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SECTION

E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R FO R R U R A L , R EG I O N A L & R E MOT E WE S T E R N AU S T R A L I A N WOM E N

AGRIFUTURES™

RURAL WOMEN’S AWARD

Finalists The

MAE CONNELLY

Connection HEALTH & WELLBEING

Women

MAKING A DIFFERENCE GOLDEN HARVEST

simple & delicious


SECTION E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

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IMAGE: Frances Andrijich Margaret River region • vintage


This edition marks 12 months since we relaunched the RRR

In November 2018 we launched a survey on Sexual Harassment

Network magazine. While it is a wonderful milestone the RRR

in the WA, which was widely distributed to our members,

network has grown into much more than “ just a magazine” and

subscribers and supporters. At the time of going to print we had

has been involved in many successful and ongoing initiatives

received 349 responses, and overall the results of the survey were

since separating from government in 2017. These initiatives

alarming. We have provided snapshot of those results and what

include

we will do with that data in this edition.

• The delivery of leadership training, in partnership with Curtin

Interestingly we have also received criticism for even raising the

University, to 100 WA women by 30 June 2019.

topic of sexual harassment but - based on our survey results the RRR Network has an overwhelming mandate to continue

• Delivery of Entrepreneur training to 30 WA agrifood business

the discussion about sexual harassment on behalf of our

by 30 June 2019.

membership. We look forward to keeping you informed of where

• The management of the Agrifutures Rural Women’s’ Award

this conversation goes next.

announcement event in WA in 2018 and 2019. Jackie Jarvis

• Our first ever RRR Network Conference in March 2019.

Chief Executive Officer

In addition, we have played a part in the #METOO discussion

Rural, Regional, Remote Women’s Network

and sought to gather evidence from our members and

of Western Australia

subscribers to ensure we understand the situation in WA

www.rrrnetwork.com.au

workplaces in relation to the occurrence of sexual harassment, your responses to inappropriate behaviours, and your willingness to report on such matters. R R R N E T WO R K

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COVER Mae Connelly Connecting community.

THE BOARD

THE MAGAZINE

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Donnybrook apples

SUBMISSIONS, ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES

Jackie Jarvis (Margaret River)

GENERAL ENQUIRIES & SUBSCRIPTIONS CHAIR

admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

Lyn Farrell (Bunbury)

PRODUCTION, DESIGN & ARTWORK

DEPUTY CHAIR Anna Dixon (Northam)

Wilderness Publishing

SECRETARY

PRINTING

Cath Lyons (Perth)

A+L Printers, Bunbury WA

TREASURER

Sarah Lang

(Busselton)

PUBLISHED BY

COMMITTEE

RRR Regional Network

Jo Barrett-Lennard (Dunsborough) Nicole Batten (Yuna)

RMB 790 Wirring Road, Margaret River WA

Elizabeth Brennan (Wongan Hills)

www.rrrnetwork.com.au

Sue Middleton (Wongan Hills)

All content is subject to copyright and may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. Opinions represented in RRR Regional Network Quarterly are not necessarily those of the publisher. RRR Regional Newtwork Quarterly is published seasonally. PEFC Certified Printing

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Kate Jenkins • Sex Discrimination Commissioner

Margaret River Open Studios

CONTENTS

WELCOME

THE QUARTERLY

The Autumn Issue 2019

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AG R I F U T U R E S ™ R U R A L WO M A N O F T H E Y E A R 2 0 1 9 FI N A L I S T S

Introducing Juliet Grist, Leah Boucher, Tanya Kitto and Belinda Lay

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17

NEWS & REVIEWS

BOOKS, PODCASTS AND SOCIAL MEDIA The interesting & entertaining

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE insights and interest

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WHAT’S ON

WHAT’S ON & THE NETWORK CALENDAR All the dates & details of events you will love

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THE WORK PLACE

BUSINESS IN THE BUSH with Sarah Woolford, Grain Brokers Australia

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SEXUAL HARASSMENT Insights from Western Australian women

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WE’RE ALL IN THIS TOGETHER Mae Connelly

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COUNTRY TO CORPORATE Danya Edwards

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SCHOOL LEAVERS SAFETY NET

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CELEBRATING WOMEN

CAREERS IN FOCUS

TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

KALGOORLIE All that glitters

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HEALTH & WELL BEING

BREAST HEALTH Jean Hailes for Womens’ Health

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SEASONAL PRODUCE

AUTUMN GOLD our sweetest season

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WRAP UP

HIGHLIGHTS Supporters, members and corporate sponsors.

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THE QUARTERLY T H E AGR I F U T U R E Sâ„¢ RU R A L WOM A N OF T H E Y E A R 2019 F I N A L I ST S

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2019

AGRIFUTURES™ RURAL WOMEN’S AWARD

FINALISTS

Written by FLEUR CHAPMAN

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he AgriFutures™ Rural Women’s Award is Australia’s leading award acknowledging and supporting the essential role women play in rural industries, businesses and communities. The Award provides a platform to inspire and support Australian women to use and develop their skills to benefit their industries and communities. Over the past two decades, the Award has gained a significant profile and is recognised as a program of influence among parliamentarians, industry, media and Award alumni. Each state and territory winner receives a $10,000 bursary for innovative ideas and projects, as well as access to professional development opportunities and alumni networks. We would like to introduce the four Western Australian finalists, each with a unique story to tell.

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IMAGE: Frances Andrijich Southern Forests Bridgetown


THE QUARTERLY AGR I F U T U R E Sâ„¢ RU R A L WOM A N OF T H E Y E A R F I N A L I ST S

JULIET GRIST

ECONOMIST, REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Darrilyn congratulated by other finalists

image JENNY FEAST PHOTOGRAPHY

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hrough her work as an economist in regional development,

causes are complex and not well understood, or no natural home

Juliet Grist is conscious of the importance of causality and

base for interventions exist (i.e. there is debate over responsibility

evidence-based best practice when developing community

for the problem, either Government, NFP or individual community

interventions. However, throughout her career she has noticed a

members). Many towns are also simply too small to be eligible for

distinct lack of focus on the people and the personal connections

traditional funding and support schemes. The pilot program will

within a community when interventions are being developed and implemented. Instead, infrastructure changes are expected to solve

combine the Wheatbelt and Great Southern regions, effectively

a problem, but what often results is short-term change only – the

bringing together over 100,000 people in order to target the social

system remains the same and the cycle continues.

impact market.

Her vision, therefore, it to turn tiny towns into one big village, to

“Part of the collective impact philosophy is that we are all

create a critical mass where real structural change can take place

responsible, we are all each other’s neighbour. Those of us who are

for ongoing positive impact for

able ought to help those that are less

the entire community and the

able,” she said.

generations to follow.

On Juliet’s priority list for the

In order to achieve this, Juliet has

Wheatbelt project is education,

been working tirelessly over the

youth unemployment and Aboriginal

past two years on establishing a backbone support organisation

economic participation. Each has

that brings people from differing

a unique set of considerations and

perspectives, skillsets and roles

complexities that make enacting

within their community to discuss

long-term change difficult, but given

key issues and collaboratively make a difference. Together, the team

the right support from key community players brought together

can work together to understand the real problem (rather than the

under a common goal, there is hope for a brighter path forward.

perceived issue) under a common agenda.

While working on getting the backbone concept off the ground,

“Instead of each town having to work on their own, through a support structure, they are all networked across each other, and

Juliet also runs her business Rural and Regional Economic

networked to resources, to hopefully get enough critical mass

Solutions, practicing her strong-held belief for human-focused

between them to be able to make a difference,” Juliet explained.

interventions over infrastructure. Through her business, she is able

Juliet has found that many core issues within regional and remote

to offer creative and innovative solutions to local government and

towns are never fully addressed, because either the underlying

community organisations.

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LEAH BOUCHER

INTERNET TECHNOLOGY

image STOKED PHOTOGRAPHY

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eah Boucher is passionate about providing employment opportunities and ongoing career development for those who are traditionally marginalised from full-time employment, particularly regional women in primary carer roles.

skills and connections, whilst I was also able to focus on giving my young child the attention he deserved,” she said. The job quickly expanded to incorporate scoping and systems management, so Leah began training other competent women to take on project tasks to share the workload while providing a pathway into a career in the growth ICT industry. Her trainees were women in a similar situation to her; primary carers who lived in regional or remote areas. This aspect of mentoring other women in primary care roles was important to Leah, as she understood first-hand the potential limitations to career development and financial independence for such women, and happily discovered there is no shortage of talent and passion.

Leah’s business Data Divas grew from a lucky break after she prepared to move from Sydney to regional WA for family reasons. Her manager at the time asked her not to quit her Sydney-based job altogether but stay on as a remote staff member in the role of web & IT manager. This role she could do from home, providing the perfect balance between career and family. “It was awesome to be able to keep working and maintain my

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From here, Data Divas was born, translating the concept of project-based IT services into a business model that is highly synchronistic with her passion for equity, equality, and the industry she loves. Over the past two years, Leah has become increasingly aware of the need for roles that suit women in in career break positions, as well as a growing need for costeffective IT solutions for SME and NFP organisations across Australia – both of which combine perfectly at Data Divas.

which they work, the Data Divas can work from home in hours that best suit them and their families, while providing quality, cost-effective services to a range of businesses and NFP organisations. Leah loves working with her clients but is now enjoying delegation and mentoring the Divas (and token Divo), allowing her to work more ‘on the business’. As Data Divas expands, Leah plans to further develop the services on offer to their widening base of clients and will achieve this alongside the continuing development of the Diva’s capacity, skills and knowledge.

Through her business, Leah continues to actively provide opportunities for women who don’t fit with traditional employment models, as well as young people who are trying to break into the industry now too. Here, they can not only utilise existing skills, but are provided the opportunity and encouragement to grow. Thanks to the very technology with

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Data Divas www.datadivas.solutions

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TANYA KITTO NUTRITIONAL DIVERSITY

image JUSTINE ROWE • Around the Traps Rural Photography

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upins have traditionally held little interest in food circles, instead being relegated to use as feed stock or in crop rotations to improve the soil. However, Tanya Kitto sees so much more – a highly nutrition, protein-packed and affordable product with unending potential.

that the key to success lies not in simply selling the lupins themselves, but creating foods with them. When customers can see (or even better, taste) the diverse ways lupins can be used, they are educated and inspired. “Farming is not like it used to be. We need to be smarter about what we’re doing. It’s no longer about just growing the grain and letting others make it into food, it’s time for us as farmers to be involved in the food creation side of things too,” she said.

Tanya is head cook for My Provincial Kitchen, a family business she runs with her husband Robert. Her mission is to not only make lupins more readily available and easy for people to incorporate into their everyday foods, but teach others about the wonderful health benefits the legumes hold. Lupins have an impressive macronutrient composition, with the wholemeal flour My Provincial Kitchen creates boasting 38 per cent protein and 41 per cent dietary fibre. Lupin flour is also great gluten free option for cooking a variety of foods. Although they have been a common sight on farms for generations, lupins were only approved for human consumption in Australia in 1987.

Tanya’s four children (now aged between 15 and 20) are also involved in the project, lending a hand on the farm and learning about the products as the business grows. Working together as a family for a successful business has been a driving force for Tanya, and she wants to similarly inspire other farmers wives to become involved in the expansion of their own businesses. “I want other farmers wives to see their importance in the world, because showing them how important they are will then flow through to their children also seeing the many opportunities for growth in the agricultural sector.”

The Kitto family has been farming since 1850, with lupins added to the enterprise on their current Midwest property in 1980. A few years after they began growing the crop, Robert and his father thought about ways to bring lupins to the human consumption market, then Tanya joined the family farm and the path to My Provincial Kitchen was laid.

The future is exciting for Tanya and her family as they continue their journey with My Provincial Kitchen. For more about the business and to see the range.

They are passionate about their product and work hard to educate people about the many benefits to using lupins in everyday cooking. They discovered early on in their journey

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My Provincial Kitchen www.myprovincialkitchen.com.au

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BELINDA LAY

FARMING INNOVATION

image DANIELLE HALFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

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elinda Lay fell in love with life on the land from a young age, regularly visiting her grandparents farm in the small town of Beverley where she grew up. She has since married a farmer and become one in her own right, overseeing mixed farming enterprise of sheep and cropping.

introduce what she effectively describes as ‘Fitbit for sheep’. She commented to her husband one day how great it would be if sheep could just walk up to them and bleat their troubles – then she found her solution. Belinda is importing an innovative sheep collar that tracks core information such as the animal’s heart rate, temperature and GPS location. She will be trialling the system on nucleus ewes at her farm to determine the usefulness of application first and foremost on animal welfare issues – especially when

As the years have passed, Belinda has worked to not only redefine her role in the business, but the way farm management is conducted on a much larger scale. Inspired by tragedies on her own land, Belinda began a project to

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Written by JO FULWOOD

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THE QUARTERLY AGR I F U T U R E S™ RU R A L WOM A N OF T H E Y E A R F I N A L I ST S

it comes to lambing time. When an animal begins showing unusual statistics, the farmer is notified via mobile phone and can determine the distressed animal’s exact GPS location. The farmer can then quickly and easily track it down and attend to its needs without disturbing the rest of the flock.

Belinda hopes this new technology will eventually expand to use in live export, where sheep can be monitored by the onboard vet and attended to as soon as a problem arises. These collars also have the ability to offer important information on animal welfare concerns and ensure due-diligence is met within the export industry.

GPS information provided by the collar is also invaluable when it comes to tracking sheep movements. The farmer can see where the flock prefers to graze and can then work to replicate those conditions elsewhere to maximise growth and therefore productivity and profit. Broken fences or open gates will also no longer cause so much trouble – an errant sheep or escaped flock can be rounded up before crops are destroyed or animals go missing.

While Belinda’s project is still in its early stages, there are mass benefits to this type of system for the broad farming community. Automation has become commonplace across areas of farming such as cropping and cattle, yet sheep farming largely requires a much more ‘handson’ approach. Once implemented, these collars have huge potential to change the way sheep farming is conducted to create a more effective, safe and profitable business.

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IMAGE: Frances Andrijich Food Trails of Nannup and Bridgetown www.australiassouthwest.com.au R R R N E T WO R K

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NEWS + REVIEWS

ANY ORDINARY DAY Leigh Sales -Penguin The day that turns a life upside down usually starts like any other, but what happens the day after? Dual Walkley Award-winner Leigh Sales investigates how ordinary people endure the unthinkable. As a journalist, Leigh Sales often encounters people experiencing the worst moments of their lives in the full glare of the media. But one particular string of bad news stories – and a terrifying brush with her own mortality – sent her looking for answers about how vulnerable each of us is to a life-changing event. In this wise and layered book, Leigh talks intimately with people who’ve faced the unimaginable, from

ABC.NET.AU/RADIO/ PROGRAMS/LITTLE-TINY Explore world history and the small things that have shaped it. Each episode details a story in history, from a tiny moment of change through to its mammoth consequences, all in the space of a coffee break. Hosted by Kara Schlegl.

terrorism to natural disaster to simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Expecting broken lives, she instead finds strength, hope, even humour. Leigh brilliantly condenses the cutting-edge research on the way the human brain processes fear and grief, and poses the questions we too often ignore out of awkwardness. Along the way, she offers an unguarded account of her own challenges and what she’s learned about coping with life’s unexpected blows. Warm, candid and empathetic, this book is about what happens when ordinary people, on ordinary days, are forced to suddenly find the resilience most of us don’t know we have.

THE CLOCKMAKER’S DAUGHTER Kate Morton - Allen and Unwin In the summer of 1862, a group of young artists led by the passionate and talented Edward Radcliffe descends upon Birchwood Manor on the banks of the Upper Thames. Their plan: to spend a secluded summer month in a haze of inspiration and creativity. But by the time their stay is over, one woman has been shot dead while

MUSEUM.WA.GOV.AU The State’s premier cultural organisation, housing WA’s scientific and cultural collection. The museum makes natural and social heritage accessible and engaging through research, exhibitions and public programs. While renovations in Perth take place, you’re invited to visit one of five other locations and keep an eye out as we pop-up in surprising places across the State.

another has disappeared; a priceless heirloom is missing; and Edward Radcliffe’s life is in ruins. Told by multiple voices across time, The Clockmaker’s Daughter is a story of murder, mystery and thievery, of art, love and loss.

DRIVING INTO THE SUN Marcella Polain - Fremantle Press For Orla, living in the suburbs in 1968 on the cusp of adolescence, her father is a great shining light, whose warm and powerful presence fills

FACEBOOK.COM/ HORTWITHHEART Sabrina Hahn is a whole lot of hort with heart – master gardener and storyteller of note. Follow and enjoy Sabrina’s latest musings.

her world. But in the aftermath of his sudden death, Orla, her mother and her sister are left in a no-man’s-land, a place where the rights and protections of the nuclear family suddenly and mysteriously no longer apply, and where the path between girl and woman must be navigated alone. Beautiful and evocative, Marcella Polain’s first novel in ten years is a gripping read.

Reviews and links favour Australian writers and content. Featured books are available as eBooks.

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@APERTUNITY_ A multimedia crew from Western Australia filming and photographing our state and country.


NEWS + REVIEWS

SOM ET H I NG for E V E R YON E

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DESTINATION

he geographical history of Rottnest Island has been

dominated by changes in sea level. This was thought

to occur either due to sea water becoming trapped and

WADJEMUP

released by moving ice sheets, or the land slowly rising and falling in response to changing stresses in the earth’s crust. It is believed that Rottnest Island was separated from the mainland 7,000 years ago. The sea level rose, cutting the Island off from the land mass, and it is now the largest in a chain of islands (which includes Garden and Carnac Islands) on the continental shelf opposite Perth. The limestone base of Rottnest Island has an effect on all life on the Island, including the types of plants which can grow on it, the species of animals which can feed upon the plants, and the extent to which humans can make use of the Island. Rottnest Island is referred to as Wadjemup by traditional Aboriginal people from the Noongar language group. As custodians of the land, the Whadjuk people have strong spiritual connections to Wadjemup and it remains significant to the Aboriginal community today.

image @atography

www.rottnestisland.com

‘STRONGER’ CONFERENCE:2019 T

he RRR Network’s 2019 Conference theme of “Stronger” recognises and celebrates the strength WA women bring to their communities, their industries, their families and each other. Together we will build each other up to be even stronger, more empowered and ready to tackle the issues important to each of us. The conference will celebrate women’s strength and endurance in all aspects of their lives, inspiring them with a lineup of guest speakers and including to explore all facets of life from motherhood, relationships, family, work, learning and living. Hyatt Regency Hotel, Perth. 5th + 6th March

Guest Speaker: JESSICA EDWARDS, AKA,’JILLAROO JESS’

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TICKETS AVAILABLE : www.rrrnetwork.com.au

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NEWS + REVIEWS S OM ET H I NG for E V E R YON E

blue ocean; this is one of the extraordinary sights you’ll see flying or

cruising through the pristine wilderness of the Recherche Archipelago. Located on Middle Island, the lake is separated from the Southern Ocean by just a thin strip of sand and it’s widely believed that the water’s permanent strawberry milkshake colour is due to the extremely high level of salinity. This discovery was made as early as 1802, when Matthew Flinders led an expedition to the islands and collected a sample from the lake, but there has been no definitive proof that salt is the source of its unique hue.

L AKE HILLIER

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icture a lake of the brightest bubblegum-pink sitting beside the deepest

MARGARET RIVER

www.visitesperance.com/things-to-do/attractions

OPEN STUDIOS

MEMBER SIGN-UP Support the RRR Network and actively engage with rural, regional and remote women to support and contribute to the economic and social wellbeing of their communities. VISIT www.rrrnetwork.com.au/join-us EMAIL admin@rrrnetwork.com.au PHONE (08) 6316 0407 or POST PAYMENT TO: 

RRR NETWORK 790 Wirring Road

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Alice Linford Forte’s studio. Photo credit: Elements Margaret River

atisfy your artistic curiosity and celebrate originality at this year’s Margaret River Region Open Studios. More than 100 painters, sculptors, illustrators, jewellers,

printmakers, glassblowers, ceramicists, photographers and furniture makers based in the Margaret River region will open their studios to visitors as part of the annual Margaret River Open Studios festival. From April 27 to May 12, visitors and art enthusiasts will have the rare chance to visit private art studios and meet established and emerging artists for a unique behind-the-scenes creative experience. Local artists participating in this year’s event include respected names such as Leon Pericles, Rachel Coad, Rebecca Cool, Lauren Wilhelm, Ian Mutch, Christian Fletcher and John Miller. The work of some of the artists will also be available to purchase exclusively from selected venues. The event is free to attend and bookings are not required. www.mrros.com.au

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Margaret River WA 6285


CALENDAR W H AT’S ON in W E ST E R N AUST R A L I A

16-17 March, Mandurah MANDURAH CRAB FEST

The largest free community event in Western Australia attracts over 100,000 locals and visitors. The event showcases the lifestyle, location, culture and talent that makes Mandurah so unique - and, of course, the celebration of the native blue manna crab! Come along and enjoy fresh food, live music, performances, children’s entertainment, competitions, cooking demonstrations, celebrities and more. www.crabfest.com.au

4-14 April, Albany TASTE GREAT SOUTHERN

Celebrating the amazing food, wine, people and attractions of the Great Southern, this 11 day festival boasts an incredible line-up of more than 20 not-to-be -missed culinary experiences, including long lunches, degustations, community markets, free events, awardwinning wine and local produce tastings, to name just a few. This year’s chef pool is impressive and contains many of the incredible talent of the Great Southern and beyond, including Amy Hamilton, Anna Gare. Paul Iskov, Charlie Vargas, Scott Brannigan and Kenny McHard, with more to be announced soon. www.tastegreatsouthern.com.au/events

16-21 April, Karijini THE K ARIJINI EXPERIENCE

The Karijini National Park provides the setting for a unique celebration of art and culture. The innovative six-day program offers a selection of intimate, authentic, once in a lifetime experiences, presented by a mix of traditional owners, nationally-renowned artists and talented locals. Timed to coincide with April school holidays, it is an experience for the whole family. An array of free and family-friendly events are spread across the program, in combination with high quality ticketed events including a culinary experience under the night sky and Opera in the Gorge. Respecting the capacity, tickets are limited.

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www.karijiniexperience.com

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CALENDAR W H AT’S ON in W E ST E R N AUST R A L I A

What’s on?

4 May, Kimberley LAKE ARGYLE SWIM 2019 The First National Kimberley Lake Argyle Swim will be held the first Saturday in May. Situated 75 kilometres from the town of Kununurra, Lake Argyle is located 40 kilometres from the Northern Territory border and covers 980 square kilometres at normal water levels. Lake Argyle is twenty-one times greater in size than Sydney Harbour, but can increase to over 80 times the size of Sydney Harbour when in flood. Long since recognised as one of the most spectacular places to visit, Lake Argyle Swim provides

18-19 May, Broome

experienced swimmers with an unsurpassed outback adventure. www.lakeargyleswim.com

AIRNORTH CABLE BEACH POLO 2019 Australia’s only multi-day beach polo tournament, Airnorth Cable Beach Polo, returns in 2019 to Cable Beach in Broome, Western Australia. Professional teams battle for the Australasian Beach Polo Championship, on the best beach polo playing conditions in the world. Cable Beach Polo is a delightful combination of casual glamour, gourmet delights and great entertainment, and is known as a bucket-list event for world travellers. www.cablebeachpolo.com.au

20-21 April, Donnybrook DONNYBROOK APPLE FESTIVAL ‘HARVEST & ARTS’

The Donnybrook Apple Festival is a ‘harvest and arts’ feast for the senses. Don’t miss this opportunity to indulge in all the region has to offer. Enjoy a range of activities providing non-stop entertainment for the entire family! From produce displays and fruit and market stalls, to pony rides, live music and street parades, the event will conculdes with a spectacular fireworks display on Saturday night. www.donnybrookapplefestival.com.au

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THE WORK PLACE BUSI N E S S I N T H E BUSH

BUSINESS in the

BUSH

With SARAH WOOLFORD, Grain Brokers Australia

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n an era when an image of a boiled egg achieves millions of Instagram ‘likes’, the impact of social media is beyond debate.

Here at Grain Brokers Australia, our website is now only part of the system we use to communicate with growers. Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and even LinkedIn have become essential components of our agricultural arsenal. Wheat might not be growing any faster, however growers increasingly prefer information in bite-sized chunks and on the go.

So much focus is placed on the dangers of social media for younger people via cyberbullying and access to inappropriate content. However, in contrast, not enough emphasis is placed in media columns on the opportunities for regional and farm businesses. We can not only tap into the outside world and beyond with immediacy, but also play ball from a commercial perspective. The ability to stay on top of global grain and livestock trends and prices is only the start of the social media opportunities for growers and farmers. Twitter is the ‘go to’ platform for most. From currency fluctuation to working dog food recommendations, the latest and greatest is at our fingertips. Kimberley pastoralist Jane Sale is co-

Station; a blog for those living in outback Australia where the duo share their stories. Its genesis was a desire to showcase the beef industry following the live export ban in 2011. Central Station has evolved into a wide-ranging Facebook platform that covers everything from food providence to mental health issues, all of which help build the brand of the northern beef industry.

Inspiration everywhere founder (with Steph Coombes) of Central

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But what about the direct social media money spinners now accessible to ladies and lads on the land? Social media stardom sounds easy when you say it quickly. However, it requires the same level of commitment as any business. Most of us don’t feel we lead exotic enough lives for global Instagram or YouTube fame. Yet many are doing well without needing to become a ‘country Kardashian’. For example, the Oz Outback Family channel on YouTube posts on the biggest transport machinery in Australia.


THE WORK PLACE BUSI N E S S I N T H E BUSH The clips are almost exclusively of road trains; some with close to half a million views. The best way to get cut-through is to focus on what you know, and include people or animals - the smaller and cuter they are, the better. This brings us to the tricky issue of involving your kids in your social media commerce. The heartbreaking story of Dolly Everett’s suicide lead to a social media campaign to prevent bullying online and off. Her devastating experience has likely led to many more young lives saved. Dolly’s story is an obvious example of the pros and cons of social media engagement at a personal level. This is an issue that requires extended family discussion and consideration. Even the Kardashian siblings struggle at times with their ‘famous for being famous’ lifestyle. What of the financial opportunity? Even if your social media presence focusses on the produce you grow, it will attract a larger audience when interspersed with slices of real life. The monetisation of YouTube can kick in from 10,000 views, but revenue is reliant on how many ads are viewed; you

might attract thousands of viewers to a video and still not receive a cent.

Assuming you have what it takes, what else should you consider?

Other social media platforms such as Instagram, Facebook and Twitter work in the same way. A presence on multiple channels will act as cross-promotion and leverage your content overall.

1. Be creative - Use unexpected angles in your images and include everyday farm activities such as gathering eggs and feeding the dogs.

What about those of us who don’t have cute kids and puppies to pull into frame? Jillaroo Jess, a keynote speaker at the

Digital media opportunities for global grain and livestock trends loom large for growers and farmers. 2019 RRR Network Conference, is a great role model to consider. With an active presence on Facebook and Instagram in particular, she is a bona fide outback media personality. This brings me to the most important advice of all when it comes to social media presence; keep it real. Jess’ images of ant hills, sunsets and feeding calves have an authenticity that is impossible to fake.

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2. Get designing - As your brand develops, low cost design options such as Canva and Photoshop will help add dynamism to your posts. 3. Analyse your results - Use free analytics such as Facebook Insights and Twitter Analytics to learn how your audience is responding post by post. For more tips, you are a Google search away from plenty of information about growing a social media audience. Always keep in mind that you know your life better than any expert, and trial and error will be as good a strategy as any. As Mark Zuckerberg put it himself; “If you just work on stuff that you are passionate about, you don’t have to have a master plan with how things will play out.”


Avon Valley Toyota Avon Valley Toyota is proud to be a part of the Rural, Regional, Remote Women’s Network of WA We’re your local Toyota dealership servicing the Wheatbelt. We stock a large range of new and quality pre-owned vehicles to browse through at our dealership. Our fully trained service team can help with servicing and repairs to any make and model vehicle and our Parts team offer a range of genuine parts and accessories available to help you personalise your vehicle.

Avon Valley Toyota Cnr Fitzgerald St & Peel Tce, Northam T 08 9622 5622 DL 20461

avonvalleytoyota.com.au

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SECTION

SEXUAL HARASSMENT E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

Insights from Western Australian Women Report compiled by KENDALL GALBRAITH

KATE JENKINS Sex Discrimination Commissioner | Australian Human Rights

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THE WORK PLACE S E XUA L H A R A S SM E N T - I N SIGH T S F ROM WA WOM E N

T

he 2019 National Enquiry into Sexual Harassment in

In addition, over 80 respondents chose to provide detailed

the Work Place led by Australia’s Sex Discrimination

stories of their sexual harassment within WA work places.

Commissioner – Kate Jenkins hopes to address these issues,

These incredibly private and disturbing stories took courage

raise public awareness to influence behaviour at the work place

to retell and the RRR Network commend these women for

and make recommendations.

sharing.

the RRR Network has conducted extensive research in the

Women expressed how speaking out against sexual harassment

past three months to assist their submission to the National

in their work places only intensified the situation and for

Enquiry into Sexual Harassment in the Work Place, led by

many, little resolution was found. It only created victim-hood,

Australia’s Sex Discrimination Commissioner – Kate Jenkins.

colleague bullying or taking sides, isolation and many as a result

The RRR released an online survey to its members and made it

left their jobs to be relieved of their new and negative daily

available to the public via social media from December 2018 to

environments. Whilst this suggests for women to stay quiet

early February 2019.

to avoid conflict and possibly loss of employment, at present there is significant change occurring in the work place related

Data was collected on 349 participants, with a quarter of the

to the treatment of sexual harassment, with more women

responses received from women living in the Wheatbelt. Over

feeling empowered that their ‘whistle blowing’ will be respected

37% of women who responded, report working the agriculture

and appropriate procedures will follow.

sector, and over 58% of respondents were aged over 45 years; with more than 10% of those respondents aged over 65 years.

The #Metoo and Ustoo# has inspired global awareness and the enquiry demonstrates that sexual harassment is no longer a

Overall the results of the survey were alarming:

facet of life to be swept under the rug. Kate Jenkins confirms

I

that there has been a ‘marked increase in the prevalence rate’

53% of respondents have experienced unnecessary familiarity, such as deliberately brushing up against them or unwelcome touching at a work place at some point in their careers.

of sexual harassment but cannot be certain this is a result of an increase in sexually harassing behaviours or from sustained national and global discourse surrounding the topic in recent years. Although, the latter seems the most probable.

I

Almost a quarter of women reported being scared or concerned to go to work because of potentially being sexually harassed in some form.

The RRR Network’s results, highlight the emotional and economic impact of sexual harassment deriving from the work place and clearly supports the need for a National Enquiry.

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58% have altered their behaviours at work to avoid certain people or situations because of unwanted or unwelcomed behaviour.

The RRR will report on the outcomes of the National Enquiry when available.

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Over 40% of respondents stated that they have, at some point in their careers, been sexually harassed by a client, customer or contractor related to their work.

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Almost 15% of respondents stated they had considered resigning from their job due to sexual harassment.

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F O R R U R A L , R EG I O N A L & R E M OT E W E S T E R N AU S T R A L I A N W O M E N

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WE ARE ALL

in this

TOGETHER

Written by FLEUR CHAPMAN Images by STUDIO 23 PHOTOGRAPHY

Mae Connelly grew up in the heart of Melbourne - a city girl right through childhood - until she had her lightbulb moment.

Y

ou would never think it now, but Mae Connelly grew up in the heart of Melbourne – a city girl right through childhood – with no real intention of changing that. She visited extended family on their farms over the school holidays and loved every minute of the experience, but the city was home.

time. This was intended to be only few months’ work to get into the workforce and earn a little money.

When it came to applying for university, Mae was still uncertain as to what she wanted do, just that science was on her radar. After sifting through the tonne of information delivered at various university open days, she had her lightbulb moment; her path was in agriculture. This would allow her to pursue her love of science, but in a practical, hands-on way.

The AWB went into crisis mode, frantically trying to chase down farmers in New York and keep on top of the crashing markets. In the call centre, Mae and her colleagues saw first-hand what was needed to protect assets and were front and centre to the action. It was a learning experience like no other – and one that sparked a new passion and career for Mae.

Just like her first foray into the world of agriculture, her next step – transcribing this experience and know-how into the financial services sector – was also by chance. After completing university and satisfying the post-school itchy feet, Mae scored a job at the Australian Wheat Board (AWB) in the call centre over harvest

“Within that one day, I went from something I thought I would do for a few months, to thinking holy cow, what goes into grain markets is really incredible.’’

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However, day two of her new job happened to be on September 11, 2001, when the world stopped.

Nearly 20 years on, that is the industry she has stayed.

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CELEBRATING WOMEN M A E C ON N E L LY Over the coming few years, the AWB provided Mae with a great deal of training and offered her the opportunity to live and work in regional areas. Being originally from a large city, this experience was invaluable to her professional development and allowed her to really get to know the prominent issues and needs of rural and regional people. She worked in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales before being sent to Lake Grace for a one-year stint. That was in 2003 and she still calls the area home! The sense of community, welcoming nature and the way regional and rural people band together in good times and bad struck a chord with Mae, and she instantly knew she belonged there. “The day I arrived I was dragged along to hockey training and made 20 friends, and the rest is history”. Once she was settled in WA, Mae moved on to work for another company for a few years before being head-hunted by Farmanco. She voluntarily undertook post-graduate studies in financial services – a testament to her passion and commitment to the

field – and her career has blossomed ever since. Interestingly, after the Banking Royal Commission began, a massive spotlight has been shone on financial advisers and educational requirements have been raised. Now, all financial advisers must undertake regular professional development in order to keep their licence. Mae was ahead of the pack in this regard, and is committed to continuing to upskill throughout her working life. “Things change rapidly in grain marketing, there’s always something new that you need to get on top of,” she said. As a woman in the industry, Mae finds that if anything, she has slight advantage over her male colleagues. Often, the person on the farm who is doing the grain marketing is the women, so Mae is highly sought-after and able to easily connect with her clients for ongoing, positive relationships. She finds her female colleagues extremely supportive too, and her mentor back at AWB was an inspiring role model as Mae forged her own path in the largely male-dominated world of farming.

On-farm storage at Glenvale Farms

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CELEBRATING WOMEN M A E C ON N E L LY

“It’s a very small industry, so everyone knows everyone, and especially with women being even lighter on numbers, we certainly band together.” Women have always been involved in farming, but recognition across the board for their efforts is becoming better recognised. Mae has seen a positive change towards equity in all farming roles, which is important to her not only from a professional point of view, but as a farm owner herself.

bumper harvest, and Mae remembers the broad smiles of those around town who were finally enjoying the spoils – together. In today’s tech-driven world, this sense of community within the farming world is further strengthened by social media. Mae is an avid Twitter user and loves how it brings people together, and allows people to share stories, anecdotes or even ways to make farming life easier. Living on a farm now does not mean isolation in the same way it used to. “Social media has its pitfalls, but used well, it is an extremely important tool and incredibly valuable. As farms get bigger and country towns get smaller, social media is becoming increasingly important in helping Aussie farmers through.”

Easier-to-use machinery, more automation and less reliance on strength and ‘grunt work’ on farms means women of any age or size can manage any jobs that need tackling within the farming environment, from sheep work, to driving headers, to staying up at night doing the spraying. This comes back to what cemented Mae’s passion for regional life – the sense of community, comradery and banding together to get the job done.

Last year’s mass delivery of hay from rural WA to NSW to help drought-stricken farms was primarily organised through Twitter and is a shining example of community spirit and support. In just two weeks, the Rapid Relief Team rounded up 1,200 tonnes (2,300 bales) of the hay to be driven over to the NSW town of Condobolin. This ability to help each other would not have been possible without the connections social media provides.

“The thing that makes us different in ag is that we are all in it together,” she said. For example, her all-time favourite moment throughout her farming life was the 2013 season in the southern wheatbelt region where she lives. During the first half of that year, crisis meetings were in full swing as the community had just come off 4-5 years of poor seasons and things were getting desperate. But then, in the second half of the year, the rains came. It ended up being a

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Mae and her husband run a farm in Pingrup while she also works for Farmanco out of Katanning. From a city girl with little idea where she wanted to head, to a global tragedy sparking a brand new career, Mae has come a very long way. She is now fully immersed in the rural and regional life, with that ever-present and incredibly important sense of community keeping her grounded.

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CELEBRATING WOMEN M A E C ON N E L LY

‘‘..easier-to-use machinery, more automation and less reliance on strength and ‘grunt work’ on farms means women of any age or size can manage any jobs that need tackling within the farming environment..’’

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Country to

Danya Edwards had a simple plan, to help businesses manage job-cuts with empathy, and to assist those seeking to gain new employment.

CORPORATE.

Written by KENDALL GALBRAITH Images by JESSICA WYLD PHOTOGRAPHY

I

n 2015 with a career abruptly ended by redundancy, Dayna Edwards was compelled to begin something that would help people and allow her to meet the needs of her young family.

another company PeopleStart HR, the outsourced HR and recruitment function for businesses in the mining, agriculture and NFP sectors.

She began her company – Get Hired Australia in 2016, with a laptop on the dining table and with two children under three years old underfoot. Her plan was simple. Create a sustainable business that helped businesses manage job-cuts with the market downturn with empathy, and to assist those who lost their jobs to gain new employment.

“A core part of our business is working with mining and agriculture clients. Their projects and customer base are in some of the most remote parts of the country, stretching from Broome all the way down to the south coast in Albany. I often travel to remote areas where our mining projects are and love meeting the locals, especially in the north west which is unfamiliar territory for me”.

Dayna has ridden the roller coaster of a small start-up business with the enthusiasm, madness and sheer will that it requires to where she stands now. That is, working in partnership with exciting and recognisable businesses in Western Australia and nationally. Her business has shifted from the dining room, to a commercial space in East Victoria Park where her staff has grown to five, of which one is her husband! Her company has transformed with the upswing in the market from managing redundancies to birth

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Dayna grew up on a wheat and sheep farm in Dumbleyung. Community spirit, helping others, being honest, and doing the right thing was ingrained in her as a young girl. Dayna firmly believes that these are the markings of having a successful rural community. You can tell that it is these very traits that have elevated her career and company to a competitive corporate height.

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CELEBRATING WOMEN DA N Y A E DWA R D S By the close of 2016, Dayna had helped more than two hundred people secure employment. By 2018, the face of her company was nearly unrecognisable. Peoplestart facilitated a $8 million government funded Aboriginal Training program in the Tanami Desert; a national benchmark providing opportunities in an area with the highest socio-economic disadvantage in the country. They were also the sole personnel supplier to a newly developed mine site, that is projected to see Australia become the largest producer of a rare earth mineral outside of China, in turn bringing new revenue streams to Western Australia.

Dayna’s company three years in has already made a significant and meaningful difference to hundreds state-wide. “Employment means hope for the future and pride in self, and that has far reaching effects for family and community” said Dayna. With values such as these, Dayna is certain to have a long and successful future ahead.

On a far more personal note, Dayna developed a passion for Aboriginal affairs when she became a foster carer and undertook cultural awareness training ten years ago. She found opportunity when working in human resources to focus on diversity targets, and see if she could make a difference in the employment of Aboriginals in remote areas. Today, it still

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only represents a small part of her job, but she believes in the difference that employment makes to an individual, to their sense of emotional and mental wellbeing, their sense of pride and value in themselves. “This is incredibly important for Aboriginal people who are often overlooked for roles or live in remote areas where there is a lack of jobs. In a recent project we hired seven local Aboriginal people from an extremely remote community and that’s almost $1million worth of income a year, now going into that community that wasn’t before, that’s pretty cool”.

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SCHOOL LEAVERS Safety Net 5

TIPS FOR A SCHOOL LEAVERS SAFETY NET Written by BEV JOHNSON

LEAVING HOME TO STUDY AT UNIVERSIT Y OR TAFE IS A GIANT LEAP. ESPECIALLY FOR RRR STUDENTS.

This will be their “go to” person when they are wondering what is coming next or how to do something.

Notre Dame University has a RRR Student Support Program, which is similar to the support offered to international students. No other Western Australian university or TAFE has a program like it.

UNI :: Universities have formal mentor programs. The mentors are older students who are building their resumes by demonstrating leadership through mentoring. New students are often allocated a mentor during orientation. If you didn’t get one, or if you don’t get along with your mentor, go to the Guild, or student services office and ask for a mentor in your faculty.

STUDENTS FLOUNDER. PARENTS PANIC

Stressed parents can help their school leavers to make the giant leap seem more like a hop by doing these things. Advise your child to -

1. GET A MENTOR People love it when you value their knowledge and expertise, so getting a mentor isn’t rocket science. Just be nice and value what the mentor tells you. Find someone whose subject knowledge you value and start to ask them for advice and support.

TAFE :: Vocational colleges like TAFE do not have formal mentor programs. Students will need to put in some effort to find a good mentor. They may choose to build a mentor relationship with a lecturer, with one of the many technical experts that work in colleges or with an older student.

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Getting a mentor means you are consciously and deliberately working towards a successful career. That can’t be a bad thing.

2.

FIND OUT ABOUT SUPPORT SERVICES

Support services are numerous and varied, and they are usually free. You really are not alone - but unearthing the support service you need may take some digging. • CAREER COUNSELLORS. Most tertiary education institutions have career counsellors. These can be your lifeline when you start to doubt your subject or course choices. Don’t just drop out. Go to one of the counsellors to see what you can do.

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CAREERS IN FOCUS S C HO OL L E AV E R S

3.

• SPECIALIST SUPPORT. There will be support for students with identifiable different needs, like Aboriginal students, people with a disability or people from non English-speaking backgrounds. If you are eligible for these services, take advantage of them.

Having the freedom to do what you like away from home is exciting. Taking risks is part of the excitement. New students are a target for crooks scammers, but these people don’t come with it written on their foreheads. They are usually nice, friendly, helpful people who know how to win the trust of a new student.

• CL ASSES IN STUDY SKILLS . There may be classes onskills useful for studying or completing essays and assignments. They will be designed to address a problem like not knowing how to study most efficiently, or how to write an essay with correct referencing. These skills can save you hours throughout your student career.

Believing the old Zen saying, ‘leap and the net will appear’, could result in you getting a criminal record or being physically assaulted.

• INDUSTRY GROUP SERVICES. Some industry groups, like the building and construction industry, provide mentors, scholarships, mental health programs and industrial relations support through the union. Google your industry to find what support services they offer.

Make a formal plan to stay connected with family and old family friends. If you are unsure about someone, invite them to come with you when you visit your family.

• SPECIALIST INDUSTRY SUPPORT. Specialist support groups, like Women in Science and Technology and associations like the Marketing Association, the Accountants Association or the Australian Computer Society, can help you while you are studying. They can also provide you with a network for applying for jobs and they will be able to tell you about scholarships, internships and financial support.

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STICK WITH FAMILY & FAMILY FRIENDS

If you don’t feel comfortable inviting them to meet your family or family friends, check your own feelings. Your innate wisdom may be telling your something. If you invite your new acquaintance and they choose not to come a few times, you will start to question their friendship. If they do come, and your family does not feel comfortable about this new person, listen to your family. They are the ones who will provide a safety net that protects you as you leap into your new life.

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4. SAY “YES, AND …”

5. CREATE A SMALL GROUP

If you just learn from class when you go to uni or TAFE, you are missing out.

If you have friends from school studying at your campus, they are your obvious first point of contact. You will soon be overwhelmed with new people who are vying for your attention and you will be trying to connect with new people who you meet.

There is so much more to enjoy. There are so many opportunities to engage with your industry, enter competitions, take on projects, join clubs, or go for scholarships. Don’t just wait for an opportunity to fall into your lap. Look for things that might interest you on campus noticeboards and join online groups to find out what is going on. When you hear about an opportunity on campus, say “Yes, and where do I apply, what else can I do, when can I start?” Growth opportunities are generally set up by your campus to help you to have a better student experience. Just by applying you are creating your own opportunities. You might find where you are going by setting out in a different direction.

Trying to be friends with everyone will exhaust you. Focus on a small group and establish friendships with them. You can make friends with other people later.

HINT: Be nice to everyone. There is a good chance you will be in the same workplace as them at some stage in your career. It is important that they remember how great you are.

Bev Johnson is a Career Advisor and writer of the IN FOCUS CAREERS NEWSLET TER. You can contact her at EMAIL: Bev. J@infocus-careers.com.au MOBILE: 0434 056 412

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n October 2018 I was lucky enough to be offered the position of Area Manager with Summit Fertilizers, covering the shires of Kellerberrin, Tammin, Trayning, Wyalkatchem and Mt Marshall. I am thrilled to be part of such a dynamic company and a member of the Summit team. I grew up on the family farm at Bonnie Rock. My career roles off the farm have included positions in natural resource management,

trials and extension in sustainable agriculture, as well as grain quality and grain accumulation with CBH. Summit fertiliser is backed by strong field research and trials providing growers with the latest locally-based research. This and their strong focus on quality and service really appeals to me, as I know I’ll always be offering the best service and advice to my growers. I look forward to working closely with growers to maximise their farming enterprise and am keen

to be out in the paddock working with them to conduct soil sampling, N gauge strips, trial sites and providing Summit Fertilizer’s service packages. It’s exciting to be back in the wheatbelt, being involved in the agricultural industry and supporting the community.

Advisor

I

FERTCARE®

I am passionate about agriculture in WA, the grain industry and ensuring the WA agricultural industry has a strong and sustainable future. SUMMIT FERTILIZERS Tracey Hobbs

www.summitfertz.com.au

Tracey Hobbs thobbs@summitfertz.com.au 0447 248 732

CBH GROUP PROUDLY SUPPORTING GRAIN GROWING COMMUNITIES. WA growers and their communities are the lifeblood of our industry. No-one understands this better than the CBH Group. That’s why every year, CBH invests more than $1.5 million to contribute to the vitality, development, wellbeing and safety of these regions. cbh.com.au PUBLIC Silo Trail Albany, 2018, Photograph by Bewley Shaylor

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KALGOORLIE

all that glitters Welcome to a vibrant mix of gold rush history, grand colonial buildings and immense mining operations, surrounded by some of the most dazzling spring wildflowers and eerie gold-rush ghost towns. SOURCE + IMAGES Tourism Western Australia

‘Kal’, as the locals call it, was born during the 1880s gold rush, when thousands of starry-eyed prospectors made the journey east of Perth to seek their fortunes.

The biggest city in the Australian

of gold rush history, grand colonial buildings and immense mining operations, surrounded by some of the most dazzling spring wildflowers and eerie gold-rush ghost towns. You can get there by air, road, rail or guided tour from Perth. Flights and TransWA trains depart daily. If you prefer to drive yourself, hit the Great Eastern Highway for the 600 kilometre (sevenhour) road trip from city to outback, stopping to ride one of Australia’s biggest waves at Wave Rock.

outback, Kalgoorlie is a vibrant mix R R R N E T WO R K

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‘Kal’, as the locals call it, was born during the 1880s gold rush, when thousands of starry-eyed prospectors made the journey east of Perth to seek their fortunes. Today, their legacy lives on in magnificent architecture and one of the world’s largest open cut mines - the Super Pit. At 3.5 kilometres long and 1.5 kilometres wide, the pit produces 900,000 ounces of gold each year and makes a mind-blowing experience for those who join the guided tour.


TRAVEL & ADVENTURE K A L G OOR L I E All That G lit t e r s THE GOLD RUSH LIFE

There are riches in Kalgoorlie’s centre too, particularly on Hannan Street (named after Irishman Paddy Hannan who struck gold in 1893) where you’ll find a buzz of lively bars, nightclubs, cafes and restaurants. For a real slice of gold rush life and Goldfields culture, check out the Kalgoorlie-Boulder WA Museum, the Royal Flying Doctor’s Visitor Centre and the art galleries featuring the works of Aboriginal and Goldfields artists. EXPLORE AND STAY

Australia exhibit by world-renowned artist Antony Gormley. Continue further to Leonora and the ghost town of Gwalia, and you’ll stumble upon the home of America’s 31st President, Herbert Hoover. Golfers should swing by the multi-million dollar international golf course that’s rapidly becoming one of the world’s top desert courses. It marks the beginning of the Nullarbor Links - the longest golf course on Earth. Accommodation-wise there are many options, from camping and caravan parks to hotels and motels. You’ll even find free 24-hour overnight caravan parking near the City of Kalgoorlie-Boulder Shire Office.

Venturing north to the vast salt pan of Lake Ballard, you’ll find yourself in the largest outdoor art gallery on Earth - the Inside Coolgardie

Check out the Kalgoorlie-Boulder WA Museum, the Royal Flying Doctor’s Visitor Centre and the art galleries featuring the works of Aboriginal and Goldfields artists. Grand Hotel, Kookynie Antony Gormley Sculptures at Lake Ballard

Panning for gold

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BREAST HEALTH

Published with the permssion of JEAN HAILES FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH

Jean Hailes: BREAST HEALTH - what’s normal and what changes to look for. Breasts come in all shapes and sizes. One may be larger than the other, a different shape to the other or you may have an inverted (pulled in) nipple or nipples. Breasts can also change a great deal throughout life at different ages and life stages. Breasts can even change over the course of your menstrual cycle, feeling different on day 1 compared to day 14. When it comes to breast health, the important thing to learn is what’s normal for you. We spoke to Jean Hailes specialist Dr Sonia Davison to learn what breast changes are to be expected throughout life and when you should seek advice from a health professional. NORMAL BREAST CHANGES DURING LIFE From adolescence through to menopause, your breast tissue is influenced by hormones. When your hormone levels fluctuate – for example, due to your menstrual cycle, becoming pregnant or breastfeeding – this can cause your breasts to look or feel different.

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“Many women find their breasts become tender and lumpy just before their period, and the pain or tenderness goes away when their period is over,” says Dr Davison. “This pattern or cycle of change is very common and quite normal. “It’s also normal for breasts to feel lumpy generally. This is referred to as fibrocystic breast condition, where the lumps are non-cancerous and can occur in one or both breasts. Fibrocystic breast condition is very common and thought to affect more than 60% of women. “However, any new lump or change in the breast needs to be properly assessed, so if you notice a change it is recommended that you see your doctor for further assessment.” Breastfeeding can bring very obvious changes to your breasts. Any issues such as mastitis (breast/nipple infection), cracked nipples or latching pain that are affecting your ability to feed, your health or the health or your baby should be discussed with your maternal health nurse or doctor.

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WELLBEING JEAN H A ILES for WOMEN’S HEA LTH

In the perimenopausal years, when women transition from regular periods to their final period (menopause), women often experience increased breast tenderness or discomfort because of the changes in hormone levels, says Dr Davison. “After menopause, breast tissue is largely replaced by fatty tissue,” she says. “This change can alter the feel of your breasts and they often become softer, less dense and with less structure.”

SIGNS &

Symptoms IF YOU EXPERIENCE OR NOTICE ANY OF THESE SIGNS, SEE YOUR DOCTOR:

GET TO KNOW YOUR BREASTS Dr Davison urges all women to get to know their own breasts. “It’s important to become familiar with the normal look and feel of your breasts,” she says. “That way you will learn what is normal for you and if any changes outside of ‘your normal’ have occurred.”

• A new lump or lumpiness in your breast or armpit • Thickening or swelling of part of your breast • Irritation or dimpling of your

Dr Davison reminds us that there is no right or wrong way to check your breasts for any changes. “Start just by getting used to it and getting into the habit of it,” she says. “Look at your breasts and feel them regularly – about once a month is a good aim.

breast skin • Redness or flaky skin in your nipple area or your breast • Pulling in of your nipple or pain

“Remember to check all parts of your breast, including your nipples, armpits and upper chest, being aware of any changes that are different for you. “Having something slippery on your skin, like water or a body moisturiser, can help when you are feeling your breasts. Many women do this in the bath or shower or before getting dressed.”

in your nipple area • Unexpected nipple discharge • Any change in the size or the shape of your breast • An unusual pain in any area of your breast

If you wish to follow a suggested guide on examining your breasts, visit www.jeanhailes.org.au and search ‘breast checks’.

Sourced from BCNA webpage

If you do notice a change, try not to panic. Most changes to your breasts are unlikely to be breast cancer or another serious disease, but be sure to discuss it with your doctor as soon as possible to rule it out.

For women seeking further health information please visit

www.jeanhailes.org.au toll free number 1800 JEAN HAILES (532 642)

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SEASONAL PRODUCE

Sweet as Honey AU T U M N G OL D

Even though throughout history man and animals have plundered beehives for a taste of honey, the honeybee has survived and adapted to climates and conditions far removed from that where bees were first recorded.

HISTORY If we journey back 4000 years to ancient Egypt, hieroglyphics show the story of the bee’s life. So primitive man had discovered the delight of honey by then — for centuries it was the only sweetener available. In the 4th century B.C., Aristotle wrote of the bee. Three hundred years later Virgil the poet and Pliny the naturalist, carried the story further. In England under Saxon rule, honey was accepted by some landlords as part-payment for rent from tenants. The bee had truly earned a valuable place in society. In 1792 a blind naturalist, Huber, published a book in Geneva on bees and honey. The honey industry that we know today began to grow. Sixty years later in Philadelphia, Lorenzo Lorraine Langstroth, a minister and teacher, invented a new kind of beehive. It was a rectangular wooden

box in which he stood a row of frames. Each frame provided a place for bees to build the wax cells that form the honeycomb. The frames could be taken out separately so that one honeycomb could be removed without hurting the others. The Langstroth hive is used by all Australian beekeepers today. INTRODUCING THE BEE TO AUSTRALIA The honeybee is not native to Australia. The colonists who came to Australia in its early days missed so many of the comforts and treats of “home” (England), they tried to introduce many of them to their new country. Plants, trees, animals, birds and many other reminders of home were introduced during those early years. In the early 1820’s the honeybee was brought to Australia aboard the ship Isabella. She arrived in our waters in 1822 and adapted so successfully that other bee species were introduced from Italy, Yugoslavia and North America. OUTSTANDING ENGINEERS Bees are inspired engineers. Each wax cell in the comb has six sides and all cells have a slight backward tilt so that the honey will not spill out. Wax cells average 140 to the one centimetre in thickness and each cell fits snugly against its neighbour on all sides — a construction so strong and cleverly planned down to the most minute detail that we never cease to find the work of these little creatures truly amazing. Source: Australian Honey Bee Industry Council

FIVE FUN FACTS

1. A colony can contain between 20,000 and 60,000 bees, but only one queen bee. 2. There are three types of bees; queen, worker and drone. 3. Honey means ‘enchant’ in Hebrew. 4. Bees have two separate stomachs; one for food and another just for nectar. 5. Honeybees never sleep and they communicate by dancing and using pheromones. R R R N E T WO R K

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SEASONAL PRODUCE AU T U M N G OL D

w

APPLE TART

i

ney syrup o h th

Create this simple and delicious tart at a moment’s notice. INGREDIENTS Block of frozen puff pastry, thawed. 50 grams butter, softened 1 egg yolk 70 grams almond meal 1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste 200ml runny honey 2 Pink Lady apples, sliced wafter thin 1 sprig of rosemary Whipped or double cream to serve STEP 1. Preheat oven to 200°C. Line an oven tray with non-stick baking paper. Roll out pastry to a 30cm diameter, 3mm thick round and place on baking tray.

STEP 2. Place butter, egg yolk, almond meal, vanilla and ¼cup honey in a bowl and beat with a spoon until smooth. Spread the mixture over the pastry. STEP 3. Decoratively arrange the apple slices onto the mixture, overlapping the edges. Bake for 20 minutes or until the pastry edges are golden and crisp. STEP 4. Place the rosemary and remaining ⅓ cup (80ml) honey in a pan over low heat, swirling to melt. Drizzle over the tart, serve with cream. Enjoy!

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regional snap shots

BECOME A MEMBER Join the RRR Network as a member; become actively engaged with rural, regional and remote women to support and contribute to the economic and social wellbeing of their communities.

SAY HE LLO Simply photograph yourself somewhere in WA then visit www.rrrnetwork.com.au and follow the links on the MAGAZINE tab. We’d love to see your backyard!

The annual membership fee is $220. Members over the age of 18, who have paid their membership by the 30th June, can nominate for a position on

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Monkey Mia on Australia’s Coral Coast, where dolphins come to play close to shore! Travel writer Lorna Hendy tells the story of getting up close to Monkey Mia’s world-famous dolphins in an extraordinary marine life encounter. www.bit.ly/2RV27 VD Image: @jessfussell via Instagram

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Anyone can subscribe to the RRR Network and register to receive a digital copy of the quarterly RRR Network Magazine via our website. Subscribers can elect to receive a printed hard copy of the magazine at a cost of $40 per annum for 4 editions

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The 2019 Busselton Jetty Swim saw over 3,000 competitors and participants take part in a variety of swims. The first female over the line was Jamie Bowler, with a record-breaking time of 43:19:06, and finishing 7th overall in the Solo Swim. The Busselton Jetty Swim is 3.6km and is the longest the Southern Hemisphere. www.busseltonjettyswim.com.au

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HE RURAL, REGIONAL, REMOTE WOMEN’S NETWORK OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA ACKNOWLEDGES THE AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES OF THIS NATION. WE ACKNOWLEDGE THE TRADITIONAL CUSTODIANS OF THE LANDS ON WHICH OUR COMPANY IS LOCATED AND WHERE WE CONDUCT OUR BUSINESS. WE PAY OUR RESPECTS TO ANCESTORS AND ELDERS, PAST AND PRESENT. THE RURAL, REGIONAL, REMOTE WOMEN’S NETWORK OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA IS COMMITTED TO HONOURING AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES’ UNIQUE CULTURAL AND SPIRITUAL RELATIONSHIPS TO THE LAND, WATERS AND SEAS AND THEIR RICH CONTRIBUTION TO SOCIETY. SOURCE: www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/ spirituality/welcome-to-country-acknowledgement-of-country IMAGE: Frances Andrijich Margaret River region - Yallingup • Canal Rocks www.australiassouthwest.com

T

THE LAST WORD UNTIL NEXT TIME

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SECTION E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

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W

e have a proud 21-year history of supporting and celebrating Western Australian women and their families who live and work outside of

the Perth metropolitan area. In 2016 the RRR Network transitioned from a WA State government advisory board to an independent incorporated entity. Our focus is every woman living in a rural, regional, or remote community in Western Australia. We have a subscriber base of over 10,000 individuals, businesses and community organisations who receive this quarterly glossy magazine from us and an active social media following.

I

IMAGE: Frances Andrijich Australia’s South West • Manjimup

FOR RUR AL , REG IONAL & REMOTE WES TERN AUS TR ALIAN WOMEN WA’s pre-eminent communication network for inspiring & connecting regional women; championing their role in our communities and advocating on their behalf.

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RRR Network Quarterly - Autumn 2019  

RRR Network Quarterly publication is for Rural, Regional and Remote West Australian Women. WA's pre-eminent communication network for inspi...

RRR Network Quarterly - Autumn 2019  

RRR Network Quarterly publication is for Rural, Regional and Remote West Australian Women. WA's pre-eminent communication network for inspi...