches (with Pembroke) on the Coorong. She is new to Pacers which form a large part of our junior fleet at the RSAYS but is not new to juniors! She is presently also studying a Certificate IV in Youth Work. The transition to working at the Squadron has taken a while to get used to as she is usually working in the field, sometimes for days or weeks at a time. She has sea kayaked around the Sir Joseph Banks Group from Tumby Bay and Thistle Island from Memory Cove and around Wardang Island. “The best thing about working at the Squadron is the help and support I have received from so many members”, Heidi says. She particularly mentions help from Roger Oaten as she learns the intricacies of Topyacht for race results and handicapping. Heidi is on a steep learning curve but is thoroughly enjoying the challenge. She says that the hardest thing is sitting at a desk for much of her working day! She is looking forward to developing her sailing skills on some of the bigger Squadron boats at some point.  By Gill Hogarth


2012-13 Racing Trophy Winners Alan Jordan Memorial Trophy -Women’ s Twilight

KIKI

LIZ MURPHY

Bundey Cup

3 COOL CATS

SCOTT MUTTON

PHS: VICKY J IV

TREVOR McHUGH

IRC: LUCETTE

CHRIS PRATT

Clive Fricker Memorial – Pt. Lincoln Fastest

HASTA LA VISTA

GERALD VALK

Cock of the Walk Cup

3 COOL CATS

SCOTT MUTTON

Correll Memorial Trophy – Easter Sun Race

NEW MORNING III

PETER VINCENT

CS Inkster Memorial Trophy

AIKIN

CAILLIN HOWARD/ DAVID OLIVER

David Hardy Trophy - Multihull Trophy OMR Series

GOLDFINGER

IAIN MACDOUGALL/ PETER BOYD

Cat Thornquest Trophy - Glenelg Gulf Race

Eileen Hardy Trophy

HELEN WILLMER CHRIS PRATT

IRC: VULCAN

JIM HOWELL

Germein Memorial Trophy – Easter Sat Race

MOJO

MAL MEAD

Gymea Cup

FISH FACTORY

MICHAEL BRADLEY

Harold Dicker Memorial Trophy – Easter Return Race

AIKIN

CAILLIN HOWARD/ DAVID OLIVER

Hawse Trophy - Etchells Cock of the Walk

CHOICES

IAN DIXON

PHS: VULCAN

JIM HOWELL

IRC: VULCAN

JIM HOWELL

Div 1: SHINING SEA

ANDREW CORLETTO

DIV 2: ARCADIA

PAUL BOGNER

Keith Flint Memorial Trophy - IRC winner Pt. Lincoln Race

LUCETTE

CHRIS PRATT

Keith Flint Sprint

ARCADIA

PAUL BOGNER

PHS: VULCAN

JIM HOWELL

IRC: VULCAN

JIM HOWELL

AIKIN

CAILLIN HOWARD/ DAVID OLIVER

PHS: AIKIN

CAILLIN HOWARD

IRC: AIKIN

CAILLIN HOWARD

HASTA LA VISTA

GERALD VALK

DIV 1: LUCETTE

CHRIS PRATT

DIV 2: TAKE 5

STEVE MARTIN

PHS: LUCETTE

CHRIS PRATT

IRC: LUCETTE

CHRIS PRATT

Offshore IRC Series Trophy

VULCAN

JIM HOWELL

Pacer Cup

GOLDFINGER

PFL Hussey Memorial Trophy – Easter Fri Race

TANIWHA

RON PARKER

Plympton Cup

AIKIN

CAILLIN HOWARD/ DAVID OLIVER

Reverie Trophy - Club Series

3 COOL CATS

SCOTT MUTTON

RSAYS Women’s Racing Series Trophy

TANIWHA

BARBRA PARKER/ THERESE GORDON

RJ & SR Duncanson Trophy - Etchells State Championship

CHOICES

IAN DIXON

Teachers Cup - Offshore Series PHS

LUCETTE

CHRIS PRATT

TG Flint Memorial Trophy

VULCAN

JIM HOWELL

Twilight Cock of the Walk Trophy

3 COOL CATS

SCOTT MUTTON

Twilight Series Trophy

MORE MAGIC

JOHN DENIET

DIV 1: 3 COOL CATS

SCOTT MUTTON

DIV 2: TAKE 5

STEVE MARTIN

George Eimer Memorial Trophy - Haystack Island Race

James Howell Trophy - Inshore/Offshore Series Kaesler Cup

Kintore Cup – Kintore Race Le Hunte Cup Mark L Mitchell Trophy - Island Cup Race Matthew Flinders (Becker Ent) Trophy – PHS winner Pt. Lincoln Race Morton Trophy - IRC Club Champion Orontes Cup – Orontes Race

Winter Series Trophy

IAIN McDOUGALL RORY McDOUGALL

REPORTS

PHS: LUCETTE

Old Keels and Wheels at the Squadron

Photos courtesy of Phil Stump Squadron Quarterly 9


REGULAR ARTICLE

Presentation Evening

David Hardy, Sir James,

rdy

Helen Willmer, John Ha

Crew of Aikin

John and Helen Presen

tation

Sir James, Jimmy and

Scott and crew of 3 Co

Presentation Evening

10 Squadron Quarterly

crew of Vulcan

ol Cats

Photographs courtesy of Roger Oaten


JUNIORS

Debbie Frisby

Congratulations to: Albert Mead Albert Mead Emily Nicholson Alistair Teagle Matthew Collins

Winner, Summer Series Winner, Club Championships Racing Encouragement Award Sailing Encouragement Award Instructor’s Award

This quarter started with the Juniors Camp, at the beautiful Lake Schubert, on the River Murray. Hot, but well attended, the Juniors had a great time exploring other water sports, as well as sailing for the coveted Crusty Cup. The season finished with the Grelka Cup, a long race to the Port River’s first bend, Beacon 32, and back. Solo sailor Sam Kovacic took out the Trophy, showing off skills he has truly mastered this season. Other winners for this season’s Junior Program were also awarded at Junior Presentation night in April. Commodore Paul Bogner and Sandee Bogner, Vice Commodore Peter Cooling and Noelene Cooling, and Junior Program sponsors David and Dee Henshall, John and Margaret Moffat, and Mal and Andrea Mead were honored with a sailpast and salute, skillfully carried out by our Junior sailors and accompanied by our Instructors in Junior 2.

REPORTS

And to the Juniors who achieved accreditation at these levels in our Program: Start Sailing 1 Emily Nicholson, Leigh Bevans, Lachlan Keith, Larissa Henshall, Alistair Teagle, Bianca Bevans. Start Sailing 2 Gideon Van Wijk, Matthew Collins, Sophie Henshall, Adam Hirniak. Better Sailing Lachlan Potter, Hayley White. Start Racing Rachel McDonald, Sam Kovacic. Participation Annie Paterson, Thomas Brand.

We would like to extend our hearty thanks to our sponsors: David Henshall and Dee Henshall, Lara II John Moffat and Margaret Moffat, INTCOM Mal Mead and Andrea Mead, HEATLIE John Butterfield, COPYCAT PRINTING Peter Heinrich, SPORTSMARINE David Oliver, MUSTO

We also warmly congratulate and thank our Instructor team on another successful season: David Arnold, Michael Arnold, Kara Kilgarriff, Mitch Mead, Hayden Trenorden, Albert Mead, Lynton Trenorden, Andrew Ellison, Ian McDonald, Peter Cooling.

Summer Series and Club Championship Winner, Albert Mead With Juniors Chairman, Debbie Frisby and Vice Commodore Peter Cooling (photo Jacqui Law-Smith)

Winner of the Grelka Cup, Sam Kovacic (photo Jacqui Law-Smith)

Sunset at Lake Schubert (photo Sam Kovacic)

The Juniors will be enjoying some winter sailing coming up, so if you see us about come and say hello! 

Instructor’s Award Winner, Matthew Collins (photo Hayley White)

Squadron Quarterly 11


HELEN WILLMER – A DESERVING WINNER! There are more qualities required than just being an excellent helmsperson and crew member and a woman to make one eligible for the ‘Eileen Hardy Trophy for Excellence in Seamanship by a Female Racing Sailor’.

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Having a love of sailing, even at 4am in the morning on a cold and wet offshore race, is one quality. Spreading the great virtues of learning to sail and mentoring others is another. Offering your help and expertise to any boat when required is certainly praiseworthy. While being involved with the boat set up prior to racing and always volunteering to assist with boat maintenance including such as joyful jobs as slipping and antifouling is sure to score you some points! This year’s winner Helen Willmer has all these qualities, and more, according those members who nominated her for this prestigious award. Helen, who has been sailing since she started at eight years of age at Grange, was quite surprised when her name was announced at the recent Presentation Night.

Helen and Geoff Manuel at Grange.

“Obviously I was also most grateful to my fellow sailors who took the time and effort to put forward my nomination,” she says. “I have a great appreciation of the contribution that the Hardy family has made to yachting in general – particularly Sir James - with his progression from Sharpie days, to world 505 titles to the America’s Cup. It was therefore a significant privilege to be on the receiving end of an inscription on his mother’s 1928 trophy and to have the award presented by Sir James himself”. Helen has been actively involved in sailing for nearly 60 years, having started as an eight year old at Grange. She took time away from sailing while bringing up her three children, but once they were old enough, about 20 years ago, Helen suddenly thought “Don’t think… act!” and phoned the Squadron office to put her name down as available for crewing. Within days three skippers had invited her to join them. Since then she has crewed on a number of Squadron boats including Arcadia, Taniwha, Vicky J IV, Luna Blue, New Morning III, 3 Cool Cats and Tarni Warra. Helen was a dingy sailor prior to advancing to keel boat racing. She has crewed on Vicki J IV for the last 10 years competing in offshore, inshore and twilight racing. She has also been a valuable crew 12 Squadron Squadron Quarterly Quarterly 12

member on many other boats competing in numerous Adelaide to Lincoln races including being part of the all-female crew on Skandia, one Melbourne to Hoabart race, two Geelong Week regattas and three Hamilton Island regattas. She has also been involved with many other all-female crew events and regattas. Helen has been involved in organising, participating in and coaching women’s sailing for many years as well as being very active in traditional twilight and Saturday racing. She has negotiated and organised the sponsorship of the boat, Mrs. OverNewton for SA yachtswomen to compete in the National Keel Boat Championship for many years. She also has been a coach in Hardy’s coaching series since its inception 7 years go. Helen has possibly completed more courses than most of the proposers put together! They say that, more importantly, it is her wealth of experience and knowledge that makes her more than suitable for the Eileen Hardy trophy.

Helen in charge. They say she is always ready to tackle any situation that arises, is an excellent helmsperson and crew member, and gives active input regarding sail trim and tactical decision making. She contributes all this experience plus her willingness to mentor others and her infectious passion for the sport of sailing. She does this on any boat she crews on, and gives her time To increase her sailing knowledge, Helen has completed a number of courses in Sea and Safety, First Aid, VHF Radio Operation and Navigation. Helen is also active in land-based activities at the club. She is a member of the Seaweed Garden Group and attends many racing and social functions at the Squadron, while fostering good relationships with other sailing clubs. Her nominees agreed that ‘to award her the Eileen Hardy trophy would be most fitting to acknowledge her unselfish contribution to the Squadron, the sport of sailing, to skippers and crew and to members both old and new.’ Congratulations to this outstanding yachtswoman! 


AROUND THE CANS By Wayne Knill Firstly, apologies for not putting pen to paper sooner. Days turn into weeks, then months and before you know it, another year has gone by… I was also worried that my Quarterly input was getting a touch repetitive – after all, how much can you say about going up and down the racecourse each week? So this time I have decided to be unashamedly indulgent and describe the effort of my boat; the mighty Medium Rare in this years Etchells State Championship, which was conducted over two separate weekends in December and February. Work commitments kept a number of crews off the water this year, and only 6 boats nominated for the series. Defending champion Shane Deussen with crew Steve Dunn and Brett James had spent the morning putting up the rig and dropping Coronation Rag in the water for the first time all summer. Not an ideal lead up to the regatta, with such testing conditions forecast. Race 1 started early afternoon in 20 knots of breeze, but already gusting much stronger. Caillin Howard’s Stretch suffered a breakage and didn’t even make the start line. Approaching the top mark for the first time we trailed the fleet, and I was debating whether to pop the kite or not… I campaign my boat on a shoestring budget, and all my sails are second hand – the spinnakers are already a few seasons old, and memories of shredding two kites in consecutive weeks last season was still fresh in my memory. Rounding the mark we made the call to wait, and see how things look when going downhill. Even under main & jib we had enough grunt to surf down the waves, and had a box seat to watch the calamity unfold. First race, first mark and Coronation Rag had rounded with a nice lead. The kite goes up as normal, but a short while later when it flogs, the shock of it refilling is too much for the backstay. Twang! … Their mast bent and the rig gracefully folded forwards over the bow. Their day was over. At the leeward mark Athena couldn’t drop their kite, and kept charging on down towards St. Kilda. Damage soon saw them heading back to shore. Choices easily won the first race, with Fish Factory a close second and us by default a distant third. By now the wind was howling, and the sea was getting very lumpy. With only three boats lining up to start race 2 we elected to try and just keep things in one piece and survive the day unscathed. Seconds before the start gun we powered up to charge towards the line. Suddenly, BANG! and the jib was flapping. I thought we had ripped the clew out of the jib but on closer inspection, the pin on the shackle connecting the sail to the sheets had failed. Never seen one of those let go before – the breeze must really be honking! We limped over the start line under mainsail only and with the aid of some harsh language, managed to fit a replacement shackle. We limped around the course and collected another third place, knowing that tomorrow would be more of the same. Sunday saw all six boats on the start line for race 3. A hybrid boat appeared this day - Coronation Rag’s sails and crew were now aboard Super Heat, which was kindly loaned by David Henshall. ‘Super Rag’ promptly won race 3, with Choices second and Athena third. We got pipped on the finish line and finished fourth. Today we were much more aggressive, popping the kite each leg. The previous days trials were quickly forgotten. Race 4 and the seabreeze was howling again at somewhere around 20-25 knots. We were sailing well but after the first lap we were at the

A study in concentration - Photograph by Langdon Hamlyn back, nipping at the heels of those in front. The last downhill run of the day and we were really flying, picking up surf after surf and having a great white-knuckle ride. We rounded the last mark in 5th place and set off upwind for the finish line. Our confidence was up, and a late right hand shift saw us in the right position to just nip ahead of a few more boats and steal second place over the finish line. The concluding weekend in February threw up much more varied conditions. Light stuff early where you had to contend with the tide, and steady playful seabreezes later on. And amazingly, this is the first time in recent memory that we actually completed all the scheduled races in a State Champ series. Despite the fickle conditions, we kept our speed up. We couldn’t get near Choices ahead of us, but had a tremendous battle with the rest of the fleet. Great crew work meant we consistently found a way out of trouble, finding ways to change gear and pick off boats ahead. Each race we would have an ordinary start, and move forwards from there. We finished in third place for race heats 5 through to 8, which gave us an amazing second place overall. Our 2012/13 State Championship winner was Choices sailed by Ian Dixon, and crew Nick Paterson and Allan Blenkle in dominant form winning 7 out of the 8 races. They were a class act every leg of every race. Stretch made a late charge with 4 second places in the final 4 races, but their earlier misfortune meant third position for them. Medium Rare (AUS608) has been racing with the Adelaide fleet for 7 years now (how time flies!). It is the oldest boat in our fleet with more hits than Elvis, and using second hand sails. Of course the most important factor in achieving any result is the performance of the crew. Gary Dawes and Russell Jones had both never sailed before joining team Rare, and have stuck by me for all this time, learning year by year. We also finished off the season nicely, clinching overall honours in the Pointscore Series 2. Please forgive this little piece of self-congratulatory backslapping. I know these results were a bit of a fluke and hell, it will probably never happen again. The point I want to make is that there would be plenty of you out there currently crewing who would like a crack at racing your own boat but think it’s all too difficult. It’s not. At the moment there’s a few Etchells around that could be bought or leased for a very reasonable amount. Set a budget, get together with a couple of mates, and have a go!  Squadron Quarterly 13


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RSAYS VOLUNTEERS ACKNOWLEDGED By Wayne Phillips

Two well-known and hard-working Squadron families who fully embrace the Squadron’s motto of ‘Seamanship and Fellowship’ were presented to His Excellency Rear Admiral Kevin Scarce at the Volunteers Function at Government House 5 February 2013. Christine and Robert Henshall were praised for their long involvement with the RSAYS. Christine is an active member of the Gardening Group and Patron of the RSAYS Foundation, while Robert holds Life Membership, serves on the Development Committee and generously lends their boat Macro as an official starting boat throughout the racing seasons. *Christine and Robert were overseas at the time of printing. A more detailed account of their Club involvement will appear in the next issue. The Mead family was also acknowledged at Government House. The family has been wonderful supporters of the Squadron in recent years and this continues with the next wave of Meads making their way through the Squadron ranks. Most members will be aware of the contribution made by Mal,

the proud owner with wife Andrea of Mojo a 14.2m Bavaria. Mal is a keen yachtsman but it has been his contribution to the re-invigoration of Marinas 1 & 2 utilising his engineering skills and knowledge which have provided enormous benefit for the Squadron. Andrea, through her involvement with club sponsor Heatlie (Andrea owns the business) continues to support the Squadron. Many members and their guests have been fortunate to enjoy the use of some of the Heatlie range of BBQ’s within the club facilities. Mal, Andrea and sons, Mitch and Albert, have been closely involved with many aspects of the club and it is pleasing to see the boy’s development from both on-water and on-land perspectives. Their alignment with our Juniors program has seen them now become very capable crew members on some of the clubs larger vessels, while still providing much assistance to the next run of Juniors starting their journeys. We should also acknowledge the next in line being their daughter Rebekah, who, during the summer months was regularly at the Squadron as part of the Walford Girls School sailing program which based itself here at Outer Harbor during term 4, 2012 and term 1, 2013. 

(L-R) The South Australian Governor His Excellency Rear Admiral Kevin Scarce with the meritorious Mead family Mal, Anthea, Mitch and Albert.

14 Squadron Quarterly


By David Henshall The end of the 2012 / 2013 racing season saw John Ellison relinquish his position as Principal Race Officer for the Squadron. His is a story of a long voluntary commitment to yacht racing and the Squadron in particular.

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MEMBER PROFILE - JOHN ELLISON

1996 saw the Squadron in difficult financial circumstances, and the decision made to sell Scotty to halt the drain of running costs. It was to John’s credit and the Squadron’s luck that he recognized in me a person who had no understanding of motor boats and proceeded to successfully sell me the idea that it would be no problem to buy and maintain, and anyway the Squadron needed a start boat! So started a 16 year close association with John. He helped take a lot of the maintainance load off me and was a good procurement officer. (”John ! we need a couple of diesel engines, do know anyone ? “) and that sort of thing. John served on racing committees for a number of years apart from turning up every week for racing. This makes big inroads on any person’s time and John gave his time generously.

John and Helen Ellison. John joined the Squadron in 1968 (he would have been a raw youth indeed!) and sailed and raced on a number of boats from the Squadron, amongst these being Gymea owned then by Stan Medwell, and also on Alan Jordans’ beautiful Celeste III. John well remembers the Easter Regattas over at Port Vincent when he crewed on Celeste III. These were times when the Easter regattas were hugely popular with 20 or more Squadron boats plus a few Port Vincent boats vying for honours, then back to the wharf to moor, and not having rude fishermen cut your moorings away at night! John also started to take an interest in cruising, and used to crew for Ron Patrick on Judy Anne, who cruised the gulfs and Kangaroo Island extensively. In the early seventies, Bill Harniman had acquired Nyroca. Bill needed a ‘Mr Fixit’ to keep it in good running condition, so the job was awarded to John. So started a very amiable relationship with John being able to attend to the many things to keep Nyroca running, and the extensive cruising around the gulfs that took place. John does remember however breaking the foremast on Nyroca. How you might ask? Well, it was the day after Whitlam was sacked. Bill Harniman was apparently unfazed by the mishap, and soon had the mast reinstated. However, one is left to wonder if Whitlam had gone sooner if the mast had let go earlier! By the early 1990’s, the Squadron had leased Enola Gay from Alan Scott of Mount Gambier fame, and was set up as the race management vessel. Its name was changed to Miss 5 DN, and under the captaincy of Bunny Preston, became the PRO’s vessel, running all the combined RSAYS and CYCSA racing fleets. John became interested in race management and became part of the volunteer crew. Bruce Tunbridge was the PRO and it was from Bruce that John picked up the skills of race management. (When things go right, one congratulates one’s self, when things go wrong, find some someone else to blame! ) When the Squadron purchased the vessel outright the name changed to Scotty, and the race management crew continued, with John taking over from Bruce Tunbridge as age was catching up with him.

He was PRO for two Australian Etchell Championships hosted by the Squadron in 1997 and 2009. Such championships can test the mettle of race officials due to the competitiveness and aggression of some of the highly ranked skippers, and it was to John’s credit that both series were carried off well with praise from the fleet at large.

John & Helen Ellison being presented with their gift by Andrew Waterman.

Of course we should not forget Twilight racing. Just more time required from John. Every Wednesday without fail, He, Helen and Milli the poodle would be out there starting and finishing the fleet, often not getting in till late if the breeze faded.

Those of us that have regularly gone to Port Vincent for the Easter Regatta have had the official boat always there with John running the Correl and Germein cups. And do not forget the prize giving on the Sunday afternoon with drinks and nibbles all set up by the good wife Helen. So we are all going to miss John and Helen and all their huge volunteer efforts. However, as a certain Prime Minster keeps saying, “We must move on!” And so the Ellison family can look to devoting more time to their business interests and just taking it a bit more easily. Thank you John, and I hope the pool of volunteers such as you does not dry up! 

Squadron Quarterly 15


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ENCHANTRESS' RETURN TO HOBART By Steve Jenkins When you’ve got a good downwind boat it does make you wonder why do a typically upwind race, the Sydney to Hobart ? Well for us it was for the challenge, the fun and it was still on the bucket list.

Tracey Kavanagh & Steve Jenkins

So after 18 months of intense preparation, on Sunday, 7th December, Enchantress with four crew skippered by Dr John Muirhead headed off on a non-stop delivery trip to Sydney.

#3 jib. Yep, Enchantress loves downwind weather. After ariving in Sydney the boat was tidied, some minor repairs completed, the skippers birthday was celebrated one night and once the racing sails arrived we spent some time on the water familiarising ourselves with the harbour and our new sail plan to help us in the race. Leading up to the race cyclone 'Evan' in Fiji was playing havoc with the weather models which eventually settled down to a forecast of strong southerlies at the start followed by 12 hours of strong north easterlies that would then compete with and be replaced by a series of strengthening southerly fronts in Bass Strait and down the Tasmanian coast for the slower boats. "I wouldn’t like to be one of the slower boat out there on day five"; was the BOM weather forecasters comment at the race weather briefing.

Many SA skippers know that getting the boat to the start of a Hobart can often be just as hard as the doing the race itself and this trip was no different. The first 72 hours was spent bashing into 30 to 40+ knot winds from the moment they left the Squadron with two reefs in the main and a #4 headsail and the following day Enchantress had three reefs and the #4. Going past Robe they had really bad seas with breakers and the inevitable backless wave and while they could have delayed leaving, as others did, John wanted to prove that the boat and crew would all pass with flying colours. The winds eventually eased near Portland and the remainder of the week was spent beating into absolute headwinds apart from a few hours under spinnaker approaching Wilson’s Promontory. It came on the nose again to Gabo Island which they reached on day seven with another three or four days at sea before they’d reach Sydney. But Huey was playing games and soon after rounding Gabo Island a southerly buster blasted them up the NSW coast in 40+ knots that saw them arrive in Sydney 24 hours later exceeding boat speeds of 20+ knots with two reefs in the main and a poled out 16 Squadron Quarterly

The breeze was around 22 knots with a tight spinnaker run to the first mark so we decided to hang back a bit to get the feel of the fleet before hoisting the asymmetrical just after the starting line. We were off and holding our own and better amongst the fleet. Near the first mark we were forced to avoid a 50 foot spectator cat that appeared in front of us inside the race restricted zone which made for a lot of fun with ourselves and several other boats trying to find room to squeeze past the offender before dousing our kites and hardening up to sail out the heads. We headed east for about 20 minutes before making out tack to head south, while the majority of the fleet continued to head east and out to sea to either chase the EAC or get into the predicted north easter sooner when it arrived. Our decision to head south was based on that Hobart was south of us and it would be better to head towards it now, as the other options didn’t offer strong enough reasons to do otherwise. Throughout the night we were hard on the wind which kept us reasonably close to the coast requiring a dig at Port Kembla to get around Bass and Martin Islands in an easing breeze and by noon the next day we were 22nm east of Batemans Bay with almost no wind as the north easter tried to come in.

S2H Kite Up at the start. Just the sort of forecast you want to hear when you’re in a small downwind biased boat isn’t it? Add to this, a weak Eastern Australian Current (EAC), but we thought we might be able to expect a bit of current assistance from an strong eddy halfway across Bass Strait if the satellite data and weather buoys were accurate. So that’s why they call it naviguessing!! It was now 11:30am and time to leave the dock get out there, celebrate a big zero birthday for myself and enjoy the atmosphere.

Many sail changes later it eventually arrived and we were now moving along at around 3 to 4 knots when the helmsman brought to our attention a 400mm dorsal fin that had surfaced 50 metres behind the boat with a big black 5 metre long shark under it. Anyone for a MOB practice ? The breeze continued to strengthen as we surfed more and more and at dusk narrowly missed a 1 metre wide sunfish which I’d bore away from to see it dive away just off our stern quarter. That was close and where was Wild Thing when you need them? Aren’t they supposed to hit all the sunfish on this race? The wind continued to build to the mid twenties helping us to gain on the bigger boats ahead of us who were now starting to struggle with their masthead kites and were


Enchantress was in her element and we had to make as much distance as we could before the strong southerlies hit us.

normally see me saying goodbye to last night’s dinner but my new seasickness regime was working well. If you’ve never been seasick you will never understand how good it feels to not feel sick in conditions like this. More on how I fixed it in another article.

At 9:15pm we decided to put in a gybe to get us back towards the rhumb line and, while Enchantress is normally pretty easy to gybe in 25 knots, this one didn’t go precisely to plan for a couple of reasons which resulted in us tearing the tape on the foot of our lightweight spinnaker. So we decided to drop it go bare headed and replace it with our bullet proof kite that was only slighter smaller but much stronger, which in the scheme of things wasn’t such a bad thing to do anyway.

the cell as much as possible.

By 9pm we were back into 23 to 30 knots hard on the nose, and off Maria Island we took a few digs to get out from disturbed air under the cliffs and got onto a lifting starboard tack that took us all the way to Tasman Island by 6am to be surrounded by the bigger boats from Div 3 IRC. Unfortunately we then made a couple of bad tactical calls on our way to the Derwent River which probably cost us a place or two in the scheme of things.

Once in the river we had 10 to 12 knots forward of the beam which dropped out for a few minutes halfway up the river before coming back in to help us finish at 6:17pm on the 30th December with a race time of 4 days, 5 hours and 24 minutes.

Once completed we continued touching 14 knots with the apparent wind rising to 170 degrees at times as we continued toward our waypoint south of Gabo Island. It was pretty obvious what was coming based on the skies and the lightning ahead which we confirmed by logging into the BOM website that showed a 40+ knot cell heading our way that soon took us from surfing along at 14 knots to dumping the kite and throwing in 2 reefs and the #3 up in the space of a few minutes. I was off watch and the guys on deck did a great job while I listened from below thinking "Glad it’s you guys up", but in the back of my mind knowing that it would soon be my turn as our 3am watch change was almost due. As bowman on the new watch (I get all the fun jobs!) it was now my turn to get cold wet hands as we doused the #3 for the number #4 to maintain control. The clouds were now at sea level and I’d spotted some new lights nearby so popped on the AIS which confirmed a container ship had just changed course to avoid both ourselves and Finistere (a Davidson 50 from Fremantle) who was hanging off our starboard quarter. The weather was now pretty ordinary and was sitting in the 25 to 30 knot range which stayed until dawn and the increasingly bigger seas were throwing the boat around a bit which would

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changing down sizes while we continued to hum along regularly hitting 12’s and 13’s, averaging 8.5 knots over 6 hours running at around 150 to 160 degrees apparent.

Enchantress' adventurous crew. The storm boards were in and remained in all the way across Bass Strait as we slowly got knocked east towards the eddy that might provide us with some assistance and by the end of the day eased back from the days 20 to 25 knot range before easing to 10 knots and increasing to 15 knots overnight as we headed south hard on the breeze most of the way towards our anticipated park up of the north east coast of Tassie the following day. The next front came through after midnight in the 20+ knot range still from the wrong direction as far as we were concerned. By midday, we were parked up off the mid coast of east Tassie in relatively warm sunny weather which we utilised to dry ourselves and the boat as we all stripped down to our underwear for an hour before reassembling the boat when the new breeze came in from the south yet again. The midday radio listening watch announced that we were back in first place in both our divisions and a quick check of the BOM website showed a nasty 40+ knot cell heading up the east coast of Tassie later that day. So we headed inshore to avoid the worst of it and as the wind increased we got a knock and we went with it to help us avoid

We’d done it, and done it well in a 30 year old 36 footer that was designed and built by Dr John Muirhead in his back yard shed all those years ago.

This was our second ocean race and also our second race to Hobart, and we’d held first place in both IRC and ORCi divisions on many occasions throughout the entire race with our final standings being: 3rd place in IRC Division 4 3rd place in ORCi Division 3 19th place overall on IRC 58th boat over the line (76 starters & 71 finishers) 2nd SA boat on IRC Skippers and crew for the race were as follows. Dr John Muirhead – Skipper, Helm, Foredeck and Navigator Dr John Willoughby – Foredeck and Helm Andy Muirhead – Cockpit and Helm Roger Harrison – Cockpit and Helm Noel Swan – Cockpit and Helm Dr Michael Lane – Cockpit and Helm Robert Large – Chef, Cockpit and Helm Steve Jenkins – Foredeck, Helm and Navigator

What next? Well, when you finish a Hobart you say "Wow I’m done!" But as I write this article discussions are already Enchantress' S2H Sponsors about maybe another one, or Codan and Electric Bug – HF Radio Tuner, Installation and Advice maybe it’s time to sell up. So RedArc – DC Battery charger tweaked to suit LIFEP04 Battery will the bucket list get ticked John Taylor – Charts for the Course sometime in the near future? Bay Of Shoals Wines – Pre and Post Race Wines Who knows .......  Squadron Quarterly 17


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WOMEN ON THE WATER By Helen Kearney and Adrian Wotton Who doesn’t have fun during each season when the Twilight Series has a ladies helm night? These races give any aspiring woman skippers a chance to get their hands on the wheel and experience the thrills and spills of keelboat racing. Women crew, who normally don’t participate in racing, come out of the woodwork and join in the excitement on the water. There is also a noticeable lack of testosterone and the atmosphere is certainly more relaxed. There are other opportunities for keen women sailors to both skipper or simply become more involved in the crewing aspects of keelboats. A few of these avenues are discussed below. Combined Women’s Series The 2012/13 summer racing season saw the running of another successful Combined Women’s Series. Consisting of seven races, the series is held on a number of Sundays between October and March each year. With four boats from the Squadron (Luna Blue, New Morning III, Freedom, Taniwha) and one from the CYCSA (School’s Out), the races provided a unique opportunity for women to develop skills and confidence by sailing in a competitive but very friendly environment. The crew can be mixed gender but the rules stipulate a woman must be on the helm at all times during the race. After each race, the crews proceed back to the Quarterdeck to have a few drinks; relate tales of bravery, great skill and the occasional boo-boo; and keenly await the presentations. The boat crews mix freely and generally join tables together to have a few laughs about the previous few hours on the water. This season saw some exciting racing held in variable weather conditions. Without doubt, this added to the fun and excitement of the series. The first race was held in rough seas and strong winds gusting up to 28 knots, and tested all boats and crews. Taniwha (with an all female crew this year) recovered from an interesting race start (on the wrong side of the line) but soon made ground up on the fleet. Luna Blue crossed the line first, with Taniwha winning on corrected time. In a race of attrition, School’s Out finished without damage but the rest of fleet struggled with gear failure in the very strong winds. The second race saw a complete reversal of weather conditions with very light winds. Luna Blue crossed the finish line first and some great downwind work saw Taniwha take their second win in succession. Freedom and School’s Out managed to eventually finish in dying winds of 3 to 5 knots. The winds strengthened for the next 18 Squadron Quarterly

race and enabled Taniwha to win a third straight race with School’s Out coming second. In the fourth race, with a good start and some steady helming, School’s Out finally broke Taniwha’s series dominance by recording a narrow win on corrected time. The fifth race saw School’s Out and Taniwha battle it out again, in absolutely glorious sailing conditions, with Taniwha recording her fourth win. The sixth and final race (one race was abandoned) was held in the river and led to perhaps the most exciting race of the series. Due to some ever changing wind directions and a strong out-going tide, all the boats stayed close throughout the race. With some excellent spinnaker work in the close confines of the river, School’s Out took out both line honours and the win on corrected time. Freedom had a good second place with New Morning III taking out third position over Taniwha. The final podium places for series were: 1st - Taniwha, 2nd - School’s Out, and 3rd - Freedom.

Women’s Series Skippers (courtesy Adrian Wotton) As well as a positive ratio of women crewing in the five boats, the respective skippers were as follows: Luna Blue (Christine Henshall), New Morning III (Nives Vincent), Freedom (Deirdre Schahinger), Taniwha (Therese Gordon, Barbara Parker), School’s Out (Mary Ann Harvey, Mary Carr). This year’s series certainly lived up to expectations and was a lot of enjoyment for all. Australian Woman’s Keelboat Regatta Another opportunity for women to enjoy the excitement of racing is the Australian Women’s Keelboat Regatta. The Regatta is held each June long-weekend, and for the fifth year running, South Australia has entered a competitive team. This year’s squad of high-spirited women will head to Victoria for the 23rd running of this event. The Regatta will be held at the Royal Melbourne Yacht Squadron with all-women teams from around Australia competing. To be held on the waters of Port Phillip over three days, this fiercely contested regatta will consist of six races. But it’s not just fun on the water, as the event organisers promise a bigger than ever social program after each day’s sailing. This year, the Squadron has provided sponsorship for the South Australian team which is greatly appreciated. The team consists of Helen Willmer, Melissa Barclay, Nives Vincent, Barbara Parker, Helen Kearney, Tess Gordon, Janet Thornley and Sarah Buckley and Di Schwerdt.


An Invitation for all Women sailors (and boat owners) This article concludes with a double invitation for next season’s Combined Women’s Series. First, to aspiring woman racers, come out and give the series a try. Whether it is for one race or many, you will be made welcome by a great bunch of fellow participants. It also gives you an opportunity to learn new skills and try out different crew positions.

is guaranteed. One boat owner was heard to say on the Quarterdeck after one of the races, “What a great opportunity for me to let go of the helm and to experience what the crew has to go through. The Woman’s Series has made me a better skipper, whilst having a lot of fun at the same time.” Should you wish to know more about the series or find crew or a boat, please contact: Heidi Pfeiffer, Sailing Co-ordinator at the Squadron on 8341 8600 or Jess Hargreaves, Racing Manager at the CYCSA on 8248 4222. 

And secondly, to all boat owners - consider entering your boat for the series or perhaps a one-off race or two. The series is open to all divisions and a good time

Combined Women’s Series Skippers and Crews, apres sailing. (courtesy Dinah Edwards) GCircle CMarine 90x205.pdf

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The SA team will be sailing on Mrs Overnewton - a Bavaria Match 38. You can follow progress on the regatta website at: www.awkr.com.au

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FRINGE EVENT AT THE SQUADRON; ERIC’S TALES OF THE SEA By Malcolm Dayman

Sue Buckley, Chairperson of the House and Social Committee, arranged a Fringe event for the Squadron for Saturday, 16th March. After much negotiation, a sail and several beers, Eric the Submariner was secured to deliver ‘Eric’s Tales of the Sea’ in the Dinghy Shed. Marc and Greg organised a BBQ dinner on the Quarterdeck. Garth Morgan (himself a submariner), and cruising crew for Second Lady, reflects on the show and background of Eric the Submariner.

All too soon arriving at his destination- after having his eyes open for 36 hours straight- he sought out the owner of the Club to let him know that he had arrived and would catch up later to find out the day and time of his gig. Imagine Eric’s sheer moment of panic when, with no time to formulate any sort of routine, he was told that he was on next- like in a few minutes! Drawing on similar feelings- well remembered from his brush with his near demise in Submarine Escape Tower training- and his later close encounter with a rather large shark whilst swimming from his submarine, Eric took a deep breath and began to ad- lib before a packed, very quiet, and potentially alien American audience.

Those of us that gathered in the Dinghy Shed back in March for ‘Eric’s Tales of the Sea’ learned much of the fascinating undersea life of a young submariner aboard one of the Royal Navy’s elite nuclear submarines. Eric gave us a most interesting, informative and often whimsical evening - one that clearly stimulated our curiosity about the world beneath our hulls. He said after his show that he was delighted that the RSAYS audience broke all previous records for the length of his question time - we questioned him for 90 minutes when his Q&A’s generally last only 20 minutes!

Eric the Submariner.

Photographer Alex Brenner

But how much do we know about Eric himself and what keeps bringing him back to Australia and Adelaide in particular? He lists his present occupation as a ‘creative writer’, but how did he begin the stage career that regularly bills him as a popular one-man comedy attraction overseas and at Adelaide’s Fringe Festival? Eric’s route to the stage began by accident one fateful night in London where he was combining his favourite pastimes - watching live comedy and drinking beer – when he suddenly found himself transformed from punter to performer! He was enjoying the show and a pint or two, when after a bit of banter with the compere, the legendary Malcolm Hardee, Malcolm suddenly announced that the next act hadn’t turned up. “So,” he said, jabbing a finger at Eric “You have to get up and do it”. Then, with no material whatsoever, Eric found himself on the wrong side of the mike with nothing but charm to see him through. That unplanned performance resulted in a comedy career that has seen the affable Londoner pack audiences in the UK, the USA and Australia. He’s still on his way up, taking as many gigs as possible, but wherever he appears his aim is always the same: “People come to a show and pay to be entertained! So, being a punter myself, I always look at it through their eyes. And try to give them what they want...” In 2001, soon after his UK debut and during a bad case of the ‘travelbug’ he had, on a whim, solicited several clubs in New York city by email and to his utter astonishment received a positive “…yeah, sure…why don’t you come over next Friday…”. It was only after he was aboard his aircraft winging his way to New York that he decided that he had better try and think of something to say! About half way across the Atlantic he had a sort of a plan on what he wanted to say to his American cousins - he decided to simply tell of the trials, tribulations and hassles of his undersea journey. 20 Squadron Quarterly

To his immense relief he was politely applauded by the audience and even better was given some constructive advice on American English from the very helpful proprietor. With this encouragement Eric’s act got better and better and after a great time in New York returned to the UK with confidence that he could develop a unique act around his own submarine experiences.

As we witnessed, these anecdotes range from the sublime to the ridiculous, from heart- tugging sadness to elation and from sheer terror to tranquillity - much like the broad canvas of our own sailing experiences! We had the good fortune to host Eric, his lovely wife Helen and their beautiful 16 month old daughter Erica aboard Second Lady for the Cruising Committee’s ANZAC Day Quarantine Station picnic. In fact that event is already brewing in his mind and might well form the basis for a new comedy gig back in the UK. It transpired that the dramas of finding a suitable PFD to protect their baby girl in the ship-to-shore dinghy transfer- coupled with the antics of our very “Orstralian” crew, may well be a new comedy theme. Whilst he will be leaving for the UK again in June, it was great news to learn that Eric is in the process of applying for Australian residency and he will definitely be back in Adelaide again soon. We have grown to appreciate the honest creativity of this loveable rogue and are sure that we will see Eric and his nuclear family back at the Squadron in the years to come. 


By Ron Stennett It doesn’t matter how young you started or how many years you’ve been sailing, things can always suddenly go wrong. How you react to emergency situations can be a matter of life or death. Ron Stennert thinks he did most things right but a few things went wrong when he accidentally fell overboard this Summer. Learn from his experience….. My boating days started as a five year old with my father Alby Stennett who moored his 20ft Carvel boat Alrora with its 5hp single stroke inboard simplex at the Royal South Australian Yacht Squadron. Being a bookmaker at the races and the trots on Saturdays gave him Tuesdays and Thursdays to go fishing. The fridge was always full of whiting and snapper. His boat was not built for speed and in the 1950’s a day’s outing was to the Norma wreck. Dad loved his boating and fishing, both of which I have inherited. My first boat was a 16ft Sportscraft trailer boat with a 90hp Evinrude bought in 1977. Progression to a bigger and better boat is something we boaties seem to do, and my last boat was a 36ft Stebar Flybridge with twin 210 diesel valves.

getting harder as my shoes were an encumbrance, my track suit pants had filled with water and my short sleeved lambwool vest was becoming a lead weight. I realised time was important as my arms and legs were getting tired and I was swallowing water that continued to hit my face. An attempt at removing clothing was in vain as I could hardly move and my fingers were starting to go numb. My last hope was to get to the boat and a frantic swim of about 20 to 30 strokes (I do not know how!) had me alongside the boat where I was able to hold onto the swim platform stays. I made it to the ladder and released it into the water only to my despair to find out that due to the weight of my water logged clothes, and my exhaustion, I was unable to pull myself back onto the boat, I had no choice but to hang on to the boat until it hit the rocks. With my hands getting numb this was becoming incredibly difficult. Fortunately a 16ft fishing boat named Shark Bait came through, saw my trouble and rescued me. Not many go fishing in 20 plus knot winds, so how lucky was I?

Miss Chrisea II ended up on the breakwater rocks with neither the Sea Rescue nor Police prepared to attempt to get her off in the conditions; their only concern was my well being. The boat eventually sank and was written off. I am pleased to say I have survived to buy Days Like This, a Riviera 3000. What lessons have I learned? Many!

On purchasing Miss Chrisea II in 2007 I completely refitted the interior and made it very comfortable, enjoying many trips to the Island and the Yorke Peninsula. The boat was very seaworthy; even a large confused sea in Backstairs Passage could not dampen my confidence in her. This boat, I believed, would see me to the end of my boating days. But on the January long weekend holiday this year fate intervened, and after 60 years of boating, made me realise how susceptible we are to the elements. For various reasons I had hardly used the boat the previous 12 months, so it was sitting in the marina with a tank full of diesel. Knowing diesel has a use by date, I decided to take the boat by myself to beyond Glenelg in 20 plus knot winds, a venture I have done numerous times. I had utmost faith in the boat, and full confidence in myself. Returning into the channel and the protection of the breakwaters I began preparing the boat for berthing back at the marina. First thing to do was to take the boat out of gear. This completed, I climbed down from the flybridge to put the fenders over. In the high seas one fender had fallen overboard and during the trip had wrapped itself around the hand rail. I knelt down to free the fender and in doing so a wave hit the boat causing me to lose my balance causing me to fall overboard into the water mid ships. The wind was still blowing at 20 knots and the sea in the channel varied between half and one metre. When I surfaced my first thought was to get to the boat. This was difficult as the sea was going into my mouth and up my nose and the boat was being blown away from me. I proceeded to swim to the stern platform where the ladder was, but this was

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LESSONS TO BE LEARNED….

First, never lose respect for the sea and become over confident. When boating alone always wear a Life Jacket, together with clothes and shoes that are easy to remove (lambswool absorbs water quickly and gets very heavy).

I do not believe that I did much wrong apart from not wearing a Life Jacket. Fortunately I did not panic, but when you feel so helpless against the elements and your body starts to tire as you try to remove clothing and swim against heavy seas whilst continually taking in salt water, your life tends to flash before you. My only thoughts were to stay positive and eventually something will happen in my favour. In conclusion, treat each day at sea as your first to ensure it won’t be your last. 

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MY BOAT: AZURE SKYE We can but dream about the type of boat we would like to have or be able to go to sea in! And attempting to achieve the dream is an adventure in itself. As Frank Seeley says in this article, 'One Metre Fever' is one thing, but more importantly, in the framework of the Squadron’s motto, it is ultimately the capacity to achieve seamanship and fellowship that will prevail. Frank and Kathy Seeley are now reaping the fruits of their labour and enjoying a craft that is bringing pleasure and adventure to themselves and many others.

Azure Skye at RSAYS.

The Boat Type of Craft; Fast Cabin Cruiser Vessel; AZURE SKYE; Callsign; CT210S Designer/Builder; Azimut Spa, Torino, Italy Make; Azimut 70’, Sea Jet LOA; 21.3m Beam; 5.48m Draft; 1.92m Max Wt; 54T Max Speed; 29Kts Cruising Speed; 20Kts Fuel; 5200lts Water; 1500lts Passengers; 7 in 3 cabins Crew; 2 in 1 cabin

We bought our first live-aboard power boat at Sanctuary Cove, Queensland, in 1990. She was a 42’ Lyscrest, with twin Volvo engines and two cabins. Her name was Blue Skye and we kept her at Hamilton Island. We had ten wonderful years of boating in the Whitsunday Islands. Then two things happened at about the same time. Kathy contracted that dreaded disease known as

Power and Ancillary Features; 2 x 1150HP MTU 12V183TE93 Engines with ZF V-Drive Gearbox; 2 x17.5kW Kohler Gensets; 220VAC 24VDC Raymarine Instruments with 2 x MFD’s (Fly Deck and main Helm); Trim Tabs; Stabilizers; Bow and Stern thrusters; Water Maker; 4 x Vacflush toilets; Black and Grey water Holding Tanks; Air conditioning and Heating all cabins and closed areas; RFD 10 Person Life Raft; RIB Tender + 20HP; Fly Deck; Jet Ski, aft garage; 300kg crane; Fridge/freezer and Icemaker; MMSI, Raymarine AIS 660 Class B As Frank Sees It: Kathy and I have always loved the sea. Her grandfather was a Swedish seacaptain and she claims to have salt water in her veins. My family moved from Melbourne to Largs Bay when I was eleven years of age. Our house was on the Esplanade and I spent many hours on the beach. At the age of ten, I was in a small sailing dinghy that capsized out in the gulf, and was saved from drowning by personnel from the Largs Bay Sailing Club. That is a story for another day, but my experience did not dampen my enthusiasm for the sea.

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Every girls dream; spa bath.


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lustre, and he could sense that I wasn’t really interested in any of them. So he offered me something bigger. It turned out to be 70’, which was a lot bigger than we had been considering. However, it ticked all the boxes, and the photos looked good, so I asked for an inspection. I have to admit it was love at first sight. She was gorgeous! I had some reservations about the size, but was confident that we would be able to handle it, and also that Kathy would make the transition to the bigger size, without too much persuasion on my part. After all, the owner’s cabin had an en suite bathroom with a spa bath and marble floor. What more could a girl require? The big problem was the asking price, which was well beyond our budget.

The main saloon. 'One Metre Fever', where the sufferer craves a boat that is one metre longer -- well I say it was Kathy. And I needed two hip replacements. As it turned out I also had to have three surgeries on my back. We didn’t know how I would recover after surgery, so we did the boat up, got her looking as good as new again, and sadly decided that she had to be sold, always with the proviso that if we were still able to manage a boat in a few years’ time we would buy another. It was about two years before we felt confident to start looking for another boat. By then we had a 'wish list' between boats. I wanted head room in the engine room, Kathy wanted all the day living area to be on one level, and we wanted more cabins, three or possibly even four. We pored over boating magazines, attended boat shows, and inspected boats all over Australia. We even went to the Philippines to look at a boat, but did not manage to find the right one. We were “between boats” for several years. Then in 2010 I had to visit China on business. I got through it with a day to spare, so took the opportunity to spend the day in Hong Kong looking at boats. I told the agent what I wanted and he showed me a huge portfolio of boats he had for sale. There were about half a dozen in the size range I had asked for, but they were all pretty lack-

Secured as deck cargo, Hong Kong

The agent followed up with emails and phone calls after my return to Australia. In the course of our conversations I discovered that the owner had already ordered a bigger boat from Italy, and urgently needed to get this boat out of his marina berth to make room for the new one. As I was the only prospective purchaser I was able to negotiate a much better price, and a few weeks later the deal was done. But she was to come to us without a name, because the former owner wanted to keep the name for his new boat. Kathy and I went to Hong Kong and were on board when the Marine Surveyor did his inspection. He gave it a glowing report, apart from a few small repairs that were completed before the sale was finalised, in August, 2010.

Then began the fun of arranging to get her to Australia. We ruled out bringing her under her own steam, because the cost of fuel was prohibitive, and also because of the risk of pirates. The only alternative was to have her shipped as deck cargo.

The first quote we got seemed very high. It took time to look for alternative quotes, which were no better anyway. So by October we decided to accept our first quote and get things moving, only to be told that the new price was now almost double, because it was getting close to Christmas, and prices always go up then due to the demand for freight at that time of the year. This was ridiculous. We decided to leave her in Hong Kong until after Christmas when the price would come down again. The agent found a swing mooring for us in the Aberdeen Harbour cyclone shelter area. There were hundreds of boats on fore-and-aft moorings, lined up next to each other with only a fender space between them. We were second-to-last on Row 4.

In January, 2011, we took some friends from Melbourne with us and lived aboard for a week. What a delightful adventure. Transport to and from the shore was by sampan. The agent showed us how to do it and explained what the going rate was for the trip. There was a recognised pick-up point at the water’s edge, with access by a narrow lane between the local small businesses. It seemed to us foreigners that as soon as there were a few people waiting a sampan would appear. We just said to the driver, “Row 4”, while holding up 4 fingers and gesturing vaguely in the direction of the boat. They always understood exactly where we wanted to go. If we wanted to go ashore we just had to stand on the back deck and look out expectantly, and within a few minutes a sampan would appear. We could say “Jumbo” and they took us to the Jumbo Floating Restaurant for dinner. Even at 11pm, we just waited on the outside deck of the Jumbo and soon a sampan appeared to return us to the boat. Kathy and Frank on Naming Day Squadron Quarterly 23


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Finally, after months of delay, we discovered that all the ships that were big enough to load and unload our boat were going only to ports on the east coast, not to Adelaide. So we had her shipped to Melbourne. There we discovered the inevitable – things that just had to be fixed before she could safely undertake the voyage to Adelaide. More delay. But we did find an excellent instructor who came aboard and spent time helping me to get my head around the very different handling of a bigger boat. Time well spent, and a great confidence booster. The change from 42’ to 70’ and 15 tons to 54 tons was enormous. We engaged a transit skipper to bring her to Adelaide, where she finally arrived in December, 2011. We took a temporary berth at RSAYS while we had annual maintenance done on her (scraping the bottom and antifouling etc. etc.), then were able to purchase a berth for her permanent home. Now it was time to give her a name. We thought we would like some sort of continuity with our previous boat. Blue Skye II was briefly considered and discarded. We wanted something more distinctive. So we thought of all the other words that were available to describe the colour blue. We tried Cobalt Skye, and Indigo Skye, then Azure Skye. The word 'azure' simply means 'sky blue'. And it had the advantage of starting with the letter 'A', which would put us at the top of the radio skeds. Decision made, and a great opportunity for a party on board to celebrate with friends. We had a naming ceremony in September, 2012, just a week before the annual Open Boat Day, when we introduced the boat formally to any club members who wanted to make an inspection. Since then we have started to get to know the local waters. We became very familiar with all the anchorages in the Whitsundays, during the ten years we were there. Now we had to start from the beginning. Our first overnight stay was at Brown’s Beach at New Year. A fantastic experience, with much helpful advice from fellow club members, including information about the anchorage off Kingscote in the lee of the Beatrice Islets for shelter in a northerly wind. We enjoyed it so much that we went there again with some friends

in January. We have since acquired a berth at the marina at Wirrina, as a very convenient stoppingplace on the way. Obviously we intend to do this trip again. Then to Port Vincent at Easter. Also a trip we have done again. And so we are gradually building up our store of local knowledge. A friend who has sold his boat and retired from boating (but gladly came with us on one of our trips to Port Vincent), gave us his copy of a publication put out by the club some years ago, entitled ‘Cruising in South Australian Waters’, a series of addresses to members of the RSAYS by Vice Commodore C. P. Haselgrove. What a fascinating read! It has whetted our appetite to go further afield. Geoff Boettcher, owner and skipper of Secret Men’s Business, is off to England to compete in the Fastnet Race in August. He has offered to come with us to Port Lincoln next summer, to show us all the interesting places on the way and all the good anchorages around the Port Lincoln area. We love this boat. It has plenty of room to entertain friends, and we love having friends on board. So if you are in the Marina and see us on board, please come and visit us. We will be glad to meet you, or to renew acquaintance if we have already met. And if you see us out on the water please call up on the radio and say "Hello". We enjoy the friendship and camaraderie we have discovered at the RSAYS. 

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24 Squadron Quarterly

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Joan Cooling; 07/01/1920 – 06/02/2013 Mum first became a yacht squadron member in February of 1966 and I am sure that her 47-year affiliation with the club contributed to some of her fondest memories. Born in 1920 and educated at St Aloysius College, she went on to work at Duncan & Co, her father’s automotive parts business before eventually being allowed to follow her dream of becoming a nurse. This was how she met her husband, my father, Max, a doctor, and it was with him that her Squadron journey began. Mum and Dad were introduced to the club by Harold & Clarice McDonald and soon felt at home in purchasing their first boat Marlin, originally a trailer boat but soon converted to the Squadron fleet on it’s own chain moorings. After many adventures and earning the respect of the Squadron members they progressed to a larger 38ft motor sailer, which they named Carinya, the Aboriginal word for happy home. She was much more comfortable for a family of seven and my parents lovingly restored and maintained her as a beautiful boat in the pool. Mum was always around for the annual three week slipping at Searles boat yard, supplying the workers with food and beverages. Admittedly, she was still a bit too precious to get out the antifouling brush but great at feeding the crew. Always keen social members of the club, my parents would raft up on the moorings with Rex von Sanderson’s Panderel, Chappy Charlesworth’s Princess and Dean and Norma Paterson’s Pauline to share a catch of crabs, cold beers and Old Castle Riesling. My dad was a member of the Social Committee before progressing to Commodore in 1974-76. Mum loved opening days, especially when dad was Commodore, as they gave her an excuse for a new outfit

ST AYLES SKIFF by Di Moncrieff The construction of a St Ayles Skiff as a skills development and community building exercise was featured in SQ September 2012. Here is the finished vessel. The skiffs are a relatively new design from Iain Oughtred’s drawing board, based on a traditional Scottish Fair Isle Skiff, a form descended from the smaller Viking skiffs. Since the first one launched in Scotland in 2009, about a hundred have been built around the world. This one was built in the Living Boat Trust workshop in Franklin, Tasmania. In February this year Imagine was rowed over 10 days from Recherche Bay in the far south west to Hobart for The Australian Wooden Boat Festival. The St Ayles can of course also be sailed. No fisherman would scorn a following breeze!

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IN TRANQUIL WATERS

and a day on the water with a boatload of close friends. Always tied up, stern to the pontoon. There would be parties on Carinya until the early hours of the morning.

One of mum’s greatest pleasures was motoring on Carinya, heading south down the coast in the early hours of a summer’s morning, with the snook line out, just the two of them – she and dad. Way before mobile phones, no contact with the outside world. They’d return to the club before the afternoon sea breeze filed in. Mum was the perfect crew for returning the boat to the mooring, she was a deadeye with the grapnel hook to pick up the span line as they reversed Carinya onto the moorings. Over the years they cruised both gulfs from Port Vincent to Port Lincoln and the Sir Joseph Banks group. Often with family and in the good company of the Patersons in Pauline, The LeCornus in Beth, the Dawsons in Prowler II and others. The fridge and freezer were always stocked with yummy nibbles, cold beer, white wine and Goddards rum.

In her later years, mum’s main involvement with the Squadron was through the Squadron Quarterly and theatre group, run by Jenny Last. Mum also became very close to Iris Williams, another longstanding member of the club, with whom she flew over the Antarctic for the midnight champagne flight when she was 80.

Mum loved the tennis at Shirley LeCornu’s, golf at the Mount Osmond Golf Club and bridge at the Naval and Military Club. Mum always loved the water, any beach would do. Her favourites were at the Squadron, Emu Bay, Black Point, Noosa, Port Douglas or Broome. More recently when getting around was more difficult she would love to be taken for a drive to the beach for fish and chips, to watch the sea and the sun. She was happy just to be there, it was always her special place. Mum slipped away peacefully at home at the age of 93. Peter Cooling

Claimed to have been rowed in Force 6 winds with waves and swell, it is apparently a remarkably dry boat. Manned by 5 crew, (in Tasmania’s case womanned by 5 of the builders) the craft is 22ft long with a beam of 5ft 8ins. Built as glued lapstrake from a plywood kit she weighs a sparse 155kg. The Tassie team are aiming to row at the inaugural ‘Skiffieworlds’ in north Scotland in July. 

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SENIOR MEMBER Ion Ullett

This is the next of a series of articles by Barry Allison recording some of the experiences and adventures of the Squadron’s prominent senior Members – this time the many years involved with boats and the Squadron of Ion Ullett.

Ion started his long sailing career at 16 years of age when a member of the Mosman Bay Sea Scouts on Sydney Harbour. They hired the boatshed to footballers and Ion signed on as bailerboy and sailed in the eighteen footer High Flyer from the Balmain Flying Squadron and regularly raced on the Harbour. Ion vividly remembers the thrill of setting a massive balloon spinnaker hoisted from the tip of the gaff, and gingerly positioning a ring tail on the leech of the mainsail!! With a crew of ten young lads sailing down wind, three had to sit on the transom and two grappled with the helm to stop her nose diving.

Later, Magic -- an old 36 foot Lake Macquarie racer was purchased and sailed from the Sydney Amateur Sailing Club based at Mosman Bay. Then early in his business career, Kelvinator transferred Ion to Adelaide, and within 24 hours Alan Jordan had made contact and asked that he sail on Celeste II. This was the beginning of many years of ocean racing with Alan and with Jim Taylor on Ingrid. It so happened that Celeste II was moored behind Kudos, a motor boat owned and sailed by Bruce Thiem, Margaret’s father, and was how Ion met Margaret Thiem, and later proposed to Margaret in the back shed of the Squadron. So from 1962 began a long period of building and owning many yachts. Spindrift was the first, and the plywood hull and masts were built in 6 months. She competed in many ocean races with the ‘butter box’ fleet, including two Neptune Islands and an Adelaide to Lincoln race. As the Ullett family grew, it became time to change to a larger craft, and so the Mystery Class Cooroyba designed by Robert Clark was purchased and raced with 26 Squadron Quarterly

the Squadron fleet. At this period, Ion was progressing through the onerous levels of the Squadron’s Flag Officers – Rear Commodore in 1966-68, Vice Commodore in 1968-70, and Commodore in 197072. As Vice Commodore, Ion was heavily involved in researching and producing the book to commemorate the first hundred years of the Squadron. Titled ‘The First 100 Years’, this publication is today a collector’s item as only 1000 copies were ever printed. When Commodore, Ion purchased the 48 foot Alden ketch Achernar from the Fricker Estate and successfully sailed her for the next few years. She was a large craft with a 3 cylinder 43 hp Kelvin engine, and required a large crew. After a refit in 1979, she successfully cruised to Port Douglas with the family, but was found to be not quite the ideal cruising yacht. So Alpha Centauri – a 40 foot Duncanson design was bought and re-fitted for extensive cruising. Back in the water in 1984, a long extended cruise was planned to sail the waters of New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. Setting off with an experienced crew of five, half way between Cape Willoughby and Portland, sitting in a relative calm, they were suddenly hit with 60 knot winds caused by an unseasonal polar inversion. The gale blew for around fourteen hours and was only the beginning of their problems, as a halyard had wrapped around the propeller. At 4 am, they knew that they were in considerable trouble and issued a mayday. An Orion aircraft fortunately happened to be in the area and provided air support for the next 12 hours, complimented by two helicopters who hovered over the stricken yacht. At this stage they were dangerously close to the Murray Mouth in the surf, and were considering abandoning ship. After an hour or so of constantly running the engine and slamming into gear, they eventually freed the halyard that was fouling the propeller and they were able to claw their way out of the surf and motor back into the Screwpile Jetty at Granite Island. Fortunately, there was no hull leakage as expected, as the skeg was ripped off the hull when freeing the halyard – breaking two ¾ inch stainless steel bolts in the process! Once safe at Granite Island, Ion rang Adelaide Radio to advise Margaret of their safety, but Margaret was already on the jetty well aware of the trauma. So ended the first leg of this cruise, and after

Alpha Centauri in Solomons.

Achernar un


In 1985, Pep and Alison Manthorpe joined Ion and Margaret in Cairns and from here they set off for northern waters and beyond. The cruise north was a fast and wet voyage with double reefed main and small jib, and once in the Louisiades, were able to comfortably cruise for the next month between villages and mix with the friendly natives. Pep and Alison left the cruise in Alatoa and Ion and Margaret continued to sail on their own to the New Guinea islands. They cruised the northern top of New Guinea in the fiord area and in many bays, and at times could not find bottom with the echo sounder. Anchoring became an exercise of attaching a line to a coconut tree ashore and dangling the anchor over the bow with maximum chain. David and Judy Judell joined to continue the cruise in Lae and across to New Britain. A local yachtie in Madang looked after Alpha Centauri while Ion and Margaret returned to Adelaide for Christmas and the family.

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some repairs, Alpha Centauri was trucked to Sydney to commence the second leg of the cruise.

Marg and Ion on Fine Romance. down the east coast of Australia and home.

They returned in early 1986 and cruised the west coast of New Britain and past the caves dug out by the Japanese forces during WWII to service their submarines. Then past Mount Mataput, which literally blew up three years later covering most of Rabaul with volcanic ash and causing considerable damage. Peter and Jenny Last joined the cruise in Rabaul and onto New Ireland and up the Buka Straits. After the east coast of Bouganville, they entered the Treasury Island Group only to find that they were illegal entrants and had to quickly motor across to Gizo to obtain clearance. While in this area, they discovered Kennedy Island where John F. Kennedy lost his patrol boat during WW II. The area is renowned for WW II incidents – Iron Bottom Sound being the graveyard of numerous war ships. Cruising in these waters is delightful with the frangipani fragrance ever present. Jenny and Peter left in Honiara and Ion and Margaret continued cruising the Solomon Islands area for the next four weeks. One memorable cruise was sailing into the Morovo Lagoon where James H. Michener was reputed to have based his South Pacific experiences.

Being away from the farm over this period did require some catchup and so it was sadly decided to sell Alpha Centauri and focus on farm operations with the family. However, the call of the sea was ever present, and in 1989 the Wilf O’Kell designed 51 foot ferro ketch Fine Romance was purchased in Brisbane. She was fitted out with the 1990 Ambon race in mind. This particular Darwin to Ambon race was unforgettable for those participants as most of the race was in a flat calm, and most had to motor into Ambon. It was during this race that the unforgettable ‘White Ocean’ was experienced – 3.00 am and the waters are luminescent caused by a bacteria of sea creatures, and lasted an hour during which one could read by this eerie light. From Ambon they cruised to Makassar for the Makassar Regatta, and then onto Bali. While in Bali, they ‘employed’ a local lad to stay and sleep in the cockpit to look after the boat for 3 days for $5. Then to Timor and Koepang to clear customs, and onto Ashmore Reef and across to the Kimberleys. They explored the Kimberleys over a month and in this time only sighted one other yacht. One highlight was to motor for five miles up Crocodile Creek and through the ‘bolt hole’ to anchor while the creek emptied with a 45 foot tide. Into Prince Regent River to Kings Cascade enabled them to fill up with fresh water.

The voyage back to Adelaide was via the south coast of New Guinea to Port Moresby, through the notorious Torres Strait where one must be very aware of the tidal movement of the waters, and then

Peter Last joined the voyage across from Darwin to Cairns and could have ended in disaster as they went aground on rocks in the tricky passage around Elco Island. Margaret busily gathered all valuables expecting to take to the dinghy, however, after four hours and a rising tide, they were able to free themselves without any major damage.

nder full sail.

They eventually returned to the Squadron in 1992 and restricted their cruising to local and Tasmanian waters. During one recent cruise to Tasmania they had to motor the entire return voyage from the ‘Nut’ on Tasmania’s north west tip, all the way back to the Squadron. Over the following years, many enjoyable days have been spent cruising with their family and many friends. Fine Romance has been sold and is now in Tin Can Bay in Queensland after seven years of successful cruising.

Today, Margaret and Ion spend much of their time tending their farm in the South East, and living on the farm near their two daughters and family. They have ten grand children and two great grand children. 

Fine Romance

Squadron Quarterly 27


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BOOK REVIEWS Di Moncrieff

Bruny d’Entrecasteaux and his encounter with Tasmanian Aborigines: from Provence to Recherche Bay Dianne Johnson

French place names dot the coasts of southern Australia, mainly the legacy of explorers Nicolas Baudin on the mainland and Bruny d’Entrecasteaux in Tasmania. Such mainland nomenclature was the theme of a wry two part article by RSAYS member Michael Manetta published in SQ’s September and December 2012 issues. In south east Tasmania there are many more French names and one cannot skirt the coast by sea or land without wondering why. How come the Huon River, d’Entrecasteaux Channel, Recherche Bay, Bruny Island, Labillardiere Peninsula, Fleurty Point et al? Only 10 years before Nicolas Baudin had met Matt Flinders at Encounter Bay, South Australia, a most extraordinary meeting of d’Entrecasteaux’s French crew with the Lyluequonny locals occurred in South East Tasmania. The French Revolution was in full swing at home, and La Perouse had disappeared. For Bruny d’Entrecasteaux, leading the search expedition for the great explorer was a chance to keep his head and escape from a family shame. And an opportunity to bring some of the new French tenets to shipboard command. This book enables the reader to understand the society from which the leader and his crew came; the fierce political differences between the aristocracy, the intelligentsia and the ordinary seamen; the injustices and extreme behaviours of changing times, and how tensions affected shipboard life and exploration. Author Dianne Johnson, anthropologist and experienced Aboriginal historian, builds a picture of a privileged man, not without sorrow, who had an ability to ‘stand in another’s shoes’ and to give and receive loyalty and respect. I would be surprised if he were arrogant, or a bully, for the account of his encounter with the Lyluequonny Aboriginal people of Recherche Bay is laced with respect and dignity, and probably out of step with many of his time. In 1792 Bruny d’Entrecastaeux was heading for Adventure Bay on Bruny Island in south east Tasmania as he sailed east along the south coast. Here was protection from SW swells and gales, a spot with fresh water and timber where Cook and Furneaux 28 Squadron Quarterly

had been before. This was to be a base from which to search the South Pacific for the missing La Perouse. But a mistake in navigation saw the two vessels, Recherche and Esperence turn north too soon, thus discovering the superior anchorage of Recherche Bay and the channel between Bruny Island and the main Island (to subsequently be named d’Entrecasteaux Channel.) Staying for about four weeks scientific data and collections were assembled, extensive explorations took place, ship repairs made good, food acquired and fresh water stowed. They had no instructions to stake territory; just to gather scientific data and find the missing sailor. After fruitlessly searching the South Pacific for La Perouse, the expedition returned to Recherche Bay in 1793 and this time was successful in making meaningful contact with the local inhabitants. Given the many accounts of such early encounters being sad affairs, it is a delight to read of the delicacy, humour and goodwill of the few days these distant people spent together. However the account is tinged with sadness for no doubt, the transmission of disease to such an isolated community had a dreadful subsequent toll. So is this a maritime tale of old, of adventure, gales and privation or something much broader? It is broader of course, than just a simple maritime tale and it is all the richer for that. For anyone interested in widening a narrow British perspective of Australian exploration, this book is a must. Post script: The expedition did sail along the South Australian coast, in the western parts. D’Entrecasteaux Reef is just west of Nuyts Reef near the head of the Great Australian Bight And Cape d’Entrecasteaux south east of Cape Leeuwin. 

Solar that Really Works Third Edition Collyn Rivers We have always had a love/ hate relationship with the power system on our sailing boat. Love when the G’n’T’s are cold; hate when they are not. Our solar panels are old and we are sailing more in autumn and in higher latitudes. In addition a gannet suicided into the wind generator one dark night mid ocean. The generator has sulked ever since. So it is time to reassess our inputs and outputs and consider what to do. This led to a close study of this practical, Aussie focused book, that deals with power generation for 12 volt systems independent


In layman’s language, Collyn Rivers covers quite complex concepts in a thoroughly understandable way. Suddenly parts of the jigsaw of boat electrics fell into place as I read it cover to cover. Not that dipping into specific themes wouldn’t work too. It is a book to be read for a comprehensive overview of 12 volt power generation in all isolated parts of Australia. And it is a book to have as a reference. It covers all the related components such as batteries and charging, inverters, combining power sources, alternatives to solar and much much more. Other than the engine alternator, solar has always been the backbone of our boat’s generation system. In fact, in times past, we never bothered to plug into 240v when in a marina. But diminishing output in recent times drew me to this book for a new look at the system. Bits that were particularly useful included: Peak Sun Hour maps showing how many hours of power generating sun is available around the country in different seasons. Calculating the optimum power storage capacity ie battery capacity for the amount of power we need and can generate. Important, given that an undercharged battery deteriorates faster than one that is fully charged regularly.

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of the grid. Whilst directed to cruisers on wheels it also applies directly to cruisers on keels.

The mystery of wiring dimensions for 12 volt systems

Measuring what power we use and need, item by item. What are the power guzzlers on board?

Surprises in the range and depth of need of some of our appliances. Who would have guessed that the galley water pump is a power guzzler? Examples of real life successful systems

Alternatives to wind, solar and petrol generators.

Collyn Rivers has alerted us to an alternative that has taken our fancy, and thus under investigation. It the latest range of fuel cells which, being light and about the size of a jerry can, are suitable to mount in a boat. They produce hydrogen from methanol allowing direct current to be produced electrochemically; no burning process or noise and very little pollution. They typically produce about 5 amps at 12v dc and can be run continuously if necessary. The down side? Cost. But they are worth a look at www.efoy.com. With this book in hand, a cruiser can confidently approach his or her vessel’s power system to get a true picture of how it operates and why. And what improvements can be made. Availability is via the author at: www.caravanandmotorhomebooks.com 

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   

Squadron Quarterly 29


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REEF WATCH Intertidal Monitoring and Feral or in Peril Project. Do you remember what it was all about? Carl Charter and Alex Gaut of Reef Watch SA, presented to social and cruising members of the Royal SA Yacht Squadron over dinner in August, 2012. If you couldn’t make it to this presentation then here is your chance to catch up on what you missed. Members may also note the Reef Watch posters on walls and noticeboards around the Squadron.

that may soon invade SA waters, and, native species of conservation concern that require further information to ensure their survival.

Male leafy dragon with eggs.

Shark Watch identification card The Shark Watch program relies on volunteers to help record shark information that will lead to the conservation of sharks that live in the seas around South Australia. While sharks have lived in our seas for over 400 million years, we know very little about them – this is your chance

Reef Watch is managed by the Conservation Council of South Australia (CCSA) and overseen by a volunteer steering committee of marine scientists and others. It has a suite of community monitoring programs to choose from including Shark Watch, Intertidal Monitoring, Subtidal Monitoring, Reef Fish Surveys and Feral or in Peril (FIP). FIP, (the focus of the presentation in August), is a marine citizen science program that Reef Watch has been running for 12 years. The program encourages boat owners and other users of the marine environment to report sightings of marine pests (‘feral’), and, native marine species that are of conservation concern (‘in peril’). FIP won a UN World Environment Day Award in 2012 for excellence in coastal and marine management. The FIP program has a wide network of participants encompassing not only boat owners but also beachcombers, fishers, divers and snorkelers. This network is an invaluable early warning system for invasive species because early notification of a potential invasion means a good likelihood of eradication, which is more effective, efficient and cheaper than trying to control marine pests once established. Marine pests are known to cause devastating economic and environmental impacts, therefore, it is in boat owner’s best interest to be ‘the eyes on the water’ and report sightings of marine pests, some of which thrive in marinas. It is important for scientists and government managers to know both where marine pests are and are not, and where they might be spreading. Reef Watch has developed a range of resources to assist the boating community identify and report marine pests and species of conservation concern: go to www.reefwatch.asn.au . Boat Owners Guide – Caring for our Coastal Waters. This guide details practical ways to reduce your boat’s running costs while looking after our coastal waters. The guide provides information about marine pest and threatened marine species awareness, especially with regard to boat maintenance and the identification and reporting of marine pests. Feral or in Peril identification cards and accompanying Feral or in Peril booklet These are water resistant identification cards and a booklet that detail 21 species of interest in three groups – species that are not native to SA but are established in our waters, species 30 Squadron Quarterly

to help researchers at the SA Research and Development Institute and Flinders University with sightings information from SA waters. Poster – ‘Look After Your bottom’ A marine pest awareness poster developed to be displayed at boat clubs, shops and marinas. Some of these are currently displayed in RSAYS. Web based reporting system Our most recent resource is a web-based and mobile compatible reporting system developed for the FIP program as part of the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA): http://feralperil.ala.org.au . The boating community are encouraged to use the system to report sightings of any of the species listed. You can upload photos, pinpoint the location of the sighting using a zoomable map and provide us with some commentary about how and where you found the species. This system provides real time email alerts of ‘red alert’ marine pests directly to Biosecurity SA, ie, those that pose the most serious threats to marine ecosystems. Email alerts of the 12 native (‘in peril’) species go to various marine researchers around Australia. The FIP program proved its worth in 2008 when a Reef watch volunteer reported the first European fan worm (Sabella spallanzanii) on Kangaroo Island. This report led to the removal


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of 26 worms and development of a major marine pest program by the Kangaroo Island Natural Resources Management Board. How can you get involved?

Reef Watch needs boats (and someone on surface) suitable for diving for subtidal surveys of Broken Bottom. Contact Steve Leske to get involved 0400 272 177.

Intertidal surveys are underway between October- March each year at Hallett Cove, Aldinga, Lady Bay and Victor Harbour. Contact Carl Charter to get involved 0466 278 187 And don’t forget to report all sightings of any of the Feral or In Peril species to help us protect our marine environment. For more information, contact Alex Gaut: alex.gaut@conservationsa.org.au ď ?

Our Sponsors & Preferred Suppliers for the 2013-2014 Season Thank you to the following major sponsors for their generous support of the Royal South Australian Yacht Squadron 2012 - 2013 Season. Please support our friends who support us.

Other acknowledgement of support to the Royal South Australian Yacht Squadron include: Copycat Printing

Dee Henshall

Heatlie Barbecues

International Communication Systems P/L

Kaesler Wines

M B Butterfield & Co Pty Ltd

Michael McMichael Motors

North Haven Marine

Sports Marine

Risk Insure

Squadron Quarterly 31


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SAILING IN TASMANIA; HEADING TO PORT DAVEY

It seems that everyone is heading to Tassie! Here’s another fascinating tale from two intrepid members who’ve headed down to Tasmania for adventure and fun. Helen Prisk shares The Tardis’s recent journey from Hobart to Pt. Davey, while Phil Moody remembers sailing the opposite direction from Pt. MacQuarie to the same destination on board Pied Piper II a few years ago. Whichever course you take, it sounds a great experience! Helen Prisk: In February this year it was a great experience to sail in The Tardis, a 10 metre Nantucket Islander, to the extremely remote area of Port Davey which is in the World Heritage Listed south west corner of Tasmania. We needed to be totally self sufficient with food, water and fuel for a month.

The Tardis in Port Davey.

My friend Graham Kilgariff and I were joined by veteran sailing friends John and Veronica Wickham. John’s skills were a great asset in assisting with the efficient sailing of the boat in very remote waters. Veronica proved a great boon in the galley with food preparation to keep the troops running. The odyssey began on Monday February 13 early in the morning at 0815. Our plan was to sail the 48 nautical miles from Hobart to Recherche Bay and wait for a suitable weather window to begin the sail around the bottom of Tasmania. We motor-sailed most of the way using the autopilot. We passed through the very beautiful D’Entrecasteaux Channel in smooth seas until we left the Channel and passed into a gentle sea. We arrived at Recherche Bay at 1800 where we anchored in Coalbins Bay which afforded us the best protection from a strong westerly. Recherche is a spectacular area which includes the beginning of the vast South West National Park Wilderness.

Rugged coastline, south west Tasmania. this area were superb and The Tardis was now heading for the very rugged South West Cape which is quite breathtaking when seen from the ocean. Rounding the Cape ahead of time at 1500, the seas changed and the wind strengthened. In the distance we could see The Pyramids, big rocks marking the gateway to Port Davey. We watched closely for craypots in this area. We passed the pots without incident and had our first sighting of The Breaksea Islands which guard the entrance to Port Davey and Bathurst Harbour. The Breakseas are very rugged with several perforations through the rocks. We passed the beautiful Spain Bay and headed for Bramble Cove at the beginning of the Bathurst Channel, arriving at 1700 well ahead of time. Anchored close to shore we settled into a peaceful night as the wind died down. The crew experienced the first magnificent sunset as nibbles and wine were served. Our sail east to west was easier than we had imagined and we were about to experience an even more amazing week as we were blessed by good weather. We hoisted anchor on Thursday at 1000 under blue skies and motored into the Bathurst Channel. At Horseshoe Inlet we stopped in the very pretty Casilda Cove. Carefully avoiding a submerged rock off Danger Bluff. We began our first walking trip at Casilda Cove. John, Veronica and I walked up Mt Balmoral over wet boggy peat covered in thick button grass. John led, making noise to warn any snakes of our

The Tardis remained at Coalbins for two nights until the weather improved and departed the anchorage on Wednesday at 0530. The trip would take 12 hours to complete the 70 nautical miles to Port Davey. There was a 3 metre swell with not much wave activity and the winds were south westerly but not very strong. We kept relatively close to the shore so that we could view the spectacular scenery passing Whale Head, South East Cape and South Cape by 1100. Next, we sailed by the cliffs of DeWitt Island known by the locals as ‘Big Witch’. Crayfishermen were busy tending to their pots along much of the coast. The Tardis soon passed Maatsuyker Island which has a light house, radio repeater and weather station. Views of the coast in 32 Squadron Quarterly

Tranquil Port Davey.


On Friday, Iola Bay was our lunch stop. Iola is quite small and already had two boats anchored. We were fortunate to see a brigantine sail from Bathurst Harbour into the channel with all sails rigged. It was a wonderful sight. Next morning the grandeur of Mt Rugby reflected perfectly in the waters.

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approach. Proper walking shoes and long pants are essential as well as a camera. The spectacular view from the mountain showed the grandeur further into Bathurst Harbour as well as magnificent seaward views. Veronica and I kayaked on Casilda Cove. The boat was moved to Shelter Point when strong SE winds made the anchorage uncomfortable.

immediate west side of Mt Rugby. The anchorage was idyllic with fantastic reflections once again of Mt Rugby. Numerous orange jellyfish swam around the boat.

A strong westerly was expected on Monday so we headed for Schooner Cove to a safe anchorage where we found several other boats doing the same thing. We saw a large sea eagle on Little Woody island on the way into the cove. A large power boat dragged past The Tardis and re-anchored with more chain. The wind howled over the mountains and trees above our heads but the skies were still blue.

On Tuesday, we awoke to misty rain and the mountains were shrouded in cloud. It was quite beautiful in a different way to what we had experienced over the last week. We departed for Spain Bay which has a beach surrounded by sand On Saturday The Tardis moved to hills and rocky outcrops. We trekked into the sand Claytons Corner which is part of hills to look for an Aboriginal Midden but aborted the human history of Port Davey. the trip because the button grass and ground was Clyde was a fisherman who married Brigantine in Bathurst Harbour. very soggy and snakes were likely to be about. Our Win, the sister of tin miner Denny King. Clyde also trek took us far enough to see into the open sea with magnificent helped maintain supplies to local tin miners. Clyde built Win a views of the Pyramids, islands and coast. The anchorage was very house at Claytons Corner and also, with Denny, a jetty to moor his good holding but the boat did roll during the night. boat. The jetty still remains in place at Clayton’s Corner and fresh water from which yachties replenish their tanks. Win established a At 0615 on Wednesday, we ended our fabulous trip to Port Davey vegetable garden for the house as well as a flower garden. There as we weighed anchor and set off back to Recherche Bay. I believe are still two of her rhododendrons near the house. we were extremely fortunate to have enjoyed such good weather for our trip and would love to return to the grandeur of Port Davey. The crew set off from Claytons Corner in the inflatable dinghy to explore Melaleuca Inlet and find the house built by Denny King Phil Moody: for his family. Denny was a tin miner who became famous for his Thanks to Di and Ian Moncrieff on Pied Piper 2, Helen and I had hospitality to the many walkers who turned up at his doorstep the opportunity to sail the west coast of Tasmania in February needing accommodation and food. He entertained many famous 2009. We met up at the Wooden Boat Festival in Hobart, hired a people and also assisted universities with the collection of flora car and drove to Strachan through the scenic hills and valleys of and fauna. He was a naturalist who spent his life maintaining the central west Tasmania. We spent one day walking around Strachan remote area of Pt Davey including fighting fires, building the airstrip undertaking last minute provisioning, admiring the views and local which is used to this day by tourists and emergency services and tourist attractions while waiting for appropriate weather. constructing light beacons for boating. Denny built the Charles King hut named after his father. He was also an artist and painted many To allow for a long day sail to Port Davey we exited Macquarie scenes of the area. He protected the endangered orange-bellied Harbour from Strachan via Hell’s Gates which is the name of parrot. the mouth of Macquarie Harbour. It is a notoriously shallow and dangerous channel entrance. Navigating out through the narrow We motored 3 to 4 kilometres along the inlet then turned into heads required careful concentration and attention to navigational Melaleuca Creek where we found the landing for the airstrip and landmarks and markers. We proceeded to motor sail to Spain Bay Denny King’s Home. A boardwalk crosses the button grass to a to prepare for our entrance into the Bathurst Channel, a 12 km long track. We were surprised at the size of the airstrip and found four planes landed. A weather station is also present. A track leads to his Nissan hut-style house which is surrounded by gardens and a bird hide. John very carefully steered us back up Melaleuca Creek to the Inlet as we were low on fuel. The last kilometre we rowed back to Claytons Corner. Sunday morning we filled our water bottles at the jetty. An eight foot black tiger snake slithered away on an old pile of tin near the track to the house. The Tardis departed Claytons for Moulters Inlet passing Celery Top Islands which show no signs of ever being burnt by fire as opposed to other parts of Port Davey. Mile after mile of mountain reflections in the tannin-stained waters in Bathurst Harbour were mesmerising. We kayaked scenic Moulters Inlet seeing much birdlife before returning to Bathurst Channel and Ila Bay on the

Phil and Helen Moody in Bathurst Channel, SW Tasmania.

Squadron Quarterly 33


SPECIAL FEATURE

popular walks with some detail about each of them. For the more enthusiastic there is always Mount Rugby, which is a challenge. Port Davey and Bathurst Harbour can only be accessed by sea, plane or walking overland on the south coast track. It has a special feeling of remoteness until walking to the airstrip at Melaluca!

Claytons Corner in Port Davey. Melealeuca Creek in mid picture.

narrow channel that connects with Port Davey. The channel is quite wide and deep but in its meandering course does get shallow in spots. Pied Piper 2 negotiated the channel from Port Davey through with an eye on the depth. Passage time was approximately 2 hours. When fresh water meets saltwater layering occurs because freshwater is lighter in weight than dense salt water. Within the marine reserve this causes the dark band of tannin-rich freshwater to sit on top of the clear saltwater. Bathurst Channel is the jewel of the marine reserve, however if you were to travel over these dark waters you could be forgiven for thinking nothing much was going on down below. Nothing is further from the truth. The area is renowned for its bad weather, but we struck an unusually calm and balmy week. The area is controlled by National Parks and a pass is required. Indeed, the Rangers visited us daily, noting the people on board and counting that no one had been lost overboard since the previous day. We walked daily at various locations up hill, down dale and across to the southern ocean through tea tree scrub. There is an excellent map produced by National Parks about the area that includes the

Clayton’s corner is just on the outside of Melaluca channel that leads to the Melaluca settlement where Deny King’s house is situated, now along with the National Parks huts and airstrip. He was the pioneer settler / tin miner of this area and King of the Wilderness. From Claytons corner to Melaluca is a shallow tidal channel that can be safely navigated at high tide if you draw under 2m. Anchoring is possible at Melaluca, however we tied up and rafted with another yacht to an old jetty. There was another old jetty warning of instability that was promptly demolished by a large motor vessel trying to tie up regardless of the warnings posted. We had a great time exploring the Melaluca site with its airstrip. It also has an elaborate bird hide to view the endangered orange bellied parrots. Planes fly in and out regularly transporting bushwalkers, kayakers, day visitors and engine parts - such as another yacht’s alternator. It is possible to sail in and fly out or visa versa if crew time is an issue. This was the backup plan for us should we have been stuck with inclement weather when we needed to get back to work. The highlights of our west coast adventure were many but the ones that stand out include the magnificent scenery, the fantastic feeling of being somewhere not many other people get to, the great food, the company and of course the sailing. A big thank you to Di and Ian and Pied Piper 2 for superb hospitality and giving us that wonderful opportunity. 

IN THE GALLEY

Veronica, the efficient Galley Slave!

On board catering is not difficult if you have a plan, according to Veronica Wickham, Chief-Cookand-Bottlewasher on The Tardis’s recentTassie voyage. Here she shares some tips for provisioning and providing tasty meals on long journeys when there is not a shop in sight for a couple of weeks.

1. Take into account the number of people on board e.g.; 4 people 4 pieces of chicken 4 pieces of steak etc. then double it. 2. Get the meat from the butcher and get them to Cryovac it so if you are having 8 pieces of chicken have two separate packets 4 in each, etc. 3. Buy plenty of tinned food, peas/carrots/beans corn etc., and a variety of canned soups; cup of soups are handy for cold rough days although not my favourite. A supply of tinned fruit with long life cream also comes in handy. 4. Large cracker breads are handy for when the bread has gone stale. Use stale bread for toasty sandwiches like grilled tomato and cheese. Packets of mountain bread make delicious 34 Squadron Quarterly

wraps, filled with salad, cheese, salmon or tuna. 5. Fresh fruit like apples and oranges will last the distance. 6. Fresh vegies will only last a week or so, potatoes a little longer but onions do well; 7. Take plenty long life milk for loads of tea and coffee. 8. Have on board all your spices and sauces to ‘tart up’ your meals 9. Nibbles are ‘a must’ for the Cocktail Hour, or just as a snack! Stock up on cheeses/nuts/dips/olives and plenty of dry biscuits 10. Plenty of sweet biscuits and cake, preferably fruitcake. Trickle some brandy over the cake - it will last longer and taste better! Veronica’s Most Popular Seafaring Recipe CHICKEN CURRY MAYO 4 Chicken breast fillets 1 can mushroom soup Diluted with ½ cup long life cream & ½ cup water 2 dessertspoons mayonnaise 2 teaspoons curry powder ½ cup grated cheese Add all together Bake in moderate oven for ½ hr. Add any vegetables you like e.g. Broccoli/cauliflower/carrot.


Many of us may dream about throwing in our jobs and sailing off to see the world wihout a care on the horizon. But how many of us actually act on this impulse? Former Commodore Peter Kelly and his wife Carol have taken the bull by the horns (and/or the boat by the wheel) and are in the final throws of tidying up things at home and preparing their boat before venturing forth. Here they let us in on their plans….

Peter and Carol Kelly. Carol and I are about to embark on what will surely be one of the most exiting, challenging and rewarding years of our life, (not that any of the previous years have been particularly dull or unrewarding!), we are having a seachange and taking a sabbatical year in our careers to sail up the east coast in our boat Home James. This is the fifth year in the five-year plan that Carol and I discussed in mid 2008 when my arm was being twisted to nominate for the position of Vice Commodore. Although Carol was still new to the Squadron at that time, I knew we would both need some serious ‘R & R’ to recover from the pressure of the Commodoreship simultaneous to the workload of our day-jobs in performing arts management. As part of the five year plan we knew we would need to upgrade our very humble 30ft Spencer called Asherah. Even though it had been an eminently suitable old vessel for day sailing and an annual two-week Christmas cruise to KI and Lincoln, I couldn’t stand upright in the cabin and it didn’t have an oven to heat up taco shells (Carol’s specialty dish for the Easter boat-hop dinner which were produced thanks to the ovens of neighbouring vessels). A twelve month cruise was too long to spend stooped over and eating cold tacos so a boat up-grade was required.

Unlike the impending commodoreship and the need to buy a new boat, there was another element of the five-year plan that Carol wasn’t privy to in mid 2008 – my intention to ask her to marry me which I duly did and we enjoyed a great wedding at the Squadron in 2009. Our five-year plan also addressed the need for real-estate consolidation. We were living between the boat, our two separate houses and my bachelor’s beach flat at Semaphore, so we settled full-time in Carol’s historic cottage in Old Noarlunga.

SPECIAL FEATURE

PETER & CAROL’S CRUISING PLANS

State Theatre Company after twelve years with the organisation and twenty- four years working within the Festival Centre. Carol progressively completed her commitments on the Dance Board of the Australia Council and Ausdance SA followed by dance projects with the Adelaide Festival and Ten Days on The Island Festival in Tasmania. For the last two months we have become full time renovators to make our house ready for tenants – re-wiring, floor sanding, paving and painting throughout. We are also working our way through the four-page list of boat jobs. At the time of writing we have finished the big-ticket boat projects –the rigging has been replaced, the chain plates re-engineered, the bow and stem fittings serviced, a new starter motor fitted, the lower rudder bearing

Following the wedding and the real-estate sales we were able to seriously consider a new boat. In the snakes & ladders game of looking at second-hand yachts we began with an inspection of Ian & Margaret Shaw’s Duncanson 34, Virago and worked our way up to 50ft late-model Bavarias on Sydney Harbour. It became apparent that we needed something in the middle of this spectrum and along came Home James - a wonderful Bill Lapthorne designed & Californian Yachts built, Cal 39. The boat design, uncommonly Peter & Carol on Home James. seen in Australia, is a reasonably heavy displacement sloop. Home James had been sailed across the pacific in the 1980’s and re-fitted in Adelaide to a very high standard by previous owner Robert Hesketh about 10 years ago. Despite her weight and age, the boat comfortably travels at 7knots+ in an afternoon sea breeze, and has ideal cruising accommodation down below with good headroom and best of all, she has a large and effective oven. Our best laid five-year plan was subject to further modification when, in a ‘carpediem’ moment we bought an Art-Deco house in Largs Bay with a sea view and a questionable 1970’s make-over. This precipitated yet another residential relocation and renovations on top of our Squadron commitments, our work and the new boat. At the beginning of March this year we were ready to progress our dream of a sea-change sabbatical. I finished up at the

replaced and a swim platform added to our transom. The new hard-dodger and pivoting davits that I’ve designed and built are in the “paint shop” (our carport) in anticipation of installation next week and a prototype of the new binnacle station I’m also constructing, is in the shed (along with most of our furniture and fifty boxes of our belongings). Despite these significant preparations we still have another couple of pages on the jobs list to go!

In answer to the constant question from friends and relatives – “When are you leaving?”, we say, we’ll go when we are ready! After years of stress and deadlines we are determined to be deadline-free for a year. We’re making one exception – we are aiming to be on Sydney Harbour for Boxing Day and New Year’s Eve. As for when we leave and how much of the East Australian seaboard we can explore between now and then…. que sera sera. 

Squadron Quarterly 35


MARINA BERTHS FOR RENT RSAYS Marina Berths For Rent as at May 2013 SIZE

BERTH TYPE

BERTH NO

COST

11 Metre

Single

C 16

$82.75

12 Metre

Double

A 05

$90.25

12 Metre

Double

B 02

$90.25

12 Metre

Single

C 12

$90.25

12 Metre

Single

D 03

$90.25

12 Metre

Double

D 10

$90.25

12 Metre

Double

K 14

$90.25

14 Metre

Multi hull

I 01 - I 02

$105.30

14 Metre

Double

I 06

$105.30

14 Metre

Double

I 08

$105.30

18Metre

Single

H 05

$135.35

18Metre

Double

SI 15

$135.35

18Metre

Double

SI 16

$135.35

Short Term

Can be used for a catamaran

For further information contact Lisa Hastings - Marina Service's on 8341 8600 - Prices subject to change without notice

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: Dear Ed,

Dear Editor

As you may be aware I am currently appointed by the Cruising Committee to keep members informed of the whereabouts of Squadron boats on the World Map in Jimmy’s bar.

History Australia-wide is disappearing at a very fast rate. Our Squadron goes back to Queen Victoria’s time and as such is very much part of the original fabric of South Australia. It behoves us as members and committees to protect our heritage – be it our own club, or the history of our state. While development must take place, development must be tempered so as not to override and disguise or destroy the history of our forebears and people’s values.

It occurred to me that it would be a good idea to place, in conjunction with the map, a list of Squadron members who, over the years, have actually circumnavigated the globe. There are some members who would have knowledge of some such from many years ago, perhaps even their parents or grandparents? Having been a member for only 20 years, I am aware of the few who have completed this wonderful adventure in more recent times. These are: Anaconda, Josco Grubic, Scotty, Glenda Scott and Derek Coldwell, Thorfinn, Dick and Kay Turpin, Marionette IV, Marion and Roger Holden. There must be many others. If members could contact me with details I would be grateful. I don’t think we need to be pedantic about whether it was an OFFICIAL circumnavigation. Yours Truly Barbara Adams ‘Ivory Lady’ Phone: 82713105 mobile: 0428190031 email:bradams7@bigpond.net.au

36 Squadron Quarterly

Yours, Bones (Kingsley) Hasket Chair Cruising Committee


MARINA BERTHS FOR SALE RSAYS Marina Berths For Sale as at May, 2013 SIZE

BERTH TYPE

BERTH NO

COST

8.2 Metre

Hard Stand

HS 05

$8,000.00

New Listing

8.2 Metre

Hard Stand

HS 10

$6,900.00

New Listing

8.2 Metre

Hard Stand

HS 12

$6,900.00

New Listing

9.2 Metre

Dry Stand

DS 01

$5,000.00

New Listing

12 Metre

Double

A 03

$70,000.00

11 Metre

Single

B 15

$60,000.00

12 Metre

Double

C 05

$70,000.00

Price Reduced

12 Metre

Double

C 07

$67,000.00

11 Metre

Single

C 14

$60,000.00

11 Metre

Single

C 16

$75,000.00

12 Metre

Single

D 08

$89,000.00

12 Metre

Double

D 10

$55,000.00

All Offers

11 Metre

Single

D 15

$57,000.00

Price Negotable

11 Metre

Single

D 16

$65,000.00

13 Metre

Double

E 05

$70,000.00

13 Metre

Single

E 07

$100,000.00

13 Metre

Single

E 11

$100,000.00

15 Metre

Single

F 05

$95,000.00

15 Metre

Single

F 07

$140,000.00

15 Metre

Single

F 08

$120,000.00

15 Metre

Single

F 10

$90,000.00

Would hold 10m Cat

16 Metre

Single

G 05

$120,000.00

All Offers

20 Metre

Single

H 01

$110,000.00

Price Reduced (Holds 16m Cat)

14 Metre

Double

I 02

$120,000.00

14 Metre

Double

I 03

$100,000.00

14 Metre

Double

I 04

$100,000.00

14 Metre

Double

I 07

$115,000.00

14 Metre

Double

I 08

$110,000.00

10 Metre

Double

I 10

$80,000.00

10 Metre

Double

I 16

$80,000.00

10 Metre

Double

I 18

$80,000.00

10 Metre

Double

I 20

$80,000.00

10 Metre

Double

I 23

$75,000.00

10 Metre

Single

I 26

$80,000.00

27 Metre

T - Head

I 27

$370,000.00

15 Metre

Single

J 04

$195,000.00

15 Metre

Double

J 08

$126,500.00

16 Metre

Single

J 12

$160,000.00

16 Metre

Single

J 17

$195,000.00

Price Reduced

New Listing

12 Metre

Double

K 10

$75,000.00

30 Metre

Single

SI 03

$450,000.00

New Listing

25 Metre

Single

SI 07

$250,000.00

22 Metre

Single

SI 09

$220,000.00

22 Metre

Single

SI 11

$220,000.00

Price Reduced

18 Metre

Double

SI 14

$150,000.00

(Or Offers)

18 Metre

Double

*SI 15

$175,000.00

18 Metre

Double

*SI 16

$175,000.00

*SI 15 & 16 can be used for a Catamaran

Reflects 2006 Purchase Price

For further information contact Lisa Hastings - Marina Service’s on 8341 8600 - Prices subject to change without notice Squadron Quarterly 37


* FOR ALL BOAT & MECHANICAL REPAIRS * ANTIFOULING & TOPSIDE PAINTING * BOATCODE & MARINE INSPECTIONS * SURVEY REPORTS

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* WAECO AGENT

KINGSLEY HASKETT 'BONES' - 0419 844 772 R.T Searles

EMAIL: searles@adam.com.au OFFICE ENQUIRIES CALL KATHY 0403 698 276

49 - 51 LIPSON STREET, PORT ADELAIDE, SA 5015

Insurance Brokers to RSAYS

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Electronics & Communications

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email: jellison@bigbutton.com.au ABN: 37308077476

Realising that most of us don’t spend all of our time at sea, ICS also have outback HF, UHF & 27Mhz radio, commercial two way systems, satellite phones, aircraft VHF, Ham Radio equipment, aerials, cables & installation materials.

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Ph: 08 8447 3688 Fax: 08 8341 1453


Sun 2

Winter Series - Race 2, RSAYS PRO Volunteer Thank You Event

Sat 8

Garden Island Cruise TBC

Sun 9

Garden Island Cruise TBC

Tue 11

Management Committee Meeting

Sat 15

Shorthanded Series Race 3

Sun 16

Plympton and Le Hunte Cup - Winter Series Race 3 Winter Party

Sat 22

Wine Tasting & Dinner - Dining Room Shorthanded Series Race 4 Private Function - Dinghy Shed

Sun 23

Junior - Aus-Sail Winter Training Program

Sat 29

Guest Speaker & Dinner

Sun 30

Winter Series - Race 4

JULY

2013

Fri 5

Something on Friday

Sat 6

Shorthanded Series Race 5

Sun 7

Shorthanded Series Race 6

Tue 9

Management Committee Meeting

Sun 14

Winter Series - Race 5, RSAYS PRO

Thu 18

Annual General Meeting

Fri 19

Wine tasting

Sat 20

Shorthanded Series Race 7 Private Function - Wedding

Sun 21

Junior - Aus-Sail Winter Training Program

Fri 26

Racing Assn AGM - CYCSA Event

Sat 27

Cruising “Youth Trophy” Presentation

AUGUST

2013

Fri 2

Wine Tasting Night

Sat 3

Shorthanded Series Race 8 Private Function - Jimmy’s Bar

Sun 4

Port Line Cup

Fri 9

Something on Friday

Sat 10

Private function - Wedding

Sun 11

Winter Series Race 6 - Series Presentation

Tue 13

Management Committee Meeting

Thu 15

RSAYS Ltd Annual General Meeting

Sat 17

Private Function - Dinghy Shed

Sun 18

Junior - Aus-Sail Winter Training Program

Sat 24

Cruising - Guest Speaker & Dinner

FRIDAY NIGHTS ARE CLUB NIGHTS

2013

EVENTS CALENDAR

JUNE


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RSAYS Squadron Quarterly Winter 2013  

The Royal South Australian Yacht Squadron's fantastic club magazine "Squadron Quarterly". Featuring a great wrap up of the club activities a...

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