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RESEARCH DOCUMENT

RSA E V E R Y D AY W E L L - B E I N G


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THE START


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BRIEF


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5 KEY WORDS – Preventing – Promote – Product – Mainstream – Incentives


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COM PHR EHENSIV E LI ST O F KE Y WO R D S A N D PHRASES Build Mental Well-Being Anxiety Depression Preventing Healthy Lifestyles Spending time with the people you love Being active Learning something Doing something for someone else Looking around you Product or service Facilitates positive behaviour Positive mental health activities Solution that embeds these positive behaviors Not overtly associated with improving mental health Mainstream appeal Become part of popular culture Consider incentives People buy it aside from wanting to improve mental health A Game Consumer service Consumer product Everyday activity or event

Went through the brief and chose what I felt were the most important helpful words and phrases, hoping something would jump out at me.


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I N ITIA L NOT ES In my initial notes I just wrote down all the initial thoughts that came into my head, lists of things I thought might be relevant that I could come back to later. I usually get a lot of good ideas from my initial notes, that I develop later, I find it very useful to write things down by hand first and change little bits and add bits in.


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I N ITIA L THO UGHT S O N BRI E F – Not trying to solve the problem necessarily, maybe try and prevent it. By maintaining a healthy lifestyle. – It could be about perception and understanding - Promoting a wider understanding of the problems. – Create something that doesn’t seem like it’s helping, something fun? But its real purpose is to make someone live healthier. – Create a tool or a system to make a certain problem people have because of anxiety or depression easier. I.E - Presentations – Find out what are common problems with, if possible, corresponding ages. – Something to help others deal with people who have anxiety. – Document the experience. Film or Take photos of idea working, or the problem in action.

These were the first thoughts I had on the brief, the key parts to the brief and initial thoughts on research.

INITIAL TASKS – Work out what information you’re going to need. – Make a questionnaire that if answered will answer some of the information you’re going to need. – Make a list of people you need to answer the questionnaire, experts in the industry and long time sufferers. Maybe a Questionnaire for both. Dawn, Lucy (ask her if she can give it to people she knows, or put me in touch with people she knows.) Guy who created the SAM app. Mum (dealing with depression) Ask Rebecca at NHC. – Write a detailed story of your anxiety – Make a comprehensive list of things you had trouble with and what could have helped. – Get Zoe to write what it was like living or being with someone with bad anxiety, and what could have helped her. – Make a list of things that helped you get better. – Start researching practices already used, like CBT. – Set up an online survey (Survey Monkey), Post on Facebook groups?

INFORMATION NEEDED What age group to aim for What area of mental health to target What is that area missing in terms if support, is there a gap in help for them? Problems people in the industry and friends etc. face trying to help people with anxiety.

This is a list of initial tasks I wrote out, how to start research and how to begin thinking of an idea.


SECONDARY RESEARCH


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M EN TAL H EALT H Mental Health is used to describe the well-being of the brain. The World Health Organization defines mental health as “A state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community”. A mental disorder is something that happens when you’re brain isn’t ‘healthy’ and can include; Anxiety, Depression, Eating Disorders, Self Harming and OCD among many others. It affects more than a third of the British population and many more in other parts of the world. Mental health may include an individual’s ability to enjoy life, and create a balance between life activities and efforts to achieve psychological resilience. Mental health can also be defined as an expression of emotions, and as signifying a successful adaptation to a range of demands. MENTAL WELL-BEING This definition of mental health highlights emotional well-being, the capacity to live a full and creative life, and the flexibility to deal with life’s inevitable challenges. Positive psychology is increasingly prominent in mental health. A holistic model of mental health generally includes concepts based upon anthropological, educational, psychological, religious and sociological perspectives, as well as theoretical perspectives from personality, social, clinical, health and developmental psychology. An example of a wellness model includes one developed by Myers, Sweeney and Witmer. It includes five life tasks—essence or spirituality, work and leisure, friendship, love and selfdirection—and twelve sub tasks—sense of worth, sense of control, realistic beliefs, emotional awareness and coping, problem solving and creativity, sense of humour, nutrition, exercise, self care, stress management, gender identity, and cultural identity—which are identified as characteristics of healthy functioning and a major component of wellness.

1 in 4 people will experience a mental health problem in any given year.


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AN XIE TY Anxiety disorder is an umbrella term that covers several different forms of a type of common psychiatric disorder, characterized by excessive rumination, worrying, uneasiness, apprehension and fear about future uncertainties either based on real or imagined events, which may affect both physical and psychological health. Individuals diagnosed with an anxiety disorder may be classified in one of two categories; based on whether they experience continuous or episodic symptoms. Current psychiatric diagnostic criteria recognize a wide variety of anxiety disorders. The term anxiety covers four aspects of experiences that an individual may have: mental apprehension, physical tension, physical symptoms and dissociative anxiety. Anxiety disorder is divided into generalized anxiety disorder, phobic disorder, and panic disorder; each has its own characteristics and symptoms and they require different treatment. The emotions present in anxiety disorders range from simple nervousness to bouts of terror. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a common, chronic disorder characterized by long-lasting anxiety that is not focused on any one object or situation. Those suffering from generalized anxiety disorder experience non-specific persistent fear and worry, and become overly concerned with everyday matters. According to Schacter, Gilbert, and Wegner’s book Psychology: Second Edition, generalized anxiety disorder is “characterized by chronic excessive worry accompanied by three or more of the following symptoms: restlessness, fatigue, concentration problems, irritability, muscle tension, and sleep disturbance”. The single largest category of anxiety disorders is that of phobic disorders, which includes all cases in which fear and anxiety is triggered by a specific stimulus or situation. Between 5% and 12% of the population worldwide suffer from phobic disorders.[6] Sufferers typically anticipate terrifying consequences from encountering the object of their fear, which can be anything from an animal to a location to a bodily fluid to a particular situation. Sufferers understand that their fear is not proportional to the actual potential danger but still are overwhelmed by the fear.

TYPES OF ANXIETY DISORDER GAD, Phobias, Panic Disorder, Agoraphobia, Social Anxiety Disorder, OCD, PTSD, Separation Anxiety, Childhood Anxiety Disorders.

Recent surveys have shown that as many as 18% of Americans and 14% of Europeans may be affected by one or more of them.

Anxiety seems to have the broadest audience, and most people I know who suffer from a mental health problem suffer from anxiety, at least in part. So I will concentrate on anxiety.

According to ‘Mental Health Foundation’ About 10% of children have a mental health problem at any one time. This supports my idea of targeting children as a person to help prevent a Mental Health problem.


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EATIN G DISO RDER Eating Disorders are characterised by an abnormal attitude towards food that causes someone to change their eating habits and behaviour. A person with an eating disorder may focus excessively on their weight and shape, leading them to make unhealthy choices about food with damaging results to their health. Eating disorders include a range of conditions that can affect someone physically, psychologically and socially. The most common eating disorders are: Anorexia nervosa, when someone tries to keep their weight as low as possible, for example by starving themselves or exercising excessively. bulimia, when someone tries to control their weight by binge eating and then deliberately being sick or using laxatives (medication to help empty their bowels) and binge eating, when someone feels compelled to overeat.

The psychopathology of eating disorders centres around body image disturbance, such as concerns with weight and shape; self-worth being too dependent on weight and shape; fear of gaining weight even when underweight; denial of how severe the symptoms are and a distortion in the way the body is experienced.

PREVENTION Prevention aims to promote a healthy development before the occurrence of eating disorders. It also intends early identification of an eating disorder before it is too late to treat. Children as young as ages 5–7 are aware of the cultural messages regarding body image and dieting. Prevention comes in bringing these issues to the light. The following topics can be discussed with young children TREATMENT Treatment varies according to type and severity of eating disorder, and usually more than one treatment option is utilized. However, there is lack of good evidence about treatment and management, which means that current views about treatment are based mainly on clinical experience. Therefore, before treatment takes place, family doctors will play an important role in early treatment as patients suffering from eating disorders will be reluctant to see a psychiatrist and a lot will depend on trying to establish a good relationship with the patient and family in primary care

10% of sufferers are anorexic, 40% are bulimic, and the rest fall into the EDNOS category, including those with binge eating disorder.


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DE PR ES S IO N Depression is more than simply feeling unhappy or fed up for a few days. We all go through spells of feeling down, but when you’re depressed you feel persistently sad for weeks or months, rather than just a few days. Some people still think that depression is trivial and not a genuine health condition. They’re wrong. Depression is a real illness with real symptoms, and it’s not a sign of weakness or something you can “snap out of” by “pulling yourself together”. The good news is that with the right treatment and support, most people can make a full recovery. Depression affects people in different ways and can cause a wide variety of symptoms. They range from lasting feelings of sadness and hopelessness, to losing interest in the things you used to enjoy and feeling very tearful. Many people with depression also have symptoms of anxiety. It is characterized by a pervasive and persistent low mood which is accompanied by low self-esteem and by a loss of interest or pleasure in normally enjoyable activities. PREVENTION Behavioural interventions, such as interpersonal therapy and Creative-behavioral therapy, are effective at preventing new onset depression. Because such interventions appear to be most effective when delivered to individuals or small groups, it has been suggested that they may be able to reach their large target audience most efficiently through the Internet. TREATMENT The three most common treatments for depression are psychotherapy, medication, and electro-convulsive therapy. Psychotherapy is the treatment of choice for people under 18, while electro-convulsive therapy is used only as a last resort. Care is usually given on an outpatient basis, whereas treatment in an inpatient unit is considered if there is a significant risk to self or others.

Women have a higher prevalence of mixed anxiety and depressive disorder than men.

In the United States, around 3.4% of people with major depression commit suicide, and up to 60% of people who commit suicide had depression or another mood disorder.


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OCD OCD is an anxiety disorder characterized by intrusive thoughts that produce uneasiness, apprehension, fear, or worry; by repetitive behaviors aimed at reducing the associated anxiety; or by a combination of such obsessions and compulsions. Symptoms of the disorder include excessive washing or cleaning; repeated checking; extreme hoarding; preoccupation with sexual, violent or religious thoughts; relationship-related obsessions; aversion to particular numbers; and nervous rituals, such as opening and closing a door a certain number of times before entering or leaving a room. These symptoms can be alienating and time-consuming, and often cause severe emotional and financial distress. The acts of those who have OCD may appear paranoid and potentially psychotic. However, OCD sufferers generally recognize their obsessions and compulsions as irrational, and may become further distressed by this realization.

In children and adolescents Therapeutic treatment may be effective in reducing ritual behaviors of OCD for children and adolescents. Family involvement, in the form of behavioural observations and reports, is a key component to the success of such treatments. Parental intervention also provides positive reinforcement for a child who exhibits appropriate behaviors as alternatives to compulsive responses. Helping in lots of cases.

Here in the United Kingdom current estimates suggest that 1.2% of the population will have OCD, which equates to 12 out of every 1000 people


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ME N TA L H EALT H MYT HS A N D FAC TS There are many myths surrounding Mental Health issues. These myths can be scary for someone first suffering any of them, and can make it even worse for someone who’s been afflicted for a long time. Here are a few of the more common Myths.

Myth: Mental health problems are very rare. Fact: 1 in 4 people will experience a mental health problem in any given year.

Myth: People with mental illness aren’t able to work. Fact: We probably all work with someone experiencing a mental health problem.

Myth: Young people just go through ups and downs as part of puberty, it’s nothing. Fact: 1 in 10 young people will experience a mental health problem.

Myth: People with mental health illnesses are usually violent and unpredictable. Fact: People with a mental illness are more likely to be a victim of violence.

Myth: People with mental health problems don’t experience any discrimination Fact: 9 out of 10 people with mental health problems experience stigma and discrimination.

Myth: It’s easy for young people to talk to friends about their feelings. Fact: Nearly three in four young people fear the reactions of friends when they talk about their mental health problems.


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Statistics about violence and mental illness – The majority of violent crimes and homicides are committed by people who do not have mental health problems. In fact, 95 per cent of homicides are committed by people who have not been diagnosed with a mental health problem – People with mental health problems are more dangerous to themselves than they are to others: 90 per cent of people who die through suicide in the UK are experiencing mental distress. – In 2009, the total population in England and Wales aged 16 or over was just over 43 million. It is estimated that about one in six of the adult population will have a significant mental health problem at any one time, (more than 7 million people). Given this number and the 50–70 cases of homicide a year involving people known to have a mental health problem at the time of the murder, clearly the statistics data do not support the sensationalised media coverage about the danger that people with mental health problems present to the community. – Substance abuse appears to play a role: The prevalence of violence is higher among people who have symptoms of substance abuse (discharged psychiatric patients and non-patients).


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CBT - COGNI T IV E BEHAV IO U R AL T HE R A PY Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a psychotherapeutic approach that addresses dysfunctional emotions, maladaptive behaviors and cognitive processes and contents through a number of goal-oriented, explicit systematic procedures. The name refers to behaviour therapy, cognitive therapy, and to therapy based upon a combination of basic behavioural and cognitive principles and research. Most therapists working with patients dealing with anxiety and depression use a blend of cognitive and behavioural therapy. CBT is thought to be effective for the treatment of a variety of conditions, including mood, anxiety, personality, eating, substance abuse, tic, and psychotic disorders. Many CBT treatment programs for specific disorders have been evaluated for efficacy; the health-care trend of evidence-based treatment, where specific treatments for symptom-based diagnoses are recommended, has favoured CBT over other approaches such as psycho-dynamic treatments.

CBT has been shown to be effective in the treatment of all anxiety disorders. A basic concept in some CBT treatments used in anxiety disorders is in vivo exposure, a term describing a technique where the patient is gradually exposed to the actual, feared stimulus. The treatment is based on the theory that the fear response has been classically conditioned, and that avoidance of it negatively reinforces and maintains the fear. This “twofactor” model is often credited to O. Hobart Mowrer. Through exposure to the stimulus, this harmful conditioning can be “unlearned” (referred to as extinction and habituation). PREVENTION For anxiety disorders, use of CBT with people at risk has significantly reduced the number of episodes of generalized anxiety disorder and other anxiety symptoms, and also given significant improvements in explanatory style, hopelessness, and dysfunctional attitudes. In another study 3% of the group receiving the CBT intervention developed GAD by 12 months post-intervention compared with 14% in the control group. Subthreshold panic disorder sufferers were found to significantly benefit from use of CBT. Use of CBT was found to significantly reduce social anxiety prevalence.


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I N TER PE RSO NAL PSYCHOTH E R APY Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) is a time-limited treatment that encourages the patient to regain control of mood and functioning typically lasting 12–16 weeks. IPT is based on the common factors of psychotherapy: a “treatment alliance in which the therapist empathically engages the patient, helps the patient to feel understood, arouses affect, presents a clear rationale and treatment ritual, and yields success experiences.” IPT takes structure from psycho-dynamic psychotherapy, but also from contemporary Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) approaches in that it is time-limited and employs homework, structured interviews, and assessment tools. Over the past 20 years, IPT has been carefully studied in many research protocols, has been demonstrated to successfully treat patients with depression, and has been modified to treat other psychiatric disorders (substance abuse, dysthymia, bulimia) and patient populations (adolescents, late-life, primary medical care). It has primarily been utilized as a shortterm (approximately 16 week) therapy, but has also been modified for use as a maintenance therapy for patients with recurrent depression.

This course of treatment seems to be used more in cases of eating disorders and substemce abuse. While is has been used to treat depression, CBT is explicitly used for Anxiety, so my research will delve more into that area.


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EN G AG ING MI NDS “Engaging Minds aims to encourage, inspire and empower children to understand more about and look after their mental health. Engaging Minds is a multi delivery programme.” They combine a range of practical techniques taken from a variety of disciplines that have been shown to have positive benefits on mental health (including Meditation, Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP), Nutrition). They deliver interesting and inspiring information, presented in a fun, engaging and interactive way. “By teaching children to understand mood changes, what causes them and how to help manage them, we aim to also indirectly address the roots of some common behavioural issues such as ADHD and bullying and common stress related issues such as exam nerves, lack of focus and worry.” WHAT THE CHILDREN LEARN They encourage children to: Eat Right, Think Right, Be Right. This is done through 3 main workshops. MIND POWER, MOOD FOOD & NINJA CALM. The workshops have been uniquely devised to provide an interactive and memorable experience for the children, actively raising awareness of their mental health and providing them with a toolkit to help them cope in many situations. Children will be taught a varied selection of techniques and approaches that they will be able to use whenever they feel necessary and that can also be built into their lives for the long term.

“Our aim is that whether it is shortly after or years after we have delivered the workshops, pupils will remember the simple techniques that can help them help themselves in many different situations. Our unique pupil resources and memorable style of delivery will give the best chance of achieving this aim.”

Engaging Minds is a program devised by the Natural Health Clinic in Bristol. The program is specifically targeted at children, and helping them either deal with, or prevent mental health issues. As I may be designing something aimed at children I think they could be a great source of information.


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MIND POWER

Children need to understand how they get themselves into an Nun-resourceful state and to learn to be able to move into a better state. When we feel angry, depressed or anxious, our intellect is lowered. As a consequence, we don’t learn so well, focus on what is being said or enjoy the moment so much. By learning to use our own positive memories, we feel enabled and resourceful which in turn boosts our confidence. This is empowering and reinforces a positive state of mind. MOOD FOOD

The discussion in addition to the food and mood chart for them to follow up with will start them thinking about the subject as well as involving their own selves and bodies with an interesting experiment. They will learn food advice that will help them with the many challenges presented at this age that can positively help them with maintaining concentration levels, balancing mood fluctuations and increasing focus.

NINJA CALM

This basic breathing meditation is primarily an exercise in mindfulness, which is the ability to hold one’s attention on something. This trains attention and allows practice in dealing with a range of events, distracting thoughts and feelings. Mindfulness is essential for good mental health. The more mindful we are, the more control we have over our thoughts and emotions, making us more calm and effective in all areas of our lives. A peaceful mind is a happy and open mind, thus the practice of meditation promotes happiness, as well as feeling more warmly disposed towards others.


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NE U RO LI NGUIST I C PRO G R AM M I N G Neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) is an approach to communication, personal development, and psychotherapy created by Richard Bandler and John Grinde. Its creators claim a connection between the neurological processes (“neuro”), language (“linguistic”) and behavioural patterns learned through experience (“programming”) and that these can be changed to achieve specific goals in life. MAIN COMPONENTS AND CORE CONCEPTS NLP can be understood in terms of three broad components and the central concepts pertaining to those: Subjectivity. – We experience the world subjectively thus we create subjective representations of our experience. These subjective representation of experience are constituted in terms of five senses and language. Sight, Touch, Sound, Taste & Smell. Furthermore it is claimed that these subjective representations of experience have a discernible structure, a pattern. – Behaviour can be described and understood in terms of these sense-based subjective representations. Behaviour is broadly conceived to include verbal and non-verbal communication, incompetent, maladaptive or “pathological” behaviour as well as effective or skill-full behaviour. – Behaviour (in self and others) can be modified by manipulating these sense-based subjective representations. Consciousness. NLP is predicated on the notion that consciousness is bifurcated into a conscious component and a unconscious component. Those subjective representations that occur outside of an individual’s awareness comprise what is referred to as the “unconscious mind”. Learning. NLP utilizes an imitative method of learning—termed modeling—that is claimed to be able to codify and reproduce an exemplar’s expertise in any domain of activity. An important part of the codification process is a description of the sequence of the sensory/linguistic representations of the subjective experience of the exemplar during execution of the expertise.

NLP, while having lots of success, has been widely discredited, so I probably won’t be looking too much into this.


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TIM E TO CHANGE “Mental health problems might actually be more common than you think. One in four of us will be affected by mental illness in any year. The effects are as real as a broken arm, even though there isn’t a sling or plaster cast to show for it.” Time to Change is England’s biggest programme to challenge mental health stigma and discrimination. Mental health problems are common - but nearly nine out of ten people who experience them say they face stigma and discrimination as a result. This can be even worse than the symptoms themselves. WHAT IS STIGMA? Mental illness is still surrounded by prejudice, ignorance and fear. What does this mean? The attitudes people have towards those of us with mental health problems mean it is harder for them to work, make friends and in short, live a normal life. – People become isolated – They are excluded from everyday activities – It is harder to get or keep a job – People can be reluctant to seek help, which makes recovery slower and more difficult – Their physical health is affected. – Many people say that being discriminated against in work and social situations can be a bigger burden than the illness itself. STARTING THE CONVERSATION If your friend had a broken leg, or he or she had just come out of hospital after an operation, you probably wouldn’t think twice about asking how they were. Sometimes that’s all it takes – asking someone how they are.


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TALKING TO SOMEONE WITH MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES – Avoid clichés: Phrases like ‘Cheer up’, ‘I’m sure it’ll pass’ and ‘Pull yourself together’ definitely won’t help the conversation! Being open minded, non-judgemental and listening will. – Think about body language: Try to be relaxed and open - a gaping mouth, regular clock watching or looking uncomfortable won’t go unnoticed. – Ask how you can help: People will want support at different times in different ways, so ask how you can help. – Don’t just talk about mental health: Keep in mind that having a mental health problem is just one part of the person. People don’t want to be defined by their mental health problem so keep talking about the things you always talked about. Just spending time with the person lets them know you care and can help you understand what they’re going through. – Don’t avoid the issue: If someone comes to you to talk, don’t brush it off because this can be a hard step to take. Acknowledge their illness and let them know that you’re there for them. – Give them time: Some people might prefer a text or email rather than talking on the phone or face to face. This means they can get back to you when they feel ready. What’s important is that they know you’ll be there when they’re ready to get in touch. What about sending an e-card? – Find out more: If you feel awkward or uncomfortable about the conversation, find out more about mental illness.

An E-card service that specialises in free cards that you can send to people, about what you’re going through? Different cards for different people. And cards to send to someone WITH anxiety to let them know how your feeling without making them feel bad or upsetting them?


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CHILDREN AND MENTAL HEALTH Mental health problems affect three young people in the average classroom We all have mental health, just like we all have physical health. And, like the body, our minds can become unwell. You might be surprised how common mental health problems are. One in four of us is affected in any year, and one in ten young people experience a mental health problem before the age of 16 - three pupils in the average school classroom. Even if you haven’t gone through something like this in your family, chances are you or your children will know someone who is going through the experience right now. They might have a mental health problem themselves, or find themselves supporting a family member. TALK ABOUT IT Talking about it is really important. Nine in ten people who have a mental health problem say they have experienced stigma and discrimination as a result of their illness, and the fact that it’s difficult to talk about mental health can often be one of the hardest parts of the whole experience. Remember: – You don’t have to be an expert to talk about mental health. – Not knowing things is OK. There are always places to find out more. – Being open about our mental health will almost always help. By speaking openly, we start to break down the taboos. As a result, your children might be more likely to come back to you should they have difficulties in the future. They will also be better equipped to support their friends if they feel they need to. POSITIVE MENTAL ATTITUDE Time to Change is England’s most ambitious programme to end the stigma and discrimination faced by people with mental health problems. Nearly three in four young people fear the reaction of others when they consider talking about their mental health, so we all have a role to play in starting the conversation.


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TA LK IN G ABO UT ANXI ET Y - GR AH AM My own issues had started about ten years ago. I didn’t talk to anyone at the time either. Emotionally I was all over the place. I was stressed and depressed. I had a busy, stressful job, a young family and my first mortgage. I didn’t know how to get on top of the situation. It continued to develop and my symptoms increased. I started to experience chronic anxiety and panic attacks; and this frightened the life out of me at the time. ‘Am I going mad?’ I would ask myself. Things came to a head when I had a massive panic attack in front of several colleagues whilst chairing a high profile meeting. Wow…the embarrassment, confusion and emotion was crippling, but at least it dawned on me I needed help! I went to my GP who assured me…’I know you’re not going mad sir. If you were losing your mind you wouldn’t be so self-aware’ he said. This actually really helped me.

Am I going mad? Is a very common question people suffering from Anxiety ask them selves. And the answer the doctor gave in this story is a really good example of the kind of simple sentences that really help people suffering from anxiety.

Acceptance and openness - Taking the pressure off Starting to open up to my work colleagues was a massive breakthrough for me but what a difficult breakthrough to make. All kinds of thoughts went through my head…’they’ll be laughing behind my back, think I’m being soft, being lazy, weak etc.’… I knew it was my only way forward though. What had dawned on me was that I could never beat my issues by masking them. It was absolutely exhausting trying to remain calm on the exterior whilst struggling like mad on the inside. I couldn’t continue the act any longer. I had to face up to my issues and learn to accept them. I’d been off work for a while so people knew things weren’t right. Naturally they started to ask me how I felt. I started to explain I was experiencing anxiety, panic and stress issues and that life was a struggle at times but I was learning to deal with them and not hide away. This acceptance and openness released a massive amount of pressure off me from trying to permanently portray that cool, calm and confident professional that we often pressurise ourselves to be. CONTINUES ON NEXT PAGE

This re-enforces the idea that people with anxiety and depression need an easier way to tell people. It’s a problem that is consistently coming up in my research.


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What also amazed me was how many others opened up about their issues once provoked. This often created such a positive experience for both of us. Listening to each other’s issues, sharing stories and experiences (often quite humorous on reflection!) and ideas on dealing with issues in our working lives. Others perhaps didn’t understand, or perhaps felt uncomfortable. That’s absolutely fine. At least I’ve been honest with them, they are aware of my challenges and I’ve also raised awareness of mental health in the workplace. All positives! I can’t articulate just how important talking through and sharing your issues with colleagues is. For me, it really does take the pressure off from trying to be someone who I’m not. What I am is a professional businessman who lives with anxiety, panic and stress challenges. Sometimes they impact my work life but that’s absolutely fine. They can be managed and I’m comfortable with that. I don’t expect everyone to understand my issues, I just ask for acceptance. If they can’t accept it then they’re the one with the problems, not me. My ultimate point to all this is we must collectively (employees and employers) look to continuously and pro-actively address the causes of mental health in the workplace. It’s an old cliché but prevention is so much better than cure when it comes to mental health. It’s time to talk and listen about mental health. It’s time to understand and learn.


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TA LK A BOUT MENTAL HEA LTH AT S CHOOL - LAURA AND FRAN We are kind of like each other’s rocks. When one of us has a relapse or a particularly bad day, the other is always there. And on the days where neither of us is well enough to go to class, the others company really does make it easier to get through. Our mentors give us advice and encouragement at school On these bad days we go to the room our school has to cater for people with issues they may have. We have mentors there who are trained to help us through our problems. They give us advice and encouragement and make sure that our education doesn’t completely go down the drain. Sometimes when we are losing hope about our futures we make plans for what we will do, like starting up our own online business, even if we can’t manage university or even leaving the house. We both go to the same mental health service, and quite often our appointments are at the same time so we wait together and chat. It’s funny how the techniques we learn in cognitive behavioural therapy sessions can be turned into something fun. We practise the techniques such as mindfulness, relaxation, and colour therapy together, though sometimes we find it hard to keep a straight face. We’ve both had to deal with discrimination Like most people with mental health problems, we have both had to deal with more than our fair share of discrimination. You would think at a school where they have a room for people with these issues to study in if they aren’t well enough to go to class, the other teachers would be sufficiently trained to assist with these problems too. However in our school, this is not always the case. We both have cards explaining that we have full permission to leave classes and sit outside when necessary. Sometimes the teachers don’t seem to understand the complexity of our problems.

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This is an example of a ‘card’ in use, that clearly isn’t getting the job done.


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Why should we be punished for having an illness? Why should we be punished for having an illness? All of our teachers have been sent emails explaining the safety behaviours that should be allowed. We can wear headphones in class to avoid silence which is a trigger for both of us and Laura must always be allowed a water bottle as she panics without one. But still, every now and again a teacher decides this shouldn’t be permitted. Fran was once shouted at and told that it shouldn’t be allowed because in the real world special treatment wouldn’t be given. Thankfully we have our mentors who do care a lot and one or two of our other teachers do too. When people hear ‘mental illness’, they think it’s just in our heads Some of the other students aren’t very kind either; they either make jokes or tell us we’re making it up. A group of lads once started a rumour saying Laura was possessed by the devil because of a panic attack she had. When people hear ‘mental illness’, they think it’s just in our heads. They don’t realise how much physical pain they actually cause; how you have a constant headache, how you’re dizzy most of the time or how your sleep pattern is non-existent due to horrible nightmares. They tell you that you’re just making a fuss and that you should get over yourself. But we always stick up for each other and have learnt to not take these things to heart. Thanks to each other, our horrible experiences haven’t always been so bad and it’s always nice to know that we will always have each other.


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UN TIL IT AFFEC T ED ME, I KN E W NOTHIN G ABO UT MENTAL H EALTH Until it began to affect me, I was completely ignorant about mental health. I'm ashamed to admit that, like my peers at school, I thought anyone with schizophrenia, bipolar or depression was 'weird' and should be avoided at all costs. I didn't understand it and I'm so glad that through suffering from depression I've learnt about all the spectrum of different mental illnesses and how they affect people. It's such valuable knowledge to have because, as the Time to Change campaign is saying, so many people suffer from mental illness and these people could include your family, best friend or even your future partner. My depression has been met with a lot of ignorance over the last few years. Stupid things that people say, like "My mum told me to stay away from [depressed] people like her, she's not the kind of person you want to be around." These throw away comments are so nasty and hurtful These throw away comments are so nasty and hurtful, and make already vulnerable people feel even more isolated and depressed. Subconsciously I felt the need to hide the fact I was depressed, as though, if I was honest about it, people wouldn't want to know me. Once, in an argument with a friend, I was called a 'f***ing psycho.' I've also been told to 'man up,' 'stop feeling sorry for myself,' and even by one person – 'nah, you haven't got depression, you just think you have!' Over the years I've been called spineless, pathetic and lazy. I was also told at one workplace that I 'don't do anything.' I would have liked to see the person who said this to me drugged up on anti-depressants and drinking bottles of Lucozade just to be able to stay alert. Because that was me at the time and it's not easy. One of the main problems is that many people don't recognise the signs of mental illness One of the main problems is that many people don't recognise the signs of mental illness or distress and instead take someone's erratic or aloof behaviour as arrogance. When I moved into halls for university I became antisocial and isolated very quickly due to my worsening depression. CONTINUES ON NEXT PAGE


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I was convinced my flatmates didn't like me and that I wasn't good enough to be there. One night I wrote one of my flatmates a message on Facebook, apologising if it seemed like I didn't like them and explaining that I suffered from depression. After this they didn't seem to speak to me at all. It felt as though I even became the flat joke - instead of giving me some space, they began to do things like hammer on my door at 3am and talk about me outside my room. they knew there was a vulnerable person in the flat, they jumped at the chance to put me down They were nervous like everyone else about coming to university and once they knew there was a vulnerable person in the flat, they jumped at the chance to put me down. Looking back now I almost feel sorry for them, but at the time it was very hard to cope with. I applied for a job recently and having been told that I had most likely been successful (unless I had a criminal record or something) I wrote that I suffered from depression on a form for medical reasons. I then received a letter a few weeks later telling me, without any explanation, that I had been unsuccessful in my application and best wishes for the future. Most employers have been fine with me having depression, so it was disappointing and sad to come across one that was still so backward in its beliefs. I'm not ashamed to say this because I understand mental health now I've self harmed for a number of years, I've lost so many friends through my erratic behaviour, I've even been in hospital twice since the start of 2012. And I'm not ashamed to say this because I understand mental health now. I know that whatever trouble a person with mental illness gets into - whether it's a suicide attempt, a horrible relationship break-up or a descent into drugs - it isn't a reflection on them, only their illness. And once everyone in our society knows this, or at least attempts to understand this, the stigma against mental illness with fade.


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R ELATE D PRO DUC T S 50 WAYS TO TAKE A BREAK This was given to me by the UWE wellbeing service. It’s a poster with ‘50 ways to take a break’ - Illustrated pictures of people flying a kite etc.... It’s purpose is to get people outside and ‘taking a break’ from work or university or whatever, go outside do some exercise let your mind think of other things. While I don’t like the look of the poster I like the idea, and think a series of posters giving similar messages about exercise etc. could be an interesting idea for the brief.

SAM SAM is an application to help you understand and manage anxiety. The app has been developed in collaboration with a research team from UWE, Bristol. Key Features SAM will help you to understand what causes your anxiety, monitor your anxious thoughts and behaviour over time and manage your anxiety through self-help exercises and private reflection. The “Social cloud” feature will enable you to share your experiences with the SAM community while protecting your identity

This is interesting because it was developed at UWE, so it has even more relevance. I’ve used the app my self and it is very helpful. I really good example of how apps can be used for good.


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YEA R OF HEALT H AND WEL LBE I N G “We all have different backgrounds, different lifestyles, different interests – but for all of us, our physical and mental wellbeing is paramount to our enjoyment of life. The North West Year of Health and Well-being is the start of an ambitious decade-long movement to help everyone in the North West to feel good and live well.” Year Of Health And Well-being have 5 simple phrases that sums up their organisation and help with your health and well-being. Connect… with the people around you. With family, friends, colleagues and neighbours. At home, work, school or in your local community. Think of these as the cornerstones of your life and invest time in developing them. Building these connections will support and enrich you every day. Be Active… Go for a walk or run. Step outside. Cycle. Play a game. Garden. Dance. Exercising makes you feel good. Most importantly, discover a physical activity you enjoy and that suits your level of mobility and fitness. Take Notice… Be curious. Catch sight of the beautiful. Remark on the unusual. Notice the changing seasons. Savour the moment, whether you are walking to work, eating lunch or talking to friends. Be aware of the world around you and what you are feeling. Reflecting on your experiences will help you appreciate what matters. Keep learning… Try something new. Rediscover an old interest. Sign up for that course. Take on a different responsibility at work. Fix a bike. Learn to play an instrument or how to cook your favourite food. Set a challenge you will enjoy achieving. Learning new things will make you more confident as well as being fun. Give… Do something nice for a friend, or a stranger. Thank someone. Smile. Volunteer your time. Join a community group. Look out, as well as in. Seeing yourself, and your happiness, linked to the wider community can be incredibly rewarding and creates connections with the people around you.


PRIMARY RESEARCH


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AN XIETY PRO BLEMS LIST - I N TE RVIE W WITH S OMEO NE WI T H AN X I E TY AT ITS WORST – Leaving my room – Going to shops – Going to university – Going out with friends – Speaking to people – No motivation – Couldn’t Sleep – Can’t be in crowded rooms – Thought I was dying – Thought I was going insane – Spontaneous Crying – Severe feeling of hopelessness – Depression

Speaking to people and going out with friends is on this list, got me thinking finding a way to help people communicate when they’re in this state might be helpful.

LONG TERM – Traveling by train and car, not ideal. – Have to have constant routine or start reverting – Still get regular panic attacks – Phobia of being sick, sick bugs, food poisoning – General phobia of being ill – Can’t go many places: Different countries, any holidays, camping, just exploring anything really. Have to stick to comfort zones. – Don’t like crowded rooms. or loud places. Gigs are pretty hard. – It has ups and downs, when down, still really bad. – Sometimes no motivation still. BAD THINGS IT CAUSED – Failed a year at university – Didn’t see or talk to any of my friends for a year or so, took a while to get that friendship back to what it was. – A lot of strain on my relationship – People think I’m weird – Missed a lot of good times.

Again, strain on friendships and relationships, and missing of nights out and general social drawbacks. A way to help people, explain why they’re not going out, or explain to friends and family what exactly is going on (It can be hard to explain to someone who has no idea what anxiety is, on the surface it sounds like the person is being stupid, as their is no physical symptoms. Maybe something that has examples of what it’s like, that people can relate to more?


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WHAT COULD HAVE HELPED – Someone telling me all I had to find out for my self right from the start. – An easier way to let people know what was going on, explained in a way they’d understand. – Knowing how much eating, sleeping and exercising would help. – A better form of communication with the University. – Someone else who’d gotten through it, telling me what to do, step by step – A way to distract my self. Was very hard to get out of own head. I used Adobe Illustrator a lot when I was really bad. Fact books also helped, and listening to radio. – A way to let someone know how to help me. When people asked how they could help. I never knew the answer. THINGS I DID TO HELP – Daily Exercise – Quit Smoking – Started eating a lot healthier – Sorted my sleep pattern out, quit napping – Stopped drinking for 6 months – Started making my self do the things I was scared of, i.e going into uni. – Started seeing a counsellor – Started to have a routine – Learned all about it, learned the signs – Talked to other people who suffer the same thing. – Cut out caffeine

Looking at what they thought could help and what they did to help is very useful, tells me what sort of thing I should be trying to aim for. Letting people know is an issue brought up again, and I think the better communication with University might be a good place to start thinking, lot’s of University students suffer from Mental health issues, and could probably have similar issues. IDEA: Cards you hand out to people (pop up?) that quickly explains what anxiety is, what they’re going through and how act/deal with it. Different cards for different occasions. Family. Friends. University...

Looking at the things that he did to help the anxiety, it’s clear just living a healthy lifestyle is key. Finding a way to reach people before the mental health problems occur with this advice is key.. IDEA: Routine was important, might be able to think of an idea that helps people get into a routine. A game that encourages routine, get points for doing the same thing at the same time each day...?


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LIVIN G WIT H SO MEO NE W I TH AN X I E TY ZOE DICKENS - BOYFRIEND HAS ANXIETY PROBLEMS: - Not being able to make plans in advance - Not being able to go out or plans being cancelled at the last minute - Not being able to do normal stuff like go to the cinema - Having to try and hide it when I don't feel well to stop you worrying - Cooking a nice dinner and then it not being eating because your not sure about it - Generally having to adapt and change things to my inconvenience etc. to accommodate the anxiety - Worries about the future if it doesn't get better - Worrying what other people think when they see you have a panic attack because they don't understand, having to defend you etc. WHAT WOULD HAVE HELPED: - Better communication and you telling me how I can help you - Advice from someone professional on how to deal with it - Talking about the anxiety once it has passed so I can deal with it better next time - You being better able to listen to reason and advice during a panic attack rather than clamming up - Knowing what to tell other people who have never come in to contact with anxiety

Again, strain on friendships and relationships, and missing of nights out and general social drawbacks. A way to help people, explain why they’re not going out, or explain to friends and family what exactly is going on (It can be hard to explain to someone who has no idea what anxiety is, on the surface it sounds like the person is being stupid, as their is no physical symptoms. Maybe something that has examples of what it’s like, that people can relate to more?


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DR GALPIN - LECTURER AT MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY “Looks to me like they don’t want something that mentions mental health directly. But some sort of product. There’s an area of psychology called positive psychology which is about some of the things they talk about. Connectedness with others etc.. And also ‘gamification’ which is a way of getting people to do healthy things through turning them into a game. I like the story idea could also turn into an app that allows connection and sharing or something. Plenty of research on that.” “Saying about a relevant theory that talks about how to motivate people to change their behaviour and it’s called social cognitive theory. So what I said before in relation to your kids story is that social cognitive theory works by someone observing someone else’s behaviour and then if they see that person being rewarded or the outcomes being good for that person, then they’re more likely to repeat the behaviour them selves. but they’ll only repeat the behaviour if they feel they’ll be able to achieve the goals themselves, so that’s called self efficacy when you got the belief in your own ability to produce the desired outcome, if you have high self efficacy you’ll think you’ll be able to do it. and if you have low self efficacy you don’t think you’ll be able too, so I think that any behaviour change story, like the one you described, it has to show somebody doing some sort of behaviour that the person reading the story will A: feel that they’ll get rewarded for doing and B: feel they’ll be able to achieve it. And also another thing that social cognitive theory predicts is that you’re more likely to try and imitate behaviour of someone you see, if that person can relate to you in some way. You think it’s a good idea that works with the brief? Yeah I think, you got 2 elements, one is the design element, which I assume will be illustrative and you’ve got the story element, and I think the story element will be the thing that SCT will help you to design because you’ll base the story around the theory’s of SCT If you use a theory like SCT it’ll help determine what’s in the story. The events. Then the design will follow from that. The other thing I was thinking about what positive psychology, Selegman is the main guy in that field and his ideas are pretty straight forward really, it’s basically psychology should be able to tell people how to lead really fulfilling lives and not just tell people how to avoid getting ill, and that I think really resonates with what the brief is talking about.”


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SOCIAL COGNITIVE THEORY

BEHAVIOUR

Explains how people acquire and maintain certain behavioural patterns, while also providing the basis for intervention strategies. Human behaviour is explained in terms of a triadic, dynamic, and reciprocal model in which behaviour, personal factors, and environmental influences all interact. An individual’s behaviour is uniquely determined by these interactions. PERSONAL

ENVIRONMENTAL

FACTORS

FACTORS

IMPORTANCE OF HUMAN AGENCY A key mechanism through which the individual contributes to this triad is personal agency Key to human agency is the person’s belief in their personal efficacy Unless people believe they can produce desired results to their actions they have little incentive to act or to persevere in the face of difficulty. MAJOR CONSTRUCTS AND IMPLICATIONS – Environment: Factors physically external to the person; Provides opportunities and social support – Situation: Perception of the environment; Correct misperceptions and promote healthful forms – Behavioural capability: Knowledge and skill to perform a given behaviour; Promote mastery learning through skills training – Expectations: Anticipatory outcomes of a behaviour; Model positive outcomes of healthful behaviour – Expectancies: The values that the person places on a given outcome, incentives; Present outcomes of change that have functional meaning – Self-control: Personal regulation of goal-directed behaviour or performance; Provide opportunities for self-monitoring, goal setting, problem solving, and self-reward. – Observational learning: Behavioural acquisition that occurs by watching the actions and outcomes of others’ behaviour; Include credible role models of the targeted behaviour – Reinforcements: Responses to a person’s behaviour that increase or decrease the likelihood of re-occurrence; Promote self-initiated rewards and incentives – Self-efficacy: The person’s confidence in performing a particular behaviour; Approach behavioural change in small steps to ensure success – Emotional coping responses: Strategies or tactics that are used by a person to deal with emotional stimuli; Provide training in problem solving and stress management

The Social Cognitive Theory is all about showing someone something, and then showing them the reward at the end, and making them feel like they could do that too. I think this is exactly what I need to do with which ever idea I choose, whether it be the children’s book or something else, the aim is to convince others to live healthier lives. And this seems like a viable way to do that.

Self control and observational learning seem particularly useful in my research. If I can utilise them in whatever project I do, that could be very beneficial.


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PERSONAL FACTORS INFLUENCING BEHAVIOUR INCLUDE HAVING THE CAPABILITY TO: – Symbolize behaviour – Anticipate the outcomes of a behaviour – Learn by observing others – Have confidence in performing a behaviour (including overcoming any barriers to performing the behaviour) – Self-determine or self-regulate behaviour –Reflect and analyse experience SOCIAL COGNITIVE THEORY: ENVIRONMENTS AND SITUATION – The environment is composed of the social environment – Family, friends, peers at work or in the classroom and the physical environment –Situation refers to the person’s perception of the environment SOCIAL COGNITIVE THEORY: OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING – Observational leaning occurs when a person watches other people’s behaviors and the reinforcements associated with those behaviors – If a person is to perform a behaviour he or she must know what the behaviour is (knowledge of the behaviour) and have the skills to perform it. – Reinforcements are applied to reward positive behaviors and sanction negative behaviors – A person learns that certain outcomes occur in a given situation and expects them to occur when that situation presents itself again ad the person performs similarly. Expectations guide behaviour – The key is the ability of the individual to engage in behaviour to achieve a goal. SOCIAL COGNITIVE THEORY: SELF-EFFICACY – The most important pre-requisite for behaviour change – The confidence a person feels about performing a particular activity.


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POS ITIVE PSYCHO LO GY Positive psychology is a recent branch of psychology whose purpose was summed up in 1998 by Martin Seligman and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi: “We believe that a psychology of positive human functioning will arise, which achieves a scientific understanding and effective interventions to build thriving individuals, families, and communities.” Positive psychologists seek “to find and nurture genius and talent” and “to make normal life more fulfilling”, rather than merely treating mental illness. Positive psychology is primarily concerned with using the psychological theory, research and intervention techniques to understand the positive, adaptive, creative and emotionally fulfilling aspects of human behaviour. METHODS Positive Psychology is concerned with three issues: positive emotions, positive individual traits, and positive institutions. Positive emotions are concerned with being content with one’s past, being happy in the present and having hope for the future. Positive individual traits focus on one’s strengths and virtues. HAPPINESS SET POINT The happiness set point idea is that most people return to an average level of happiness - or a set point - after temporary highs and lows in emotionality. People whose set points lean toward positive emotionality tend to be cheerful most of the time and those whose set points tend to be more negative emotionality tend to gravitate toward pessimism and anxiety. Lykken found that we can influence our level of well-being by creating environments more conductive to feelings of happiness and by working with our genetic makeup. A reason why subjective well being is for the most part stable is because of the great influence genetics have. Although the events of life have some effect on subjective well being, the general population returns to their set point. Besides the development of new habits, the use of antidepressants, effective exercise, and a healthier diet have proven to strongly impact mood. In fact, exercise is sometimes called the “miracle” or “wonder” drug - alluding to the wide variety of proven benefits it provides.

GENETIC TENDENCIES CIRCUMSTANCE INTENTIONAL ACTIVITIES


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BROAD THEORIES Some positive psychology researchers posit three overlapping areas of investigation: – Research into the Pleasant Life, or the "life of enjoyment", examines how people optimally experience, forecast, and savour the positive feelings and emotions that are part of normal and healthy living (e.g. relationships, hobbies, interests, entertainment, etc..). Despite the attention given, Martin Seligman says this most transient element of happiness may be the least important. – Investigation of the beneficial effects of immersion, absorption, and flow, felt by individuals when optimally engaged with their primary activities, is the study of the Good Life, or the "life of engagement". Flow is experienced when there is a positive match between a person's strength and their current task, i.e. when one feels confident of accomplishing a chosen or assigned task. (See related concepts, Self-efficacy and play). – Inquiry into the Meaningful Life, or "life of affiliation", questions how individuals derive a positive sense of wellbeing, belonging, meaning, and purpose from being part of and contributing back to something larger and more permanent than themselves (e.g., nature, social groups, organizations, movements, traditions, belief systems). HOW TO INCREASE HAPPINESS A practical application of positive psychology is to assist individuals and organizations in identifying strengths so as to increase and sustain well-being. Therapists, counsellors, coaches, various psychological professionals, HR departments, business strategists, and others, are using new methods and techniques to broaden and build upon the strengths of a wide population of individuals. This includes those not suffering from mental illness or disorder. Researcher Dianne Hales described an emotionally healthy person as someone who exhibits: flexibility and adaptability to different circumstances, a sense of meaning and affirmation in life, an “understanding that the self is not the centre of the universe”, compassion and the ability to be unselfish, an increased depth and satisfaction in intimate relationships, and a sense of control over the mind and body. The easiest and best possible way to increase one’s happiness is by doing something that increases the ratio of positive to negative emotions.


CHILDRENS BOOK EVIDENCE


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T R EATM ENT O F DEPRESSIO N I N CHILDR E N ‘ NEEDS IMPROVI N G’ This is all taken from an article published on nhs.uk on 30/09/13 “Children as young as five are now suffering from depression,” says The Daily Telegraph, while the Daily Mail reports on the “worrying rise in the number of children with depression,” saying that almost 80,000 children are now affected. WHAT DO CURRENT STATISTICS SAY ON HOW COMMON DEPRESSION IS IN CHILDREN? NICE says that nearly 80,000 children and young people in the UK suffer from severe depression, including more than 8,000 children aged under 10 years. According to the ONS findings: – one in 10 children and young people had a mental health illness. – 4% had an emotional disorder such as anxiety or depression. – 6% had a conduct disorder (a range of disorders associated with aggressive and anti-social behaviours). – 2% had more than one type of disorder. SOCIAL EFFECTS FOR CHILDREN WITH MENTAL ILLNESS Almost half of children with emotional disorders, about two thirds of children with conduct disorders, and over 80% of children with hyperkinetic disorders scored in the bottom 25% on a measure of parent-assessment of child’s ability to empathise with others. Around half of children with one of these three conditions also scored in the lowest 25% on a scale measuring the child’s perceived network of close family and friends. WHAT DO THE NICE QUALITY STANDARDS ON CHILDHOOD DEPRESSION SAY? Information about depression that is appropriate to the child’s age NICE says that children and young people need age-appropriate information so they can understand their diagnosis and treatment options. With the right information, the child will then be better able to participate in making decisions about their care with their healthcare professionals and family members.

NICE is the ‘National Institute for Health-Care and Excellence.’ - NICE publishes guidelines in four areas. The use of health technologies within the NHS (such as the use of new and existing medicines, treatments and procedures), clinical practice (guidance on the appropriate treatment and care of people with specific diseases and conditions), guidance for public sector workers on Health promotion and ill-health avoidance, and guidance for social care services and users.

ONS is the ‘Office of National Statistics’ a non-ministerial department which reports directly to the Parliament of the United Kingdom.


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CHILD R E N’S BO O K I DEA INITIAL STORY IDEA There is a selfish Man, that drives to work everyday (even though it isn’t that far), always thinks he knows everything there is to know has no friends or family (that he sees) never does anything for anyone else and is in his own little work bubble, never goes out never ‘see’s’ anything. He’s terrible lonely and gets these ‘weird feelings’ that he cant describe, he just knows he hates them. Has trouble sleeping. He eats really badly. At one point an old woman drops her shopping, or something? and he just drives on ignoring her, and sneering? First of all his car breaks and he has to walk in, it takes him ages so he buys a bike. When he’s cycling in, he starts bumping into a couple of work colleagues, who invite him out for something, a drink? A game of badminton? He’s feeling more sociable after doing some exercise and surprises him self by agreeing. At some point on his journey he see’s the old lady drop her shopping again, he helps her and it makes him feel good. He goes and plays the game of badminton (he’s never played before, it makes him feel good to learn, they tell him he’s a natural or something). He goes to buy his usual un-healthy dinner and they’re sold out, he has to buy something healthy, he enjoys it more than he thought he would. and for the first night in ages, sleeps straight through, waking up feeling refreshed. It ends somehow, with him wishing he’s always lived like this, and reflecting on how much better his life is now.

[EDIT] After talking to Dr Galpin about the Social Cognitive Theory. He was talking about how a person is more likely to try a behaviour out if he relates to the person he’s observing doing the behaviour. Because of this i’ve decided to change the main character to a child. Instead of driving to work, he’s being driven to school, he’s selfish and doesn’t share his toys and never goes outside during playtime. Spends all his time playing on the computer and sitting inside. Loves chips and crisps. Throws a tantrum if doesn’t get them.

This is just a rough story outline, I think it shows a clear path to how eating well and being more physically active can change your life in a positive way. The story won’t mention any Mental Health conditions by name, but the way the man acts will be similar (not being able to sleep, anti-social and always in a ‘bad mood’). Hopefully it’ll show children that and maybe even their parents who are reading it to them.


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CONTENT IDEAS Book starts of darker, as in colours, and gets lighter as he starts doing all the mentally healthy things. Might be easier to use 3 different colours, or gradually swap out the colours. Start off with 3 dark colours, end up with 3 light colours. As he starts to ‘look at the world’ the backgrounds become more detailed, or less in shadow. A recurring frame could be his mouth, as the book goes on, slowly turns from a frown to a smile. Very stylistic, simple drawings, maybe mainly silhouettes. 3 colours throughout? Half story, Half comic? As in, it has speech bubbles sometimes? Recurring frame, probably twice. Getting out of bed. First time, really dark, curtains drawn, Shot of alarm clock, he uses his fist to turn it off. not happy. Second time, throws curtains open, shot of alarm clock, using a finger to press it off. Happy.

Example of what the illustrations would look like. Simple yes stylised.


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J U STIFICAT I O N Authors use children’s books to put across huge moral dilemma's and problems all the time. Find examples. It gives the moral of healthy living and shows how it can help someone mentally (i.e their sleep) without ever mentioning the words. It is a consumer product, parents will buy it for their children, and would probably read it to them as well (as they want their children to be a good person and be healthy). It’ll sink into their minds as well they might be like (maybe I should cycle to work, like I always wanted to.) Teenagers and adults might buy it on their own, due to the stylised way it’s drawn? Look at Emily Strange, teenage goths love her. It could if popular enough become part of popular culture, see hungry caterpillar). It is a solution I feel embeds the positive behaviour. It’ll be quite clear what the good option is. It can have tie ins, like a board game? that could promote healthy living.

EVIDENCE LITTLE FEET, BIG STEPS BY BRIT SHARON A coming of age story about Gabby, a young girl who signs up for an AIDS Walk in her city. She turns to her community to fundraise and is unstoppable on her journey to make a difference. Throughout the story, Gabby comes to terms with what AIDS is and why people come together to support causes that effect others.

RACHEL AND THE LION BY STEPHANIE LAINEZ An excellent tool for parents, this book helps to create a platform in which to discuss pressing life issues, such as sickness, death, honesty and respect. Rachel is a 7-year-old girl in a small town in Africa that is struck by malaria. As tragedy hits her household, her special relationship with the Lion helps her cope and find inner strength through understanding grief, conflict, and truth.


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WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE GLOBAL BY RANA DIORIO In this whimsically drawn and thoughtfully told story, children learn what it means to be global by visiting the pyramids, eating sushi, celebrating Kwanzaa, and learning how to say “hello” in Swahili. The book is a conversation starter for parents and educators to teach children about the goodness in exploring, appreciating, and respecting other children’s traditions, religions, and values the world over.

CHILDREN'S STORIES TACKLE PROBLEMS BIG AND SMALL Books * Self-help tales address major traumas as well as situations kids must face every day. Two recent trends are changing the face of self-help books for kids: They look more like traditional children's storybooks, and they cover not just serious physical and psychological disorders, trauma and problems, but routine challenges in children's everyday lives. Here's a selection of recent self-help books published for kids: "Just Because I Am: A Child's Book of Affirmation" - Lauren Murphy Payne's simple book for children ages 3 to 8 is delightfully illustrated by Claudia Rohling and contains essential truths about the unconditional value of childhood. "A Terrible Thing Happened" - Sherman saw something horrible and couldn't forget it. This gentle story by Margaret Holmes, illustrated by Cary Pillo, helps traumatized children who have witnessed violence, accidents, homicides or suicides, or natural disasters. "I Don't Want to Sleep Tonight" - Anchor Deborah Norville's cute bedtime companion tackles the nighttime fears and wake-up monsters many children anticipate before dozing off. "Help! A Girl's Guide to Divorce and Stepfamilies" - Author Nancy Holyoke provides support, advice and straightforward answers to girls trying to cope with their parents' divorce. "How to Do Homework Without Throwing Up" - This funny little volume, written and illustrated by Trevor Romain, gives tips for doing homework with minimal hassle.

This is an article from the LA Times talking about how Children’s books are more and more being used to tackle big issues.


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WHY ARE YOU SO SAD: A CHILD'S BOOK ABOUT PARENTAL DEPRESSION Author: Beth Andrews Publisher: American Psychological Association The book explains how depression is a problem with the way you feel, and that mums and dads don't feel bad on purpose (in exactly the same way as when someone gets a cold or flu). Depression can't be caught or seen. It explains that depressed people sometimes don't sleep well or eat properly, may forget things and have a lack of energy. They may shout and get cranky, cry or be sad. Some parents may put on a brave face and act happy, but still be unhappy inside. The book goes on to explain that there are things that can be done to help parents feel better, such as therapy or counselling. A doctor may prescribe medicine. When depression gets bad, the parent may need to stay in hospital. A few questions that children might ask are: who will take care of them, can they visit, when will they come home. A child can't fix depression, and it's not their job to do so. They are also not alone, and there are lots of adults around to talk to ask for help from. The book recommends that the child talks things through with friends or a responsible adult. It also includes advice on how to manage feelings of anger.

While not as relevant as the second story, this book is really useful research for my other idea which is finding a way of helping people explain to friends family work what exactly is going on and how they can help.

MOMMY STAYED IN BED THIS MORNING Author: Mary Wenger Weaver This unique book shows the impact of a parent’s struggle with depression through the eyes of a child. The sensitive and honest portrayal provides talking points and identifies sources of support for children and family. Rarely do books for children four-eight years old deal with the problem of mental illness in the family. This story follows preschool David as he confronts the trauma of his mother’s depression and is helped to resolution. Always viewed through David’s eyes, the scenes depict symptoms of depression and therapeutic interventions for children. Readers see David’s range of emotions and the many people who help him find the way to happiness and security, including the spiritual dimension. Mommy Stayed in Bed This Morning helps children recognize their fears and anxieties and then points to ways of discovering health and wholeness. Healing from mental illness is an ongoing process; the book has a realistic but satisfying ending.”

These 2 stories are particularly good examples, because they are targeting mental health. One is a more direct ‘guide’ while the other more of a story that incidentally is all about a parent having depression. If I make a children’s book it will be more of the latter.


TELLING PEOPLE EVIDENCE


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TE LLIN G P EO PLE THE IDEA The idea is a simple one. A series of cards that can be easily transported are designed with a specific mental health problem in mind, and on the card is a simple and easy to understand explanation of what the mental illness is, how to treat someone who has this mental illness and likely or common thoughts or actions the person is experiencing. The card is designed to help people who find it hard to tell friends, family, teachers etc. what they’re experiencing and how it feels. Potentially the cards could be geared towards specific audiences as well. Cards would exist for the other side too. A card a friend or family member can give to the person with the problem, explaining what they’re going through, that they just want to help, but don’t know how etc.. These cards would be for all ages, and would be free to pick up at GP’s, Hospitals and anywhere else were people with these problems would likely to be. EVIDENCE Almost every single person I have spoke to about what challenges they had, mentioned telling people being one of the main issues they faced. They found it hard, didn’t know how to explain, were scared of ridicule. Something they could easily give to someone explaining what is going on with them and how to help them, how to act round them, is an idea that has gone down well with the professionals I have spoken to. A big problem my research has shown is the stigma attached to these mental health issues. Some people become isolated, others are excluded from everyday activities, physical health is affected and many other problems can arise because of this stigma.

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It happens at work at school anywhere where your mental health problem is going to become apparent. Realistically we’re never going to be able to remove that stigma completely, but my research showed that even having ONE friend or family member that understands can greatly benefit the person, and help on the road to recovery. But it can be very hard to start this conversation with someone, sometimes the closer you are to the person, the harder it gets. Sometimes you don’t know how to explain it, don’t know what to say, and just end up making things even more complicated. When Interviewing a guy who’s had anxiety for over 2 years and his girlfriend separately they both said that communication was one of the worst problems, and when they did finally start to talk about it and understand, it was one of the turning points in his illness. An interview with an older male who works full time showed similar results: “Starting to open up to my work colleagues was a massive breakthrough for me but what a difficult breakthrough to make. All kinds of thoughts went through my head…’they’ll be laughing behind my back, think I’m being soft, being lazy, weak etc.’…” - He goes on to say that acceptance and openness takes the pressure off. 2 Girls who go to school suffer discrimination on a daily basis from other students, but also from the teachers who don’t understand how ill they are and how to treat this illness. One girl says “Fran was once shouted at and told that it shouldn’t be allowed because in the real world special treatment wouldn’t be given. Thankfully we have our mentors who do care a lot and one or two of our other teachers do too.” She was referring to the ‘special’ measures they have like always having a water bottle on them. The other students make fun of them and say it’s ‘just in our heads’ one boy accused one of them of being possessed by the devil when she had a panic attack. This ignorant behaviours only make illness’s like Anxiety worse. The website The Year Of Health Awareness seems to agree, and has one of their ‘5 key ways’ to help combat mental health is ‘Connect’ “with the people around you. With family, friends, colleagues and neighbours. At home, work, school or in your local community. Think of these as the cornerstones of your life and invest time in developing them. Building these connections will support and enrich you every day.”


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R E LATE D TO BRIEF HOW THE IDEA RELATES BACK TO THE BRIEF The brief says to find a way to increase everyday behaviours that build mental well-being. the everyday behaviour I’m trying to increase is communication. It will greatly benefit the person with the disorder, and could help build good mental well-being.

The brief says that they’re looking for a preventative measure While this isn’t solely a preventative measure, it could be used as one. While the most likely person to pick up the booklet is someone who already has a problem. Anyone is welcome to, someone who thinks they might be developing something could pick it up, and follow the advice and ‘nip it in the bud’ so to speak. It could, and is designed too, lead onto other areas of mental health information. For example, someone worrying about getting one of these mental health issues could pick up the booklet, see the list of helpful websites on the back, and do some research, seeing that daily exercise and eating healthy can easily prevent or help with a mental health issue.

The brief gives a list of activities that promote good mental health. It wasn’t a definitive list, and I felt that ‘Talking’ is a very simple, helpful activity. So this is the one I concentrated on. Others include: Spending time with the people you love: Friends, family etc.. My booklet fully promotes this activity. It’s all about communication with your friends or family, regardless of whether you’re the person with the disorder of just a concerned friend.


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Doing something for someone else. Again, these booklets are all about helping someone else who already has the problem. This in turns makes you more knowledgeable and adheres to the learning something new example that the brief gave.

The brief says that they want a solution that embeds these positive behaviours into a product that isn’t overly associated with mental health. This is where my idea falls down a little. Mine is fully associated with mental health. And that’s the point! I wanted to make something that I knew would have helped me when I had anxiety really badly, and I really think this would have. Along with people in the industry and other experts in the field who agreed something like this would be useful. I decided to go ahead with this idea, and hope that the fact it hits all the other criteria would be enough. I think the project has mainstream appeal, and along with a proposed advertising campaign, can be really driven into the market, and can get people talking, hopefully socially and mentally. It says consider the intensives people would use it other than wanting to improve their mental health. I say the other incentive is helping OTHERS who want to improve their mental health.


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TELLING PEOPLE DESIGN


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H: 95mm

W: 130mm

THE SIZE: I decided to make it bigger than to fit in a wallet. The wallet sized options were just to small to get all the information on it. But it still fits easily in a pocket or any sort of bag. People can still carry it about with them wherever they go. It’s about an average wallet size, but much flatter, so if you have your wallet in your pocket you can have this in it to no problem. Any smaller and the mechanism gets really complicated and it becomes more likely to fail or break.

W: 240mm

H: 210mm

This is the size the inside would be if it didn’t expand. Is has 3 times the space to add information/visuals.


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THE FONT: It’s all lowercase and a ‘soft’ round font. It’s easy to read and is the sort of font that is used in materials for children, as the letters are easy on the eye and very clear. THE COLOURS: The main colours are a pinkish red and white. The red is a nice soothing colour. Magenta can mean s a colour of universal harmony and emotional balance. So seems pretty fitting. THE DESIGN: I like the simplistic megaphone and use of the shadow. I think it’s effective. Block colour use of the Magenta is a little much for my tastes. It is eye catching though. The logo is OK, I don’t think it stands out very much.

THE FONT: In a very similar font to ‘time to change’ all lower case and soft. THE COLOURS: Only one colour, grey. Probably not meant to represent anything. Quite like the minimalism of it. THE DESIGN: The logo has grown on, I hated it at first, it looks better printed. As a device it’s quite good at catching an eye.


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THE FONT: Same as the others, lower case and soft. THE COLOURS: I think this one makes good use of colours. 5 bright colours to represent 5 different parts of the charity. It’s the sort of colour use I had in mind, to present the different mental illnesses. THE DESIGN: The Icons are kind of what I had in mind for the icons that represent the different mental illnesses. The logo is eye catching, and I think works in a strange way. Not my usual style, but my favourite out of the ones I looked at.

THE FONT: Still lowercase, but a serif this time. I don’t think a serif font is as appropriate as a san. THE COLOURS: Blue and yellow, in my experience are used a lot in charity’s, like CAB so maybe a bit over used for this kind of thing. THE DESIGN: The only part I like is the replacing one of the letters with an image that looks like the letter. A common tact in logos, but an effective one.


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THE FONT: First hand drawn font i’ve come across. Works quite well, and joins up to the image nicely. THE COLOURS: Nice shades of blue, I think they work well. THE DESIGN: I like the logo, I think it’s clever, makes you think a little, and is likely to make you remember.

THE FONT: Familiar soft childrens font again, all lowercase again. THE COLOURS: Red and grey work notoriously well together. THE DESIGN: The logo is smart I think, it uses the 2 colours well. I like that the red parts of the logo both relate to the brain.


OPEN UP BRANDING


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TYPEFACES FO R LO GO From looking at other logos in the mental health industry I have determined that the font should be soft and preferably lower case. I don’t necessarily want to have a logo that looks exactly like all the others, so I’m going to look at a broader range of typefaces and experiment with uppercase as well.

OPEN UP.

MAAGKRAMP / REGULAR

OPEN UP.

Has the round quality of that the other logos suggest mine should have. Don’t think the caps takes anything anyway. Looks a bit more like an order.

Another round soft typeface, thinner this time. Think I prefer the thickness of the previous one.

AG BOOK ROUNDED

OPEN UP. OPEN UP. OPEN UP. OPEN UP.

Again similar, but a bit more different, I think this is my favourite so far.

AG BOOK ROUNDED CONDENSED / BOLD

Not rounded, makes it look more authoritative, and not as inviting.

AVINER NEXT / BOLD

DIN / BOLD

DIN 1451 STD / ENGSCHRIFT

Prefer this one to the typeface above, but prefer the rounded full stop of the previous.

This is my favourite of the nonrounded fonts, doesn’t look too commanding. Starting to think I should go lowercase though.


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LOWERCASE

open up. open up. AVINER NEXT / BOLD

First lower case font looked at, quite like it, it does seem more relaxed and inviting than the uppercase counter parts.

I prefer this one, might be a bit too skinny though.

ADVENT / BOLD

open up. open up. open up. open up. open up.

I like this one, but it’s too ‘bubbly’ and thick, makes it look fun, which is not the desired effect.

BORISBLACKBOXX / BOLD

DIN 1451 STD / ENGSCHRIFT

FILETTO / BOLD

See lots potential in this one, not as ‘fun’ as some of the others, but not too demanding and authoritative either. A nice cross.

I like this one as well, simple, easy to read, a little different from others.

This one is a little hard to read, and looks like it should be on a restaurant logo.

JAPAN / REGULAR

PRINT BOLD / REGULAR

Like this one too, like the kerning, actually gives a sense of opening up.


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S HORTLIST

open up. open up.

open up. open up. open up. open up. open up. open up.

Trying out the shortlisted fonts in a block colour and without, not sure how it’d be used yet, so got to try both ways, see if they both work, might be being used for different reasons, in different formats.

CHOSEN I’ve decided to go with this option. I really like it, and I think it works in both situations, it’ll look good in/on any colour and I think there’s a lot of manipulation potential.

CHOSEN I’m going to try and play with this one as well, just to make sure i’ve chosen the right one. I really like this one, it looks a bit more childish, but maybe that;s what I need.


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open up. open up. open up. open up. TO MENT AL HEA LTH

Playing with the concept of opening, by making a letter look like a door opening. I like the idea, but in practise when the logo is small it’s very hard to see that that is what is going on.

Opening up again, could work, but don’t really like how it looks, takes up too much room.

Like this, it’s simple and looks neat, just needs an opening up factor included, to make it unique.


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CHOS E N IDEA DEV ELO PM E N T

Trying out incorporating a key into the logo using negative space, I like it, but has the same problem as the door, when small, very hard to see what is going on.

CHOSEN Am going to use this one. It’s clear that something is opening from practically any size, and I think it looks neat too. not too complicated.


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The mental health part could change with regards to whatever illness that leaflet is referring to. For example ‘About Depression’ ‘About Anxiety’.

A B O U T

A N X I E T Y

ABOUT DEPRESSION

While it makes sense to have it change, I don’t like the fact that the kerning changes each time, isn’t consistent. Doesn’t look professional. Was thinking of having the specific mental health illness listed in its chosen colour underneath the mental health sub title. This shows that they are all under the mental health banner. It gives me a consistent Logo to work with, that I can just add to whenever I need. Will try

Quite like this, makes sense and is easy to distinguish. The colours aren’t decided yet, these are just random ones. The teal reminds me of dentist related material.


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Worrying that the ‘subtle’ changes in the differences between the illnesses won’t be enough to distinguish them. My original idea to have a different coloured background for each, to make it more immediately obvious should be tried out. Need to find a way to write the word ‘anxiety’ or ‘depression’ that fits in the design so far.

Added an arrow to the front of the packaging, as a pointer where to open up.

ANXIETY

ANXIETY

DEPRESSION


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LOGO ICON Decided that each logo that represents the different mental heath problems should have another way to make it clear which one it’s referring to, if for some reason the actual word can’t be used, people will still know. Decided simplest way to do that would be to add a unique icon to each of the logos. For example, for depression, and thunder cloud.

This is the icon for depression. There will be one for all 5 of the mental illness’s these booklets are targeted at.

This will be the placement of all the icons, the same on each one promotes the fact they’re a series.


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I initially the arrow was meant to represent the full stop and show where to open it. Showing people they concluded that the arrow, the cloud and the open S was too much and I agreed. Someone also pointed out that the full stop at the end of the open up, makes no sense, as it’s technically part of the ‘About mental health’. So I got rid of it entirely.

DEPRESSION

DEPRESSION

Made the cloud and DEPRESSION a dark grey because I felt like there was too much white, and it also makes the distinction between the actual logo and the removable interchangeable add ons clearer. LOGO/FRONT COVER OF BOOKLET COMPLETE.


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I NS PIR AT I O N I really like the labels on these bottles. They’re clearly all linked, while being different as well. Also like the icons, simple yet easily identifiable. Something I want in the icons for my design. The colour pallet of just 2 colours is great as well. I want to go for a limited colour pallet in the booklets, 3 max probably.

I really like this. The way it opens out was inspiration for the way my booklets pop out. Again the simple icons and simple colour usage was very influential for me.


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I like how these business like documents look really nice just because it’s really nicely layed out, I wanted to make this research document that way. Also the use of colours to separate the different parts, gave me the idea of different colours representing the different mental health issues.


DESIGNING THE BOOKLET


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D ES IG N ING T HE BO O KLET BOOKLET LAYOUT Working out how many sides the booklet has, what space I have to work with.

3. PAGE 2 OF OPEN BOOK

2. BACK COVER

4. PAGE 1 OF OPEN BOOK

5. POP OUT - MAIN INFORMATION

1. FRONT COVER


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4. PAG E 1 O F O PEN BO O K This is the first page you see when you open up the booklet, I want it to show clearly what booklet it is you’ve picked up, and I think basically to be an introduction to The mental health disorder and to explain what this is.

The booklet who’s mental health problem it belongs to will be thicker bigger and will include its icon.

CONTENT When a family member or friend suffers from depression, your support and encouragement can play an important role in his or her recovery. Depression is a serious condition, don’t underestimate it. The symptom’s aren’t personal and can’t be helped by the sufferer. It’s not something YOU can ‘fix’ but you can be an important part of their recovery.

This will be where the intro is placed.

This was written with all the research I gathered in mind, using quotes and impressions people had to try and and explain clearly and quickly what depression was and how opening up can help.


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3 . PAG E 2 O F O PEN BO O K This page is the second page when you open it up, it’s supposed to just be additional information. In this case ways to help someone with depression.

This list of ways to talk to someone with depression was comprised from my research, taken from all sorts of sources. I used my primary research to sort through and choose the ones that came up the most as problems.


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5. POP OUT - CO NT ENT CONTENT LIST, WHAT IS MOST IMPORTANT TO GO ON? The pop out will need to have the majority of the information on it, it’s the meat of this dish. Looking at the past research I gather that a brief list of the most important rules for helping someone with depression/anxiety would be key, it sets a base that they can work on from there. There is a lot of stigma attached to depression and anxiety and other mental health problems, so statistics that show how common it is in the UK and even the world I feel would be very beneficial, straight away showing people that it isn’t something freakish and rare, that in fact they probably know lots of people with something the same or similar. An idea I had, that from looking at other similar products, seems none of them have, is a personalisation element. The idea I had was a list of all the most common symptoms, with a tick box or something next to it, and whoever can tick what symptoms they have, and instantly it makes it more personal and can for the other person suddenly makes it more real and deep. The page isn’t that big, so I think that should be enough to get onto the page. TO GO ON POPOUT – Statistics about the problem – Ways to help care for someone with the problem – List of common symptoms, that they can personalise All the content will be gathered from my earlier research. Using what I feel are the most important or beneficial parts from all the sources.


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The colours are the same 2 colours that basically the whole booklet is. Other booklets will have their own colour palette.

Included a map of Britain to make the pop out more visually interesting. Don’t want people to open it up and instantly get bored. We want them to read the whole thing.

Caring plays a vital role in the recovery of a person with Depression.

Anxiety or depression affects nearly one in five UK adults. Depression is believed to be the most commonly affected mental disorder in Britain.

ACKNOWLEDGE: Let them know you’ve noticed and want to help. What not to do: Pretend like it is not there or that this is not a serious condition.

Nearly 80,000 children in the UK and young people suffer from severe depression.

FIND OUT WHY: Do they know why they’re depressed? Some don’t. What not to do: If they tell you why they are depressed, or why they think they are.

LISTEN: Sometimes listening to someone can make them feel worthwhile. What not to do: Don't make jokes when they are talking to you. Cheapens it.

BE THERE: Most importantly is to just be there for your friend.

What not to do: Don't say you will be there for them and then not be there.

DON'T PUSH TOO HARD: If they’re not up for talking, don’t push them. What not to do: Don’t yell or force them into anything they don’t want to do.

1/4

3/4

9/10

People will experience a mental health problem in any given year.

Young people fear the reactions of friends when they talk about their mental health.

People with mental health problems experience stigma and discrimination.

STAY IN CONTACT: Check in. Call them just to call them.

What not to do: Is ignore them. If you can't do something tell them.

COMMON DEPRESSION SYMPTOMS

Please tick the symptoms you have. Make it clear what you’re going through.

I can’t sleep, or I sleep too much

I can’t control my appetite

I have a severe loss of energy

I find that previous easy tasks are now difficult

I am more short-tempered or aggressive

I have trouble focusing and making decisions

I feel hopeless and helpless

I am engaging in more reckless behaviour

I have unexplained aches and pains

I can’t control my negative thoughts

I have lost my ability to feel joy or pleasure

I have strong self loathing

New research shows that depression and anxiety is in every society across the world.

Estimated 120million people around the world currently suffer from depression.

The section that their can personalise I think is one of the USP of the booklet. According to a worker at the well-being service, she hasn’t come across a pamphlet that has that kind of personalisation and she feels it could be beneficial.

A study undertaken by the World Health Organisation found that depression does more harm to a person’s well-being than physical diseases such as asthma, angina and diabetes.

Use visuals to display the statistics for the same reason I included the map, keeps it visually interesting and helps cement the message.


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M A K IN G A PROTOT YPE


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CHAN GES There were a few little changes to make, like moving a line up a little bit so that it was in line. and a couple of spelling errors or word changes to make.

On the pop out, I wanted all the lines coming out of the England map to be the same length, just for neatness’ sake. I also wanted to add tick boxes to the selection option. Before I thought they could circle them, but this seems more efficient and obviously.

People I showed this too, all mentioned that the little diagram was too much. They didn’t really get it and felt it wasn’t necessary. So i’ve gotten rid of it.

A peer had an idea to somehow attach a card to the booklet, that you can sign or tick or whatever, basically saying ‘I will help you’ again, just a way to talk without talking. I liked the idea, and as the back is the only place where there’s anyspace, I tried to find a way to simply add a card slot. It didn’t work, whatever I tried was either too complicated or cut into the pop out that’s glued to the other side.


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THE WHO LE PACKAGE Now that the basic design of the whole thing is tied down, I need to design he other booklets, choose colours and make their individual icons etc.... ICONS + LOGO


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COLOU RS The colours need to be eye catching, and different enough from each other that there’s no confusion, and need to all work together as a group. The trouble I was having was that the colour needs to be able to see dark and light coloured writing at the same time. This limited the palette considerably.

In this first selection of colours I didn’t like the red or the yellow, it was too bright, and garish. I didn’t want to go anywhere to extreme with the colours, they were all picked to be eye catching but not offensive. Calm, relaxing colours. That all work well together.


THE AWARENESS CAMPAIGN


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AWA R E N ESS CAMPAIGN

I wanted to do an awareness campaign to go along side the actual booklets. A viral-thing that just gave people a glimpse of what we’re about, got them interested. I thought a series of short films. One for each mental health problem that the booklets are about. Each one with the corresponding colour and logo for each one. Each clip would last 30 seconds or so and have no sound. THIS IS TO REPRESENT PEOPLE SITTING WITH THEIR DISEASE IN SILENCE AND NOT OPENING UP. And will also be a stark contrast to other adverts. More shocking.

The background will be a block colour, like the booklets. Each clip will feature and object (related to the illness) being opened. - Jar of food for Eating Disorder. - Box of plasters - Self Harm - Anxiety - Water Bottle - Depression - Box - OCD - 4 Boxes, 1 crooked, open that one.


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The shorts should be Stylised in the same way, all shot from the same angle. I’m thinking shot from above, so you can really see it opening up. The video will consist of the object being opened, and then just the logo will come onto the screen for the last few seconds. Maybe with a hash-tag #OpenUp. People can then hash-tag it on twitter, it might start tending, then more people will know about it and it could spread. Then when people see one in the doctors or whatever they’ll have some idea of what they are, or at the very least, will be curious about what they are.

PLANNING OUT A SHORT

I’m going to change the self harm object, which was going to be a box of plasters. To a duck that has a removable lid, with plasters inside. This is because more than any other mental health problem, people keep self harm a secret. So using an object that isn’t obviously a box or something is better at symbolising that. Also it’s more eye catching, when trying out the box of plasters it was hard to tell what it was.


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T EST PHOTO GRAPHY

# O PEN U P


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# O PEN U P


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# O PEN U P


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Don’t like this one, will try out some other anxiety options.


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TEAS ER P O ST ERS A Series of adverts that advertise the service, each one directly relates to the teaser videos. It occurred to me that a simple way to add another form of advertisement would be to make a series of posters.

# O PENUP

#OP E NU P

#OPENUP

#OP E NU P


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I replaced the water bottle with a box of tea. I have 2 options. This option is a soothing tea from Romania. The message behind the other language is ‘Sometimes talking about mental health is like talking another language.’ I really like the way the photograph came out and the retro look of the tea packet. The colour of the background is a large improvement as well.

#OPENU P

This is an English tea box. I like the pattern, and it won’t have the confusion of the other one. I really don’t know what one to choose though.

#OPENUP


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I was never really happy with the old OCD one, so I made another, this time using hand soap, as a common symptom of OCD is obsessively washing hands.

#OPENU P


POINT OF SALE


R S A EVERYDAY WELL-BEING RESEARC H DOC U ME NT

POIN T OF SALE - INST RUC TI O N S When showing people the booklets, someone pointed out that it wasn’t immediately clear what to do with the tick boxes and the giving it to someone else aspect. This was a lapse on my part. I knew what it was so clearly, It never occurred to me it wouldn’t be immediately obvious to others. So I decided to create a really simple stand to go alongside the booklets, just really quickly showing how to use the booklet.


R S A EVERYDAY WELL-BEING RESEARC H DOC U ME NT

These 3 frames are how i’m going to show how to use the booklet. Simple and stylistic, fitting with the illustration on the back of the booklet. The first step is picking it up, the second is ticking the boxes and the third is handing it over to someone. There will be a brief explanation about each picture as well. The colours are some of the colours of the booklets, just so it fits in with the aesthetic.


THE EVALUATION


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EVA LUATIO N THE RESEARCH How I did I think I went about the research methodically, and I got a decent amount. I’d want more primary ideally, but finding people to talk too about this in depth was hard with such a short time scale. What would I do different I wouldn’t waste so much time trying to get people at well-being to talk to me, but they wouldn’t, because of privacy issues. Which is a perfectly legitimate reason, just wasn’t very helpful for my research. This research file initially had page numbers and a planned content page. But due to lack of time I had to take them out, as I had to print the document, but assumed i’d probably have more pages to add after.

THE BOOKLETS How I did In the end I am really happy with my booklets. When I first started on the idea, it was my least favourite of my ideas, but other people’s reaction was more positive, and a woman at the well-being service thought it had potential. The turning point for me was when I named it ‘OPEN UP’ and it had the opening up ability it possesses, the branding on the whole is probably my favourite element of the whole project, and the branding has, especially the icons, been positively received. So after that turning point I really got into the project and enjoyed creating the look and feel of the booklet. What went wrong Lots went wrong, especially at first, trying to work out how the fold worked, took forever, I was just using a map of Paris I found, and it wasn’t very forthcoming. I constantly had problems with sizing and printing. Working out how big the fold out had to be in relation to the booklet was tricky and I had to make lots of dummies. Whilst printing The sizing constantly got out of whack, and it was very frustrating. I had real trouble thinking of the colours, there wasn’t a specific colour for each issue, so I decided to just concentrate on colours that worked well together, and made everything easily readable.


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What would I do different I would use the print centre immediately. I tried printing on other laser printers and the colours was constantly distorted, and it was hard to duplex. Design wise I think I would have made a couple of the colours less similar to each other, and I would have included a little ‘What to do with this booklet’ section, it was just too late to re-print them when I worked that out. I still was never quite happy with the way it printed, colour and quality is excellent, but there are a couple of things out of place, which annoys me. Overall I’m happy with the final piece, and I think it’ll make a good addition to my portfolio.

THE ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN How I did An advertising campaign was never in my plans when I first mapped out this idea, but I’m really glad I did it in the end. It’s really simple because time was limited, but I think I managed to make it look like it’s part of the campaign anyway, using the same block colours. The posters and videos at least go really well together, and I think make a pretty good viral advertising campaign, getting people to think ‘what is that about?’ and just generally getting people talking. What went wrong The photography was a nightmare, I tried my best to get background colours that matched each colour of the booklets, so that they’d have one poster and film short each, but even after getting almost the right colours, my camera just refused to pick them, and turned them grey or red or something. It was very annoying. If I’d had more time I would have found a way round that. I would have loved to have a website that went along with it, but there wasn’t time, so had to settle with a #hash-tag. What would I do different If I had more time I would have made sure the background on the posters and videos were too my liking, and maybe been able to find some more relevant objects (The duck was to show that people keep self harm a secret). I would have made a corresponding website and social network pages to help the awareness campaign. But as it isn’t actually a thing I didn’t want to make a facebook page about it, plus it would have had like no friends and that wouldn’t have looked good.


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FINAL COMMENTS This was an enjoyable but very stressful month, I wouldn’t like to repeat it every month, but it was a great indicator of the pressure the industry demands at times, and taught me to work more efficiently and to manage my time better. I could have managed it better of course, I wish I had more time for a lot of little bits that still niggle at me, but overall I’m happy with the outcomes and think this is a worthwhile cause, and I hope this could lead to someone actually being helped. Which would be great.


RSA Research Document