Page 1

A DAY

IN THE LIFE

Family Favourites / Produce to Plate RURAL WOMEN’S AWARDS: MEET THE FINALISTS

the good books SOCIAL in the OUTBACK


THE HEALTH OF THOSE WE LOVE STARTS WITH US

03–07 SEPTEMBER WOMEN’S HEALTH WEEK 2018 Putting the wellbeing of others ahead of our own is something many women do without realising. Jean Hailes’ annual Women’s Health Week is a time to invest in ourselves and make our own good health a priority.

SIGN UP TO:

womenshealthweek.com.au

For trusted, practical tools and resources to help you start making positive changes that can last a lifetime.

#womenshealthweek

Jean Hailes is supported by funding from the Australian Government.


Welcome to the re-launched RRR Network magazine. We are proud to be able to continue a tradition that started with publication of the first RRR Network News magazine in late 1996 – the brainchild of the always fabulous Marg Agnew of Esperance.

The commercial reality is that we have accepted advertising to offset the cost of this publication and, as long as we continue to have and grow the support of the WA business community, we intend to continue to provide this magazine for free, in both hard copy and electronically, hopefully for another 20 years at least.

In late 2016 the RRR Network transitioned from a WA State Government Reference Group to an independent, incorporated entity with the very welcome support of Royalties for Regions seed funding. When I took on the role as the inaugural CEO in November 2017 I did wonder if there was still a role for a quarterly printed publication in this age of instant news and social media, but the message received load and clear was that the women of rural, regional and remote WA still wanted to share stories in a magazine just for them.

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On behalf of the Board, we hope you enjoy the new look RRR magazine and we welcome your feedback. Jackie Jarvis Chief Executive Officer Rural, Regional, Remote Women’s Network of Western Australia www.rrrnetwork.com.au

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COVER The inspirational truck-driving, whip-cracking, snake-handling cowgirl Jess Edwards

THE BOARD CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

SUBMISSIONS, ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES

Jackie Jarvis (Margaret River)

GENERAL ENQUIRIES & SUBSCRIPTIONS

admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

CHAIR

Lyn Farrell (Bunbury)

PRODUCTION, DESIGN & ARTWORK

Wilderness Publishing

SECRETARY

Fiona Palmer (Pingaring)

PRINTING

TREASURER

A+L Printers Bunbury WA

Debbie Dowden (Mount Magnet)

PUBLISHED BY

COMMITTEE

RRR Regional Network RMB 790 Wirring Road, Margaret River WA

Maria Bolten Magnay (Kununurra) Anna Oades (Donnybrook) Sue Middleton (Wongan Hills)

www.rrrnetwork.com.au

All content is subject to copyright and may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. Opinions represented in RRR Regional Network Quarterly are not necessarily those of the publisher. RRR Regional Newtwork Quarterly is published seasonally. PEFC Certified Printing

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Darkan Sheepfest image: Astrid Volzke

Waringarri Corroboree Under the Stars image: Sarah Duguid

OVM Kimberley Moon Experience image: Ben Broady

CONTENTS 04 - THROW BACK TO…

27 - NETWORK CALENDAR

21 years after our first incarnation, we’re back

Dates and details for what’s on in Western Australia

THE QUARTERLY

28 - AROUND THE REGIONS

06 - BECOMING SOCIAL IN THE OUTBACK The inspirational Jess Edwards

A round-up of what’s been happening in the communities of Western Australia

10 - MEET THE FINALISTS

32 - THE WORK PLACE

The AgriFutures™ Rural Women’s Award

Technology, Planning, Law and Finance

16 - MUSTER’VE BEEN CRAZY

44 - CELEBRATING WOMEN

Meet Narelle, the one making it happen at the Kimberleys’ Ord Valley Muster

Women taking their places at the top

20 - MAKING A DIFFERENCE

48 - HEALTH & WELLBEING

Say hello to Pam McGregor, doing her bit

Information and insights

52 - SEASONAL PRODUCE

23 NEWS & REVIEWS

Celebrating the bounty of Western Australia

Books, podcasts and social media Seeking out the interesting and entertaining

56 - THE LAST WORD

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Until next time

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THROW BACK TO… NOT- S O - H U M BL E BEGI N N I NG S

from seed

tofruition A look back 21 years to our not-so-humble beginnings: A REPORT FROM THE NETWORK CHAIRPERSON, MARG AGNEW

T

he first time I read a Rural Women’s Network newsletter from Victoria, I’d just spent three days sitting on a tractor. My husband, Rob, was away at our other block, so I’d only had the Wonder Dog for company. When I flopped exhausted into bed and started to read the newsletter, I know I’d found a publication that related to women in isolation and somehow felt it I wasn’t quite so alone in this life I’d chosen to lead. After attending the Inaugural International Women in Agriculture Conference in Melbourne in 1994 and meeting like minded women, I came home with a vision of establishing a Rural Women’s Network and newsletter for women in Western Australia.

Local women provided the bulk of the contributions with reflected their feelings on everyday experience. After a huge cooperative effort, 1200 newsletters were printed and, by December, 1100 copies were distribute to rural households from Lake King to Condingup.

This coincided with the driest year on record in the Esperance region. A series of initiatives were developed by concerned people in the district involving strategies to support farmers through this trying period. A group of us decided to produce a newsletter to provide a spirit of understanding for rural women and their families.

This process gave a breath of life to my vision. I realised, if we could do it locally, it might just be possible to call up support for a statewide newsletter for rural women. The remaining 100 copies were posted to women I knew throughout WA, plus State and Federal politicians from rural electorates. We asked the politician’s to

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ABOVE - Deputy Premier Hendy Cowan with Chairperson Marg Agnew and Coordinator Kate Daniels, at the Project launch in August, 1996.

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support the concept of a WA Network and newsletter and encouraged the women to lobby their local politicians to support such an initiative. The response was overwhelming! Since that time, there have been many phone calls, faxes, budgets and meetings called between departmental staff and myself. The outcome of all this negotiation was a commitment of support from two State Ministers and two year funding for the project provided through the Department of Commerce and Trade and Agriculture Western Australia. Persistence, patience and perseverance have been


THROW BACK TO… NOT- S O - H U M BL E BEGI N N I NG S

WA RURAL WOMAN OF THE YEAR 1996 Kathy Finlayson (at home on the salt flats) Jeedamaya Station.

essential in keeping the project rolling along – and meanwhile, there’s still the farm to be run! On 12 August, the inaugural meeting of the WA Rural Women’s Network Reference Group was held. A full time Network Coordinator, Kate Daniels, also commenced her first day on the job. At the end of the day’s proceedings, the Deputy Premier, Hendy Cowan, officially launched the Network. The development of the Network from seed to fruition has taken the dedication of many people, and without them we would have no Network and you would not be reading this newsletter today. My thanks to Pat, Lesley, Margaret, Dorothy, Mike, Wendy, Trish, Lee, Kerrie, Jill and Rob, also EOPP for the funds that paid for the printing and postage of the original Esperance newsletter. Thanks also to Hendy Cowan, Deputy Premier; Minister for Commerce and Trade; Regional Development; Small Business) and Monty House, Minister for

Primary Industry; Fisheries whose personal commitment has ensured the departmental structures and financial support to actualize the establishment of the WA Rural Women’s Network and newsletter. Our first newsletter is a showcase of what we would like to present in the future publications. Except, in future we’d like to see a lot more of YOUR stories. The newsletter is a tool in bridging the gap of distance and bringing women together from throughout the State. I would like everyone to feel this is their magazine and to make it the success it deserves. I urge you all to become involved and welcome your contributions. On behalf of the Reference Group, I wish you and your family a safe and happy Christmas and everything you wish for in the New Year. Enjoy your newsletter, pass it around to your friends or send us their contact details. Happy Reading, Marg Agnew EDITION 1, SUMMER 96-97

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Excerpts from the COORDINATORS DESK “Well, here we are at last, Marg’s vision is a reality and I’ve been fortunate in being selected as the person who makes it all happen. Working with Marg and a 15 member Reference Group from all over the State has provided a few challenges, but lots of fun too… … selected for their diversity of skills and experience across many industry sectors and aspects of rural life. We’ve had two meetings now and with the help of today’s technology, I can bridge the physical distance and communicate regularly with the group. … advice from our Northwest Reference Group members we all agreed that our target group is rural, remote and regional women and to recognize, promote and expand the contributions they make to their communities. … Our newsletter will be pro-women, reflecting their achievements, successes, interests and personal and professional diversity. … I hope everyone enjoys reading this first newsletter and that we’ll hear more from you soon.” Kate Daniels

COORDINATORS DESK


T

ruck-driving, whip-cracking, snake-handling cowgirl Jess Edwards is an inspirational young lady, forging her own path in what is often seen as a harsh and unforgiving world. Spending your days in the outback chasing livestock in the heat, dodging flies and snakes, with nothing but desert as far as the eye can see may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but to Jess, she wouldn’t have it any other way. At just 27 years old, Jess has been on some awe-inspiring adventures. She’s worked on stations as a contract musterer, a stationhand, a leading hand and a manager. She has driven road trains, worked in mining, ridden in rodeos and explored parts of our beautiful country many of us have never heard about. Isolation can be a big issue in the outback, but through the magic of the digital age, Jess has been able to share her stories, build her own brand and connect with like-minded ladies throughout the country, and even the world. Her posts are exciting, from the heart and a fascinating look into a world many of us only see on TV or read about in the paper.

under her nails! In the outback, Jess feels free; cities are not her thing. She feels claustrophobic surrounded by buildings and can only handle being there a short time. As a young woman in a historically male-dominated industry, Jess has had her share of gender-related difficulties, but she has managed to deal with them all with pride, strength and dignity. Jess holds her own with any other worker; being physically tall and strong is certainly an advantage, but she has also developed an emotional and mental resilience to any negativity. She is smart and follows rural travelling rule number one – always let people know where you are going. She never puts herself in a situation where she feels uncomfortable and has her own precautions which she follows to the letter to keep herself safe. It is this kind of ‘street smart’ that gives her the freedom she longs for, the adventures she dreams about and the stories to tell.

Jess didn’t grow up on farms but she was quickly drawn to the open space of the outback. She was given the opportunity to experience rural life just after her 16th birthday and has not looked back. Red dirt is now in her blood she says, as well as

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THE QUARTERLY

This strength and resilience Jess credits to her mother, whom she believes single-handedly moulded her into the strong woman she is today. Being gracious and kind-hearted was a given in Jess’s family and her mother always encouraged her to stand up for what she believes in and follow her own path.

Jess began blogging in 2012 under the pseudonym ‘Jillaroo Jess’ as a creative outlet and a way to connect to people in a positive way. At the time, she was working on some small mustering contracts in Queensland. With a background in media, she was longing to somehow combine the two industries she loved – agriculture and media - so heading into blogging was a natural choice. In 2014 she started up her Facebook and Instagram pages as accessories to her blog and to build her brand through quick snapshots and short stories. She is now also on Twitter and Snapchat. Jess is a down-to-earth girl who works hard but loves what she does, and her posts reflect her larrikin nature and genuine, kind heart. Stained shirt, ripped jeans, Akubra-adorned and covered in red dust – this is Jess and she really does make it look good! With just shy of 60,000 Facebook followers and over 17,000 followers on Instagram, her stories have become a

All that said, working on the land can take its toll physically and mentally and Jess is very aware that sometimes she overdoes it, especially during the particularly busy mustering season. Unfortunately, Jess has had to deal with a chronic health condition which can cause her excessive fatigue, so she is careful to eat well and rest as her body needs it to stay at the top of her game. Mentally, Jess credits her incredible support network of family and friends that are there to lend an ear in times of need – even if that is via telephone or computer.

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THE QUARTERLY BEC OM I NG S O C I A L I N T H E OU T B AC K

part of every day for many people out in cyberspace looking for a laugh, to learn something new, to be inspired or to simply be entertained by a new story. For Jess, the internet has made rural life that much less isolating and she too is inspired by the many other incredible women out there working hard and making change.

There are many more adventures on the horizon for this amazing lady, now with her best mate Bunji the kelpie in tow. On her must-do list is to get her helicopter licence and become involved in heli-mustering. With such incredible landscapes to look over, this would be a dream job for Jess – flying through the spectacular gorges looking for cattle. In her spare time, she is a water baby and seeks out waterholes and beaches wherever she can. Fishing, snorkelling and swimming – a stark contrast to life in the desert!

In addition, Jess’s online presence has opened up an array of once-ina-lifetime opportunities along the way. She has been taken to the Deni Ute Muster and visited Hollywood to help showcase a pair of cowboy boots to the stars. She has featured in two TV ads and a TV series, and has had sponsorships and ambassadorships with several notable Australian companies. To further put her creative streak to work, Jess has recently produced a range of trucker caps that are built tough, but with a feminine edge.

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Stay up to date with Jillaroo Jess on her social media platforms: Facebook page JillarooJess and Instagram @jillaroojess, or check out her blog https://jillaroojess.com

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CBH GROUP PROUDLY SUPPORTING GRAIN GROWING COMMUNITIES. WA growers and their communities are the lifeblood of our industry. No-one understands this better than the CBH Group. That’s why every year, CBH invests more than $1.5 million to contribute to the vitality, development, wellbeing and safety of these regions. cbh.com.au


Sophie Dwyer Two Sparrows Photography

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THE QUARTERLY T H E AGR I F U T U R E S™ RU R A L WOM E N’S AWA R D S

Meet the

finalists. S O P H I E DW Y E R

The AgriFutures™ Rural Women’s Award is Australia’s leading award acknowledging and

Sophie’s vision is to create a thriving, sustainable hemp industry in WA with localised manufacturing capabilities in regional areas; and she sees expanded opportunities to create an Australia grown organic hemp food industry. Her project is to develop the commercial case for investing into hemp seed as a food.

supporting the essential role women play in rural industries, businesses and communities. The Award provides a platform to inspire and support

This idea builds on Sophie’s passion for creating safe and sustainable food supply chains. Hemp seed, Sophie explains, is a complete food, containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (Omega 3 & 6), gluten free protein, a range of vitamins and few carbohydrates. By building both a thriving food and industrial fibre industry, hemp can provide an alternative crop for broadacre farmers to utilise within their rotation and provides the opportunity for local processing facilities to add value to the raw material, in turn supporting the development of regional economies.

Australian women to use and develop their skills to benefit their industries and communities. Over the past two decades, the Award has gained a significant profile, and is recognised as a program of influence among parliamentarians, industry, media and Award alumni. Each state and territory winner receives a $10,000 bursary for innovative ideas and projects, access

Based in Perth, Sophie is also an elected Local Government member and serves on the board of Food, Fibre and Land International Group (FFLI Group) and the Small Business Development Corporation. She also volunteers on a local independent public-school board, a harm prevention charity and several other community groups. She is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, holds a Masters of Business Administration and Bachelor of Science in Horticulture with Honours.

to professional development opportunities and alumni networks, so it’s here we proudly introduce the West Australian finalists. Written by JACKIE JARVIS, CEO RRR Network WA

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THE SECTION QUARTERLY T HEEDI AGR TOR I FI U AL T USU RE BT S™ I T RU L E ROR A L DI WOM S C LEAN’S I M EAWA R R DS

Darrylin Gordon Patrick Karenna Photography

DA R RY L I N G O R D O N

program at Lamboo station to build self-respect and pride, together with valuable employment and life skills. As Derrylin explains, where there are high levels of education, there is virtually no gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. She wants to take control of the opportunities she has to make a difference and be a positive role model to others.

Darrylin is a busy young mum who lives and works on Lamboo Station, an Aboriginal managed pastoral station in the Kimberley. As a Jaru woman, she is one of the traditional owners of the station and is passionate about her country and regional development. She understands that, traditionally, prosperity has been linked solely to economic success, but Darrylin sees a future where rural business can mix culture, business and community together by taking a holistic approach to land management and cattle production. This idea supports traditional owners caring for country and maintaining cultural values whilst managing successful pastoral businesses.

Darrylin is currently studying a BA. of Applied Science in Indigenous Community Management and Development at Curtin University, whilst working as an Indigenous Community Alcohol and Drug Worker for Kimberley Mental Health. She has worked as a community engagement officer for the Shire of Halls Creek and as a community support worker in various roles such as mentoring youth justice children for Yura Yungi Medical Service, financial management, and case management work. She is 26 years old and has ambition to be the first Aboriginal woman to run the family cattle business one day.

She has seen first-hand the poor outcomes from employment programs delivered to Aboriginal people in Halls Creek and her project seeks to design a Community Training and Empowerment

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THE QUARTERLY SECTION T H E AGR E DI I FTOR UTU IA RLE S™ SU BT RUI R TL AE L OR WOM DIESN’S C L AAWA I M ERRD S

PAU L A P OW N A L L

Through education Paula hopes to encourage sustainable farming practices and plans to host workshops on insect farming and wants to develop a contract farming insect system to help support regional economies and provide future employment opportunities in this emerging industry.

Paula wants to change our perception of the protein needed to feed a growing global population. Her project aims to support a new sustainable insect farming industry as a supplementary income for traditional farm businesses. She plans to learn the world’s best practices in insect farming methods from leading insect producers in Canada and the USA, and share that knowledge with both emerging insect production businesses, as well as the broader WA public.

Paula lives in the Shire of Murray and is the founder of Grubs Up Australia, WA’s first edible insect farm. She has a degree in Agribusiness from Curtin University, and studied business management at Marcus Oldham College. Her past professional experience includes local government mosquito management activities. She is a member of her local volunteer Bush Fire brigade and played an active role during the 2016 Yarloop bushfire emergency.

As Paula explains crickets are over 69% protein, high in folate, have 9 essential acids, and are high in vitamin B12. Cricket protein can therefore play an important role in creating healthy animals, and healthy humans. Insect production takes just 6-8 weeks from hatching to harvest, uses minimal water, and utilises recycled food. 100% of the cricket is used in the protein products made, and all manure and exoskeleton is turned into fertilizer.

Paula Pownall and her family Two Sparrows Media

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THE QUARTERLY T H E AGR I F U T U R E S™ RU R A L WOM E N’S AWA R D S

CAROL REDFORD

sky views with visitors. Carol plans to mentor Wheatbelt tourism organisations and support astro-tourism businesses that attract visitors to regional towns. She sees an important role for Aboriginal tourism businesses to share their stories and connections with the night; and sees a broader role in encouraging regional and metropolitan students, to engage with science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in the Wheatbelt for future employment opportunities in regional towns.

Carol is an avid stargazer who wants to share her love of astronomy and help people discover the amazing WA night sky. With Astro-Tourism picked to be the “next big thing” in travel, Carol has recognised that WA’s Wheatbelt towns, with their low light pollution, present the perfect opportunity to capitalise on the growing international interest in celestial experiences in places where the sky is the darkest and most clear.

Carol lives in the Shire of Gingin and is an experienced small business operator, having owned Gingin Observatory and now Stargazers Club WA. She is a qualified marketing professional and has considerable experience working in State and Local Government and serves on the board Heartlands WA. She is the Chair of Astronomy WA and with the Stargazers Club WA, she partners with Act-Belong-Commit, WA’s health promotion campaign to promote stargazing as an activity that’s great for mental health.

As Carol explains the Wheatbelt has unique advantages for stargazing. The Southern Hemisphere is recognised as where the best parts of the Milky Way are seen. Wheatbelt towns are far enough away from Perth light pollution for dark skies to be protected; and the region is home to international space science projects like the Australian International Gravitational Observatory and the European Space Agency Deep Space Antenna. Her project is commercially focused and she hopes to encourage Wheatbelt farmers and communities to proudly share night

Carol Redford Two Sparrows Media

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Food Gascoyne

Festival 2018

AN AUSSIE GOURMET ADVENTURE 5th August - 8th September  Enjoy the best of Gascoyne produce prepared by world class chefs in some of the most stunning locations in Australia. Event program soon to be announced with something for everyone to enjoy.

CARNARVON | DIRK HARTOG ISLAND | EXMOUTH | MT AUGUSTUS For more information and to be notified when tickets go on sale please email: admin@gascoynefood.com.au 

www.gascoynefood.com.au

@gascoynefoodcouncil

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@gascoynefood

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Muster’ve been crazy! Fervor Degustation Dinner image - Ben Broady

T

he multi-award winning Argyle Diamonds Ord Valley Muster has become the N a re lle centrepiece to Kimberley tourism B ro ok over the years and a must-do on calendars around the country. With the spectacular scenery and abundance of diversity and talent coming from this region, it is little wonder the event has gone from strength to strength, attracting many notable celebrities and thousands of visitors every year.

on the Board or worked as their book-keeper, written award submissions and worked as a consultant for the event. She quickly became known as the “encyclopedia for all things Muster”. On a personal level, Narelle has found this journey incredibly rewarding but of course, at times, challenging. In between Musters, Narelle has worked mainly in tourism roles and community volunteer positions while raising her daughter. Her young child (now 20 years old) often accompanied her to meetings and her very supportive husband was always willing to offer help, whether with the housework, cooking, parenting or even lugging around event equipment. Friends have also been vitally important to Narelle over the years, offering shoulders to cry on, child care support, being recruited as volunteers at events or even just for a refreshing drink at the end of the day! It is this sense of camaraderie, family and belonging that have kept Narelle going and ensured the success of every Muster, year-in, year-out.

However, the Argyle Diamonds Ord Valley Muster had humble beginnings. In 2000, the Kununurra Chamber of Commerce & Industry (KCCI) suggested a new event be developed to boost tourism and showcase the region. Enter Narelle Brook: the lady handed the task of (in her words) “making it happen”. Narelle had lived in Kununurra for five years at this stage and had taken on the role of Executive Officer with The Kununurra Chamber of Commerce & Industry in 1999. From a board meeting in 2000, the Argyle Diamonds Ord Valley Muster was born!

The diversity of events over the years is truly commendable. There’s always something for everyone in the community – the Bush Olympics, Biggest Barra BBQ, Rotary Car Rally, Speedway, Rodeo, Street Party, Muster Idol, Bush Magic Film Festival, Art Appreciation and a triathlon. Some of these have stood the test of time, others have evolved. By 2010, the event had grown so much that the Ord Valley Muster Committee (a sub-committee of the Kununurra Chamber of Commerce & Industry) became incorporated as Ord Valley Events Inc. Narelle and her fellow Board members voted to outsource the event management side of the single biggest event on the program, the Kimberley Moon Experience, to popular Perth-based event management company

The plan was to create an event spanning several days that programmed a little something for everyone; art, music, a movie night, dinner and drinks, a market and a car rally were in the very first line up. The community rallied in true Kimberley style, and before long Narelle and the team secured an impressive list of 131 sponsors for that first year. From there, the event has become bigger and better every year. There isn’t one year, in now 18, that Narelle hasn’t been involved in some shape or form. She has volunteered or run events, sat R R R N E T WO R K

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THE QUARTERLY N A R E L L E BROOK ~ OR D VA L L E Y M UST E R Mellen Events who had the experience in running large outdoor concerts. The decision paid off and the ‘Moon’ is now the major drawcard to the Muster’s program.

and certainly amounts to some very sleepless nights as you wait on ticket sales and sponsorship dollars to come in. The weather can also prove a challenge, which of course we have absolutely no control over! Waking up to rain on the morning of Saturday May 29, 2010, we wondered if we would get through the day and actually be able to put on the show with John Farnham.

This year, Narelle is Chair of Ord Valley Events Inc. for the second year and the young and enthusiastic Board have over 50 events planned for 11-20 May 2018. In just two short years, the Muster will reach its 20th anniversary, which Narelle is very much looking forward to celebrating – what an achievement for an event that began from the spare room of a local home all those years ago! The commitment, strength and community spirit of all involved has ensured the event’s success, both now and well into the future.

We were very close to making the call to cancel when the sun came out and we got to enjoy a fabulous line-up at the Kimberley Moon Experience! Biggest sigh of relief ever!

What have you learned

Narelle has kindly shared some of her experiences of the Argyle Diamonds Ord Valley Muster over the years, including some of the challenges and highlights, in her own words.

from your OVM work?

To have faith. Kununurra is an extraordinary place and the people who live here are just as extraordinary. We are very lucky that our fabulous community has ALWAYS come through with not only their sponsorship dollars, but in-kind donations, ticket sales, volunteer time and an enthusiasm for the event that has seen it succeed every year. I have learnt to never underestimate the effect a personal visit to a supplier, sponsor, community organisation or one-to-one conversation can have on making an event succeed.

greatest challenge

What was your with the OVM, and how did you overcome it? Definitely the first year when it was a matter of building the event with the hope that people would come! We had to lock in suppliers, flights for celebrities and a program of events without knowing if we were going to receive the sponsorship and patronage at ticketed events to pay for it all! Throughout some of the following years, there has been a very similar stress – will we receive the sponsorship dollars to make the event work? It can be a terrifying thought

most satisfying

Can you pinpoint your moment with the OVM?

Every year that we manage to host this amazing event is one of great satisfaction for me. To think of how far we have come – from the absolute chaos of the first event where we built it with no funding, crossing our fingers and hoping for the best – to now,

Mu

s te

r

Ch

o ir

- im

a ge S

a r a h D u gu i d

Parks for People image - Ben Broady

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THE QUARTERLY N A R E L L E BROOK ~ OR D VA L L E Y M UST E R

Street Party - image Landi Bradshaw

(Husband) Paul, (Mum) Sandra, (Brother) Justin, me, (Dad) Adrian & (Sister-in-Law) Claudia. - Kimberley Moon Experience

where we have incredible State Government support through Eventscorp and some of our sponsors having contributed cash or in-kind support for the entire 15 years! Then there are the Awards that we have won for this event through the Western Australian Tourism Awards each year since 2003. Both the Ord Valley Muster (2008, 2011 and 2017) and the Kimberley Moon Experience (2008) have been inducted into the Tourism Hall of Fame and the event won the 2015 Australia Regional Event of the Year. I really am very proud to see the growth of the OVM and I hope that it continues for many years to come.

enjoy the Kimberley Fine Diamonds Corporate Circle – all whilst wearing the gorgeous diamonds! I was the best jewellery-adorned, alcohol-decanting, chauffeur-driving vollie ever!!

advice

What would you have for any regional centres running festivals and events - particularly the interested in running them?

women

Surround yourself with enthusiastic ‘do-ers’. Kununurra is full of them but I am sure we are not the only town that has people willing to jump in and turn an idea into something great. Any event doesn’t just happen because of one person – it takes a team of people. With the Muster, it has also helped to employ an event management company that has the expertise and the contacts to turn our event into something extraordinary. And, as we found out – it is ok to start small; 10 events in five days to now up to 4050 events over 10 days! Surround yourself with amazing people, do your sums, involve your community, watch the magic happen and take time to enjoy the ride! It also pays to keep your sense of humour – there will be trying times!

funny stories

Do you have any that you can share?

I have been fortunate enough to be able to have many great stories about the Muster; sitting on the floor in Wendy Matthews’s hotel room drinking lattes, hosting Peter and Bev Brock for a day, hanging out with Curtis Stone and teaching Manu Feildel some French of my own! My favourite moment though, was getting to host my idol John Farnham in 2010 – showing him the sights of Kununurra and chauffeuring him to and from the Kimberley Moon Experience.

What’s

The night of the Kimberley Moon Experience, I was also volunteering in the confiscated items tent (decanting alcohol from glass containers into plastic, storing excess alcohol in eskies and putting dips from glass jars into plastic cups – a very glamorous job!). To showcase some of Kimberley Fine Diamonds fabulous diamond jewellery to John Frauke Bolten-Boshammer decked me out in the most exquisite diamond jewellery - $250,000 worth.

next for you? .

I was recently elected as a Shire Councillor for the Shire of Wyndham East Kimberley for a four-year term. With my Councillor role, Chair of Ord Valley Events Inc. and Coordinator of the East Kimberley Marketing Group – my community cup is full to the brim. My small business, Brook Project Management & Marketing, is also set for a terrific year with some wonderful local clients and general promotion of Kununurra and the East Kimberley region.

I found myself in my ‘chauffeur-driving clothes’, then into my bright orange volunteer shirt to decant alcohol, then into my finery to R R R N E T WO R K

Daryl Braithwaite - image Sarah Duguid

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Kimberley Kitchen with George Colombaris - image Pauline Kirby

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Making a Written by JO FULWOOD, images by CAROLINE TELFER

W

ith a list of committee and office bearer positions as long as her arm, and a handbag full of community and service awards to match, you’d be forgiven for thinking Pam McGregor was born and bred in WA’s Great Southern. But according to the softly spoken Scottish native, it took a move half way around the world with a husband and two young sons in tow, to really find her place in life and make a difference to the lives of others.

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THE QUARTERLY S A Y H E L LO TO PA M MC GR EG OR

Moving from Scotland to Western Australia in the early 1970s, Pam and her husband Jim bought farmland between Denmark and Mt Barker in the State’s Great Southern region, moving to Kojonup in 1998 and eventually developing a large Angus cattle stud. Being a young wife and mother in a strange country was no barrier to Pam, and it didn’t take her long to immerse herself into community roles. “Jim laughed when I came back and said I was taking up my first volunteer role, very soon after emigrating to Australia. He knew it wouldn’t take me long to get out and about connecting with people,” she says. But she says none of her achievements would have been possible without the support of her family and community, and the effectiveness of the teams she has been involved with. And she says, rarely does she find herself out of place in what many would term a “man’s world”. “It is tough breaking down those barriers, particularly when everyone expects men to be in these higher level positions, but I believe being effective in regional and rural communities is not so much about your gender but about the skills you can bring to the job,” she says. “It’s about being assertive not aggressive, and a smile certainly goes a long way.”

Pam first began her volunteering commitments as the District Commissioner for the Guides Association, which took her to the State Council, then to a position as a Commissioner trainer. After being actively involved with Forest Hill - Denbarker Country Women’s Association, she became South Coastal Division President, then served on the CWA State Council for three years. She has also been the State Chairman of the WA Angus Committee and a federal Councillor with the Angus Society of Australia. She says she will always treasure her time spent with the Mt Barker Agricultural Society, as both Secretary and President, where, through her leadership, the well-known Mt Barker Wine show was born.

“But it didn’t matter how good I was, if there wasn’t a team of people committed to their jobs, we wouldn’t have been able to do what we did, and that award was really for our whole team.”

“I’ve loved every minute of this journey, and I wouldn’t change a thing”.

In fact, her commitment to the WA wine industry was recognised at the State level when she was awarded the Prestigious Jack Mann Memorial Medal in 1999. “That was mind bogglingly astounding,” she says. “I’m not a wine producer but I know a lot about organising wine shows, and I guess that is why I was presented this award, because this Wine Show showcased WA wines.”

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While she is incredibly humble about her achievements, Pam can rattle off a whole host of awards she has received over the years, as recognition of her service to the local community and regional industries. One of these was the ABC Rural Woman of the Year Award (South Coast), for her long term involvement leading the WISALTS sustainable land care group and other community involvements.

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“I’ve loved every minute of this journey, and I wouldn’t change a thing,” she said. “If I have any advice to pass on, it would be to understand your skill set, and find ways you can apply these skills to improve the opportunities for everyone in your community. That’s the incredibly rewarding part of being actively involved in the community – knowing you have made a difference.”


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NEWS + REVIEWS

Read, listen, follow THE SIGNATURE OF ALL THINGS Elizabeth Gilbert - Harper Collins Alma is born at the beginning of a new century. Her father is a bold and charismatic botanical explorer whose vast fortune belies his lowly beginnings as a vagrant in Sir Joseph Banks’s Kew Gardens and as a deck hand on Captain Cook’s HMS Resolution. Her mother, a strict woman from an esteemed Dutch family, has a knowledge of botany equal to any man’s. Alma, an independent girl with a thirst for knowledge soon comes into her own within the world of plants and science. But as her studies take her deep into the mysteries of evolution, the man she loves draws her in the opposite direction. The Signature of All Things soars across the globe with extraordinary characters - missionaries, abolitionists, adventurers, astronomers, sea captains, geniuses and the quite mad - and above all its unforgettable heroine, Alma Whittaker. She is a woman of the Enlightened Age who stands defiantly on the cusp of the modern. THE GOOD GIRL STRIPPED BARE Tracey Spicer - Bloomsbury Tracey Spicer was always the good girl. Inspired by Jana Wendt, this bogan from the Brisbane backwaters waded through the ‘cruel and shallow money trench’ of TV to land a dream role: national news anchor for a major network. But she found that, for women, TV was less about news and more about helmet hair, masses of makeup and fatuous fashion, in an era when bosses told you to ‘stick your tits out’, ‘lose two inches off your arse’, and ‘quit before you’re too long in the tooth’. Still, Tracey plastered on a smile and did what she was told. But when she was sacked by email after having a baby, this good girl turned ‘bad’, taking legal action against the network. In this frank and funny ‘femoir’ - part memoir, part manifesto - Tracey ‘sheconstructs’ the structural barriers facing women in the workplace and encourages us all to shake off the shackles of the good girl. SECRETS BETWEEN FRIENDS Fiona Palmer - Hachette Australia Friendship is a million little moments, but can it survive this? Three friends embark on a luxury cruise to celebrate their ten-year reunion in this story of how long-held secrets can catch up with even the best of friends. Abbie, Jess and Ricki are set to recreate a school trip they took ten years earlier to the historic port town of Albany, the oldest city on the stunning turquoise coastline of Western Australia. Ricki questions, is she happy or stuck in a rut? Jess found her way through tough times with the help of her closest male friend, Peter. But Peter is ready to propose to Ricki… Abbie had it all: but a visit to the doctor bears scary news and she feels adrift at sea. A poignant novel of romance, family dynamics and friendship, while posing the ultimate question: What is really important in life?

See overleaf for you chance to WIN one of 4 copies of Secrets Between Friends R R R N E T WO R K

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ABC / CONVERSATIONS Conversations draws you deeper into the life story of someone you may, or may not, have heard about someone who has seen and done amazing things. http://www.abc.net.au/radio/ programs/conversations

JEAN HAILES for Women’s Health podcasts Explore a broad collection of topics from leading women’s health practitioners and academics inspiring and informative health topics. https://jeanhailes.org.au

kendall_o Direct and informative news content. Kendall O’Connor, journalist reporting from Karatha, NW WA.

@countrystylemag An Australian lifestyle magazine offering home and garden insights.


NEWS + REVIEWS

SOM ET H I NG for E V E R YON E W

estern Australia boasts some of the most spectacular trails and tracks

waiting to be discovered, our ancient lands offer adventures for walkers, cyclists and

TRAIL S + TRACKS

4WD enthusiasts. The Kalbarri National Park is no exception, surrounding the lower reaches of the Murchison River cutting a 80 kilometre gorge through the red and white layered sandstone creating formations for scenic views to the town and river mouth. The walks along the coastal cliffs where wind and wave erosion has exposed the sedimentary layers in the sandstone cliffs that plunge more than 100 metres to the Indian Ocean are spectacular. For more information about Kalbarri National Park visit

Kalbarri National Park, DPAW

www.parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au

Community harvest

O

n any Saturday morning, throughout Western Australia the local farmers and producers make their way to their

regional farmer’s markets in town centres, parks and community spaces to sell their farm fresh harvests or products directly to locals and tourists alike. These vibrant markets connect the consumer – who delights in getting to know the source of their food – directly to farmers themselves. The popularity of the farmer’s markets is building strength in the connections that regional towns are forging with our city visitors. Farmer’s markets can be found in Boyanup Brook, Albany, Margaret River, Eaton, Bunbury, Esperance, Gascoyne Grower’s Market, GeraldtonGreenough and Manjimup – and the list continues to grow!

Image: Frances Andrijich

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NEWS + REVIEWS S OM ET H I NG fo r E V E R YON E

RE ADER GIVE AWAY

L ATITUDE GALLERY

L

atitude Gallery’s story began with Pia Boschetti otherwise known as ‘the girl who grows the pearl’.

While many young women dream of wearing pearls, Pia is happy farming them in the remote waters of the Abrolhos Islands. Working on the ocean for many years in many parts of the world, Pia embraced the opportunity to farm pearls. Latitude Gallery

4 COPIES

to be

won

creates each piece as a work of art - the jewellers have ‘the freedom to create’ and their creations

RRR Network Quarterly are

are displayed in a Gallery not just a jewellery store. Now Latitude Gallery creates wonderful pieces

giving you the opportunity

of jewellery using pearls, diamonds and all gemstones. Pia explains “At Latitude Gallery we believe

to WIN one of 4 copies

a piece of jewellery should tell a story. A story created by the customer and a jeweller who makes a

of the latest novel from

customer’s dream come true. Each stone has a meaning, each style represents a personality, each is

Fiona Palmer, Secrets

a piece to be treasured for a lifetime.” www.latitudegallery.com.au

Between Friends a poignant novel of romance, family

ORANJE TRACTOR

dynamics and friendship.

O

Through her highly ranje Tractor Wines is a small organic vineyard near Albany. Owners Pamela

relatable, sympathetic characters, beloved

and Murray are on a continuous sustainability

Australian storyteller Fiona

journey to craft unique, terroir-specific wines

Palmer writes about issues,

to enjoy, using practices that care for the

experiences and emotions

earth, focusing on sustainable and organic

we have all faced while

farming, renewable energy, recycling,

trying to figure out what

re-using and revegetation.

is really important in this life?

Take a gentle meander through the organic gardens and mixed fruit orchard to the

H OW TO E N T E R

rustic tasting room; visitors can enjoy tasting

Simply photograph

award winning wines when open or arrange

yourself in your

a personalised or bespoke group tasting.

town or landscape -

‘Seaonal Dinners’ bring gastronomical

email us at

offerings to the table and ‘Harvest Days’ are

admin@rrrnetwork.com.

an opportunity for sharing skills in preserving

au before 20th May 2018

what is in abundance.

and we will send you a

Join the Tractor Seat CSA Club for more

DROPBOX folder to load

delicious perks! www.oranjetractor.com

your image(s) into. *Please do not email the images to us!

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When your children want to show their grandchildren… You take your children back to the farm where you grew up, where your farming life started. You imagine their excitement when they spot the chook yard, the stables, and the towering salmon gums. Only when you arrive, you see it through their eyes. The house has long been abandoned, the shearing shed is in disrepair, and fences have been removed to make way for machinery. Far from the thriving farmyard you remember, the kids are staring at fallen ceilings and an eroded landscape. You wanted them to share your memories, to feel the warm familiarity of your childhood farm. Your father, young and strong, labouring on the farm. Your sweet, warm mother always laughing while doing chores. And you, a carefree farm kid, feeding your calf or riding your bike through the dirt to the bus stop. R R R N E T WO R K

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Don’t let your precious memories fade; preserve your farming story to relive with future generations. I would be delighted if you would allow me the privilege of photographing you, your family, and your farm to be showcased in your own Australian Farm Album. Caro Telfer, Photographer

Every Australian Farm Album includes:

• Beautiful, natural family photographs • Comprehensive coverage of your farm • Aerial drone photography All from an AIPP Accredited Professional Photographer (with farming in her blood)

Visit ausfarmalbums.com.au/rrr to begin the journey

info@ausfarmalbums.com.au 0427 363 068

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CALENDAR W H AT’S ON in W E ST E R N AUST R A L I A

What’s on?

11-20 May, Kunnanurra ARGYLE DIAMONDS ORD VALLEY MUSTER

30 events in 10 exciting days. A lifetime of memories! Set against the stunning East Kimberley landscape this event is truly a bucket list ‘must-er’ for every Australian. Check out the diverse calendar packed with excitement - including a rodeo, dining under the stars, live music, yoga, comedy and much more… Muster is an enthralling, enchanting and magical experience for all. TICKETS and more information available on the website www.ordvalleymuster.com.au

MANY SEASONS GONE canvas by Peter Denton

12+13 May, Narrogin DRYANDRA MAKERS TRAIL MOTHER’S DAY WEEKEND

Grab the colourful and informative guide (in print or online) and spend the Mothers Day weekend on a self-drive odyssey through the Dryandra Country region. Makers of art, craft, food, wine, music and all things original, quirky and beautiful will be on display and for sale. Visit venues in Narrogin, Cuballing, Popanyinning, Williams and Wickepin from 10-4pm on both days. More than 100 passionate and dedicated makers will be contributing to the trail in 2018. www.artsnarrogin.com.au

26 April-6 May, Pemberton UNEARTHED PEMBERTON

The 2018 Unearthed Festival will showcase the beauty and diversity of the Southern Forests through its food and wine, art, heritage and of course nature-based adventure. We will be continuing to add new and interesting events, tours and experiences that highlight just how diverse and exciting our region is. TICKETS and more information available online now via www.unearthedpemberton.com.au

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AROUND THE REGIONS

Words by KARLENE GOSS Images ASTRID VOLZKE

O

n Saturday 10th February a passionate and enterprising Darkan community group proudly witnessed up to 1,200 visitors and community members streaming through the gates of the Darkan Sheepfest and they couldn’t have been happier.

your kids run around and join in with all the other kids and be happy and safe all day. I was lucky enough to grow up in the country but unfortunately like so many other parents, my children haven’t been able to have the same upbringing and childhood experiences that I did. At least at events like the Darkan Sheepfest they get to know what it would be like, even if it’s just for one day.’’

Not bad for a committee of six having less than thirteen weeks to plan and a town with a population of under three hundred people! The grass roots country show made all the better with the entry fee at the gate being just a gold coin donation.

Iconic local farmers David Harrington and Bob Lubcke’s words sum up the enterprising outcomes of Darkan Sheepfest perfectly. David commented; ‘‘It’s great to see all these people living by the coast coming over the hill to find out what actually is out here in the country and what we are all doing’’.

Sheepfest Committee Event Coordinator Teleah Higgie says; ‘‘Anyone who organises an event like this knows first-hand that it takes a lot of blood, sweat and tears - but it has all been worth it. Of course it would never have happened without sponsors, community contributions and we haven’t done the final tally yet but hundreds of hours of volunteer time putting all of this together.’’ Darkan is located 200km South of Perth, in the Shire of West Arthur and within the Wheatbelt region of WA. It has a long and proud history associated with the sheep industry. Visitors and locals spent the day wandering around the Darkan town oval and recreation reserve, dividing their time between children’s free entertainment and rides, sports shear competition, sheepdog mustering, wool fashion shows to name a few plus picking up some purchases from the market stalls.

Bob added; ‘‘We need more young people to enter into our industry, workers and young families we need to support the younger ones and get them to come here’’. David sums it up; ‘‘you can come and rent or buy a house in Darkan and set yourself and your family up for life if you are prepared to work hard and give it a go’’. Darkan Sheepfest evolved from the Regional Development Australia (Wheatbelt) Enterprising Communities Program facilitated through the Shire of West Arthur. The program’s main aim was to increase awareness of and showcase the Wheatbelt towns. The Sheepfest has certainly achieved this for the small town of Darkan. Want to share with us your event or happenings taken place in your West Australian town or neighbourhood? Please submit your story, approximately 150-200 words to admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

City mother of two Nerica Pickup loved the day trip from Bunbury; ‘‘This has been fabulous. What other event can you let

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AROUND THE REGIONS DA R K A N SH E E PF E ST

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AROUND THE REGIONS

the

southern forests S U R R O U N D YO U R S E L F W I T H N AT U R E B A L I N G U P • B OY U P B R O O K • B R I D G E TO W N • G R E E N B U S H E S • M A N J I M U P N A N N U P • N O R T H C L I F F E • P E M B E R TO N • WA L P O L E

There’s no other place in Australia’s South West that deserves the description as much as the Southern Forests and Valleys region. Immense Karri, Jarrah, Marri and Tingle trees tower over every town, yet they’re not oppressive or stifling; quite the opposite in fact. The fresh and the scent of clean forest is intermingled with freshwater streams and the salty ocean air. SOURCE: AUSTRALIAS SOUTH WEST Images FRANCES ANDRIJICH

explore

produce

play+stay

ky-scraping Karri, Jarrah, Marri and Tingle trees tower over the many towns that make up the Southern Forests and Valleys. The striking coastline of the region stretches across 140km, where beautiful forests sit atop rocky cliffs, and white sandy beaches are pounded by the wild Southern Ocean. In contrast, the region has a number of tranquil inlets, streams and rivers that are brimming with life. Perfect for swimming, canoeing, fishing and camping. The beautiful Blackwood River is the ribbon of water that ties the region together. Measuring 300km in length, it is the longest continually flowing river in Western Australia.

Often regarded as the food bowl of Western Australia, the Southern Forests are home to some of the most productive soils in Australia. A wide variety of fresh produce is available year-round, and often straight from the farms from which they are grown. Niche epicurean treats including chestnuts, cherries, ginseng, green tea and the black truffle can be purchased throughout the region, while waterways are densely populated with trout, perch and marron (freshwater crayfish).

Each of the towns have their very own personalities, many featuring quaint main streets complete with tearooms serving scones, perfect planter boxes full of seasonal blooms, a classic country pub and antique stores aplenty. In late Winter to Spring, the region comes alive with it’s iconic tulip and daffodil displays, adding vibrancy to the already rich colours of the region.

S

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AROUND THE REGIONS SH I R E S + TOW N S of W E ST E R N AUST R A L I A

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Wireless in the

west

South Western Wireless WA will be providing fast and reliable internet that is safe and secure to nine regional WA shires by April, 2018. Written by MAREE GOOCH ~

Director of the South Western Wireless WA

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THE WORK PLACE W I R E L E S S I N T H E W E ST - A DV E RTOR I A L

“We work collaboratively with small business owners, community groups, government agencies, universities and agricultural businesses to expand the network”.

B

eing able to connect is a basic human need. Sara Ballard is a Director of South Western Wireless WA and is part of a team of people committed to providing fast and reliable internet to regional Western Australia.

and agricultural businesses to expand the network”. She added “ We think outside the square when it comes to expanding the network and that seems to be working well.” RRR Network research from 2015 and 2016 confirmed that the challenges faced by people living in rural, regional and remote WA were often conducting their business, access to education and access to health, often these challenges were magnified by poor telecommunications or internet connectivity.

Sara hails from the West Pilbara region and spent her early years on a pastoral station. She now lives in the Wheatbelt town of Narrogin with her family – husband Leigh and their sons Lachie and Max. The South Western Wireless WA team are proud to be an ‘enabler’ in regional WA by removing barriers for doing business, such as poor internet. The board and management team all have personal experience running businesses across regional WA, and they understand the pain and frustration of not having fast reliable internet. South Western Wireless WA is based in the Wheatbelt town of Narrogin, and has been supplying fast reliable fixed wireless internet services to the Murray and Waroona shires since early 2017. It’s not satellite and it’s not NBN. Sara totally understands the pain that many people experience “We know of people who have been getting up at 1 am in the morning to pay their bills or download important data. That is outrageous! They won’t have to do that anymore!” Sara added “Imagine fast, stable, secure and reliable internet at your fingertips – the possibilities are endless!”

SWW WA won a contract in late 2017, federal Building Better Regions funding so that by April 2018 the North East Wheatbelt shires of Nungarin, Wyalkatchem, Koorda, Mukinbudin, Trayning and Merredin shires will all be able to access fast reliable internet. The team combine their collective passion for making a difference in regional WA with the resources and capacity to grow the business into the future and look forward to expanding the network. Ms Ballard said “We work collaboratively with small business owners, community groups, government agencies, universities

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Maree Gooch, Chairman of South Western Wireless WA and a former chair of the Rural Regional Remote Women’s Network said “We know regional West Australians are experiencing considerable heartache and frustration with regard to reliability, speed and latency with the internet and the providers available, so we decided to do something about it.” Maree added “We have testimonials from customers who have increased productivity in their business by up to 30 percent, which is phenomenal for a small business”. SWW WA offer well tested and proven products and packages as part of a national offering. The support team is based in Australia. For more information register at www.fasterinternet.com.au


Self-drive trail through the iconic Dryandra Woodlands to the towns of ... CUBALLING • NARROGIN • POPANYINNING WICKEPIN • WILLIAMS

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SECTION THE WORK PLACE E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R BUSI N E S S PL A N N I NG

HEALTHY BUSINESS A rural business is an integral part of the fabric of rural society, a gateway to the outside world and a window to employment opportunties presenting it’s own set of unique risks. Written by ROBIN LEWIS Rural Financial Counselling Service of Western Australia (RFCSWA)

A

nyone who has run a small business in rural town can appreciate that it becomes so much more than just a provider of goods or services. A rural business is an integral part of the fabric of rural society. It’s a gateway to the outside world, supplying remotely based people with a range of goods and services that they would not be able to otherwise easily access. It’s a meeting place, creates employment opportunities and can be a much needed source of donations or goods to local clubs and events. That’s why, when businesses suffer or are forced to close in rural areas it can be devastating, not only to the business owner, but for the whole community. However, doing business in the country comes with its own set of unique risks. There’s the obvious challenges, such as trying to compete on price with large city businesses, the cost of freight and trying to meet salary expectations. Then there’s the less obvious challenges such as attracting (and keeping) qualified staff if there’s a lack of education or health options in the area. Finally, and perhaps the most difficult to deal with, is managing a downturn when drought or any number of external factors affect the local area

– what do you do when your customers stop spending money? With many of these challenges beyond the control of the small business owner it can all seem a bit overwhelming. But it doesn’t have to be. If you’re asking what you can do to keep your business healthy in the face of all these issues, then number one is to look at what you can control. Firstly, it’s really important to know your business - what it provides and who your customers are. This can help you tailor your service and differentiate your business, so while you may not be able to compete with city businesses on price, you can certainly provide a better product or service. It may be harder to budget for a cash-based industry, but it’s worth taking the time to have a computer program that is geared towards commercial small business. You need to know what is coming in as opposed to what is going out of your account. Ask yourself, what do you need to be earning on a monthly basis to pay for your operating and fixed costs, wages, bank interest and your own drawings? What does it look like if there is a downturn in the area, what is the least amount you can earn to continue these payments

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regularly? If you are regimented and keep on top of your debtors and creditors and know your financial position at all times, you are able to meet fluctuating and uncertain times much easier. One of the really important things I ask my small business clients is, ‘do you have a Business Plan?’ It might sound academic but a business plan is just a way to help manage what can be a turbulent operating environment. Identifying your goals for your business and family – whether it’s financial security, ability to educate your children, expansion to other businesses or retirement - and how you might achieve those, is a really important process. Finally, if things are getting hard, seek help sooner rather than later. Things can be turned around with good planning and management skills.

ASSESS YOUR RISKS Do you have a business plan? Get to know your business and identify your goals.


REMOTE CONTROL

I

f you’ve run a recruitment process and found yourself lamenting the lack of suitable candidates, it might be time to think differently. To go remote. Written by ANNA DIXON, Creative IQ

A

s internet access (gradually) improves across the regions, and with some local governments like those in the northeast Wheatbelt and Peel taking steps to roll out innovative solutions for internet access, remote working is a genuine option for many regional businesses.

taking less personal leave days than their office-bound counterparts. And with no requirement for office space, there are considerable savings to be made. HOW DO YOU GO REMOTE?

Aside from increasing the likelihood of finding the right person for the job, there are lots of reasons to get flexible in what you view as the workplace. Productivity is a major attraction for moving to remote working, with numerous studies showing significant boosts to workers’ outputs when given this opportunity.

Moving into the remote space may feel risky for businesses, with the potential to lose control, but with some smart strategies and using tech solutions able to deliver an upbeat remote team environment, you may well find you gain more positive results than with a traditional location-based team. And, not surprisingly, many of the principles of managing a remote team apply equally to traditional workplaces.

Employee loyalty also enjoys a big lift, with staff appreciating the flexibility, convenience and level of autonomy that remote working offers. Health tends to take an uptick too, with remote workers

As with locally based teams, selecting the right candidate is key. Independent ‘gogetters’ make excellent remote workers. While you’ll need to provide guidance and direction to your team, building a team

WHY GO REMOTE?

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of self-starters who are achievement orientated will maximise your chances of high productivity. Placing trust in the team to deliver results is critical – creating expectations, systems and structures allow people to do their best work with flexibility and autonomy. While they might be out of sight, a remote team shouldn’t be out of mind. In fact, creating a virtual ‘workplace’ is vital to a functional (and happy) team. So how do you create a thriving virtual workplace? It’s a two-pronged approach – a conscious commitment to regularly connecting in meaningful ways, and utilising tech tools to create the workplace. You want to set everyone up for success and a positive experience. CREATE SPACE Just because there isn’t a physical space, doesn’t mean you don’t need a virtual one.


THE WORK PLACE I N NOVAT ION + I N SIGH T Instead of ordering furniture and working out who gets the desk by the window, the space you’ll be organising is just as important to allow the team to function. The tools you use will depend on your size and industry, but you’ll probably want to think about a few key areas.

responsibilities to meet the timelines for the project – great for businesses that rely on their clients meeting timelines in order to complete the work. TIME MANAGEMENT Time is money when you’re delivering a service, so knowing where it goes is essential for tracking profitability. One popular tool is Harvest Time Tracking which integrates with services like Asana and Trello. It’s super easy for teams to keep track of time and gives you insights into what’s profitable and what needs tweaking. Other popular time tracking apps are

PEOPLE MANAGEMENT Working remotely can be lonely. Make sure your team are getting the contact they need to avoid the gloom that can set in when you realise you haven’t spoken to anyone other than the cat all day. Remote teams can use apps like Voxer, WhatsApp and Slack to chat, or use online spaces like private Facebook groups. Make sure you are checking in daily with your team – shooting some chatty emails back and forth or hopping on a quick video call to touch base. It keeps you connected and morale high. Popular services include Zoom, Skype and Google Hangouts. If you find other businesses with remote working arrangements, you can even try out virtual ‘co-working’ and get together on a video call and chat between work tasks – it’s a nifty way to break up to the week and get an ‘office’ feel.

DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT If you’re in business today, the chances are your team needs access to some shared documents. One of the most commonly used cloud services is DropBox Business because of its range of features, including audit trail, but there are a bunch of others out there – Google Docs and OneDrive being other popular options. The key things to consider are having the ability to share and sync files and having a solid back up strategy.

‘‘The most talented people in the world don’t all live in one place.’’

TASK MANAGEMENT What needs to be done, by whom, by when, and how? Popular options with virtual teams are Asana and Trello. Tools like these are free (or cheap, depending on the number of users) and allow the team to be accountable for working together to complete tasks and projects, and provide a central place to discuss how the work will get done. A bonus of these types of services is that clients can be invited into individual projects and can clearly see their

to closely monitor how employees are scheduling their time. Often there is more of a risk of ‘burnt out’ than ‘slacking off’ because the type of people selected to undertake remote work tend to be highly motivated by achievement.

Jason Fried & David Heinemeier Hansson – Remote: Office Not Required

Schedullo (Australian!), Toggl and Tsheets. Flexibility is also a big benefit of remote working. Our team knows they can shape their ‘work week’ to meet their personal commitments too – so long as the work gets done and any virtual ‘face-to-face’ commitments are met, they’re free to fit in school assemblies and trips to the chiropractor. That flexibility can also be a trap. Sam Howard, who heads up The Business Classroom based in Kojonup, advises it’s easy to forget the importance of structure. “It is easy to fall into the trap that your remote worker is available 24/7, so set clear working hours from the start.” Boundaries are vital for any team, but particularly where you aren’t able

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GET TING STARTED

If going remote sounds like a good fit for your business (or you’d like to propose it to your boss!), it’s time to do some more research. Once you start looking, you might be surprised how many businesses, including many multinationals, are already using remote teams. Do some browsing online and see what’s working (and what’s not) for others. Want to know more? Check out the book Remote: Office Not Required for a more detailed look. If you aren’t ready to run a recruitment for a remote team member yet, try experimenting with flexible arrangements for current staff. Or try out a service like Pointer that matches employers with remote staff. Think differently and imagine what a remote team could mean for your business.


SECTION

CYBER SPACE PROTECTION E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

Who said that Cyber-Losses only happen to business that turnover $3 million or more? Taking a closer look at the NDB scheme and privacy laws for businesses big and small as the scheme is about to take effect in February 2018. Written by JODY WILLIAMS Director. Oracle Group (Australia) Pty Ltd

W

ith the impending Notifiable Data Breach

(NDB) Scheme about to affect businesses in Australia on the 22nd February 2018 I thought it timely to provide a little bit of insight into some common Cyber and insurance myths. CYBER MYTH: ONLY BIGGER BUSINESSES NEED TO PROTECT THEIR DATA. If your business turnover is over $3million, you should already be on top of the NDB Scheme.

WHO SAID THAT CYBERLOSSES ONLY HAPPEN TO BUSINESS THAT TURNOVER $3MILLION OR MORE? Typically a smaller businesses is more vulnerable (and less prepared for a loss of data) and the opportunity for an attacker to succeed is higher. There are other smaller businesses that are affected by the NDB scheme such as health

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THE SECTION WORK PLACE I N NOVAT ION + I N SIGH T E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

services, finance or businesses holding identifiable personal information (names, addresses and phone numbers). These businesses have 30 days to determine if a loss of data is a breach, and report it to the OAIC. Although the NDB scheme does not affect all businesses, it is time to consider how your business would be affected if you lost access to your data.

CYBER MYTH: THE CLOUD PROVIDER HOLDS ALL MY DATA SO I AM SAFE. No matter where your data is held, it is your responsibility to look after it. If your system is hacked it is not the fault of the cloud provider. There is a slim chance your cloud provider could be hacked and you (would expect) that they have insurance and procedures in place to recover your data and compensate you for your loss. In this situation you will be left to your own devices to notify your clients of the attack and lodging a breach to the OAIC.

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My thoughts are if Uber and the Australian Bureau of Statistics are able to be hacked (remember the embarrassing Census website hacking) then there’s a good chance your system is not foolproof. Funnily enough, one of the most common types of Cyber Loss is from human error, yes human error! Who would have ever thought!? Accidently clicking that link in an email, having the same password for all applications, accidental loss of your laptop or mobile phone, or simply forwarding an email with a trail that contains the personal information of someone else. If you are unsure, engage a professional to conduct a data audit on your business and help you build a data response plan. It is probably a good idea to keep a paper copy of your Data Response Plan somewhere safe, hackers work on weekends too! Your plan could involve Cyber Insurance coverage.

IS CYBER INSURANCE FOR ME? Before you rush out and purchase a Cyber Insurance policy you should ask yourself;

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THE WORKPLACE I N NOVAT ION + I N SIGH T

• What is my tolerance to a data loss?

can start from a few hundred dollars. These cheaper policies are normally ‘boltons’ to another policy such as a Liability policy or a Professional Indemnity policy.

• How long can my business survive if my systems are down? • What impact would this have on my clients? (and my reputation)

They are a very good introduction into Cyber Insurance although they provide a limited amount of cover.

• Do I have a plan of action if a loss occurs? • What other professionals are out there who can help me?

CYBER = CHEAP The insurer will determine what premium they charge based on your data type, data security and your exposure. Your broker will help you choose a level of cover that is suited to your needs and budget. Like most things, you get what you pay for. The cost of Cyber Insurance

your clients and reimbursement of some costs you incur. The premiums can start from a few hundred dollars. Middle of the range cover will incorporate a wider range of data loss (including accidental physical loss of data).

WHAT DO I NEED TO ASK MY BROKER ABOUT CYBER INSURANCE?

You will be able to choose the level of cover and other risks such as phone phreaking or phishing attacks.

Ask your Broker for a variety of options; The cheaper covers in the market are generally limited to Cyber-Hacks, or limited to attacks on your Website.

It is important to check if the policy includes cover for;

• Therefore the policy excludes the most common risk - accidental physical loss of data. • The policy should pay for losses to

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• Investigation costs • Fines & Penalties • Claim Defence Costs • Loss of your own ability to earn an income


THE WORKPLACE I N NOVAT ION + I N SIGH T • What Jurisdiction the policy operates in Top quality cover will provide all of the above with additional benefits; • Access to a Cyber response team that you can contact 24/7 • A response team who will do the investigation and ransom negotiation for you • A ssistance with notifying your clients. Take into the cost of a ‘team’ who can respond to phone calls and customer concerns that may be ongoing for some months. • A ssistance in determining if it is a data breach & notifying the OAIC

• Flexibility with higher limits and less restrictions

months if you have a passive income ability

• Ability to include cover for Cyber Terrorism

Ensure procedures are in place for when a Cyber Loss occurs. Having a Data Response Plan may not prevent a loss although the OAIC could consider your situation favourably with penalties and fines, if you have a good Data Response Plan.

HOW DO I KEEP MY PREMIUMS DOWN? If your policy is covering loss of income to your business, choose an indemnity period that is suitable to your situation. Why pay for 12 months of income if your team can get your business back up and running at 100% within 3 months Choose longer waiting periods for your loss of income. You will need to work out how long your business could survive with no income. This may be 3 or more

Communicate any loss quickly and honestly to your clients. Being proactive in an event will help retain customer confidence and retain your income earning ability. CONTENT SUPPLIED This article does not form part of any paid advertising undertaken by Oracle Group (Australia) Pty Ltd.

CHECK-IN WITH THE EXPERTS There are a variety of experts who are available to assist businesses both in the Preventative stage and Response stage. For more information you can contact your trusted Insurance Broker, your trusted Cyber Consultant or the OAIC https://www.oaic.gov. au/engage-with-us/ consultations/notifiabledata-breaches

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LEGAL MATTERS H E A LT H + S A F ET Y

WORK HEALTH & SAFETY Written by JONATHAN IVANISEVIC and EMMA SCOTNEY, HOPGOOD GANNIN

Is your business prepared? Western Australia set for increases to penalties for workplace safety offences.

Parliament by mid-2019. The changes to the OHS Act have been flagged to provide an incentive for WA businesses to comply with workplace safety laws, as well as align the penalty provisions with community expectations.

In September 2017, the WA Government signalled significant changes to the Occupational Health and Safety Act 1984 (WA).The proposed changes place WA businesses on notice, as penalties for business owners who commit workplace safety offences are set to increase significantly.

Examples of increases to penalty provisions under the proposed amendments.

The proposed legislative changes to penalty levels are expected to take place ahead of the introduction to the Work Health and Safety Bill, due for introduction into State

WA is also expected to introduce the new offence of reckless or gross negligent conduct causing death in the upcoming Work Health and Safety Bill. The new penalty provisions signal the need for WA business owners to seriously address occupational safety and health issues in the workplace. A comprehensive risk assessment can assist business owners in complying with their legal obligations. A review of company policies and procedures in this area is also essential.

WORKPLACE SAFETY OFFENCE

CURRENT PENALTY PROVISION

PROPOSED PENALTY PROVISION

Level 4 offence involving employer breach of safety duties in circumstances of gross negligence

Maximum $500,000 for first offence and $625,000 for subsequent offences

Maximum $2.7 million indexed annually

Individual convicted of Level 4 offence

Maximum 2 year jail term

Maximum 5 year jail term

Level 1 offences such as employer failure to identify a manual handling hazard

Maximum $50,000

Maximum $456,000

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INCREASE BUSINESS PROFITS THROUGH SAFE CHEMICAL HANDLING Delivering quality and vitally important programs to the farming and associated industries using agriculture and veterinary chemicals for more than 20 years • 40 courses scheduled across WA in 2018 • Accreditation for 5 years • 1 day re-Accreditation courses • National connections & tailored training delivered by RTO’s • Tailored half day ‘Introduction to Chemical Safety’ courses for Women in Agricultrue www.auschemwa.com.au

LOOK AFTER THE FARMS MOST IMPORTANT ASSET - YOU! All of Safe Farms WA’s activities are focused on supporting the farming industry. We do this by providing information and tools that are vital in improving and implementing SAFE farming systems and building a strong safety culture. Healthy, safety and wellbeing has never been more important, working with industry to reduce deaths and accidents to provide simple and effective solutions. INSPIRING SAFE FARMING www.safefarms.net.au

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➮ We use proven business models based on a decade of success helping rural people.

PPS is a state wide, rural not-for-profit. Independent, confidential and free. PPS also operates RFCS WA for primary producers, see rfcswa.com.au

➮ We have 40%+ female staff and a history of championing women’s roles in rural businesses.

1800 612 004 www.primary.org.au

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SECTION E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

REGIONAL FARM SAFETY Safe Farms WA is leading the way in several areas. The board is made up of fifty percent women as well as being the leading advocacy and support group for agriculture industry safety. Introducing these talented and diverse women who take their seat on board. Written by MAREE GOOCH Director, SAFE FARMS WA

Jessica McCartney and her family, husband Edward and son’s Eddie and John

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CELEBRATING WOMEN WOM E N of the BOA R D

WOMEN of the BOARD

Introducing the Women of the Safe Farms WA Board. Passionate about providing strategic direction to Safe Farms WA and are active in the farming industry and rural communities. They have worked hard to develop relationships with industry members.

S

ince 1994, Safe Farms

In 2017, the board made the decision to change the name from the Farmsafe WA Alliance as too many people thought the organisation was Worksafe, the government regulator.

WA has been working

hard to engage with and provide support tools to the farming community in Western Australia. In mid-2016, AusChem WA merged with Safe Farms WA. AusChem WA has continued to operate under a separate brand and importantly provides accredited training delivered through the regional TAFE system.

The eight member board of Safe Farms WA is leading the way in several areas. The board is made up of fifty percent women as well as being the leading advocacy and support group for agriculture industry safety. Importantly each of these women bring a unique skill set and come from different age groups and backgrounds. They are passionate about providing strategic direction to Safe Farms WA and are active in the farming industry and rural communities and have all worked hard to develop relationships with industry members. Introducing the Women of the Safe Farms WA Board.

JUDI FORSY TH Judi Forsyth is Vice Chairman of Safe Farms WA and joined the board of Safe Farms WA more than eight years ago. Following a long farming career at Kellerberrin, Judi now works full time as an

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Agricultural and Business TAFE Lecturer with Central Regional TAFE. Judi said “I’m involved in Safe Farms WA to bring awareness of workplace health and safety to the agricultural sector and to assist farmers with education and training.” She made a further comment “Farm safety is paramount as our workplace is unique, in fact the families live and work in the same environment”. Judi is passionate about safety practices in general and works closely with the agricultural industry to ensure they are aware of the legislation requirements for employers and employees. Judi is also involved in her local community, volunteering and offering support to a wide variety of not for profit organisations. Her strengths are in governance, finance, training and education.

PIP GOODING Pip Gooding joined the board in mid-2015. Pip and her family farm at Dumbleyung in the Wheatbelt. Farming grain and sheep and with two small children…. the work-life balance is full on! Pip shared “As a member


CELEBRATING WOMEN WOM E N of the BOA R D

of the board, I am excited to be part of an organisation who can make a positive difference to farming businesses and to work with a dynamic board whose expertise, integrity and understanding of farming and the rural sector will ensure that the organisation remains relevant and continues to gain support from the sector.” Pip is a partner in the farming business and is currently taking on more of an administrative role as well as running a bed and breakfast on the farm. Pip also has an important off-farm role in the region, as the Executive Officer for the HothamWilliams Economic Development Alliance and was previously with the Wheatbelt Development Commission as a Regional Manager for ten years. Pip is an active

Emily Miller

board member and her strengths are in business development, strategy and operations.

Pip said “Our farming business is a grain and sheep, family owned enterprise operated by three families. We employ seasonal and contracted workers and organisations throughout the year as part of the farms activities. She added “Working safely, working healthily and working proactively to achieve this, will ensure our business continues to strengthen and external organisations and individuals want to work with.”

EMILY MILLER Emily Miller was joined the board in mid-2015. At the time, Emily was a 21 year old student at Muresk and has been instrumental in engaging people of her generation and sharing the farm safety message. Originally from Beverley, Emily attended boarding school in Perth at Presbyterian Ladies College. She was successful in gaining a Horizon Scholarship through the Rural Industries Research Development Corporation.

Judi Forsyth

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CELEBRATING WOMEN WOM E N of the BOA R D

Emily commented “I became involved with Safe Farms WA because I want to encourage people to eliminate the risks on farms. Farm accidents are far too common and affect entire communities.” Emily added “If we can help to prevent farm accidents then we can help keep farming families and communities together”. Emily is now a Graduate Agronomist with Kalyx Australia and is heading up the opening of a new office for the company in Esperance. Kalyx Australia is a company undertaking grain trials. Emily involves herself in the local community playing sport such as tennis, netball and hockey. She is a go-getter, is passionate about agriculture and the opportunities that are presenting for the farming industry. Emily realises that having a safe workplace is vital in any farming business.

JESSICA MCCARTNEY Jessica McCartney joined the board of Safe Farms WA, following on from the merger with AusChem Training WA in mid-2016. Jessica was a board member of AusChem Training WA for several years and believes strongly in providing important stewardship regarding safety and chemical safety training. Jessica was an important addition to the Safe Farms WA board following the merger with particular strengths in governance and strategy with large and broad networks. Jessica originally hails from the United States of America. She has been living and working in Australia since 2004. Jessica is married to Edward with two young sons, Eddie and John.

Pip Gooding

Jessica is on MAT leave from her day job of Corporate Account Manager in the Marketing and Trading Division of Cooperative Bulk Handling until April 2018. Jessica is often in rural, regional and sometimes remote WA supporting CBH who has a strong commitment to safety. Jessica commented “Any safety whether it’s food safety or farm safety is about following procedures that a business has put in place to prevent accidents once a business has identified it as a potential risk” she added “Safe Farms WA provides solutions to enable farmers to protect themselves and allows them to be viable into the future by protecting their livelihood”.

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It seems the addition of several women to the reinvigorated board of Safe Farms WA is really making a difference! Safe Farms WA is engaging with a wide variety of organisations such as WIFEWomen In Farming Enterprises, delivering farm safety workshops across the state through the Community Resource Centre network, the CBH group provided a large grant to build and develop a new website, HopgoodGanim Lawyers are providing support to Safe Farms WA and to those that subscribe to the new Safety Management System and Manual and WFI have been a long term supporter for more than 25 years.


WELLBEING JEAN H A ILES for WOMEN’S HEA LTH

in the new millennium

Menopause was once a life stage of secrecy and mystery – whispered ‘women’s-only’ business – but thanks to more research and greater awareness, today’s midlife women can have a different, more positive experience to those of previous generations.

A

s Jean Hailes Executive Director Janet Michelmore explains, the experience of menopause, while sometimes challenging, can also be a positive one; an opportunity to look to the future and what’s ahead. “Back when Jean Hailes as an organisation was founded in the early 1990s, one of our primary purposes was to bring menopause as a topic into public conversation, and to provide support for mid-life women in Australia,” said Ms Michelmore. “It’s now 25 years later and we’ve come a long way.

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“Menopause often adds another layer of complexity to women’s lives,” she said. “It brings challenges and changes, and for some women it can also be an empowering and exciting time. Menopause can give women a chance to reassess their lives and health – work out what changes, if any, they need to make and begin the next phase of their life on their own terms. “Certainly, many women are impacted by symptoms of menopause, such as hot flushes, increased anxiety or poor sleep. So it’s important for women to know that help and support is available if they need it.” Jean Hailes hormone specialist Dr Sonia Davison said while many women did get “bothersome and sometimes severe symptoms of menopause”, she also believed menopause could be a “positive turning point” in women’s lives. “Women today can often feel liberated and more confident in this phase, and some women just love not having to deal with their monthly periods,” Dr Davison said. “Menopause as an experience today is not just about looking back; it’s actually a great opportunity to look to the future and set yourself up for good health in later life,” she said. “When I talk to my patients about menopause, we’re not just talking about hormones – we look at all the other parts of their lives and health as well; heart health, bone health, mental and emotional health, their libido and sex life.” Here are some ways to help you make the most of your menopause:

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WELLBEING JEAN H A ILES for WOMEN’S HEA LTH

GET THE RIGHT ADVICE If you’re experiencing menopausal symptoms that are affecting your quality of life, see your GP. If you don’t feel properly ‘heard’ by your GP, find one who listens to you and your concerns. COMMUNICATE OPENLY AND HONESTLY Those around you need to know what you’re experiencing, so they can try to understand. Menopause doesn’t need to be a silent, lonely experience. If you feel comfortable, speak about your experiences (whether they are positive or negative) with your friends, family and colleagues. Your own stories may also help other women who are struggling alone with their mid-life changes. SHARE BUT DON’T COMPARE Menopause is an individual experience for every woman. So share your stories with your friends – shout them from the rooftops if you want! – but don’t compare your menopause with your best friend’s, or think that the advice that they received from their doctor also applies to you.

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Even if you’re breezing through menopause, put your health on the agenda and make an appointment with your GP. The hormonal changes that come with menopause have an effect on other areas of your health, such as your heart health and bone health. If using natural therapies, see a qualified naturopath and tell your doctor about any supplements you may be taking. EMPOWER YOURSELF WITH THE KNOWLEDGE Menopause is normal and natural. Watch the webinar Menopause: all you need to know at https://vimeo. com/136170789 to learn more. FOCUS ON THE ‘PAUSE’ IN MENOPAUSE Take some time out for you. Think about what you want from the next phase of your life, what’s important for you and how you can achieve your goals. Consider talking to a counsellor or psychologist if you need help with this. For further health information please contact 1800 JEAN HAILES (532 642) or visit www.jeanhailes.org.au

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WELLBEING JEAN H A ILES for WOMEN’S HEA LTH

TOP 5 FOODS to nourish your gut O

ur digestive systems are the unsung workaholics of our bodies, toiling around the clock to break down and absorb nutrients from the food and fluids we consume.

Our large intestine – often referred to as our gut – is the hero, or heroes; because it is actually the populations of tiny organisms that live in our gut that keep us healthy. Also known as the microbiota, gut flora or gut bacteria, your gut is home to billions of them, with most of us having more than 1000 different species. We cannot underestimate the important role that our gut bacteria play in not only our digestive health, but our immune system and

1

BROWN RICE

The nutrients in brown rice encourage the growth and activity of healthy gut bacteria. Red and black rice are also good options for the gut and, luckily, are becoming more available in some supermarkets. Wherever possible, opt for brown rice over white rice and get the benefits from this healthy wholegrain.

2

mental health. Their duties also involve the absorption of essential nutrients, protecting us from harmful bacteria and influencing inflammation. We spoke to Jean Hailes naturopath Sandra Villella about how to support your digestive system through eating everyday foods. Here are her five top foods to nourish your gut bacteria:

OATS

Oats contain a unique type of fibre that nourishes and restores healthy gut bacteria. This makes oats a great food to eat every day and they are especially suited to breakfast – porridges, muesli or a smoothie with oats.

3

LINSEEDS/ FLAXSEEDS

These tiny brown, tan or golden-coloured seeds are high in fibre and can help create an environment within the gut in which healthy bacteria want to grow and live.

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To ensure freshness and to get the most benefit from this food, Sandra recommends freshly grinding your linseeds at home in a coffee grinder or spice grinder, and storing the ground seeds for up to two weeks in an airtight container in the fridge. Get more linseeds into your daily diet by trying out Sandra’s latest recipe, Buckwheat porridge, her Linseed, banana and date muffins, or simply sprinkle a tablespoon or two of ground seeds over your porridge in the morning.


WELLBEING JEAN H A ILES for WOMEN’S HEA LTH

A recipe for health & happiness: We hope you can start including more of these foods in your daily diet. If you’re still not sure where to start, Sandra has designed a delicious recipe filled with colourful whole foods and ingredients which will nourish and restore your healthy gut bacteria: get the recipes for Aduki Bean Salad and also try out her Bircher Muesli by visiting the website. As a leaving thought, did you know that up to 60% of digestive health conditions are associated with stress? So while it’s important to eat a balanced diet rich with gut-nourishing foods, it’s also important to keep your stress levels in check – a balanced lifestyle, rest and happiness are just as essential to your digestive health. Read more about healthy living and healthy eating on the Jean Hailes website.

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PREBIOTIC FOODS

Prebiotics (note: not probiotics) are a type of nutrient that are very beneficial for promoting gut health. Essentially, prebiotics are fuel for healthy gut bacteria, so it’s important to eat enough prebiotics to keep the populations alive and healthy. Prebiotics occur naturally in a number of everyday foods, such as: • garlic, onions, leeks and spring onions • asparagus, artichokes and beetroot • broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, watercress and kale • legumes such as chickpeas, lentils and red kidney beans.

5

YOGHURT & KEFIR

Another way to help keep your populations of good bacteria healthy is by eating them! Yoghurts often contain healthy gut bacteria, but it’s important to check the labels. Good products will not only specify the type of good bacteria, but also the quantity of good bacteria. Sandra recommends eating yoghurt that contain around one billion good bacteria per serve. Kefir is another type of food, similar to yoghurt, containing even greater amounts of healthy bacteria. Kefir is available in some health food stores, or some people make it at home. It can be quite sour to taste, but many people enjoy it as part of their breakfast – added to smoothies or with fruit.

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SEASONAL PRODUCE by the GASCOYNE FOOD COUNCIL

The growers along the banks of the Gascoyne River are fanatically committed to producing, the sun-ripened produce reflects the regions focus on top quality and innovation with an incredible range of varieties hitting the market. Written by GEORGIA THOMAS Media from Gascoyne Food Council

T

his summer Perth foodies can put the best of local produce delivered straight from Carnarvon on their shopping list and make the most of the seasons quintessential flavours. The sun-ripened produce reflects the regions focus on top quality and innovation with an incredible range of varieties hitting the market. Sweet and juicy grapes, including diverse breeds with unique eating qualities, colours and shapes, divine mangoes with an assortment of varieties for different taste profiles and fruit size, delicious pawpaw, refreshing melons and cream bananas are going to be available throughout the season. Not to mention the regions stalwarts of top quality Rangelands beef, goat and incredible

seafood including prawns, crabs and fish. There really is something for everyone coming from the Gascoyne.

Carnarvon fruits & veggies have a unique, sun-drenched flavour and sweet juicy ripeness!

Must Winebar Chef and TV Presenter Russell Blaikie has enjoyed many trips to the Gascoyne and recently co-hosted Channel 9’s DELISH program featuring the amazing food from the region. ‘‘I have travelled to the Gascoyne region for over five decades with my family and I’ve always been blown away by the quality of produce that we’ve sourced from the region on our visits. Swift transport pathways and market systems mean that this amazing produce is also available in our local shops. Fruit and vegetables grown in Carnarvon have a unique sun-drenched flavour and

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sweet ripeness. The growers along the banks of the Gascoyne River are fanatically committed to producing high quality, beautifully flavoured fruits and vegetables… And then there’s the abundance of the waters of Shark Bay; Blue Manna Crabs, Whiting and Pink Snapper are some of my favourite seafoods and at Must Winebar - I only use prawns caught in this world heritage listed area, they are snap frozen on the boat within 30 minutes of being caught, this really sums up the food produced in the Gascoyne region, it just doesn’t get fresher than this!” said Russell.

he ultimate summer dessert, fresh from the Gascoyne. Head overleaf to serve up Chef Russell Blaikie’s fresh and fruity dish - Carnarvan Fruit Mess - using seasonal Carnarvon produce.

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SEASONAL PRODUCE S W E ET SU M M E R F RU I T S

Chef Russell Blaikie shares the ultimate Summer dessert, fresh from the Gascoyne.

CARNARVON FRUIT MESS

Serves 6

Get creative pick and mix fresh, seasonal Carnarvon fruits to make this recipe your own! FRESH FRUITS • 1 wedge of Carnarvon watermelon, cut into 6 thin slices and cut the rest into large diced pieces or balls using a melon baller. • ½ Carnarvon rock melon, cut into large diced pieces or balls using a melon baller. • ½ Carnarvon honeydew melon cut into large diced pieces or balls using a melon baller. • ½ Ripe Carnarvon pawpaw sliced • 500g ripe bananas, peeled, diced and frozen.

Chef R uss

e ll

Bl

a ik

ie

LIME-GIN SYRUP • Juice and julienne zest of three limes • ½ cup caster sugar • ⅓ cup water • 60ml gin PASSIONFRUIT JELLY • Bloom gelatine leaves in warm water until they become soft. • Place passionfruit pulp, sugar and water in small saucepan, bring to boil. • Pour through fine strainer to remove seeds, then place about ¼ of the seeds back into the liquid. • Return to heat and bring to a gentle simmer. Squeeze excess water from gelatin leaves and add to liquid, simmer until dissolved and pour into a thin layer 3-4 mm thick onto a plate. Refrigerate MANGO CUSTARD Heat mango puree in a small saucepan to simmer, meanwhile whisk the egg yolks, sugar and cornflour together. Pour mango puree over egg mix, whisking

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to combine, place back into small saucepan and cook over low heat until set (approx 85ºC, if you have a thermometer). Strain, cool and reserve. CHANTILLY CREAM Beat cream with a little sugar until soft peaks form, reserve in refrigerator BANANA ICE CREAM Peel and place bananas into the bowl of a food processor, blitz into a creamy consistency, reserve in the freezer. PUT IT ALL TOGETHER Place Chantilly cream into a large bowl, add a generous amount of meringues, reserving a few to garnish along with several scoops of banana ice cream. Place a large scoop of cream into the plate, garnish with the entire range of fruits, pipe mango custard around the plate, drizzle with lime syrup and drape with pieces of the passionfruit jelly… and ENJOY!


YOGA

ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES please contact: admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

“A Yoga Teacher Training is one of the most incredible adventures you will have in your life… Teach your passion!”

TEACHER TRAINING 100 – 350 HR This March 2018 become a certified yoga teacher accredited by Yoga Alliance and teach internationally. 16 - 18 March, 13 - 15 April, 4 - 6 May @ Fonty’s Pool On-going classes: Manjimup | Pemberton |Northcliffe Gwen’s Profile: Join Us for: Registered Yoga Teacher Retreats Yoga Alliance Australia- Workshops ERYT500, Yoga Australia- Senior Yoga Teacher, Events

Yoga Alliance US- YACEP, International Association of Yoga Therapists- C-IAYT

www.rrrnetwork.com.au

@rrrnetwork

/rrrnetwork

www.bewithgwen.com | namaste@bewithgwen.com

@rrrnetwork

AUTHOR, EDUCATOR & SPEAKER Sylvia

Marina is well known for her ability to engage and inspire audiences to take action.

BRINGING FASTER, MORE RELIABLE SERVICES TO REGIONAL AND REMOTE WA

Grounded in wisdom and experience her sessions will give you confidence with new skills and know-how to think and behave differently.

Proudly partnering with the following leading telecommunications companies

An inspiring personality, Her native wisdom gives her a unique perspective and ability to engage and inspire audiences, while her focus is re-connecting people to their wisdom and values. Leigh Ballard - Principal Sales Consultant T: (08) 6809 2100

E: lballard@regionalcomms.com.au

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0412 198 612

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info@sylviamarina.com

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www.sylviamarina.com


THE LAST WORD UNTIL NEXT TIME

T

he Rural, Regional, Remote Women’s Network of Western Australia acknowledges

the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of this nation. We acknowledge the traditional custodians of the lands on which our company is located and where we conduct our business. We pay our respects to ancestors and Elders, past and present. The Rural, Regional, Remote Women’s Network of Western Australia is committed to honouring Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ unique cultural and spiritual relationships to the land, waters and seas and their rich contribution to society.

SOURCE: www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/spirituality/welcome-to-country-acknowledgement-of-country IMAGE:Frances Andrijich Great Southern - Denmark www.australiassouthwest.com

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A

dvocare supports and protects the rights of older people by providing advocacy, information and education. Elder abuse affects 1 in 20 older people in WA, impacting vulnerable members of our community. We offer advice, organise access to resources and support services, and work with them to resolve their situation.

Gwen’s story Gwen*contacted Advocare via her Residential Aged Care facility. She was upset that her son was taking advantage of her through the abuse of an Enduring Power of Attorney. Gwen had set up the EPA when she went in to hospital for major surgery. After recovery, Gwen wanted to take back control and discovered her son had been using money for himself and not paying her bills. As with many people in this situation, Gwen

was highly distressed at the thought of confronting her son. She also felt ashamed. One of our Advocates discussed various options open to Gwen. We prepared a letter revoking the EPA for Gwen, and her Residential Aged Care facility assisted Gwen providing copies of the letter to Centrelink and her Bank. It was important to Gwen to make her own decisions and be back in control of her own * money. not her real name


W

e have a proud 21-year history of supporting and celebrating

Western Australian women and their families who live and work outside of the Perth metropolitan area. In 2016 the RRR Network transitioned from a WA State government advisory board to an independent incorporated entity. Our focus is every woman living in a rural, regional, or remote community in IMAGE: Frances Andrijich

Western Australia. We have a subscriber base of over 10,000 individuals, businesses and community organisations who receive this quarterly glossy magazine from us and an active social media following.

WA’s pre-eminent communication network for inspiring & connecting regional women; championing their role in our communities and advocating on their behalf.

Join the RRR Network, it’s as simple as registering your details via our website.

www.rrrnetwork.com.au

admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

@rrrnetwork

/rrrnetwork

@rrrnetwork

RRR Network Quarterly - Autumn 2018  

RRR Network Quarterly for Rural, Regional and Remote West Australian Women WA's pre-eminent communication network for inspiring and connecti...

RRR Network Quarterly - Autumn 2018  

RRR Network Quarterly for Rural, Regional and Remote West Australian Women WA's pre-eminent communication network for inspiring and connecti...