RRR Network Quarterly - Spring 2019

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FO R R U R A L , R EG I O N A L & R E MOT E WE S T E R N AU S T R A L I A N WOM E N


SECTION E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

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IMAGE: Frances Andrijich Australias South West : Kirup, Newy’s Vege Patch fresh produce


This edition marks the end of an era and start of a new one. We sadly say goodbye to the printed version of the RRR Magazine.

On top of that we have also has our AGM (20 Sept) and welcomed a new Board. Sarah Lang (Busselton) stepped into the Chair position with Yola Bakker (Pilbara) as Deputy Chair and Cath Lyons (Perth Hills) as Secretary and Alys McKeough (Canarvon) as Treasurer. Marilyn Rulyancich (South West), Fleur Thompson (Geraldton), Elizabeth Brennan (Wongan Hills) and Georgina Ferreira (South West) became general Board Members.

Previous versions will still be available online and we will continue to share the wonderful stories of the great women our state is home to, through our website and social media channels. There have been a couple of changes since the last edition. Firstly, you might have noticed that I’m not Jackie.

With a diverse and wide geographical spread this year, I am excited to see where the next twelve months takes us.

We said goodbye to Jackie in August and, what big shoes she has left me to fill. Jackie consolidated the RRR’s position as the premier women’s organisation in Western Australia and taken the organisation from strength to strength.

Although the printed magazine is no longer, we hope that you will continue to watch the RRR’s activity with interest and engage with us online and at our regional and Perth events throughout the year. I would encourage you to pop online now -

Originally from the Scottish Highlands I moved to Perth in 2012. I took a job with WAFarmers and that lead me to traveling from Esperance to Broome, out to Kalgoorlie and everywhere in between. That is where my love for the regions began and why I am thrilled to be working for an organisation that represents the women who made WA feel like home for me very quickly.

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find us, follow us, join us! Megan MacNeill Chief Executive Officer Rural, Regional, Remote Women’s Network of Western Australia www.rrrnetwork.com.au

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COVER Paige Valentine image Paris Hawken Photography

THE BOARD

THE MAGAZINE

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

SUBMISSIONS, ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES

Megan MacNeill (Perth)

GENERAL ENQUIRIES & SUBSCRIPTIONS

CHAIR

members@rrrnetwork.com.au

Lyn Farrell (Bunbury)

PRODUCTION, DESIGN & ARTWORK Wilderness Publishing

DEPUTY CHAIR Anna Dixon (Northam)

PRINTING

SECRETARY

A+L Printers, Bunbury WA

Cath Lyons (Perth)

PUBLISHED BY

TREASURER

Rural Regional Remote Women’s Network of WA

Sarah Lang (Busselton)

WeWork

COMMITTEE

Level 32, 152 St Georges Terrace

Nicole Batten (Yuna)

Perth, Western Australia, 6000

Elizabeth Brennan (Wongan Hills)

The Stronger Conference Manjimup Cherry Harmony Festival

www.rrrnetwork.com.au

Sue Middleton (Wongan Hills)

All content is subject to copyright and may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. Opinions represented in RRR Regional Network Quarterly are not necessarily those of the publisher. RRR Regional Newtwork Quarterly is published seasonally. PEFC Certified Printing

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‘Kelpie’ image Helen Burton, Around the Regions project

WELCOME

THE QUARTERLY

The Antarctica Experience

The S P R I N G I S S U E 2019 03 I N S P I R I N G T H E N E X T G E N E R AT I O N O F WO M E N I N AG R I -T EC H

Teacher Belinda Howse is leading the way

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HOME GROWN TALENT Paige Valentine - a musician on the rise

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BOOKS, PODCASTS AND SOCIAL MEDIA The interesting & entertaining

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NEWS & REVIEWS

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Insights and interest

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WHAT’S ON

WHAT’S ON & THE NETWORK CALENDAR All the dates & details of events you will love

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AROUND THE REGIONS

WINDOW TO THE REGIONS Bringing rural communities together through photography

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WOMEN’S VOICES The RRR Regional Roadshow

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CELEBRATING WOMEN

A VERY PERSONAL SHOPPING EXPERIENCE ‘Papillon’ endurance, hope and life

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS

SURVIVING FAMILY SUCCESSION How to plan to succeed

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS

THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS OF COMMODITY MARKETING 32

WOMEN IN BUSINESS

THE FAMILY FARM The return of the exemption

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WOMEN IN BUSINESS

SETTLE FOR NOTHING LESS THAN YOU STRIVE FOR Community business

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

THE NINGALOO COAST Simply spectacular

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HEALTH & WELL BEING

THE SMALL WONDERS OF GUT HEALTH Jean Hailes for Women’s’ Health

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SEASONAL PRODUCE

WOMEN IN AGRICULTURE The Rolly Polly Farmers

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WRAP UP

HIGHLIGHTS Supporters, members and corporate sponsors

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THE QUARTERLY THE QUARTERLY T H E AGR I F U T U R E S™ RU R A L WOM A N OF T H E Y E A R 2019 F I N A L I ST S AGR I F U T U R E S™ RU R A L WOM A N OF T H E Y E A R

Written by FLEUR CHAPMAN Images SUPPLIED

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Geraldton and then Kununurra, Bel retrained as a teacher and moved to Margaret River to take up a post at the high school. Teaching agriculture in a school is what she describes as her “dream job”, and her passion is contagious. She confesses she “particularly loves teaching kids about the wonderful world of insects but also all things agricultural”.

et over an incredible 50 acres, complete with vineyard, sheep, cattle, chickens, an orchard and thriving vegetable garden, Margaret River Senior High School is the perfect base for an exciting new project aimed at encouraging women to take on management roles within agribusiness and harness the burgeoning technology we have at our fingertips.

Bel teaches years 7-11 in all facets of farming; from growing food through traditional methods in soil but also the environmental benefits of using technology to produce food using aquaponics, hydroponics and aquaculture. The teaching program also includes cattle work, sheep shearing, tending to chickens (and selling the eggs) and viticulture. She is passionate about technology and sustainability, which she weaves across all subjects.

Teacher Bel Howse is leading the way, recently selected as the only WA participant in the Central Queensland University project, Women in Agri-tech. Fifteen of the 68 applicants from across the STEM, digital technology and agriculture teaching field have been selected for a place in the project, where they will receive training, funding and mentorship through CQU and fellow participants to create a unique program for their students. The final learning modules will become available through CQU for all schools around Australia to utilise. “Currently there is a dearth of women in agriculture, so this project is a Government push to get more women interested in the industry. So, as female teachers in agriculture we are role models to encourage girls into agriculture and show them it is a field many women can engage in,” Bel said. After working for 10 years with the Department of Agriculture specialising in entomology and covering areas of South Perth,

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“Everything we do as humans relates back to food and fibre, which is why we (in agriculture) do what we do. I teach about plastics, the planet, climate change, penguins, pandas and polar bears! We have to look after our planet and come up with much smarter ways of producing food.” Her CQU project began with the Women in Agri-tech Symposium in Brisbane in February, where participants were exposed to new and emerging agri-tech they can utilise for their learning modules. The group will meet regularly online to support each other and learn from industry experts as they progress through the project, then come together again in November this year for the final symposium.

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THESECTION QUARTERLY TOR SU T Lof E OR DIESNC L A IAGR M E RI -T EC H I N SPIE RDI I NG th eI ANLE X T BT GEI N WOM IN

Belinda Howse

Bel’s background and enthusiasm for bugs led her to base her project around native bee hotels. “My specific area for the project was geolocation-animals, for which I chose insects. The Department of Agriculture already has an app called My Pest Guide, which is basically citizen science. If you see a weird bug in your garden, you can take a picture, using satellites it gives GPS positioning then it gets sent to the Department. It has proved useful for biosecurity matters, but also to help people identify insects in their garden if they are interested.” Bel has been granted permission to utilise the app as an administrator to track uptake of native bee hotels around the country as her project is rolled out. She hopes that her learning modules will not only introduce

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school children to the app and help them discover the often unseen world in their own backyards, but also get schools as a whole involved in protecting and nurturing native bee populations. “We have to recognise the value of insects, and our native bees, of which there are lots, they are mostly solitary, largely stingless – and cute!” Bel said. “Bees are a precious resource. We are getting to a point where we need to look after not only our European honeybees, but also recognise the valuable part native bees play in pollination of native flora.” Bel’s students will assist by building a collection of bee hotels, which will be distributed to schools in the area with a bar code and instructions on how to track their bee population. She will develop a program consisting

IMAGE: Frances Andrijich Southern Forests Bridgetown R R R N E T WO R K

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THE QUARTERLY I N SPI R I NG th e N E X T GE N of WOM E N I N AGR I -T EC H

TOP: Central Queensland University project, Women in Agri-tech participants.

of three sixty-minute lessons, including videos aimed at encouraging students to get involved and learn about the importance of native bees in our ecosystem. They will receive instructions on making their own bee hotels, which are very easy to construct with stormwater pipe and bamboo with 3-4mm wide holes. The peak time for native bee activity is between November and April, so Bel is working hard now to have the learning modules and example hotels constructed and distributed before the end of the year.

ideal habitats for native bees and helping to naturally boost numbers. For example, if numbers are low in one area, plants known to attract native bees can be added and program participants could then see what impact this has. In terms of bolstering Bel’s leadership as a woman in agriculture, the project has enabled her to really push what she is passionate about – and very good at – and show the girls in her class what wonderful opportunities are available in the world of agriculture and technology.

Once complete, CQU will add the project to their own website along with the others created via the Women in Agri-tech program. This will open up participation from schools right across the country.

“I guess I just see myself as a mentor to the girls in my class, especially as I have had a previous role in agriculture,” she said. “This is a great opportunity to build my profile, get out there and take on a new challenge.”

To begin with, Bels’ project is simply looking at native bee hotel occupation rates and, as she points out, it is only as good as the teachers running it. However, data collected over time from across the country could prove invaluable into the future in terms of creating

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THE QUARTERLY I N SPI R I NG th e N E X T GE N of WOM E N I N AGR I -T EC H

Bel has been granted permission to utilise the app as an administrator to track uptake of native bee hotels around the country as her project is rolled out. She hopes that her learning modules will not only introduce school children to the app and help them discover the often unseen world in their own backyards, but also get schools as a whole involved in protecting and nurturing native bee populations. “We have to recognise the value of insects, and our native bees, of which there are lots, they are mostly solitary, largely stingless – and cute!” Bel said.

TOP: Margaret River Senior High School farm lab. MIDDLE: Hydroponic farming area. BELOW: Bel with the native bee hotels made by the

students.

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Written by KENDALL GALBRAITH Images CREDITED

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n the South-West of Western Australia, Paige Valentine has been a local music identity for years. Paige is known for her soft and folk like sound accompanied by her guitar. She offers original songs mixed with recognisable old favourites. She grew up listening to the likes of Crowded House and Joni Mitchell and was largely inspired by her parents.

In saying that, you will still find Paige doing local gigs, such as in Collie, in an old town hall with the Black Sorrows and Jon Stevens from the INXS, where exactly 100 guests stood and captivated by her presence. “I’m all about performing in old halls. They’re the shows I love.” She speaks of touring South Australia where she visited remote communities, sung in shearing sheds and old halls.

Paige grew up just north of Australind in a small bush town near Binningup. Her music career has taken her all over Australia and Asia. She has even cracked the Los Angeles music industry, but the southwest of Western Australia is where she feels most grounded and calls home. Paige’s unique sound has caught the attention of some big music talents and provided opportunity to collaborate with Wendy Mathews, Matt Gresham, Eskimo Joe and Passenger. She has even released music overseas achieving over a million downloads.

“I grew up in the bush, I need nature, that’s where I write from” “People would come from miles away. I’ve always found that the people in the regions value moments of entertainment far greater than those who live in the city….and it is that unique crowd response which makes those gigs richer and so unforgettable’’.

L-R Hyatt Regency Hotel - Perth

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PARIS HAWKEN PHOTOGRAPHY

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THE QUARTERLY

MEMORIES MADE HERE

SARA STORM PHOTOGRAPHY

PA IGE VA L E N T I N E : HOM E GROW N TA L E N T

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THE QUARTERLY PA IGE VA L E N T I N E : HOM E GROW N TA L E N T

Paige is down to earth, a natural beauty, a storyteller, passionate about music, writing and loves living in the south-west. She recalls fond memories related to music. A little girl, not yet tall enough to see the piano keys, but stretching up enough to catch a glimpse and being mesmerised. As a teenager, sitting in the National Park, alone and peaceful with her guitar and song writing book. “Every winter I go to remote Esperance and just write” She is a self-made superstar who has simply followed her passion and trusted her talent. Paige found by saying ‘yes’ more, that professional music opportunities for her started to increase. More than she ever anticipated. Her brand started to diversify and was booked out for gigs well in advance. Her willingness to step outside of her comfort zone has now seen Paige write and produce music in other genres, such as hip-hop and dance. “I decided that my voice is an instrument on its own, and like actors who get to act in various ways, I can do the same and still be successful. It’s my voice and its recognisable no matter what I do”. It was this decision that opened doors for Paige in 2018, elevated her brand and allowed her to tap into additional music markets. This year she has been working on a new EP but has mostly returned to her folk like sounds that she is originally known for. The music industry is highly competitive with over 24,000 daily uploads of music to Apps such as Spotify or Sound Cloud from socalled ‘bedroom producers’. Paige recognises that opportunity for big success in the music industry is readily available. It can be any moment, that is, if you produce something which truly resonates and separates itself from the rest.

PARIS HAWKEN PHOTOGRAPHY

“Technology has been essential to my success. It has given me a platform to showcase my music, but it hasn’t always been like that. In the beginning, it was about doing gigs and going to local venues that supported local musicians”. Paige Valentine is committed to living in the regions and has demonstrated that if you have passion and talent, geography is no longer an obstacle to success.

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MAGE Astrid Volzke WINDOW TO THE REGIONS PROJECT | Yagan Square, Perth R R R N E T WO R K

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NEWS + REVIEWS

A MONTH OF SUNDAYS Liz Byrski - Pan Macmillian Australia For over ten years, Ros, Adele, Judy and Simone have been in an online book club, but they have never met face to face. Until now... Determined to enjoy her imminent retirement, Adele invites her fellow bibliophiles to help her house-sit in the Blue Mountains. Each member has been asked to bring a book which will teach the others more about her. With the women all facing crossroads in their lives, it turns out there’s a lot for them to learn, not just about their fellow book-clubbers, but about themselves.

WWW.PODCASTS.APPLE. COM/AU/PODCAST/ FIERCE-GIRLS/ID1351065618

From athletes to aviators, scientists to spies. Australia is full of girls who dare to do things differently. Adventurous girls. Girls with guts and spirit.You know what they are? They’re FIERCE and these are their stories.

WWW.TRAILSWA.COM.AU

THE VALLEY Steve Hawke - Fremantle Press

Find 100’s of trails crossing the spectacular state of Western Australia and find discover amazing places! Find worldclass wilderness trails to jawdropping gorge walks; forest mountain bike adventures and outback 4WDs, there’s an experience waiting for you!

A murder in the remote bush in 1916 sparks a chain of events that will haunt a family for generations. Hidden in the refuge of a secret valley, their tiny community lives unknown to the world. When, a century later, Broome schoolboy Dancer falls foul of the local bikie gang, he and his father head up the Gibb River Road. Here, in a maze of rugged ranges and remote communities, Dancer begins to unravel the truth behind the mysterious disappearance of Milly Rider, the mother he never knew. But the valley hides its secrets well. As Dancer learns the ways of his mother’s country, he uncovers a precious inheritance – one not even those closest to Milly expected to find. A masterfully told epic of the Kimberley.

FACEBOOK.COM/ VISIBLEFARMER

SWIMMING TO THE MOON Robert Drewe - Fremantle Press From a floury encounter on a baker’s work table to the art of sitting backwards on chairs, from budgie training to spontaneous human

Invisible no more! This page celebrates the incredible women farmers who produce much of the food we consume each day.

combustion, this collection showcases the non-fiction writing of one of Australia’s best-loved authors. These pieces encompass suburban portraits and coastal living, affectionate nostalgia and the absurdity of the everyday. They are endearing and often hilarious snapshots of Australian life from a master novelist who has turned the column into an artform.

Reviews and links favour Australian writers and content. Featured books are available as eBooks.

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@COUNTRYARTSWA

Country Arts WA is an innovative leader in the arts and in regional and community development. The purpose: “To celebrate and strengthen a powerful regional arts sector”.


NEWS + REVIEWS S OM ET H I NG for E V E R YON E

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here country folk come to unleash their creativity and tell their stories; speaking to

all regional, rural and remote Australia, not just agricultural sectors. Creative features draw out the artistic, the cultural and the textured tapestry of life in the bush. Similarly, their audience is a cross-section of people who live in regional towns, in remote communities, on rural properties and also includes city people who desire to connect to their own bush backyard and vicariously enjoy the space, country characteristics, people and access to nature that regional Australia provides. The aim is to ultimately create a progressive, dynamic, creative picture of life in regional Australia which extends beyond the stereotypes and negative perceptions that have traditionally perpetrated mainstream media. Visit the website for more information and how to be involved . www.ruralroom.com

SWAMP GIRL image by ASTRID VOLZKE

‘‘It was a hot afternoon in late March when we walked over the cracked mud to get to the inflow swamp at Lake Towerrinning in Moodiarrup for a photoshoot. Six-year-old Charlotte Gibbs, a local farmer’s daughter, waded out into the low swamp as the sun descended warm and pink on the horizon. Charlotte stood ankle-deep in mud and looked at her reflection, the colours of her clothing blending in with the environment. It was one of those moments in photography when the stars aligned.’’ Astrid Volzke Two of Astrid’s image’s have been shortlisted for the Perth National Portrait Prize. ‘Swamp Girl’ in the Open Colour Category and ‘Wool Classer’ in Australian Rural Life Category. www.astridvolzke.com R R R N E T WO R K

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NEWS + REVIEWS S OM ET H I NG for E V E R YON E

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ocals and visitors of the greater southern region of WA will be treated once again to a feast of visual arts and crafts at this year’s Southern Art and Craft Trail. ArtSouthWA (ASWA) is the organiser of the Art Trail, which is now in its 17th year. A not-for-profit organisation, ASWA volunteers and contracted personnel work in preparation for the event. They also run art education workshops, and include members from regional-based art galleries, and arts organisations.

MEMBER SIGN-UP Support the RRR Network and actively engage with rural, regional and remote women to support and contribute to the economic and social wellbeing of their communities.

“The quality and diversity of our members is what makes the Southern Art and Craft Trail so outstanding”, commented Merry Robertson, Chair of ArtSouthWA. “Members of ASWA are promoted for a full year, attend workshops at reduced rates, and are kept up to date with other events of interest. We welcome volunteers to our committee who do not need to be based in our Albany location.”

VISIT www.rrrnetwork.com.au/join-us EMAIL admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

The Southern Art and Craft Trail runs for three weeks from Saturday 21st September to Sunday 13th October, right across the greater southern region of WA.

PHONE Portraits, Nature and Curiosities, Eve Young

or POST PAYMENT TO:

Art lovers can see over 300 artist’s works at 86 different venues that include cafes, wineries, galleries, local businesses, community halls, libraries, art centres, studios and pop-up spaces. Visitors will experience textiles, painting, sculpture and jewellery, printmaking, photography, pottery, glassware, woodcraft and more. Many Artists will also hold demonstrations and talks throughout the three weeks of the Art Trail.

RURAL REGIONAL REMOTE WOMEN’S NETWORK OF WA

WeWork Level 32, 152 St Georges Terrace Perth, Western Australia, 6000

ArtSouthWA’s website enables visitors to find artists geographically and read about their works as well as interact through Facebook and Instagram. Over 15,000 copies of the Trail booklet are distributed across the amazing south coast, the Great Southern Region, Perth and the south west. It can be found in in cisitor centres, libraries, local councils, galleries, cafes and other ‘arty’ outlets and trail venues. View the booklet via www.artsouthwa.com.au

(08) 6316 0407

I Belong’, Michael Francas

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CALENDAR W H AT’S ON in W E ST E R N AUST R A L I A

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CALENDAR W H AT’S ON in W E ST E R N AUST R A L I A

8-17 November, S-West GOURMET ESCAPE

Join Marco Pierre White, Momofuku’s David Chang, Pierre Koffmann, The Rubens, James Halliday and more, plus over 160 local wineries and producers, in a 10-day food, wine and music festival across Western Australia. From Margaret River to Swan Valley and Perth, there’s nothing more extraordinary. www.gourmetescape.com.au

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AROUND THE REGIONS SECTION N DOW H IETR S SPROJ TR EW DIITOR I A LTO SUTBT L EGION E OR DI C L A IEC ME

written by ASTRID VOLZKE - images: PAUL PRZIBILLA ‘Canning Stock Route’

‘‘Don’t shoot what it looks like, shoot what it feels like’’ - David Alan Harvey

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AROUND THE REGIONS W I N DOW TO T H E R EGION S PROJ EC T

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AROUND THE REGIONS W I N DOW TO T H E R EGION S

Photographer: KYM GIBBS Darkan workshop participant

Photographer: EMILY COLE Broome Wworkshop participant

Photographer: ASTRID VOLKZE Hopetoun workshop

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AROUND THE REGIONS W I N DOW TO T H E R EGION S

TOP: Photographer: JOANNA CYRUPA

‘Barefoot Snake Catcher’ MIDDLE: Photographer JACKIE EDWARDS

‘Hopetoun Jetty’ LEFT: Photographer KEVIN SMITH

‘Broome Motocross’

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AROUND THE REGIONS T H E R R R R EGION A L ROA D SHOW

Women’s Voices: a 2019 project led by the Hon. Simone McGurk MLA from the Department of Communities to address gender inequality in Western Australia.

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he Department of Communities (DoC) wanted to explore the very personal and lived experience of WA women via a community forum process on the topics of – health and well-being, safety and justice, economic independence and leadership to form a gender equality strategy for the women of WA in 2020 and beyond.

success. Women expressed passion, confusion, sadness and happiness. It was evident that regional women are resilient and pragmatic; they understand that they cannot have the full range of services provided to women in metropolitan Perth, but they do feel more could be done to ease their burden of geographical isolation.

The project was created in such a way that any civic group or organisation could download an online tool kit and host a forum and provide feedback to the DoC. All feedback received would help form the gender equality strategy and deliver policy changes that positively affects women.

“It was evident that women in the regions tend to expect less, therefore ask for less and as a result, settle for less with little improvement or satisfaction” said Jackie.

However, the RRR Network was concerned the project could mostly reflect the metropolitan woman, and that the RRR experience may be overlooked. Former CEO Jackie Jarvis voiced her concern and proposed to the DoC to conduct the “RRR Regional Roadshow”, a series of forums that would connect with the RRR Network membership base, their subscribers and any other women in the community. The DoC positively supported the RRR Network’s proposal which allowed for an innovative and comprehensive approach to be undertaken in the regions. “Women’s Voices presented an invaluable opportunity for the RRR Network to engage with women on a personal level and to communicate the mission and initiatives of the RRR Network” said Jackie Jarvis. The RRR Network conducted ten forums in total in Northam, Busselton, Geraldton, Esperance, Manjimup and Bridgetown, travelling over 5000km’s throughout the months of May, June and July of 2019. The RRR Network met with 142 women and received demographic data via a survey for 92 more.

The impact of isolation and its cumulative effect was by far the largest issue identified. There was a sense that participants were overwhelmed on how to reduce the impact of isolation. For instance, isolation and a small community means there is little to no private or public transport services available in the region. In turn, this determines many women to not receive necessary health care, opportunities to socialise, improve well-being or be enabled to generate an income unless their workplace is within walking distance to their residence. Other discussions included daily and monotonous long-distance travel, little to no childcare options including flexible arrangements, overwhelming sexist attitudes, untapped skills, lack of jobs and social complications for reporting of domestic violence and sexual harassment in small communities. These are all issues that continue to drive a wedge in achieving gender equality.

All participants were thoroughly engaged and the forums were a huge

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The RRR Regional Roadshow

WOMEN’S VOICES Written by KENDALL GALBRAITH Images SUPPLIED

The RRR Network analysed all responses from the ten forums and the below themes were identified and reported back to the DoC: 1. Lack of career building jobs for women and specifically professional leadership positions, compounded by childcare difficulties and geographic isolation. 2. Burden of volunteering and caring responsibilities where women primarily fulfil these roles; 3. Lack of essential women’s health services in the regions; 4. Domestic violence and surrounding complications of reporting in small communities due to isolation; 5. Sexual harassment and fixed expectations to accept such behaviours with little to no effective reporting channels available; 6. Regional to metropolitan transition concerns for families when youth are pursuing education or employment. “We also noticed expectations of feminine-like services to not be available to women in the regions,resulting in a lack of awareness of what is actually available. Or an acceptance and conflicting reality that a woman’s potential and skill would not be reached because of her geography” said Jackie. The RRR Network concluded that the coming together of women from diverse backgrounds where intelligent and personal conversation was encouraged was a positive and rewarding experience alone. The RRR Network would like to thank all those who participated. If anyone would like to read the final report that has been provided to the DoC (August 2019), please contact Policy and Research Officer Kendall Galbraith from the RRR Network on 0410 785 726 or email her at policy@rrrnetwork.com.au

TOP - BOTTOM The Bridgetown Public Library, The Dukes Inn, Northam and The Esplanade

Hotel, Busselton.

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arely two months after a routine mammogram showed suspicious spots in Cecilia McCarron’s left breast, she underwent a mastectomy to remove a confirmed ductal carcinoma. However, this is no ordinary cancer survivor story. This is the story of a driven, community-minded, big-hearted lady who has single-handedly transformed the lives of so many other women facing the same battles she did.

When she told her friend this, the response was simple but lifechanging.: “Well, you had better do something about it.” So, she did. Papillon Lingerie was created soon after. The word ‘Papillon’ is French for ‘butterfly’ and, for Cecilia, it represents endurance, hope and life. This is what she wanted to provide for her clients, as well as make people aware that a bra is more than the fabric it is sewn from and prosthesis is more than aesthetics.

Cecilia’s story really begins in a bra shop, weeks after her mastectomy.

These elements are vital to helping a woman feel feminine, complete, and at ease with her body. They help her walk out the door each day with confidence and dress in a way that suits her personality and charm. They help her forget (at least temporarily) the pain she has had endure and allows her to greet each new day with hope.

“The surgery was very daunting because, I mean, you’ve had breasts for so long! I was only two weeks post-surgery and I couldn’t handle looking down and just seeing the one breast. So, to help recover, I set about trying to find out where I could get a breast form or external prosthesis and I found that very difficult living in a regional location“ she said. While shopping for mastectomy bras and prosthesis with her friend, Cecilia experienced a lack of understanding for women in this situation and poor customer service. As a very positive person, despite the situation she had found herself in, she wondered how other women would also feel.

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To begin her business, Cecilia had to undergo extensive bra and prosthesis fitting training with the distributors of mastectomy products. Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA) initially put her in touch with representatives of the brand Berlei, who then forwarded her details to Pacific Brands who look after a number of big-names including Berlei, Holeproof and Bonds. Cecilia

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CELEBRATING WOMEN ‘PA PI L LON’ re p re se nt s E N DU R A NC E , HOPE and L I F E

started with one-on-one training in Perth with a sales representative, and later took herself to Melbourne for additional training. She was going through chemotherapy at the time as well – a testament to her commitment to ensuring she could provide the best possible service to women in need. Cecilia’s business model is such that she provides a mobile service. This makes it private and personable, plus offers her clients the opportunity to be professionally fitted in a comfortable, dignified and convenient way in their own homes. For many, getting to a shop is fraught with difficulties due to mobility issues, illness or distance, so a service that travels is welcome relief. There is an option for clients to purchase products from the Papillon Lingerie online shop for future purchasing if they know exactly the size they require: www. papillonlingerie.com.au At each client consultation, Cecilia’s service extends far beyond the tape measure and sales pitch. She is always open to sharing her own story and offering advice and tips drawn from her experiences with therapy and support services. “I find when I talk to women at fittings, I can tell them first-hand what services are out there to help them based on what I have discovered along my own journey. They are always very appreciative of this,” she said. “Apart from my initial diagnosis and mastectomy, I have had chemotherapy and hormone therapy. More recently, I have also had the other breast removed and undergone reconstructive surgery, so often find myself having discussions with women who wish to find out more information first-hand about the procedure, especially if they are considering this themselves.” While Cecilia initially set out to help women like her who had been affected by breast cancer, she quickly learned that the demand for her services extends far beyond women with breast cancer. There are many reasons women do not, or cannot, shop at a retail store for bras, so a private fitting at home is a welcome option.

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CELEBRATING WOMEN ‘PA PI L LON’ re p re se nt s E N DU R A NC E , HOPE and L I F E

“I have found along the way that I have also been able to help women who are quite big-busted and have trouble finding bras in a retail shop. Others I have helped include those with shoulder problems who need a front-closing bra and women with conditions such as Poland Syndrome or lymphedema,” she said. Papillion has recently introduced a swimwear range, but Cecilia is looking to create her own for the long term. She found first-hand how challenging prosthesis-friendly swimwear is tosource when she began

was only diagnosed due to screening. She didn’t have any signs there was anything wrong, nor had an immediate family history of cancer. It was a complete shock, and reminder that sadly, cancer can strike anyone, at any time. When talking to various women’s groups, she also takes a selection of external breast forms to show them what they look and feel like along with her range of products. As part of her commitment to supporting women affected by breast cancer on a wider scale, Cecilia took on the challenge of a lifetime in a BCNA-organised trek earlier this year through the stunningly beautiful Tuscan countryside. She had always wanted to go to Tuscany, and when the opportunity came up, she jumped at the chance and set about raising the necessary $4,000 to participate. Cecilia’s flagship event was an Ambrose Golf Day, which really put her to the test. “That was very daunting. I had to go around to local businesses and ask for support and donations of gifts for the competition. It was a whole new experience for me, but the local business community was fantastic,” she said. At the end of the event, Cecilia had secured over $5,000 through the Ambrose Golf day and another $3,000 through online donations. These funds went to BCNA, who provide essential support to both men and

an exercise program designed for women who have been affected by cancer. “When I started the exercise program, I discovered that the mastectomy bathers that I had purchased weren’t really practical. At that time, I still had one breast and my prosthesis was quite large, so I was very conscious that my scarring was showing. I set about finding mastectomy swimwear that could be worn by all women, not just women who had breast cancer. A woman wants to feel beautiful and confident without worrying about their prosthesis or scarring showing,” she said. As her business has grown, education and advocacy for routine mammograms has become increasingly important to Cecilia. Her cancer

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CELEBRATING WOMEN ‘PA PI L LON’ re p re se nt s E N DU R A NC E , HOPE and L I F E

women affected by breast cancer. Cecilia was Tuscany-bound with 12 other women who had been on a similar journey, along with a selection of supporting friends and family.

challenges, it was an incredible experience she will never forget. Read more about the trip on the Papillon Lingerie blog here, https://www. papillonlingerie.com.au/blog

The trek itself was a challenge too. ‘Undulating’ hills, as Cecilia and her friend soon discovered, was a little bit of an understatement. There were days she felt like giving up, but had prepared as best she could by hitting the gym four times a week in the months leading up to the trek and had remembered to wear in her hiking boots. However, despite the

Moving into the future, Cecilia would love to extend her services into more remote areas, as she remains passionate about helping women who live outside city areas who find shopping difficult. She will continue her work educating women about the importance of regular screening and is a consistent advocate for breast health in her community.

To see Papillon Lingerie’s range of products, book a one-on-one consultation or have Cecilia visit your organisation to do a talk and show a range of products, visit www.papillonlingerie.com.au

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RRR NETWORK BUSINESS PL A N N I NG fo r SUC C E S SION

SURVIVING family succession Written by KAROLINA RZYMKOWSKA, BALIWICK LEGAL

O

ver the next decade, 1.5 million Australian business owners will be retiring.

As a guide, a business succession plan can include any or all of the following:

However, according to Small Business Secrets’ recent research, only 16 per cent of Australian businesses are equipped with a succession plan.

managerial control.

l The complete or gradual transfer of l The transfer of assets and ownership. l The establishment or reconfiguration of business structures.

It is often difficult to discuss business succession planning, particularly in a family business environment. This is often because:

l Education and training of successors into their new roles.

l Planning and managing the entry and

l Everyone is too busy running the

exit of family members.

business.

l Broader estate planning of the

l Parents are unclear about their children’s expectations.

individuals involved.

l Children are concerned that

instigating business succession conversations may lead to their parents feeling they are being “pushed out” of the business prematurely.

l Parents find it hard to discuss financial aspects of the succession plan (i.e. will they be paid for stepping away from the business).

It is hard to separate family and business because, unlike other business, the individuals involved will always remain ‘family’. Unfortunately, a failure to successfully plan for the REMEMBER future of the business often results more often than not, in not only the detriment of the failing to plan means business itself, but a permanent planning to fail. fracture in the family as well.

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As lawyers, we often find that clients are most concerned about what will happen to their family business in the event of their demise, however very few consider what will happen to the family business in the event of their permanent incapacity. A well-considered and thought-out succession plan should cover circumstances of death, retirement, incapacity and possibly even the impact of relationship breakdowns (i.e. divorce and separation). Succession plans can sometimes take several years to finalise, so it is important to begin the process early. At Bailiwick Legal we take a holistic approach to succession planning. We believe it is important to work with your accountants, advisors, financial planners and bankers to ensure a robust and effective transition takes place. If you are part of a family business and require assistance with business succession planning, please contact Karolina Rzymkowska via email Karolina@bailiwicklegal.com.au for more information.

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This is me I’m an Ag School graduate. 4th generation grain and sheep farmer. Mother of three. Master multitasker. I’ve driven tractors since age 10, and one day I dream of being both a farmer and a nurse. It’s hard work but I love it, and wouldn’t dream of being anything else. Michelle Ball, Grain Grower

Grain Brokers AUSTRALIA

www.grainbrokers.com.au R R R N E T WO R K

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RRR NETWORK BUSINESS Avo iding T E M P TAT ION in a VA R I A BL E M A R K ET

Written by SARAH WOOLFORD Corporate Broker, Grain Brokers Australia

Agribusiness success can be a mind game. The variables at play during a day on the farm would send many other business people over the edge, particularly as so many factors, including weather and global markets, are beyond the individual’s control. However, a grower can always control his/ her response to those variables and there are “Seven Deadly Sins” we recommend you avoid at all costs:

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RRR NETWORK BUSINESS Avo iding T E M P TAT ION in a VA R I A BL E M A R K ET

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RRR NETWORK BUSINESS Th e F U T U R E of FA M I LY FA R M I NG

Supplied by BALIWICK LEGAL

Amendments to the Duties Act 2008 to assist with family farm transfers.

A farmer transfers farming property to a family member and retains an interest in the entity (such as a partnership) conducting the farming business on the land. l

Bailiwick Legal regularly advises farmers on farm transfers and the exemptions that are available. As we noted in January 2019, under the Duties Act an exemption of duty was not available where the transferor of the land continued to be involved in the business by farming the land after the transfer had taken place. This position has now been amended under changes recently made to the Duties Act 2008.

A farmer is not conducting a farming business immediately prior to a transfer of farming property to a family member, if the Commissioner is satisfied the farmer had previously conducted the business and a family member (or a related entity) is conducting the business immediately prior to the transfer. l

The partnership that conducts a farming business includes nonfamily members. l

Revenue Law Amendment Act 2019 On 13 June, 2019, the Revenue Law Amendment Act 2019 came into effect, including changes to the family farm transfer exemption provisions under the Duties Act 2008. The changes are intended to re-establish the flexibilities that were available under the old laws for the generational transferring of farmland.

If a transferee is a bare trustee, the beneficiaries hold an interest in the related entity that conducts the farming business. l

These changes to the family farm exemption provisions should allow greater flexibility for intergenerational transfers of farmland. This will be a positive outcome for rural businesses and planning for successions.

In the Explanatory Memorandum to the Bill, it is said that the changes will provide for the exemption from duty to apply where:

If you would like assistance with family farm transitions between generations, or family and business succession planning, please contact us on (08) 9321 5451 or by email at  karolina@bailiwicklegal.com.au or phil@bailiwicklegal.com.au

A farmer transfers farming property to a related discretionary trust under which the farmer is a beneficiary. l

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G R EA T S O U T HER N W A G R EA T S O U T HERGN RWEAA T S O U T HER N W A

G R EA T S O U T HER N W A

G R EA T S O U T HER N W A

G R EA T S O U T HER N W A

G R EA T S O U T HER N W A

G R EA T S O U T HER N W A

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RRR NETWORK BUSINESS 19t h A N N UA L WOM E N in AGR IC U LT U R E e ve nt

Settle for

NOTHING LESSthan you STRIVE FOR! Written by SARAH HYDE Facey Group

T

he Facey Group presented the 19th Annual Women in Agriculture event on Wednesday 24th July, 2019.

Throughout life we all build upon our experiences; leading each of us to have a story to tell. The question is, why do we not challenge ourselves to share our stories? Why are we reluctant to share them more freely? The 2019 event was sponsored by CSBP and welcomed and we local sales representative, Maree Dougall as MC for the day; joined by CSBP General Manager Tanya Rybarczyk as the opening speaker. Tanya took us on her family and career journey to where she is today, with CSBP General Manager. In perfect summation, Tanya challenged the group to think about leadership and urged us to focus on the job at hand while being more willing to learn and ‘‘give things a go’’. Tania reiterated that ‘‘women should settle for nothing less than they strive for’’. The dynamic duo of our local agronomist Hilary Witwer (Planfarm) and Helen Wyatt (Elders) educated and challenged us by relating weeds to politics. An interative session in identifying weeds in paddocks (or in the garden) and some quizzes to get the brain ticking was a perfect segment for educating us all on the pesky things that are keeping the local boomsprays busy at the moment. A great tip was to look between the rows and inveestigate what differs from the normal.

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Ever wondered what eating grubs would be like? Lets be honest, I don’t think many of us owuld have dwelled on the thought for long, that is unless you are Paula Pownall from Grups Up. Paula shared her amazing adventure, from the inception of the idea to putting it in place in her own backyard. The persistence, research, connections to be made and the determination to be bold and give it a go were the keys to her success. And yes, we all had a taste of those crispy critters, and I’d say we were all pleasantly surprised! If you ever want a change from the usual snack, get yourself some ‘cricket dukka’ to add to the weekend’s gourmet platter. This year we tried something a little different and it was a huge success. The concept recognised that that we all lead busy lives and cross paths in many different ways within our small communities, there is still so much we don’t know about each other; the different hats we wear, the experiences we have, the success we gain and our life stores. Four amazing women contributed short videos of themselves, telling their stores. Everyone enjoyed the segment and it was a fantastic effort by the group. Kate Lamont, the entrepreneur of all things wine, food and tourism also joined us at the event. In following with the theme of the other speakers,’ Kate challenged us to ‘get up, get it done-all with a smile on your face’’. Reminding us that ‘word of mouth’ is critical, not only to the business

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RRR NETWORK BUSINESS 19t h A N N UA L WOM E N in AGR IC U LT U R E e ve nt

The Facey Group with guests, presenting

the 19th Annual Women in Agricultur e event.

in which Kate is involved but for all industries; it is evident we need to ensure our consumers have a positive experience with our products and services make an impact, as we may only have that one chance to make an impression.. Kate has a vast amount of experience across industries and it’s awe-inspirig in the way she manages work and life; leaving us with a parting message to ‘’reflect, rather than dwell.’’

Thank you to the local businessses including the Wickepin Post Office, Wickepin Newsagency, DRIL, Jade Bushby Tupperware, Kindly & Co., Grups Up and CSBP for providing the amazing door prizes throughout the day. We extend an enormous thanks our valued sponsors for their continued support; Rabobank, Summit Fertilizers and the Shire of Wickepin and CSBP as the event sponsor.

We encourage you all to get-up and get going, to ‘back yourself’ and have a ‘crack’ at whatever it is your heart desires and don’t settle for anything less than what you are striving for.

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SOURCE www.visitningaloo.com.au

Ningaloo Marine Park became World Heritage listed in 2011 and, although most famed for its whale sharks, the reef is also rich in coral and other marine life. During the winter months, the reef is part of the migratory routes for dolphins, dugongs, manta rays and humpback whales. The beaches are an important breeding ground of the loggerhead, green and hawksbill turtles and supports an abundance of fish, corals, molluscs and many other marine species

THE HISTORY The first documented European landing on the Ningaloo Coast was made by the Dutch Captain Williem Janz of the Mauritius in 1618 near the tip of what is now known as North West Cape. To put that into perspective, this was 150 years before Captain James Cook and his HMS Endeavour arrived on the east coast at Botany Bay! Australian Captain Phillip Parker King later visited in 1818 while surveying the northern coastline of Australia, and named Exmouth Gulf in honour of his hero, Viscount Exmouth, formerly Sir Edward Pellew...the man author C.S Forrester would one day base his Horatio Hornblower series of novels around. In the years that were to follow, pearl luggers visited the area from Broome and a small number of pastoralists operated large sheep stations along the coastline. Very little changed on North West Cape until 1942, during World

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War II, when the US Navy established a submarine base under the code name Operation Potshot. This facility only served as a permanent base for a short period of time, but continued to operate as a refuelling facility. THE NINGALOO REEF The World Heritage listed Ningaloo Reef is one of the longest fringing coral reefs in the world. Stretching from Bundegi Beach near the township of Exmouth in the north, right along the western shore of North West Cape, past Coral Bay and beyond to Red Bluff at Quobba Station to the south, the Ningaloo Reef is 300 kilometres of unspoiled underwater paradise. The Ningaloo Reef was declared a marine park in 1987 in order to protect this unique environment and its inhabitants. In 2011, the Ningaloo Reef and Ningaloo Coast received UNESCO World Heritage listing, with the inception of the Ningaloo Coast World Heritage Area. This was largely in recognition of the fact

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE T H E N I NG A LO O C OA ST that the Ningaloo Reef is one of the most biologically diverse marine environments on the planet; home to more than 250 species of coral and over 500 species of fish. Unlike most coral reefs which are located well offshore, the Ningaloo Reef runs within very close proximity to the shoreline. In most places along the reef’s 300km length, coral gardens brimming with brightly coloured tropical fish lie mere footsteps from the beach. This makes the Ningaloo Reef Australia’s easiest access coral reef experience.

the area, including the white centred variety of the Sturt’s Desert Pea. Surveys have recorded over 630 species of flowering plants on the peninsula and within the Cape Range National Park. This is a surprisingly high number for an arid limestone area. Over 700 caves are catalogued in the area and it is likely that many remain undiscovered. There are numerous gorges and sanctuary areas that provide a haven for wildlife and contain rare and unusual flora. A stunning array of wildflowers can be seen in late winter, including Sturt’s desert peas and the beautiful bird flower.

CAPE RANGE NATIONAL PARK Situated on the west side of the North West Cape is the Cape Range National Park; a spectacular place of rugged limestone ranges, breathtaking deep canyons and 50km of pristine beaches. The park covers some 50,581 hectares and its northern boundary is just 40km from Exmouth. Wildlife is abundant with a variety of birds, emus, echidnas, lizards, wallabies, kangaroos and dingoes commonly sighted. Cape Range offers a variety of attractions and activities for visitors interested in the natural environment. In ancient times the range was isolated as an island as rising sea levels inundated lower lying areas. As a result of this geographic isolation, there are some species of plants and animals that are endemic to

CORAL BAY Coral Bay is a perfect destination for people of all ages seeking relaxation, adventure or simply something refreshingly different. Coral Bay is ideal for the independent traveller searching for excitement; families looking for an enjoyable, safe environment; scuba divers; fisher persons; snorkellers and those who simply want to relax, unwind and see nature at its very best. There are many tours on offer in Coral Bay, including glass bottom boat tours, diving tours, manta ray snorkel tours, whale watching tours, whale shark snorkel tours, quad bike tours and sailing tours.

The coast and reef draw their name from the Australian Aboriginal Wajarri language word ningaloo meaning “promontory”, “deepwater”, or “high land jutting into the sea”. The Yamatji peoples of the Baiyungu and Yinigudura clans have inhabited the area for over 30,000 years

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Published with the permssion of JEAN HAILES FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH

T

eaming with life, your digestive system is home to trillions of bacteria and other microorganisms. Known as the gut microbiome, this collection of ‘small wonders’ is driving a rapidly expanding body of research.

fibre- found in wheat bran, high-fibre cereals,

explains accredited practising dietitian Kim

brown rice, wholemeal products and fruit

Menzies.

and vegetables - helps to keep your bowels regular.

chain fatty acids, are ‘‘excelllent for the

‘‘This is great news,’’ says Jean Hailes naturopath Sandra Villella, ‘‘But what we need more of are fermentable fibres such as

Linked to many areas of human health - from

resistant starch.’’

obesity and immunity, to inflammation,

Resistant starch is what’s known as a

allergies, mental health and metabolism -

prebiotic - a type of carbohydrate that can’t

research in the past decade has revealed the

be digested by your own body but is good for

gut microbiome’s crucial role in our overall

your gut’s ‘good’ bacteria.

health and happiness.

“Having a healthy balance of gut bacteria is

With so much still to be explored, now’s the

all about being a good host; keeping the ‘good

time to learn how to take care of your gut’s

guys’ happy by feeding them the food that

greatest allies.

they love,’’ says Sandra.

A MENU FOR YOUR MICROBIOME

Foods rich in resistant starch include lentils,

Science tells us that fibre is your gut’s best friend. But when it comes to nourishing your gut bacteria, not all fibre is created equal. The CSIRO says that Australians generally do a good job of eating enough insoluble fibre (also known s roughage). This type of

peas, beans, firm bananas, some wholegrain foods, cooked and cooled potato and rice, and cold pasta salad.

health of your intestinal cellls’, fuelling the ‘good’ gut bacteria and helping to reduce gut inflammation. ADD AND SUBTRACT The key to a healthy micobiome may not only be what you put on your plate, but what you leave off it. Researchers are finding that certain food additives, common in packaged and processed foods, may harm gut bacteria and, in turn, your overall health. Two common emulsifiers (chemical agents used to give processed foods a smooth texture or extend their shelf life) were tested on mice and found to not only reduce levels of healthy gut bacteria and increase levels

When potato, rice or pasta are cooked, then cooled and eaten, resistant start is created,

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of inflammatory gut microbes, but also put them at increased risk of chronic disease.


WELLBEING JEAN H A ILES for WOMEN’S HEA LTH

Artifical sweeteners may also be a cause for concern. Often used in

‘‘We cannot alwys be sure just how many good bacteria are present

‘diet’ or ‘sugar-free’ products, animal studies have shown that these

in home-fermented foods, but provided you prepare them safely and

additives disrupt the balance and diversity of gut bacteria.

follow instructions, it certainly does no harm,’’ says Sandra.

However, as Sandra explains, the key to knowing what’s in your food is

Eating these foods regularly may help to bring the right types of

to use less packaged foods and build your diet around natural, whole

bacteria to your gut, and, most importantly, including ta wide variety

foods.

of resistant starches and fibres in your diet will keep the populations happy.

‘‘Keep ‘sometimes’ food to sometimes only, check food labels for numbers and additives, where possible and use simple natural

It’s an exciting time in the world of gut microbiome exploration. To help

ingredients and make your meals from scratch,’’ she says.

you on your way to a healthier gut, try our easy sauerkraut recipe on page 43.

THE RIGHT TYPES Fermented foods, such as sauerkraut, kimchi, kefir and yoghurt contain

For more health and wellness information, visit www.jeanhailes.org.au

good bacteria. Plus, if you learn how to ferment these foods at home, there’s the bonus of one less food label to read.

I

MAGES: Frances Andrijich Australia’s South West Above: Southern Forests and Valley’s, Pemberton

Right: Newey’s Vege Patch

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REGIONAL PRODUCE WOMEN IN AGR ICULTUR E

R

oly Poly Farm is a small-scale market garden located in Gidgegannup, Western Australia. It is run and operated by Melissa Charlick and Declan McGill, two young farmers who are passionate about creating a more meaningful relationship between food, soil, consumer, and farmer. The farm’s vision is to play a part in the re-localisation of Perth’s food economy, whilst regenerating land, ecology and community. Declan and Melissa are passionate about their consumer-direct sales model, which sees them selling their produce through both farmers markets and a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). CSA is a model developed in Japan that sees ‘members’ prepurchasing their vegetables at the beginning of each season, and then picking up their ‘share’ of vegetables each week once the season begins. This allows the farmer to purchase seed, tools and growing materials prior to the season beginning, and means that both consumer and farmer share in the risks and successes of the farm. Roly Poly Farm harnesses a range of regenerative growing methodologies, including organic, bio-intensive, no-till and biodynamic, all without the use of synthetic pesticides or herbicides. The farm is centred around transparency of their growing practices and methodologies, with the intention being to encourage more young farmers to enter into a career in agriculture, and view it as a job and lifestyle to aspire to. At the end of this year, Roly Poly Farm will be relocating down to Harvey, WA, where they hope to have the space to create jobs within the local community, as well as develop a farmer incubator program where new and young farmers can grow and develop their skills in a low-risk environment. Head to www.rolypolyfarm.com.au for more information. Melissa Charlick features in the Visible Farmer, a film project that tells the untold stories of the gutsy women behind our food and fibre, and the vital, innovative role they play. A journey that will change our perception of who a farmer is: www.visiblefarmer.com Images courteousy of Briana Shephard. ABC

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SEASONAL PRODUCE WA BE E F R EC I PE

Vegan, gluten free, dairy free, nut free 20 minutes to prepare • 10 days to ferment • 30 serves INGREDIENTS

1 medium green or red cabbage 1 ½ tbsp sea salt 1 tbsp mix of fennel, cumin and coriander seeds and /or 1 small birdseye chilli, finely diced Iif you like it spicy

PREPARATION + FERMENT

Clean and rinse jar and bowl thoroughly. Remove and discard cabbage’s wilted outer leaves and core. Thinly slice remaining cabbage, then combine with salt in mixing bowl. Squeeze and massage cabbage with your hands for 10-15 minutes, until you have a very wet mixture. Add your chosen seasoning and mix through. Pack the mixture into the jars as tightly as possible, pressing down as you go.

UTENSILS

1 litre glass jar (or 2 or 3 large jars) Small piece of fabric to cover jar top Elastic band or string Large mixing bowl

For food safety, the cabbage needs to be completely covered by liquid throughout the fermentation process. If it is not, mix 1 tbsp salt with 2 tbsp water, add to jar and press mixture down firmly. Repeat as necessary. Cover jar top with fabric, secure with elastic band / string. Store in pantry, out of direct sunlight and allow to ferment for 10 days. Then, move it to the fridge and enjoy!

Traditionally-made sauerkraut has had a long journey throughout human history and can be traced back to 400 BC. Sauerkraut can be used in many ways. Add it to salads, sandwiches, wraps and burgers, or serve as a side for roasts, veggies, curries, casseroles and stir-fries. It contains vitamins A, B, C and K, various minerals, live lactobacilli (beneficial gut bacteria, also known as probiotics) and a large amount of lactic acid. It is best eaten uncooked to preserve this good bacteria. Cabbage is also a prebiotic, feeding existing healthy gut bacteria.


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WRAP UP S A Y H E L LO

BECOME A MEMBER Join the RRR Network as a member; become actively engaged with rural, regional and remote women to support

SAY HE LLO

and contribute to the economic and social wellbeing of their communities.

Simply photograph yourself somewhere in WA then

The annual membership fee is $220.

visit www.rrrnetwork.com.au and follow the links on the MAGAZINE tab. We’d love to see your backyard!

Members over the age of 18, who have paid their membership by the 30th June, can nominate for a position on

RIGHT:

the RRR Network Board (also known

The Dowerin GWN7 Machinery Field Days is one of Australia’s largest and most impressive annual agricultural expos. From tractors to cheese, water tanks to stud rams, it’s a well-loved family day out for young and old. www.dowerinfielddays.com.au

as the “committee”, as detailed in the constitution). Members receive discounts on events, training and invitations to member-only events.

SUBSCRIBE

Anyone can subscribe to the RRR Network and register to receive a digital copy of the quarterly RRR Network Magazine via our website. Subscribers can elect to receive a printed hard copy of the magazine at a cost of $40 per annum for 4 editions

LEFT:

Gnarabup, Margaret River is full of life in and out of the water. The local cafe is well loved by tourists and locals alike for all of its deliciousness, and the white sandy beaches for their calmer waters. Pictured is a local group of swimmers, affectionately known as the ‘mermaids’, most of whom take to the water and swim to the reefs almost every day of the year; rain, hail or shine. On this day the gathering was to celebrate the birthday’s of two members while wearing pink caps in recognition and support of Pink Ribbon Day. www.swimmingwomen.com.au R R R N E T WO R K

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per year, posted to your door.

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EMAIL admin@rrrnetwork.com.au PHONE (08) 6316 0407 POST PAYMENT TO: Rural Regional Remote Women’s Network of WA WeWork Level 32, 152 St Georges Terrace Perth, Western Australia, 6000


THE LAST WORD AC K NOW L E D GE M E N T OF C OU N T R Y

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SECTION E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

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HE RURAL, REGIONAL, REMOTE WOMEN’S NETWORK OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA ACKNOWLEDGES THE AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES OF THIS NATION. WE ACKNOWLEDGE THE TRADITIONAL

CUSTODIANS OF THE LANDS ON WHICH OUR COMPANY IS LOCATED AND WHERE WE CONDUCT OUR BUSINESS. WE PAY OUR RESPECTS TO ANCESTORS AND ELDERS, PAST AND PRESENT. THE RURAL, REGIONAL, REMOTE WOMEN’S NETWORK OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA IS COMMITTED TO HONOURING AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES’ UNIQUE CULTURAL AND SPIRITUAL RELATIONSHIPS TO THE LAND, WATERS AND SEAS AND THEIR RICH CONTRIBUTION TO SOCIETY. SOURCE:www.creativespirits.info/aboriginal culture/spirituality/welcome-to-country-acknowledgement-of-country IMAGE: Frances Andrijich KOOMAL DREAMING www.australiassouthwest.com R R R N E T WO RK SPRIN G 2019 47


W

e have a proud 21-year history of supporting and celebrating Western Australian women and their

families who live and work outside of the Perth metropolitan area. In 2016 the RRR Network transitioned from a WA State government advisory board to an independent incorporated entity. Our focus is every woman living in a rural, regional, or remote community in Western Australia. We have a subscriber base of over 10,000 individuals, businesses and community organisations who receive this quarterly glossy magazine from us and an active social media following.

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IMAGE: Astrid Volkze Madeline Roux SWAMP GIRL: TO THE REGIONS Project WINDOW TO T WINDOW HE REGIONS stories photographed by the locals

FOR RUR AL , REG IONAL & REMOTE WES TERN AUS TR ALIAN WOMEN WA’s pre-eminent communication network for inspiring & connecting regional women; championing their role in our communities and advocating on their behalf.

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