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WINTE R 201 8

FO R RU R A L , R EG I O N A L & R EMOTE WE S TE R N AU S TR A LI A N WOME N

empowering young women BUSINESS, TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

the good books HEALTH & WELL BEING

Darrilyn Gordon

2018 WA AGRIFUTURESâ„¢ RURAL WOMAN of the YEAR


THE HEALTH OF THOSE WE LOVE STARTS WITH US

03–07 SEPTEMBER WOMEN’S HEALTH WEEK 2018 Putting the wellbeing of others ahead of our own is something many women do without realising. Jean Hailes’ annual Women’s Health Week is a time to invest in ourselves and make our own good health a priority.

SIGN UP TO:

womenshealthweek.com.au

For trusted, practical tools and resources to help you start making positive changes that can last a lifetime.

#womenshealthweek

Jean Hailes is supported by funding from the Australian Government.


I

am one of the fortunate people who lives in a wonderful regional town and gets to work from home in a job I love. The RRR network office is currently housed on my family farm near Margaret River. By any measure it is a great place to live and work.

is to “Act, Belong, Commit” and these women were the very embodiment of that mantra. What has become clear however is they were living with a man- a husband, a father, a grandfather -who was clearly struggling and troubled. I do not have any insight into their private lives, or what help they may have sought, but I know that access to mental health services is much harder outside of a city, and I am sure there many women in our communities struggling to understand how they might support or help a loved one. I would urge you all, as a first step to reach out and ask for help. A good starting point might be - www.thinkmentalhealthwa.com.au

Sadly, my little corner of the world was rocked to it’s core recently. My home office is just off Osmington Road. If that name sounds familiar it is because Osmington Road has now become synonymous with a family tragedy that unfolded on the Friday before Mother’s Day. I want to be clear that, despite living only a few kilometres away, I did not personally know the Miles/Cockman family who died in an apparent murder/suicide on that Friday.

Jackie Jarvis Chief Executive Officer

What I do know, is that the women in that family, a mother and an adult daughter, were loved by many and well connected to their communities. They had a network of friends and were active and involved in community groups. We know the mantra of improving mental health

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Rural, Regional, Remote Women’s Network of Western Australia www.rrrnetwork.com.au

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COVER Shane Pickett wtih Darrilyn Gordon’ The 2018 WA AgriFutures™ Rural Woman of the Year

Wooramel Station stay

THE BOARD CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

SUBMISSIONS, ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES

Jackie Jarvis (Margaret River)

GENERAL ENQUIRIES & SUBSCRIPTIONS

admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

CHAIR

PRODUCTION, DESIGN & ARTWORK

Lyn Farrell (Bunbury)

Wilderness Publishing

SECRETARY

Fiona Palmer (Pingaring)

PRINTING

TREASURER

A+L Printers Bunbury WA

Debbie Dowden (Mount Magnet)

PUBLISHED BY COMMITTEE

RRR Regional Network RMB 790 Wirring Road, Margaret River WA

Maria Bolten Magnay (Kununurra) Anna Oades (Donnybrook) Sue Middleton (Wongan Hills)

www.rrrnetwork.com.au

All content is subject to copyright and may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. Opinions represented in RRR Regional Network Quarterly are not necessarily those of the publisher. RRR Regional Newtwork Quarterly is published seasonally. PEFC Certified Printing

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Dowering GWN7 Field Days Kate Drennen Photography

Bullara Station stay

CONTENTS 01 - WELCOME

24 - AROUND THE REGIONS

The Winter Issue

A round-up of community based happenings

THE QUARTERLY

34 - TRAVEL & ADVENTURE From the Gibb River Road to the Sahara Desert

04 - AGRIFUTURES™ WA RURAL WOMAN OF THE YEAR The inspirational Darrilyn Gordon

38 - THE WORK PLACE Staffing, Crisis Management,

48 - CELEBRATING WOMEN

8 - THE POWER AND THE PASSION Meet Natalie Browning first female grower Director elected to the Board of CBH Group

Women taking their places at the top

48 - HEALTH & WELL BEING

12 - WA WOMEN’S HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES Meet the Honour Roll of Western Australian women leaving their mark.

Information and insights

54 - SEASONAL PRODUCE Moora Citrus, enjoying the bounties of Western Australia

19 - NEWS & REVIEWS

60 - WRAP UP

Books, podcasts and social media Seeking out interesting & entertaining

Subscriptions & Reader Contributions

22 - NETWORK CALENDAR Dates and details for what’s on in Western Australia

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Darrilyn Gordon

By Fleur Chapman

Ngunjiwirri Aboriginal Corporation banner, Lamboo is home to a cattle station and gold mine. Darrylin is the youngest on the Board of Directors at Lamboo and offers business administration support at the station, as well as helping out with operations, planning and coordinating activities wherever needed. Darrylin also works as an Indigenous Community Alcohol and Drug Worker for the Kimberley Mental Health Service. She has a young son, as well as lots of nieces and nephews for whom she strives to be a consistent source of inspiration, hope and positive role-modelling as she tirelessly works to enact change for good throughout her community.

Meet Darrylin Gordon, in incredibly bright young Aboriginal woman with a vision to shake up the way traditional land management and employment opportunities for her people are conducted in WA’s far north. At just 26, Darrylin is the 2018 Western Australia winner of the AgriFutures™ Rural Women’s Awards, and it is very easy to see why. The AgriFutures™ Rural Women’s Award acknowledges the essential role women play in rural industries, business and communities across the country, with each state and territory winner receiving a bursary for an innovative idea or project that will benefit their industry and community. Darrylin’s idea fits the bill precisely.

Lamboo Station belongs to the Jaru people, and as one of the traditional owners of the land, Darrylin is passionate about her country and has some incredible plans to use her knowledge,

Darrylin lives and works at Lamboo Station, located approximately 50km from Hall’s Creek in the Mueller Ranges. Run under the R R R N E T WO R K

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THE QUARTERLY T H E AGR I F U T U R E S™ WA RU R A L WOM A N OF T H E Y E A R skills, passion and connections to better the lives of many people around her. She is one of a growing group of Aboriginal women challenging gender barriers and enacting change for a brighter future for local young people. As Darrylin explains, traditionally, management of cattle stations tends to be treated as a lifestyle rather than a business. It is time to divide the two and step over some of the cultural boundaries; while maintaining traditional values and practices is incredibly important and cannot be lost to the business world, a station needs to still be able to bring value to the community and operate at a respectful, professional level. There are pastoral rules and regulations that must be met, correct safety procedures to educate on and enforce, and legal licensing and ticketing procedures to follow. A successful business has many benefits for the community – a solid profit means more money to give back to the people to create a better overall standard of life for all, to update infrastructure and to create training opportunities. It is this last point, creating training opportunities, that is of particular interest to Darrylin and the reason she won her award.

She is in the throes of creating a new Community Training and Empowerment Program to be run at home on Lamboo that will undoubtedly change the lives of everyone who walks through the doors. Having worked in housing services, welfare and counselling agencies in Halls Creek, she has seen all too often the shortfalls of current work-ready programs, particularly for Aboriginal people. Her vision is to implement a holistic training program, where participants will come to live at Lamboo for a short period of time and build the skills they need to find (and keep) employment. To many of us, employment training simply means learning the job skills, getting the tickets and perhaps putting in some work experience hours. For Darrylin, this means so much more. Her program uniquely integrates building self-respect and pride, working through culturally-pertinent issues and boosting resilience and life skills. It is only then that job training, and ultimately long-term employment, can also be successful. It is hoped that this program can go a long way to helping to break the cycle of unemployment, poverty and associated problems that

L to R Anna Oades; Lyn Farrell; Maria Bolten Magnay; Fiona Palmer; Darrilyn Gordon; Sue Middleton; Jackie Jarvis; Debbie Dowden


THE QUARTERLY T H E AGR I F U T U R E S™ WA RU R A L WOM A N OF T H E Y E A R

Darrilyn congratulated by other finalists

Darrilyn’s proud family Uncle -Robin Yeeda, Dad-Murray Gordon, Mum -Georgina Yeeda

plague too many of Darrylin’s people.

Building practical skills is the final component of the program. For some, learning life skills will be high on the list of priorities, such as cooking, cleaning and hygiene. Lamboo has the unique facilities to offer experience across construction, mining and pastoral industries, providing the perfect mix for practical skill building that translates to a range of industries outside. Darrylin has plans to work with other training organisations in the future which will further complement her goals, such as licensing services and ticketing agencies. This will help ensure participants have everything they need on board to be work-ready when they leave.

Participants will leave “shiny and new” from their time at Lamboo, empowered and encouraged to move forward and “do good” back in the community. Darrylin explains she has found that many people want to do good. They have the abilities and the want to make positive change, but often lack the confidence or skills to do so. On a practical level, finding meaningful and longterm employment is a perpetual concern to Aboriginal people in remote areas also because there are very few opportunities to gain skills and experience. How can one be expected to head off and get a job without previous experience, tickets, licences or skills to put forward? Couple this with cultural considerations such as intergenerational trauma and often complex family situations, and the task becomes even more difficult. However, Darrylin believes that where there are high levels of education and support, there is virtually no gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians when it comes to employment opportunities.

Amongst all of this, Darrylin has faced challenging traditional gender roles in the male-dominated pastoral industry. Women work just as hard on the land as their male counterparts, but it is only in the past few years they have stepped up and begun taking on management roles in the Indigenous pastoral industry. They are fighting for change and Darrylin is leading the way in empowering not only other women, but encouraging Aboriginal men to see and respect gender equality too. As well as her work at Lamboo and in Halls Creek, Darrylin has a busy schedule networking, training herself and speaking out about the good things happening at Lamboo. Through this work, Darrylin and her supporters are inspiring and encouraging other communities and businesses to take ownership and work in solidarity towards more financial independence, economic success and ultimately healthier families.

Physically living on the land is a very important part of the program. Being on country allows people to heal, to get back in touch with traditional practices, to reconnect with the earth and be with people who understand. As Darrylin is from the country herself, she has the knowledge, respect and connections to deliver a successful program tailored to her people that complement, not conflict, with modern-day needs. Participants will have the unique experience of a “wrap-around” service here. Agencies such as drug and alcohol counselling, housing support services, mental health services and legal assistance can be brought right to site to support, educate and upskill.

R R R N E T WO R K

Sarah Klahn-Jolley; Darrrylin Gordon

Through healing, support and practical skills, there is a new hope in the north. The passion, dedication and sheer hard work this lady has shown is incredible, and her journey is really only just beginning.

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THE QUARTERLY T H E AGR I F U T U R E S™ WA RU R A L WOM A N OF T H E Y E A R

Paula Pownell (Finalist); Bill Ryan (AgriFututes); Sophie Dwyer (Finalist); Todd Cardy (CBH), Darrilyn Gordon (winner); Carol Redford (finalist); Wade Krawczyk (Westpac)

Georgina Yeeda, Murray Gordon, Darrilyn Gordon, Robin Yeeda, Shane Pickett

Dr William Ryan, Board Member AgriFutures Australia, Darrilyn Gordon, The Hon. Alannah MacTiernan MLC, Minister for Regional Development; Agriculture and Food.

Darrilyn Gordon with The Hon. Kerry Sanderson AC, Governor of WA (term ended 1.05.18)


the power &the

passion Written by REBECCA LAWSON

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THE QUARTERLY N ATA L I E BROW N I NG - T H E POW E R A N D T H E PA S SION

“Y

ou’ll never get any pessimism out of me!”

“You’ll never get any pessimism out of me!”

have it good here in this state,” she said.

It’s an exclamation when quizzed about the future of Western Australia’s grain industry that typifies Natalie Browning’s can-do attitude, which helped propel her to become the first female grower Director elected to the Board of CBH Group.

From then on, her transition to farming kicked off with less nursing shifts and more time on her husband’s farm, doing a wide range of jobs from admin, financial management and logistics to on the paddock and delivering grain to CBH sites.

“As long as we’re always striving to improve and not be complacent or rest on our laurels, we can definitely overcome any challenges,” she said.

“Once I started working on the farm, I absolutely loved it.” Her path to the CBH boardroom started in 2012, when she was invited to be one of eight participants with the Rabobank Client Council – a group analysing and discussing solutions with Rabobank management over industry and rural community issues such as long term industry capacity, sustainability, rural health and the rural/ urban divide.

Natalie’s optimism for WA’s grain industry stems from a passion for farming she found a little later in life that has now grown to multiple industry and community roles she squeezes in-between the 6,400 hectare crop farm she owns and runs with her husband, Karl. A self-proclaimed ‘townie’ from Kondinin where her parents own and operate a mechanical business, Natalie’s exposure to farming came through Karl, a fourth generation farmer.

The spot on the council sparked an interest in strategy and governance, and further propelled her passion towards industry and community roles that looked to the sustainability and future of WA’s agriculture sector.

Before fully committing to the farmers’ life, she had studied and worked as a nurse but came to a cross roads when she was offered a scholarship to become a registered nurse.

“Farming is in my husband’s blood and I share that passion with him, and when I get passionate, I want to contribute and get more involved,” Natalie enthuses. She then travelled to Japan, China and Vietnam as part of CBH’s Grower Study Tour in 2014 and saw firsthand the international grain industry that WA growers were playing in, which prompted her to join the co-operative’s Growers Advisory Council.

“I came into nursing as it was in demand at that point in time but it wasn’t really my passion. So I decided to put it all on hold and join my partner on a trip to Canada.” It was during that trip – where Karl and his friend worked a grain harvest – that made Natalie recognise the expertise and knowledge of WA farmers.

“Once I learned more about CBH, I was really keen to be involved because I wanted to do everything possible to maintain and strengthen our industry and see it be successful in the international space.” However it wasn’t without some self-doubt.

“Ever since that trip, it made me appreciate Western Australia’s grain industry so much more and made me realise that we really do

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“We have a fantastic industry and I feel really lucky to be a part of it” L-R: Natalie Browning, Noah Browning (aged 8), Karl Browning, Chloe Browning (aged 3) and Jace Browning (aged 10).

Natalie confesses that in every role she has ever done, the biggest limiting factor was that she almost didn’t go for the role. But all that is swept aside when she’s in her first meeting and the self-belief of “this is where I’m meant to be” settles in. “My one piece of advice for those who may be deciding on whether to be more involved is be brave enough to put your hand up because sometimes that’s the biggest challenge - having the self confidence in yourself,” she said. “We need people to stick their hand up to do the work and contribute to the industry, to strengthen it and tackle the challenges coming from lower cost grain producing countries like Russia, which are targeting our key markets. “We need to make our industry strong and sustainable for future generations – I would love to add a fifth generation to our farming history. “We have a fantastic industry and I feel really lucky to be a partof it.”

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CBH GROUP PROUDLY SUPPORTING GRAIN GROWING COMMUNITIES. WA growers and their communities are the lifeblood of our industry. No-one understands this better than the CBH Group. That’s why every year, CBH invests more than $1.5 million to contribute to the vitality, development, wellbeing and safety of these regions. cbh.com.au PUBLIC Silo Trail Albany, 2018, Photograph by Bewley Shaylor

Where can you buy

Moora Citrus? everywhere!

(...in Western Australia)

If you can’t find it in your local supermarket or greengrocer,

make sure you ask for it! Your local fresh produce manager

can source it fresh for you. Our season is May to December.

look for this sticker Get our fruit in your country town R R R N E T WO R K

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WA WOMEN’S

Hall of Fame SUE MIDDLETON

CELEBRATING WOMEN & THEIR ACHIEVEMENTS The 2018 induction ceremony was held in the Ballroom at Government House, in the presence of the Hon. Simone McGurk MLA, Minister for Women’s Interests, and distinguished guests. Fourteen inspirational women were honoured including these amazing regional women.

Recognised as an entrepreneur, skilled advocate, and highly influential leader within regional and rural Australia. At age 22, Sue set her life goal to “create prosperity in RRR Australia”, and she has worked continuously to achieve this over the last 28 years. Sue is part of a diversified family farm based at Wongan Hills in the Wheatbelt, who run a broad acre cropping business, a pork production enterprise, and are best known for developing Moora Citrus, a greenfields horticulture business in the Dandaragan/ Moora area. Needless to say, Sue is passionate about developing agriculture across WA, and sees the northern corridor from Perth to Geraldton as being a high intensity agriculture area within the next 20 years. Sue has also been an active leader and advocate across many sectors. She is currently Chair of Country Arts WA, on the RRR Board, WA Telstra Regional Advisory Committee and was recently appointed to the FRRR (Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal). Sue has wide reaching and practical change management experience across many sectors and communities and runs a consulting company from the family farm (although like many rural women lives in her car), which assist groups to develop new business models to achieve growth, and financial sustainability. She is a passionate advocate for other rural women and believes they are the key resource to managing change in communities and industries.

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THE QUARTERLY WA Women’s H A L L OF FA M E Inductees

2018 Inductees Written by GINA CHURCH - WA WOMENS HALL OF FAME

KELLY HOWLETT

IRENE HOOPER AM

The Care For Hedland Environmen-

POSTHUMOUS INDUCTEE

tal Association operates in Port Hedland, home of the world’s

The late Irene Hooper AM

largest bulk-tonnage export

was born in 1925 and grew

port. It is also home to Flatback

up on the family farm near

Turtles, which only breed on

Lake Grace. She was a member

beaches and islands of northern Aus-

of the CWA for nearly 70 years.

tralia. It is one of only six marine turtle

During this time, she also served

species found in WA, and they are

as the National President of CWA

all threatened.

Australia, and became a Life Member of the Associated Country Wom-

It is commonly thought in the Port Hedland community that there

en of the World. Holding a pilot’s license, Mrs Hooper was known as the

would be no Flatback Turtles still nesting in the area today, if not for Kelly

“Flying President”, as she flew her plane Romeo Whiskey to many CWA

Howlett’s intervention, continued ongoing monitoring, data collection,

Branches around the State. She worked tirelessly for CWA and amongst

and communication of findings.

many other achievements is credited with opening new holiday homes at

In 2003, at 26 years of age, Kelly Howlett founded and formed the

Albany, updated the holiday home in Dongara, opened a new centre in

Care For Hedland Environmental Association which celebrates its’

Gidgegannup and oversaw extensions in Mt Helena.

15th birthday in June this year. During this time, Kelly has offered her

Her tireless community work did not stop there. Mrs Hooper also served

volunteer services as Chairperson, contributing significant time, personal

as a Councillor for the Wongan-Ballidu Shire, was a Justice of the Peace,

resources, energy, and passion towards the Association.

member of the WA Week Council, served on the Government Advisory

In 2009 Kelly was elected the Mayor of the Town of Port Hedland a role

Committee when Aussat was being established, and the Adult Literacy

she held until retiring from the position in 2016.

Board. Mrs Hooper was awarded a CWA Honorary Life Membership in 1984 and Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in 1985.

Today she is the Chief Executive Officer of Bloodwood Tree Association Inc, an Aboriginal not-for-profit organisation which provides support for

Mrs Hooper passed away in May 2017. A plaque in memorial

vulnerable, at risk, alcohol and drug affected members of the commu-

of Mrs Hooper and her incredible years of service to community

nity. Kelly Howlett is a dedicated, passionate and energetic volunteer

will be erected at Middleton Beach in Albany.

who has given, and continues to give, so much of her time back to her community of Port Hedland.

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THE QUARTERLY WA Women’s HALL OF FAME Inductees

NICOLA FORREST Nicola Forrest is driven by the philosophy that the best way to solve a problem is to prevent it. “Philanthropy is a powerful tool to illicit change – through philanthropy we can reconsider our approach to controversial areas, interesting projects or problems previously considered too hard to solve,” Nicola says. “But Philanthropy is most effective in driving social change when it drills into the root of an issue. Why treat the symptoms when you can eliminate the cause?” As the chief executive of Minderoo Foundation, which Nicola co-founded in 2001 with her husband Andrew, Nicola has focused on building stronger communities through early intervention and education. Under Nicola's leadership, Minderoo has committed $645 million across philanthropic initiatives. March 2018 marked the launch of an unprecedented publicprivate partnership between Minderoo, Telethon Kids Institute and the West Australian state government. Spearheaded by Nicola, the Early Years Initiative will trial new approaches to child development in four priority communities – three from regional or remote locations. These approaches will be community-led, evidence-based and implemented and Nicola Forrest

measured over a decade. The aim of the partnership is to inform large scale policy and service delivery change across the public sector in Western Australia, and potentially, across the country. “I grew up in regional NSW, so I am acutely aware of the challenges

children and families from the beginning of life, I am confident we can

faced by rural and remote communities and passionate about ensuring

stop serious social, health and economic issues from continuing to hold

the future wellbeing of all Australians,” Nicola says. “By working with

back future generations.”

T

hroughout the history of our State, Western Australian women have left their mark. The WA Women’s Hall of Fame was launched in 2011, as part of WA’s centenary celebrations for International Women’s Day, to recognize and promote the significant contributions of women to Western Australia’s history, culture and communities. Acknowledging and celebrating the difference they have made to the lives of others as both leaders, and mentors, providing positive role-models and encouragement to the young women of our future. These inspiring women come from all walks of life, diverse cultural backgrounds and all regions in this State. We all know an outstanding woman who simply goes about her daily life doing remarkable things which bring about positive change in a multitude of ways. Often unnoticed, I encourage you to consider nominating them for induction to the WA Women’s Hall of Fame in 2019. Nominations open in December www.wawomenshalloffame.com.au WRITTEN BY FIONA REID

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THE QUARTERLY WA Women’s HALL OF FAME Inductees

DR TRACY WESTERMAN Dr Westerman’s inspiration goes beyond her incredible success and achievement as a psychologist. She is a person who has overcome significant disadvantage and stands as a role model to Aboriginal people, those from remote backgrounds, females, and those who struggle with a lack of familial advantage to achieve in life. Dr Westerman was born in the remote area of the Murchison in Western Australia – her mother, as an Aboriginal woman had to obtain citizenship of her own country in 1964, as most Aboriginal people experienced. Both of her parents did not go past year three education. She also had to undertake much of her high school and tertiary entrance by school of the air and is now considered to be a world leader in her field. Dr Westerman has successfully run her business IPS – Indigenous Psychological Services for 20 years without government funding and has now trained over 22,000+ clinicians in her culturally appropriate mental health approaches. Astoundingly, she has selffunded research and intervention programs into chronically impacted Aboriginal communities a direct reflection of her desire

Dr Tracy Westerman Government House of Western Australia

to ‘reduce the burden of suicide and mental ill health in Aboriginal communities.

if they believed in themselves. This video was viewed over 76,000

Dr Westerman used the opportunity of

times. Her message was, and always will be, “I stand as an example

being named Western Australia’s finalist in the 2018 Australian of

that anything is possible as Aboriginal people if we believe in ourselves

the Year Awards, to post a video which reinforced the message that

strongly enough”.

all Aboriginal, rural and remote and / or females could be deadly too

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THE QUARTERLY WA Women’s HALL OF FAME Inductees

WA Women’s Hal of Fame Inducttees and official guests

Kelly Howlett

Irene Hooper AM

Government House, Western Australia

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THE QUARTERLY WA Women’s HALL OF FAME Inductees

PATRICIA BARBLETT AM

HELEN CREED is the

Chair of Regional Early Education

protection of WA’s unique environment. She

and Development- a new initiative

was the first woman appointed to the Rottnest

bringing children’s services in the Wheat-

Island Authority Board, serving on the Board

belt together under a regional management

for 16 years, and chairing it for 3 years before

structure. Originally a social worker, Helen

retiring in 1993. She was awarded the Sir David

gained a high public profile as the WA Secre-

Brand Medal in the WA Tourism Awards in

tary of the Miscellaneous Workers Union (now

2003 and was made a Member of the Order

United Voice) during the 1990s and repre-

developed her own earth sciences program, the

of Australia and received the Prime Minister’s

sented working women at both the national and

Centre of Resources Excellence (CoRE), an

Medal in 2004.

international level. She has held senior State

innovative STEM educational program at Kent

HAZEL BUTORAC OAM JP spent the first 12-years of her married

government positions, worked in peak commu-

Street Senior High School and was recognised

nity sector organizations and sits on a number

for her phenomenal work as a science teacher

of Boards and Committees.

with the Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence

TERRIE GOMBOC has had a

in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools in

life in regional WA supporting her Engineer husband. She then spent decades volunteering

le t on

is a leader in the field of conservation and

i M

dd

The Hon. Simo

MLA ne McGurk

wit

ue hS

SUZY MAREE URBANIAK

2016. She is now working on a project to bring

for women’s refuges and was the Inaugural

significant impact in the world of art, sculpture

Chairperson of the Midland Women’s Health

and sculptors in WA. For over 35-years, she

Care Place (MWHCP). Hazel was the Director

has volunteered her time to develop, run and

of the Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) and she

manage the Gomboc Gallery and Sculpture

has been actively involved in the creation and

Park, both of which provide much-needed

continuation of many community organisa-

exhibition space for established and emerging

(Noongar) daughter with links, through her

tions including the Soroptimists International;

WA artists and sculptors. Since 1982, Terrie

grandmother, to the Kitja people of the East

Mature Adults Learning Association, Tales of

has inspired, mentored, and supported over

Kimberley. Her music is informed by an ancient

Times Past Senior Storytellers, and Council on

1,295 sculptors, assisting ‘the person’ as well

Indigenous culture drawn from a deep well

the Ageing.

as ‘the artist’. Continuing her work, Terrie is

West Australian, and personal history. From

PROF. CHRISTOBEL SAUNDERS is an outstanding inter-

currently preparing for their 35th Annual

her early work as a news presenter, to an

Sculpture Survey.

award-winning singer-songwriter, her dedication to preserving the Noongar language, and

who has performed research for 25 years,

DR ANN O’NEILL has champi-

oned the cause of women and those suffering

including practice changing clinical trials of

from abuse and community victims of violence

new treatments, supportive care, translational

for the last 20 years. Having experienced

and health services research which have led to

domestic violence, Ann established the Victims

better treatments for people with cancer and

of Crime Reference Group, was instrumental

improved survival. As a Consultant Surgeon

in the tabling of amendments to the Criminal

career in the law culminating with her appoint-

she is closely involved in strategic planning of

Injuries Compensation Act in Parliament, and

ment as Chief Justice of the Family Court of

cancer services and research in Australia and

actively involved in the Review of the Victims

Australia in July 2004. She occupied this po-

was named joint WA Premier’s Scientist of the

of Crime Act. She was integral to the estab-

sition until her retirement at the age of almost

Year in 2017.

lishment and initial development of the Hom-

70 years in 2017. Beyond her stellar career, she

icide Victims Support Group and angelhands

has advocated on behalf of women in the legal

Inc. and remains passionate about trauma

profession as founding member of the Women

recovery as a fundamental human right.

Lawyers Association of Western Australia, and

nationally renowned breast cancer surgeon

her unique style of STEM education to schools nationally, alongside her ongoing support for Young Person’s Plan for the Planet.

GINA WILLIAMS A Balladong

her work for an inclusive Australia Day, Gina has made contributions to the WA community which will have a lasting impact.

HON. DIANA BRYANT AO QC has had a long and distinguished

former Patron of Australian Women Lawyers. R R R N E T WO R K

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IMAGE:Frances Andrijich - Jesters Flat, Rosa Brook - www.australiassouthwest.com


NEWS + REVIEWS

THE LOST FLOWERS OF ALICE HART Holly Ringland - HarperCollins The most enchanting debut novel of 2018, this is an irresistible, deeply moving and romantic story of a young girl, daughter of an abusive father, who has to learn the hard way that she can break the patterns of the past, live on her own terms and find her own strength. An enchanting and captivating novel, about how our untold

ABC / TALL TALES & TRUE Another season of gutwrenching, jaw-dropping, emotionally-charged stories featuring well-known and not so well-known storytellers. Presented by Rebecca Levingston http://www.abc.net.au/radio/ programs/talltalesandtrue/

stories haunt us - and the stories we tell ourselves in order to survive. Spanning two decades, set between sugar cane fields by the sea, a native Australian flower farm, and a celestial crater in the central desert, The Lost Flowers of Alice Hart follows Alice’s unforgettable journey, as she learns that the most powerful story she will ever possess is her own.

BODY & MIND Embodying health, happiness and well being through achievable goals and inspiration in all areas of their lives. www.bodyandsoul.com.au

NICCI WAS HERE Peta West - Vivid Publishing A country town, an ordinary house, two parents and three children. A family like any other, until a series of events alters the course of their lives forever. After Peta’s father disappears, her mother must take a job in an era when women are expected to stay home. Peta discovers the shocking truth about her father - a secret she cannot discuss with anyone, not even her own sister. When their mother packs the two girls and their younger brother into the car and heads north into unknown territory, the children must adjust, gradually shedding the upheaval of the past. But just as they are adapting, an unexpected tragedy occurs, and Peta is thrust into a role she never imagined possible. Nicci Was Here is a powerful memoir of Australian childhood, told with humour and heart, and will especially resonate with those who grew up in the same era.

WIMMERA Mark Brandi - Hachette Australia In the long, hot summer of 1989, Ben and Fab are best friends. Growing up in a

@natgeoau Driven by an insatiable curiosity National Geographic Australia takes you to the places and events of an amazing world.

small country town, they spend their days playing cricket, yabbying in local dams, wanting a pair of Nike Air Maxes and not talking about how Fab’s dad hits him or how the sudden death of Ben’s next-door neighbour unsettled him. Almost teenagers, they already know some things are better left unsaid. Then a newcomer arrived. Fab reckoned he was a secret agent and they staked him out. Up close, the man’s shoulders were wide and the veins in his arms stuck out, blue and green. His hands were enormous, red and knotty. He looked strong. Maybe even stronger than Fab’s dad. Neither realised the shadow this man would cast over both their lives. Twenty years later, Fab is still stuck in town, going nowhere but hoping for somewhere better. Then a body is found in the river, and Fab can’t ignore the past any more. Reviews and links favour Australian writers and content. Featured books are available as eBooks.

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@deliciousaus An Australian food reviews and recipes for family and occasions.


NEWS + REVIEWS

SOM ET H I NG for E V E R YON E

PARKS& WILDLIFE

K

arijini National Park is WA’s second largest, covering 627,422 hectares north of the

Tropic of Capricorn and the traditional home of the Banyjima, Kurrama and Innawonga Aboriginal people. It is a place where Aboriginal land management practices, such as ‘fire stick farming’, resulted in a diversity of vegetation types and stages of succession that helped determine the nature of the plants and animals found in the park today. Massive mountains and escarpments rise out of the flat valleys where the high plateau is dissected by breathtaking gorges, and stony, tree-lined watercourses wind their way over the dusty plain. There are many beautiful gorges and sites to visit, but be sure to include Dales Gorge, Fortescue Falls, Weano Gorge and Oxers Lookout. For more information about Karijini National Park visit www.parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au/park/karijini

Karijini National Park, DPAW

Ord River Harvest

O

n any Saturday morning, throughout Western Australia the local farmers and producers make their way to their

regional farmer’s markets in town centres, parks and community spaces to sell their farm fresh harvests or products directly to locals and tourists alike. These vibrant markets connect the consumer – who delights in getting to know the source of their food – directly to farmers themselves. The popularity of the farmer’s markets is building strength in the connections that regional towns are forging with our city visitors. While some producer are less accessible to the consumers direct - send their supply of seasonal produce to our kitchens via the big and smaller sellers, including these watermelons from the Ord River. Keep

Ord River watermelons

your eye on the shelves.

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NEWS + REVIEWS S OM ET H I NG for E V E R YON E

Maggie Edmonds W

inner of the 2008 West Australian Rural Industries Regional

Development Commission Rural Women’s Award and in the same year, runner-up for the Australian Rural Women’s Award, Maggie Edmonds transitioned from farmer to stall-holder, setting up her fresh produce stall, Maggie’s Place, with the assistance of the $10,000 bursary won as a part of RIRDC Award. Sourcing fresh provisions from more than 20 regular growers and producers, Maggie’s Place offered customers farm direct shopping. Maggie moved from the Swan Valley to the seaside town of Augusta with similar aims to offer local produce. Now championing local produces of cheeses, jams and chutneys, olives and oils along with a variety of delicious treats, at 68 Maggie continues to be proud of West Australian producers, heightened by her RIRDC win and is grateful her customers

DOWERIN FIELD DAYS

who continue to value her initiative. When in Augusta, visit Maggies Place.

MEMBER SIGN-UP BEFORE JUNE 30! Support the RRR Network and actively engage with rural, regional and remote women to support and contribute to the economic and social wellbeing of their communities. APPLY TO BECOME A MEMBER

Annual membership is $220. * Members over the age of 18, who have paid their membership by the 30th June, can nominate for a position on the RRR Network Board (also known as the “committee”, as detailed in the constitution).

BECOME A MEMBER VISIT

Kate Drennen Photography

www.rrrnetwork.com.au/join-us/

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n the weekend of August 29-30 head on over to the Dowerin GWN7 Machinery

EMAIL

Field Days. Green in winter and golden in summer, Dowerin lies 156km north

admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

east of Perth and is only a two hour scenic drive from the city along the Pioneers Pathway. Upon arrival you will be greeted by Rusty their iconic rusty Tin Dog who

PHONE (08) 6316 0407

stands guard at the Western entrance to town proudly representing the spirit of this

POST PAYMENT TO:

small rural community. An event for farmers, rural folk and city dwellers alike. For

RRR NETWORK

more info please visit www.dowerinfielddays.com.au

790 Wirring Road Margaret River WA 6285

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CALENDAR W H AT’S ON in W E ST E R N AUST R A L I A

22-26 August, Busselton CINÉFEST OZ FILM FESTIVAL

Set in the seaside centres of Bunbury to the Margaret River wine region, CinéfestOZ premieres feature films and events in the region’s cinemas, wineries, small bars and galleries, making it a feast for the senses and an unforgettable five-day getaway. As a premiere destination film festival in Australia presenting a record numbers of high calibre film guests and a sensational lineup of new Australian and French films. The full festival program and ticketing will be live from July 2018! www.cinefestoz.com

2 June, Mullewa MULLEWA MUSTER & RODEO

An all ages, licenced event attracting thousands of visitors each year. The event includes a full points and prize money Rodeo, a ‘Beaut Ute’ and ‘Whip Crackin’ Competition. There’s interactive workshops, stalls and a variety of food and refreshments on site. The Country Music Concert is fun for the entire family, featuring performersTravis Collins, Amber Lawrence and WA’s own, Renegade. Plenty of room to set up a picnic blanket and share dinner from the various food stalls. Enjoy the music as the sun goes down.. Free camping is provided on site and breakfast is served on both Saturday and Sunday. TICKETS and more information via website www.mullewamuster.com.au

26 August - 2 Sept. Broome SHINJU MATSURI

Tempt your senses with an exciting whirlwind of colour, sound, taste and smell as the community shares this beautiful event. Shinju Matsuri rekindles the excitement and romance of Broome’s early days of being a world-renowned producer of South Sea Pearls when the Japanese, Chinese, Malay, Koepangers, Filipino and Europeans flocked to Broome from the late 1800’s to be a part of this prosperity. This unique multicultural population of pearl industry workers joined with the local Aboriginal people to work on up to 400 Pearling Luggers that sailed out of Broome. More information, please visit www.shinjumatsuri.com.au

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CALENDAR W H AT’S ON in W E ST E R N AUST R A L I A

What’s on?

18 August, Dwellingup ACT0-BELONG-COMMIT DWELLINGUP 100 - 10th Anniversary

The 100km Mountain Bike Classic has been carefully curated by mountain biking legend and course director Tony Tucknott, the D14, the Dwellingup 40 and the newest edition the Super 70. This esteemed event is Perth’s largest one day mountain bike race, attracting plenty of newcomers plus some of Australia’s best riders including Jason English, Andy Blair, Craig Cooke, Jodie Willett, Gracie Elvin, Jenny Fay and Stephanie Russell. A part of the National Cross Country Marathon (XCM) Series as the fifth race of the seven event series. Four distances offered to cater for all abilities from ages 8 up. www.dwellingup100.com.au

16-19 August, Nannup NANNUP FLOWER & GARDEN FESTIVAL

Nestled beside the beautiful Blackwood River, Nannup’s unique charm & relaxed rural lifestyle is the perfect wintry weekend getaway. Be inspired at the Nannup Flower & Garden Festival, as we celebrate the iconic Nannup winter flowers. Be prepared to be delighted and surprised as you wander the festival. The program includes open gardens, floral, art & quilt exhibitions, garden talks and workshops, and evokes the nostalgia of historical displays and a program for our little ones too. www.nannupgardens.org.au

15-30 September, Great Southern region SOUTHERN ART & CRAFT TRAIL

The artists, creatives, galleries and studios of the Great Southern Region swing open their doors to become a part of the Southern Art and Craft Trail. Discover visual delights, take part in one of the many creative workshops and enjoy the performances and screenings that are scheduled throughout this time and take in the many wonderful and varied galleries. More information via the website. www.southernact.com

ARTIST Catherine Brooker

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AROUND THE REGIONS YOU NG WOM E N E M POW E R E D E X PO

…inspired by a lineup of exceptional speakers and talent, including Amy Coombe, Veronica Bravo and Dr Sarah Youngson. Manjimup Indoor Recreation Stadium

The volunteers who made it happen!

Veronica Bravo - singer, songwriter and producer

Amy Coombe - inspirational speaker

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AROUND THE REGIONS SH I R E OF M A N J I M U P YOU T H N ET WOR K

young women empowered EXPO T

he Manjimup Community Resource Centre team were delighted at the success of the “Young Women Empow-

ered 2018” Expo which attracted over 300 young women. This inaugural event, held at the Manjimup Indoor Stadium on Saturday, 10th March 2018 in collaboration with the Shire of Manjimup and Warren Blackwood Youth Network, was in response to growing concerns over suicide, self-harm, bullying and self-confidence related issues for 12-18 year old women. This free event included inspiring speakers and a fashion parade and various activities including makeup tutorials, yoga classes, aromatherapy, macramé and crystal jewellery workshops, kokedama workshops, henna art and laser tag. The event resonated with so many young women, particularly a transgender female who used this event as a stepping stone to become more confident and accepted within society.

Henna Art

“It was fantastic to see so many young women attend, have fun, be enlightened and inspired by motivational speakers,” said Ranui Harris, Manager of the Manjimup CRC. “Thank you to all staff, community organisations, stall holders and volunteers for your passion and contribution.

‘‘Together

we made a difference!”

Inspiration everywhere

Written by JANE CHILCOTT Images PROVIDED & SOURCED

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Words by GEORGIA THOMAS Images PROVIDED

Life on a remote pastoral station can be hard at times but Edwina Shallcross of Bullara and Rachael Steadman of Wooramel Stations’ find inspiration is never in short supply. Faced with tough challenges on the land, both women use their unique mix of skills and experience to work with what they’ve got to create business opportunities, including the once-in-a-lifetime chance for tourists to experience the outback on a working property.

T

he family-run Bullara and Wooramel Stations’ are located in the Gascoyne, where there are around 80 stations spread across the region. The properties are on average around 150,000 hectares in size and have historically stocked large numbers of sheep for meat and wool.

“Our close proximity to Coral Bay and Exmouth put us in an ideal location for day tripping to the coast. We are also right on the main road, so people don’t have to venture too far off the track to experience a station stay,” said Edwina. Edwina says that their biggest hurdle so far would have to have been Cyclone Olwyn in 2015. “We sustained lots of structural damage to our accommodation buildings, infrastructure and stock losses, it was absolutely devastating at the time,” said Edwina.

In recent times coastal areas have had very little significant rain, meaning stock numbers have been greatly reduced and income has been hit hard. However, from adversity often comes new opportunities, as both Edwina and Rachael have experienced along the road to developing their outback tourism offerings to support their business.

“I remember the girls saying, ‘mum don’t come outside because you don’t have a garden left anymore’! Three years on and we are still cleaning up and repairing the damage. I suppose there is always good to come out of any adversity and we are rebuilding in a positive way,” she added. Wooramel Station is 120 kilometres south of Carnarvon on the North West Coastal Highway and mostly stocks cattle and goats. Wooramel River Retreat, the station’s accommodation business,

Bullara Station, located between Coral Bay and Exmouth, opened its doors to visitors in 2010 after losing 40% of their income due to the banning of live exports. Since then the accommodation side of the business has grown with new staff and amenities being added.

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AROUND THE REGIONS A TA ST E OF STAT ION L I F E

is entering its 4th year and already represents a significant income stream for the property. “We were going through another dry spell, so it was a great distraction. Our first plans were pretty low key and simple with lots of low cost up-cycling and creativity, we weren’t even sure if people would like what we had to offer as most tourism in our neck of the woods is centred on the coast. But people love the artesian baths, the great old trees, the closeness to nature and a glimpse into station life,” said Rachael. “The recent drought has led to major destocking of sheep from our property in order to regenerate the land. Diversifying into the tourism business gives us the means to continue to work the land in a sustainable way and stay on the property,” Rachael added. An extended gap year spent working in mining and hospitality turned into a whole new life for Edwina after she met her

husband-to-be at a 21st in Carnarvon and moved to Bullara soon after. Having grown up in Kojonup on a sheep farm before moving to Nallan Station near Cue, Edwina had experienced farm life from a young age. “My parents had a station stay business at Nallan Station, so I suppose this was a great introduction into tourism growing up. My sister and I would be very hands on during the school holidays (from boarding school in Perth) and we were a very social family, always having visitors to stay,” said Edwina. Trained in photography and journalism at the Queensland College of Art, Rachael also comes from a rural background, having grown up in Baradine in New South Wales on a small wheat and sheep farm on the edge of the Pilliga Forest. “I ventured over to WA to help my sister who had just had a baby. I

Edwina and Rachael

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AROUND THE REGIONS A TA ST E OF STAT ION L I F E met my husband over the radio first, helping out muster sheep. I was riding a motor bike (pretty poorly in the newly uncharted sand country which was very different to riding on normal dirt) and Justin was the pilot telling me to hurry up!” said Rachael. When asked if they prefer the farm work or the tourism side of the business, both women agree that they have the best of both worlds. The opportunity to enjoy nature while mustering cattle or goats is in complete contrast to the hustle and bustle of managing accommodation and catching up with holiday-makers every day. Rachael says spending time with happy and carefree tourists definitely gives you a good feeling. Although Edwina cautions, “I wouldn’t recommend going into tourism if you don’t love people and are prepared to give back lots of time and energy.” Looking to the future, there are no shortage of ideas for the development of Bullara and Wooramel Stations. In particular, Rachael is interested in developing an option for people to have a volunteer holiday at the property and give their time for conservation. Edwina is also lining up a range of concepts, including an enhanced food offering, plus ways to give visitors greater insights into the running of the station including the longer-term vision for an interpretation centre to showcase the history and cultural background of the pastoral region.

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“I can’t see people remembering the turn down service in a 5-star hotel, I see them remembering the stories shared around the open fire of an evening. In our busy lives it is important to have a break away from technology and get back to nature and the Coral Coast region where we live is a mecca for these experiences! We want to keep offering visitors an insight into how pastoralists live and care for our rangelands. Show kids the animals and where their food comes from… spending time on a station stay is a great way to showcase an authentic outback experience. So yes, watch this space! We have LOTS of ideas in the pipeline!!” said Edwina. Offering visitors a genuinely Aussie experience, Gascoyne stations provide affordable accommodation near world class attractions, such as the Ningaloo Reef Marine Park and World Heritage Listed Shark Bay. Tourists can experience an authentically Australian adventure amongst the native wildlife with activities such as walktrails, fishing, snorkelling and surfing. For more information visitors should get in touch with the Carnarvon Visitors Centre. The team provides tourists with detailed information about all station stays in the region , answer enquiries about accessibility and road conditions, plus shares information about extraordinary experiences including fishing, bird watching, wilderness camping, swimming and snorkelling spots.

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AROUND THE REGIONS A TA ST E OF STAT ION L I F E

Want to share an event or happenings taking place in your West Australian town or neighbourhood? Please submit your story, approx. 300 - 350 words and images to admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

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AROUND THE REGIONS WOM E N’S BUSI N E S S SUC C E S S

women’s business success Written by JANE CHILCOTT Images PROVIDED

The Quairading Community Resource Centre helped inspire confidence and competence around financial skills with the help of funding from the Grants for Women Program – Department of Local Government and Communities, at their Women’s Business event held on International Women's Day (8 March) 2018.

F

rom the very informative Samantha Hamilton (Key Choice Financial Solutions) to the inspiring Claire Gray (Rabobank) and emotively thought provoking Wendy Carter - all were very well received and set in motion the empowerment of every woman in the room.

showcased the economic diversity of the Wheatbelt, sharing an insight into their small businesses and offering inspiration to anyone considering turning their passion into a business. There was also much interest in Maree Gooch's information regarding Faster Internet for the Wheatbelt.

The crowd was delighted to receive Her Excellency the Honourable Kerry Sanderson AC Governor of Western Australia, whose sentiments regarding gender diversity echoed those of

The Quairading CRC—like many Community Resource Centres across the state—is an integral part of the community. On a tight budget they provide incredible and varied services, information,

other speakers perfectly, “Women often lack confidence to apply for roles, believing that they don’t have all the necessary attributes. Something we can all do is to help, support and mentor other women, and to give them confidence to take opportunities and to apply for new roles if they are interested.”

activities, initiatives, training, support and events; which Women’s Business was just one of. The Quairading CRC thanks and acknowledges CBH Group Grassroots Fund along with sponsorship from CSBP, Valenti Lawyers, Plum Grove, Quairading Earthmoving, Countrywide Insurance Brokers and West Civil for their contribution to making this an enjoyable and quality day out.

The women behind the successes of Manavi Farm Pastured Eggs, Rustic Events, Bee Buzzy Wraps and Whitney Consulting

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AROUND THE REGIONS WOM E N’S BUSI N E S S SUC C E S S

Lisa Thompson (Bee Buzzy Wraps), Tara Whitney (Whitney Consulting), Nicky Brennan (Rustic Events) and Robyn Cousins (Manavi Farm Pastured Eggs) sharing an insight into their small businesses.

‘‘We can support and mentor other women to give them confidence to take opportunities to apply for roles that interest them.’’

comments & reflections “The program you delivered, the care you gave to the event promotion and location and the energy and comradery that you generated were extraordinary!” Wendy Newman, CEO Wheatbelt Development Commission

"The importance of determining a goal first in your financial planning really resonated, as did the themes of backing yourself into roles that are usually male dominated." Hayley Hobbs, Plum Grove

“Amazing - so complementary to each other, on point. Light & shade, a perfect blend.” Jill Dawson, South Perth

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"It was fantastic! A great balance of serious business talks intertwined with personal stories and amazing guests and food. It had a nice personal touch, wasn't too formal or overwhelming." Amy Fuchsbichler, CBH Group

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"Food, venue superb. Speakers great. Panel fabulous. Loved the whole vibe, great group of women from around our fabulous Wheatbelt - strong, amazing women.” Lisa Fischer, Merredin


AROUND THE REGIONS WOM E N’S BUSI N E S S SUC C E S S

Shae Johnston (QCRC Secretary), Sharon Richards (QCRC Finance), Robyn Richards (QCRC Vice Chair), Tamara Spark (QCRC Reception), Her Excellency the Honourable Kerry Sanderson AC Governor of WA, Jo Hayes (QCRC Chair), Jill Hayes (QCRC Coordinator) & Melanie Mills (QCRC Finance).

Sarah Caporn, Stacey Harris and Bec Wilson (Quairading)

Quairading CRC Chairperson and MC, Jo Hayes with Samantha Hamilton of Key Choice Financial Solutions.

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The Gibb River Road is a truly unique outback adventure through vast untouched wilderness and ancient gorge country. An adventure of travel that must be seen experienced. SOURCE: AUSTRALIAS NORTH WEST

O

riginally constructed in the 1960s to

Station stays and campsites are now open and

There will also be some water still left in

transport cattle from outlying stations

ready to welcome visitors, tour operators are

the creek crossings, and we recommend

to the ports of Derby and Wyndham, the

setting out on their Gibb itineraries, and the

that travellers take particular caution when

660-kilometre 4WD trail is the best way

gorges have been refreshed by the wet season

driving through.

to discover the natural treasures of the

rains.

Kimberley’s wild heartlands. Allow yourself

• You can now book online for the Silent

The Gibb River Road is 660km of adventure,

at least 14 days to truly immerse yourself in

suited to high clearance 4WD vehicles,

the adventure at Windjana Gorge, Tunnel

campervans and camper trailers. For those

Creek, Lennard Gorge, Bell Gorge, Galvans

travellers whose caravans are not set up to

Gorge, Manning Gorge, Drysdale River Station, Home Valley Station and El Questro Wilderness Park. Or make a shortlist of your

tackle the Gibb, caravan storage is available in Derby and Kununurra.

Grove campsite (close to Bell Gorge). • Travellers on the Gibb from 11-18 May 2018 may see lots of mountain bikers taking part in the annual Gibb Challenge, raising community awareness and money for the Royal Flying Doctors.

must-see attractions for a shorter, but no less

EARLY SEASON TRAVELLERS TIPS:

exciting trip.

We recommended checking road conditions with

Road and Port Warrender Road (access

With the start of the North West’s dry season

the local visitor centre just before you set out.

to the Mitchell Plateau) - this includes

come beautiful warm days and cooler nights,

• T his is a fantastic time of year to see the

perfect for exploring the Gibb River Road.

Gibb’s waterfalls and gorges at their best.

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• Work is still underway on the Kalumburu

the section from the Gibb River Road to Drysdale River Station.


Copyright Tourism Western Australia. HOme Valley Station, Gibb River Road

Copyright Tourism Western Australia. Cockburn Ranges, Gibb River Road

TRAVEL & ADVENTURE GI BB R I V E R ROA D

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

CAMEL RIDING IN MOROCCO…

and why I’ll never do it again!

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orocco was one of the most beautiful places I have ever visited. The architecture, the tagines, and the colour, but it was also one of the most eye opening experiences. I feel like I need to emphasise that it really saddens me to write this blog, and in no way does it mean you shouldn’t visit Morocco. But it was something that hurt my heart and I feel like the message needs to be spread.

I watched as my tour guide allowed people to throw their rubbish into the Saharan sand explaining that their cigarette butts would simply blow away in the wind. As we approached camp, remnants of plastic bags and bottles became more apparent, as did millions of camel poos left in and around the camp from previous treks. The guide got the leading camel to sit down by yanking on a metal ring that was pierced through its nose. And down my camel went with another groan, into the camel poo ground. Makeshift saddle and rope still rubbing on her. There she would sit for the remainder of the night, until the next morning. When we finally finished the camel tour, I noticed the imprints of the makeshift saddles on the camel’s backs, missing hair where the saddle had been on so long it had started to rub away at the camel’s coat.

Tourism is incredibly important in Morocco. In 2016 it generated roughly 800,000 jobs in Morocco and by 2027 is predicted to generate over 2 million jobs (according to the World Travel and Tourism Council). One of its greatest tourist attractions is the beautiful Sahara Desert and there are hundreds of tour companies that offer to take you – one of the highlights being a Saharan Camel Ride. We’ve all seen it too, the photographs of people riding camels off into the Saharan sunset or sunrise. Sadly, these beautiful shots are met with a harsh reality when you visit. Upon entering the camel ‘palace’ where we would start our camel trek, I couldn’t help but notice all the camels sitting down. Tied together, and on closer inspection, tied together by rope so they could not stand up. I do not know how long they had been sitting there, but I wish I had stopped and refused the ride then.

The saddest thing about this whole experience is my ignorance, my true ignorance as a traveller in Morocco. I love animals, I truly do, and I was incredibly excited to visit the Sahara atop a camel. But I was met with images that I will never forget. I hadn’t thought to research properly and I hadn’t questioned the guide about anything. I was silent.

As soon as I sat on my camel it groaned, refused to get up. My guide tugging on its rope eventually persuaded it. I couldn’t help but notice the whole time my camel was resisting walking, pulling against its rope that’s tied to the camel in front. The more it pulled, the more the rope rubbed against its nose. And it started to bleed. Yet, the guide assured me it was okay. I then noticed that one of its ears was hanging off. Like it has been ripped, cut or bitten - I’m not sure. Its fur was matted and dirty. For an hour I sat on this ride, dumbfounded at the industry we were supporting.

The Sahara is one of the most astonishing sights I have ever seen, but will it be as beautiful for the tourists in 2027? I can’t say, not unless we travellers collectively do something. There isn’t enough out there bringing awareness to these issues.

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE T H E A DV E N T U R E S OF AY L A TR AV E L S IF YOU ARE VISITING MOROCCO I URGE YOU TO DO THE FOLLOWING: • Thoroughly examine the camels and tour agencies before doing a camel trek. This guide is really helpful, although I would avoid camel treks. Visit www.spana.org • Buy a water filter before you go as opposed to plastic bottles. Those plastic bottles will litter the desert. • Avoid buying foods with plastic packaging. • Responsibly dispose of your waste. • Speak up about what you see. Report animal mistreatment. • Don’t take sand/rocks from the desert. It’s estimated up to 40% of the rock art and landscape has been looted. We don’t need to be part of the theft. • Don’t always pick the cheaper option; animals and the environment could pay the price. I can’t think how to end this really. I don’t want you to think that you can’t visit. You can, Morocco is honestly stunning. But to ensure generations after us will still be able to see the beauty of this world, we all need to do our part. I mean what I said in the title until things get better I can’t bring myself to ride a camel ever again. But equally, this isn’t a change I can make alone. In the words of Erica Perry, as she picked up plastic water bottles on her daily beach walks. “If everyone does a little, no one has to do a lot”. Ayla Xx

Stay up to date with Ayla Travels on her social media platforms: Facebook page - ayla.travelss and Instagram @ayla.travels or check out her blog www.aylatravels.com.au

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SECTION E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

Staff

MATTERS

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THE WORK PLACE STA F F M AT T E R S

Staff are an investment, employee retention is crucial. Lets look at how to keep them! Written by HELEN WOODHAMS Rural Financial Counselling Service of Western Australia (RFCSWA)

W

hen you hire staff you’re making an investment, so employee retention is a crucial part of any small business’s success. But once you’ve employed a great set of people for your business, how do you keep them?

feedback can help improve employee performance and by giving positive feedback regularly, it makes it easier for those other times when the feedback is around improvements to be made. Additionally, providing opportunities for staff growth and improvement will significantly add to employee morale.

It’s expensive to recruit, hire and on board new employees, and the changing work landscape has made it all too common for people to jump jobs on a regular basis. For that reason it’s worth thinking about what strategies you can use to make your business the type of workplace that people want to stick with. For a small business, it’s important to build a sustainable organisation that can minimise staff turn-over and withstand the pressures of encroaching job offers from other businesses. A successful business starts with a strong culture. Businesses the world over are looking to adopt incentives that build successful business environments and positive work cultures. It isn’t necessary to go to the extreme of big expense tabs or luxury employee retreats, but it is worth having a think about how you can contribute to making your business a positive place to work. Having a well-defined mission is key to maximising your chances of keeping staff. What is it that your business aims to deliver? Your employees need to know

where they fit in the business and what the company is working toward. This helps achieve buy-in from employees and improves trust and loyalty. It also helps everyone stay focused. The saying, ‘be the change you want to see’ is an important motto when it comes to running a small business. By serving as an example for your employees you align your idea of your business’s culture with day-to-day reality. Be honest and genuine to your own ideals as a business owner and once you have an idea, be the first to follow it. Be sure to give credit where it is due and make it sincere and timely. Quality

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Team work is crucial. Your employees are likely to each have different strengths, and by encouraging them to work as a team, your business can capitalise on that. Not only does it promote engagement and deepen their understanding of other areas of the business, it also gives employees an opportunity to gain recognition and trust from colleagues. Underpinning all of this is the provision of an appropriate salary, commensurate with skills and experience. This should be aligned to the level of responsibility and reviewed at different stages. Salary not only helps attract staff, but it will contribute to keeping them if it is in line with current industry expectations. Finally, being an approachable boss, knowing your people and relating to them goes a long way to getting the best out of your employees and encouraging them to stick with your business. I hope you find some keepers!


THE WORK PLACE BUSI N E S S SU PPORT

YOUR PIT CREW A team of helpers who stand in the background, equipping us with the resources and support we need to keep us driving towards our goals. Written by MAREE MCPHERSON - Maree McPherson Consulting

CAN YOU SPOT YOUR PIT CREW?

I ask participants to trace around one hand on a sheet of paper.

In car racing, drivers need to stop at various

encourage our curiosity - to ask more. Naomi Maltby is a South Australian Saloon

intervals to refuel, change tyres, or have

At the top of each finger and the thumb, I

Car/Super Six Touring Car driver. She races

engine checks performed.

suggest they list a person they consider to

at the state and national level. Maltby was

be one of their champions. Along the length

asked the best advice she ever received in her

of each finger, I ask them to write how that

racing career. She said “to keep at it. Very

person can help them. This shows the ways

few people get in a car and are immediately

that person is currently their champion.

winning races. Most of the faster drivers

The pit crew are the people who perform these duties. They wait for the time they have to leap into action. They get the driver back on the track fast and with everything they need to keep going. They want their team

Women are often pleasantly surprised at how

driver to make it to the finish line without

easy it is to find four or five champions who

any obstacles.

are in their pit crew.

I COMPARE THE PEOPLE WHO HELP

On one occasion, a participant exclaimed

US ACHIEVE IN OUR CAREERS WITH

“it’s all here in front of me. I’ve been ignoring

A PIT CREW

my champions. What a lesson!”

Our pit crew is the team of helpers who stand

This simple activity visually reinforces an

in the background, watching our progress.

important concept for us. It reminds us that

They want us to keep driving towards our

there are people in our pit crew. We do have a

goal – to get to our finish line. Our pit crew

group of champions who support us.

focuses on giving us the equipment and resources we need to complete the race. They see their job as preparing us to sweep the obstacles out of our way. THEY ARE OUR CHAMPIONS In my women’s workshops, we often take a simple exercise. I call it a Champions Map.

They are the people who help us succeed in our race towards our goals. They give us advice, mentoring, information and networks. They champion us by putting us forward for new opportunities. They connect us in places we might otherwise not have gone to. They answer our questions and

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you see at club meetings are the ones who have been racing for years and learning their craft... get some expert one-on-one coaching if you can - precise feedback on what you’re doing wrong is worth its weight in gold.” It sounds to me like Maltby has her pit crew sorted. She has the crew that helps her on the racing track. She also has the group of champions who provide her with expertise, sage advice and coaching. Try developing your own Champions Map. See if the visual representation of your pit crew is useful in your career planning. It might even help you in your life objectives.


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NICCI WAS HERE Peta West A Memoir ‘Somewhere in that softened space between day and night between shade and light she’s there, she’s always there’ A country town, an ordinary house, two parents and three children. A family like any other, until a series of events alters the course of their lives forever. A powerful memoir of Australian childhood, told with humour and heart, and will especially resonate with those who grew up in the same era. It is a testament to sisterly love and the fractured yet enduring bonds that hold families together.

On sale now, www.vividpublishing.com.au/nicciwashere Peta West lives and works on her family property in the wheatbelt, writing prose and poetry, anecdotes and rhyme, often about life in the country for light entertainment at rural and women’s events. She is currently working on several short stories. bpwest10@hotmail.com

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COPING IN A CRISIS Written by MAREE MCPHERSON , Maree McPherson Consulting SIMPLE (BUT IMPORTANT) THINGS TO

WE ARE A STRONG PARTNERSHIP

In a recent article, Dr Jenny Brockis, author of

REMEMBER ABOUT COPING

TOGETHER

Future Brain, asked readers if it’s time to ‘ditch

IN A CRISIS

In times like this when decisions need to be

resilience’. Brockis described a new perspective on what helps us to thrive as humans. She noted

A friend recently had a farm accident. It has left

made, I’m fully aware of the issues, and capable

him with some injuries which will take time to

of making the call. I don’t need to go back to

heal. It’s been a disruption to life as usual for his

anyone for guidance. We are a team, and he’s

• Choosing empowerment

family.

got my back.

• Accepting reality

His wife is one of my best friends. The accident,

WE HAVE ALWAYS BEEN ACUTELY

and his debilitation, means she needs to

AWARE OF RISK MANAGEMENT

continue to do all the work she has always done. It means she also needs to do most of his usual tasks. The work can’t stop.

So, we have trained some people who can take the reins temporarily if one or both of us is out of action. This includes our young adult children

I asked my friend if she could tell me the three top things that are helping her through this time. Here’s what she sent me.

who are extremely capable.”

several factors:

• Seeking alternatives • Taking positive action I endorse these strategies and I’d add another: KEEPING YOUR PIT CREW CLOSE My friend mentioned the team of people and family members she could call on to help. I

When reading over my friend’s comments, I

also know that our mutual friends and her local

get a strong sense of empowerment from her

community have been a great support.

“Whatever task is put in front of me, I don’t

words. It seems to me she knows it’s going to

have the option of doing it or not. It MUST be

be tough for a while. She knows she will have

done. In our world, there’s no room for giving up

to do more work. She knows she can work

or not coping. It can’t be part of our vocabulary.

independently. And she knows she can, and

To say to myself ‘I can’t do this,’ isn’t helpful.

will, ask for help as needed. She is prepared for whatever happens. She is living in the moment. She knows this time will pass. Yet for now, this is the ‘new normal’.

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What gets you through a crisis when you have no option but to cope? I wonder if choosing empowerment over resilience might be a useful strategy for you? GO WELL


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0412 198 612

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WORK PLACE HARASSMENT THE EVERYDAY WORKPLACE SHOULD PRESENT A POSITIVE EXPERIENCE, BUT WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THAT IS NOT THE CASE? Compiled by BELINDA LAY

HOW YOU CAN PROTECT YOUR BUSINESS • Assess and identify the 10 behaviours and make changes accordingly to remove undesirable culture. • Develop and implement a sexual harassment policy (you should by law have one) • Ensure internal complaints processes meet the expectations of staff (Don’t make the person they report to a relative and watch this person doesn’t become the perpetrator) • Better training for managers and supervisors so that they are prepared and able to handle complaints. • Inclusion of information about harassment in orientation for new staff.

10 1

WAYS TO IDENTIFY THE CULTURE IN YOUR WORKPLACE

PAY-GAP The gender pay gap is the average difference between a man’s and a woman’s remu-

neration. There are two distinct numbers regarding

6

POSITIONAL BIAS when a gender is deemed

subconsciously more suitable for some occu-

pations. For example administration is associated

the pay gap: unadjusted versus adjusted pay gap. If

with women and truck driving with men however

you have an unexplainable difference that is regarded

both genders are capable. This can also come in the

as Gender bias.

form of trying to replace a really good employee with

2

someone who looks the same.

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS The question you ask at an interview have to be questions that

apply to both genders. Questions about family and family life should be out of bounds, whether a woman

7

GL ASS CEILING Is an invisible upper limit in corporations and other organizations, above

which it is difficult or impossible for women to rise

has children or plans to have children does not affect

in the ranks. “Glass ceiling” is a metaphor for the

her skills any more than it does a man’s.

hard-to-see informal barriers that keep women from

3

getting promotions, pay rises and further opportu-

DIMINISHED RESPONSIBILITIES If you

are being tasked to perform duties that are less

than your position requires, and these duties are not given to other colleagues employed at a similar level to you. For example if you are unloading 25kg bags of Ammonia Sulphate don’t cast female employees aside if they offer to help.

4

RESTROOMS A lack of suitable facilities

and accommodating needs of both genders in

nities.

8

STEREOT YPING Is a fixed general image or

set of characteristics that a lot of people believe

represent a particular type of person or thing.

9

INCLUSIVENESS An inclusive workplace is a

working environment that values the individ-

ual and group differences within its work force and chooses activities that suit them all. For example all

regards to restrooms can indicate gender bias.

team members should be invited to a debrief at the

5

pub, not just some.

CONVERSATIONS Should not change

regardless of which gender you are talking to,

information and instruction should be gender neutral

10

TERMINATIONS Be consistent! If employee

get a warning for a particular error then so

should all employees. If an employee if fired for a

and consistent.

certain action then so should all employees.

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THE WORKPLACE WOR K PL AC E H A R A S SM E N T

WHAT IS HARASSMENT? Harassment is defined in the Sex Discrimination Act 1984 as “any unwanted or unwelcome sexual behaviour where a reasonable person would have anticipated the possibility that the person harassed would feel offended, humiliated or intimidated.” IS THIS THE ONLY T YPE OF HARASSMENT? No, there is also Visual and Verbal/Written Harassment. Visual Harassment is in the form of nude calendars in the workplace, the texting of pictures or emailing things such as pornographic material. Verbal/ Written Harassment is abusive language or inappropriate comments, they can also be written on paper or via other media. WHAT TO DO? Spare a thought for others, too. Or, what if your situation changes? Someone new may be

introduced to the workplace that doesn’t have the same ethics or agenda as everyone else. You can imagine having the school-yard bully turn up in your work place would be a challenge for all, being on the receiving end of their attention is not where anyone would want to be. In order to change this culture, it is up to us all to call out this kind of behaviour, if and when it happens in our workplaces and if it persists then speak to your boss about it. OTHER CONCERNS What is vicarious liability? Do you know your workplace rights? Are you being harassed? Do you know where or how to lodge a complaint? For answers to these questions and more, from the perspective of both employer and employee, you can visit www.humanrights.gov.au

EMPLOYER RESOURCES https://www.humanrights.gov.au/our-work/employers https://www.humanrights.gov.au/employers/good-practice-good-business-factsheets/ workplace-discrimination-and-harassment-policy

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“As a farmer and an employer, I must admit when I first starting looking into this issue, I was not only shocked but appalled at the statistics I have found and yet not surprised. There is a lot more research needed but if the initial indicator is accurate then its little wonder the Agricultural Industry is having trouble finding employees. Not to mention the stories I have heard in regards to the treatment of backpackers, it is enough to make your skin crawl. I believe there is a distinct lack of regulation of farm employment and as a result it appears sometimes anything goes. The savvy have started to implement induction procedures and training, with the help of groups like WIFE and PinG, which is great initiative. I am hoping however that others will join in by implementing and enforcing policies like I have in a bid to curtail this issue that plagues us all, even if for not other reason than to cover your own butt”  - Belinda Lay, Esperance


CELEBRATING WOMEN F R E SH FAC E of the F I E L D DA Y S

fresh face of the field days I

n 2002 Nadine McMorran’s affiliation with the Dowering

Nadine, originally from Goomalling moved to Dowering and

GWN& Machinery Field Days began.

began working as the Assistant Event Coordinator 16 years ago.

The event was initiated in 1964 and is now WA’s largest agricultural expo. The not-for-profit community organisation has grown from 20 exhibitors attending to 770. It employs three staff and over a ten year period has instilled $1.3 million dollars back into the local and surrounding communities via grants and volunteer hours. With roughly $3 million dollars going back

One aspect of the job was overseeing the 300+ volunteers who donate their time, with $17 an hour going back to a community organisation of their choice. After four years in this role she stepped up to be the Event Coordinator for three years, later becoming the Deputy Chairperson for two years and now in 2018 has taken the position of Chairperson.

into the local businesses and community due to the more than

The theme selected for the 2018 event is ‘Women in

25,000 people attending the event. It’s safe to say the humble

Agriculture’. Recognising the diversity of roles that women

idea 54 years ago has ensured Dowerin’s sustainability. Now, for

have played in this industry past and present and continuig to

the second time in the histroy of the event, there is a woman

celebrate and share them. Nadine has been one example of t

stepping into the Chairperson role.

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CELEBRATING WOMEN F R E SH FAC E of the F I E L D DA Y S

he contribution women play to our community and being an

or the organisation. When she first began, she was working

advocate for the Agriculture sector.

alongside Ann Rackham, the first female Chair person and

Like many rural women, the Dowering Events Management Chairperson is just one of the many hats Nadine wears as she is also a farmer, the local WIFE branch president, Captain of the ladies hockey team, Vice President of the P&C and mother to three daughters. Her daughters being the reason why she is so community minded, in wanting to set an example and encourage them to pursue leadership positions throughout their life.

trailblazer, Wendy Newman, CEO of the Wheatbelt Development Commission. The volunteers who redefine the meaning of passion and hardwork have contributed a large portion of their lives to ensure the event remains viable. They have installed values that she wishes to teach her kids and helps her sustain the love and qualities required to lead the Dowerin Field Ddays team into it’s 54th year and beyond. To all young women wanting to pursue a leadership opportunity

Nadine acknowleges the mentors the has had throughout her time at Field Days as playing a massive part in her passion f

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she believes passion will always show, so stick to your guns and always go out there to prove them wrong.

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SECTION E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

bringing

outback australia to the

world

Written by JO FULWOOD Images supplied.

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CELEBRATING WOMEN T H E M I L L I N E R Y OF F E L IC I T Y BROW N

F

An incredible story of a girl from the outback landing on her feet amongst the world’s fashion glitterati, from New York to London to Geneva and beyond. All in the name of the hat.

elicity Brown is one of northern Australia’s most popular exports – capturing the essence of the Australian outback in each of her bespoke hat and head pieces, and promoting this unique part of our landscape to the world’s fashion elite.

regional race events are the social highlight of the calendar,” she says.

Her beautiful creations are all hand made, and many utilise handpicked feathers from stations and remote communities across the top end. “I used to work in aged care in remote aboriginal communities, and a lot of my handpicked feathers still come to me from people living out there,” she says. “I will often have people send them to me from stations, even kids will collect them for me as part of their projects for school of the air.” Originally from a sheep property in New South Wales, Felicity ended up in Broome after what began as an around Australia trip 22 years ago. “I’ve worked on the land on and off my whole life, and I know that the local and

“The business began because everyone would be working right up until race day, and while it was easy for the boys to scrub up and head into town, it was harder for the girls to source a hat. So I just altered what we already had and I’ve been doing that for years.” These days, Felicity doesn’t need to alter old hats, but she does love recycling material, particularly beautiful Australian feathers, for her new creations. Serendipitously stumbling upon a rare ticket into the New York Fashion show, Felicity has turned every moment of her fashion journey into an opportunity, and has never looked back. “I was staying at a hotel in New York, giving myself some time out after a melanoma operation, and I ended up comforting the hotel’s concierge after she had an altercation with an angry guest. I couldn’t believe it when she gave me her ticket to New York Fashion Week,” she says.

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After being discovered by an international designer through her attendance at Fashion Week, Felicity has now shown her range three times in New York, and has been invited to display her creations in other parts of the world. But despite the international attention she is now receiving, Felicity admits she is more at home throwing her collection in the back of her car, and heading out to show her creations to the ladies on remote stations across outback. “I’ve worked on stations, so I know how special it is when someone makes the effort to come out and put on something like this. The girls all have a chance to get dressed up, do their hair, have some bubbles, and try on my hats, and this is something that I really love doing,” she says. With the business going from strength to strength, the next step for this entrepreneurial regional woman might be the big screen. “I’d love to work in film and television, so yes, watch this space,” she laughs.


WELL BEING When MOT H E R’S DA Y isn’t a Greeting Card

when mothers day isn’t a greeting card. HOW DID YOU GO WITH MOTHER’S DAY? Did you have a wonderful day filled with love, flowers, chocolates and “mooshy moments”? If you did, then the biggest, sincerest congratulations, with a teeny side-order of jealousy is the reaction you may get from some people. For those who describe their mum as their best friend, their rock, and query how they would cope without them in their life Mother’s Day is wonderful, and they can’t understand what the other versions look like. Sadly, there are many for whom Mother’s Day brings with it sadness, anger and

Amanda Lovitt AMICDA Institute of Community Directors of Australian Funeral Celebrants

other mixed emotions. There are those who are grieving their mum who is no longer living, and they miss terribly because when their mum was alive, Mother’s Day was a living greeting card. We live in a world where social media, and at times of the year, like Mother’s Day, EVERY media form is full of the ideal. The ideal mother who looks like a 1950’s magazine cover, with every hair in place, the apron tied in a cute bow and who provides huge support to all her children. In modern days it’s the mum who works, cares, drives and supports, cheers and listens. The all round super-human who probably fits in gourmet cooking and a gym class as well. The sort that we strive

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to be as mums but rarely actually achieve. Hiding in the shadows though are the children of the mothers who aren’t greeting card models. The mothers who have created anxiety, stress and issues for their children that are the stuff of counsellors and close confidantes. This is almost a secret society where saying the words “I have a difficult relationship with my mother” is akin to any major admission you can think of. It is an embarrassment to say these words because according to those children who feel loved and accepted by their mothers it must be your fault. The blame game is a strong one, the shame game comes a very close second.


WELL BEING When MOT H E R’S DA Y isn’t a Greeting Card Theories that mothers are blameless creatures abound. Partly from the Christian ethos of the Virgin Mary, and partly from tradition, from media and from those who enjoy their mothers. It is a taboo topic, that of the toxic mother. And yet, hiding quietly in the corners there are many who suffer alone in silence because they feel guilty they didn’t get the mother everyone else seems to have. And of course, the mother they deserved. Start to unpack the Pandora’s box and material abounds on the subject of Narcissistic mothers, surviving a narcissistic parent and parentifying the child. It is an untapped resource for those who need that support to get through these big days of life. There are certain tell-tale signs of someone who struggles with this significant relationship. Weight gain, weight loss, toxic relationships, substance abuse, career issues. This comes because the mother issues are so deep seated. They stem from the beginning of our lives and take decades to identify, acknowledge and then to begin to heal. This may come as a surprise to many reading this, that there are adults around you who cannot remember ever hearing the words “I love you, I’m proud of you, Thank you or I’m sorry” from their own mother. Those of you with such a relationship however are reading this saying “Oh it’s not just me!” Worse still, are those who have heard it, but never believed it because of the mixed messages they receive in every encounter with their mother. These messages either given quietly or bluntly undermine the child’s self-confidence

to a point where careers, health and relationships are harmed. As adult women we are left with 2 options when we are still children ourselves. Option 1 is where we have those greeting card style relationships. These are the ones where after reading this you may pick up the phone or pop round for a cuppa and give them an extra special hug. Say thank you and enjoy a much deeper gratitude and understanding of what they

Not every mother looks like a 1950’s magazine cover, with every hair in place, the apron tied in a cute bow whilst providing huge support to her children. have done for you. When they say, “I love you” and you believe it, take it as a symbol of paying it forward. She has created a loving relationship with you that you can then share with the world. Enjoy! If your mother has died, then allow some tears of both joy & sadness for the amazing woman she was and acknowledge her for everything she meant to you and be grateful that her love still surrounds

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you. It is a truly special feeling. Option 2 is obviously more difficult. If you limited contact with your mother just so you could cope with that big day of the year when it seems everyone is bathed in a warm glow, then that’s OK. If you have no contact with her, then sadly that is OK too. When you have not been cared for by your mother, you have to self care. You have to self-love too, so go and do something that you enjoy, show yourself that you are special, and you are loved. You will have tougher days than others, but you have already survived what life has thrown you. If your mother has died, then allow some tears of both joy & sadness (sounding like a repeat isn’t it?). Acknowledge that you deserved better, that you have survived and that she deserves to be forgiven, even if only so that you can move forward. Surround yourself with things that you love and feel peace. Next time someone talks about their experience as a child, even an adult child, just take time before rushing into an answer. That person who is full of admiration for their mother deserves your congratulations and respect, not a re-run of the “You’re lucky” scene from Monty Python. And before denouncing someone for being a “bad daughter” or “naughty boy” for not doing all the things that you think they should be doing for their mother, take time. Time to take in their situation, pick up the signs they may be struggling, and to be gentle. Not every mother/child relationship is worthy of those greeting cards.


WELL BEING JEAN H A ILES for WOMEN’S HEA LTH

looking after you,

looking after your baby N

o one can possibly tell you what it feels like to be pregnant, to give birth to a baby or to become a new parent. These are deeply personal experiences and are different for everyone. It is a time of great change and challenge, often bringing feelings of joy and celebration, and potentially also feelings of worry and anxiety.

feel like things are out of your control, that there is so much to learn and that sometimes it’s difficult to cope. The good news is, there are lots of things that can be done to support yourself and/or your partner during this time in your lives. SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS TO LOOK OUT FOR

Many new and expectant parents worry about how a new baby will fit into their lives, or how they will care for an infant. It’s important to remember that if you’re feeling worried and anxious during this period, you’re not alone and these are common reactions that many new parents have.

The signs and symptoms of perinatal depression and anxiety can vary from person to person and may include: • Excessive worry or fear that is difficult to control. Often the worry and fears are focused on the health or wellbeing of the baby, or your abilities as a mum

In fact, up to one in seven women who are pregnant or have recently given birth experience perinatal depression and anxiety (perinatal refers to the time from when pregnancy begins to the first year after the baby is born). Partners can experience mood problems too, so it is important that you are both well supported

• Losing interest in the things you usually enjoy • Fear of being alone with your baby • Feeling low most of the time, or crying for no good reason

during this time.

• Physical symptoms – such as decreased energy, a change in appetite, difficulty sleeping even when you have the opportunity, increased heart/breathing rate, tight chest and feeling light-headed

When you are pregnant or have a baby, there are lots of changes going on, from physical and hormonal changes to big adjustments in your sleeping patterns and daily routine; it might

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WELL BEING JEAN H A ILES for WOMEN’S HEA LTH

• The development of obsessive or compulsive behaviours; for example, needing to do the same task a number of times when it doesn’t need repeating • Thoughts of death or suicide If you feel that your worries, anxiety or low mood are interfering with your health, relationships, daily life or ability to care for yourself or your baby, then it is time to get some help and support. GET TING THE RIGHT HELP AND ADVICE Start early! Managing mood symptoms well during pregnancy can make a big difference to how things go when your baby is born. Your general practitioner (GP) or maternal child health Nurse are both great sources of support. If you are unsure about talking with a doctor or health professional, reach out to a trusted friend, family member or your partner. Remember, if it is urgent, please call Lifeline on 13 11 14. There are also many pregnancy and parenting websites, blogs and apps available. It’s important to make sure the information that you’re accessing is reliable – pick one or two sources you trust and stick with them. R R R N E T WO R K

One such resource is the What Were We Thinking! mobile app. It provides week-by-week information on essential topics to help mums and dads (and anyone supporting them) adjust well to the first six months of life with a baby. Developed by Jean Hailes and Monash University, the app is adapted from the evidence-based parenting program of the same name. It is free and easy to download, and helps to build your confidence by giving you the knowledge, skills and reassurance to navigate this period. The app helps you to develop the practical skills for settling babies, such as establishing a Feed-Play-Sleep routine as well as ideas to help you strengthen your partner relationship, such as how to best share the workload and communicate each other’s needs. Download the What Were We Thinking! app or learn more about perinatal depression and anxiety.

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MID-LIFE WEIGHT GAIN what’s really going on?

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or many women, the menopause years are often met with physical, emotional and mental changes. And often, just as you are navigating the tricky symptoms of hot flushes, night sweats or increased anxiety levels, you are greeted by another unwelcome visitor: weight gain. We know that weight is a complex area of health, influenced by many factors. Diet and physical activity can play their part, but when it comes to mid-life weight gain, there are some other pieces of the puzzle that need to be taken into account. Here we’ll explain what’s really going on in mid-life weight gain, when and why you need to pay attention to it and what you can do to minimise or

manage it. What’s really behind midlife weight gain? Research has debated for decades on what’s behind mid-life weight gain. At a time when there are so many things changing in a woman’s life, it’s hard to pinpoint the exact reason. Is it all down to menopause and changing hormones? Or is it simply a matter of getting older? The Interna-

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tional Menopause Society looked to the research to answer this age-old question. Here’s what they found: mid-life weight gain of about 0.5kg per year is due to age rather than menopause or changing hormones. In other words, whether a mid-life woman is going through menopause or not, a half kilo gain per year is simply a consequence of getting older.


WELL BEING JEAN H A ILES for WOMEN’S HEA LTH

BUT, THERE’S MORE…

WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT

The research also found that the hormonal changes of menopause often affect where this extra fat is stored. The studies show that the reduction of the hormone oestrogen that occurs in menopause favours fat storage in the abdominal region – that is, the waist, rather than the thighs and hips.

Get active, stay active. The more you move, the more you can lower your overall weight and waist circumference (the measurement around your waist).

Many women notice an increase in waist size or a change in body shape in their mid-life years, from more ‘pear-shaped’ to more ‘apple-shaped’. But what is really important here is that too much weight around your abdomen can have serious follow-on effects to your overall health. WHY YOU NEED TO BE AWARE The fat stored in the abdominal region is also known as ‘visceral fat’. Compared to the other type of fat (subcutaneous fat), you cannot pinch visceral fat with your fingers or grab it with your hand. Visceral fat lies out of reach, deeper in your body, wrapping around vital organs such as your liver, gut and pancreas. Visceral fat is favoured in mid-life weight gain and unfortunately, it’s a key player in a variety of health issues. An excess of visceral fat is linked to an increased risk of heart disease (the number-one killer of women in Australia), type 2 diabetes, breast cancer and dementia.

Even though physical activity may not entirely prevent weight gain with age, it can protect against the development of obesity and abdominal obesity. What’s more, physical activity supports healthy bones, another key health issue for mid-life women. Studies show that 60 minutes a day of moderate-intensity activity are key to maintaining a healthy weight. If this sounds like too much for you, start small and work your way up. The important thing is to start. What you eat matters. Diet is always a key part of being healthy, but in midlife it can be especially important in keeping the extra belly weight at bay. Choose a healthy way of eating that works for you and your lifestyle and make sure it’s one you can stick to. You can find out more about healthy eating and good nutrition by visiting the Jean Hailes Healthy living pages, or read more about menopause and how to best manage your mid-life years.

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nourish a healthy

mind

&body HEALTHY LIVING TIP:

Omega-3 fatty acids help to control inflammation and oxidation in the body and brain. Brain oxidative processes are a major factor in age-related cognitive decline.


SEASONAL SECTION PRODUCE E DI TOR I A L MO SU BT ORI T ALCEI T OR RUS DI S C L A I M E R

WHOLE ORANGE CAKE

Serves 6

With less than ten ingredients this whole orange cake with citrus icing is super easy to make and is the perfect way to treat yourself, as well as your guests. INGREDIENTS

METHOD

1 (240g) whole orange

Preheat the oven to 180°C (160°C fanforced). Grease a deep 20cm cake pan, line base with baking paper.

200g butter, melted 3 eggs, lightly beaten 1 cup (220g) caster sugar 1 1/2 cups (225g) self-raising flour

CITRUS ICING 1 (240g) orange 1 cup (160g) icing sugar mixture 1 tsp boiling water

Wash and dry orange; cut into quarters and remove seeds. Process in a small food processor until pulpy. Transfer orange to a medium bowl, stir in butter, eggs, sugar and sifted flour until smooth. Pour mixture into prepared pan. Bake for about 40 minutes or until cooked when tested. Stand for 10 minutes before turning onto a wire rack to cool.

Add a dash of orange to your favourite fish dish. Bake or pan fry white fish fillets with orange zest and juice, crushed ginger, ground black pepper and a little olive oil. Serve with steamed Asian greens and brown rice.

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To make citrus icing, use a zester to remove strips of rind from the orange – you will need 2 tsp. Squeeze juice from fruit – you will need 4 tsp orange juice. Sift icing sugar into a bowl; stir in juices and enough water to make a smooth paste. Stir in rind. Pour icing immediately over cake; stand until set.


SEASONAL PRODUCE MOOR A C I T RUS

ORANGE is the new snack Written by ELISABETH BRENNAN

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he local WA citrus season is underway, with navel oranges in plentiful supply through the winter months. Navel oranges are so-called for their tell-tale protrusion, resembling a bellybutton-like ‘navel’. Most navel orange varieties grown in WA are seedless, sweet and super juicy. They’re the perfect vitamin C-rich snack! Moora Citrus is one of the largest citrus orchards in WA with seven varieties of navel oranges which all ripen at varying stages across the season, ensuring that WA can savour locally grown citrus for as many months as possible. Moora Citrus’ navel varieties are complemented by three mandarin varieties and an exclusive late season seedless valencia orange which extends the season right up until Christmas. The 212ha orchard was planted in stages from November 2005 to December 2013 and as such, all the trees are yet to reach full maturity. The annual volumes from orchard will steadily increase over the next six years, providing the local WA market with local and fresh oranges and mandarins. Whilst the domestic market continues to be a priority for Moora Citrus, in recent years, excess volumes have been exported to relieve supply pressure. The major export market for Moora Citrus has been China, with modest

volumes destined for Japan, Philippines and Indonesia. Building authentic relationships with export partners has been critical to the success and growth of Moora Citrus’ export program. The level of export enquiry far exceeds the supply and now that Moora Citrus has gained valuable insight and experience, the business is now sharing this knowledge and opportunity with other growers in WA. In November 2017, Moora Citrus commissioned a new packshed, Northern Valley Packers, which has vertically integrated operations and enabled the business to further assist other growers in packing and marketing for both export and domestic markets. The packshed has become a one-stop-shop for fruit producers in the Northern Valleys region including horticultural areas such as Chittering, Gingin, Moora and Dandaragan. Northern Valley Packers packshed manager and co-owner Shane Kay said “the Northern Valleys region has the potential to grow, pack and provide the highest quality fresh produce to families here in WA and right across the Asia Pacific region. It’s amazing to think that oranges and mandarins with our little blue Moora Citrus sticker can travel from our farm to a fruit bowl half a world away.”

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BECOME A MEMBER WITH THANKS

SUBSCRIBERS, SUPPORTERS & MEMBERS

There are a number of ways you can connect to; or join the RRR Network. BECOME A MEMBER BEFORE 30 JUNE

WE WELCOME & ACKNOWLEDGE

Join the RRR Network as a Member; become actively

THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF:

engaged with rural, regional and remote women to support and contribute to the economic and social wellbeing of their communities; can to apply to become a member and pay before the 30th June. The annual membership fee is $220. Members over the age of 18, who have paid their membership by the 30th June, can nominate for a position on the RRR Network Board.

BE A SUPPORTER

Supporter the RRR network with an annual contribution to the production of the RRR Quarterly Magazine for only $25.

SUBSCRIBE

Anyone can subscribe to the RRR Network and register to receive a digital copy of the quarterly RRR Network Magazine via our website Subscribers living in Western Australia (WA) can elect to receive a printed hard copy of the magazine, posted for free!

JOIN US! VISIT

www.rrrnetwork.com.au/join-us/

EMAIL admin@rrrnetwork.com.au PHONE (08) 6316 0407

Supporters as at 18 May 2018 Dolores Aitken Pauline Bantock Nicole Batten Elizabeth Blyth Karen Crouch Roni Davies Maggie Edmonds Katherine Jane Jenny Latham Ian Longson Rita Marshall Fleur McDonald Susanne McGrath Jeanette McQueen Jacquie Moses Sue Moss Naomi Purser Carol Redford Sharyn Sinclair Vicki-Anne Smith Allison Steber Peta West Helen Woodhams

Members as at 18 May 2018

Margaret Agnew Robyn Clarke MLA Anna Dixon Debbie Dowden Lyn Farrell Maree Gooch Alysia Kepert Belinda Lay Amanda Lovitt Catherine Lyons Maria Bolten Magna Fleur McDonald Fiona Palmer Shelley Spriggs

POST PAYMENT TO: RRR NETWORK 790 Wirring Road Margaret River WA 6285

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WRAP UP S A Y H E L LO

our readers hello! snap shots SAY HE LLO We’d love to hear from you! Simply photograph yourself somewhere in WA and visit our website to submit your photograph and information via the LINK provided. www.rrrnetwork.com.au/magazine/submit-an-article

Hammer Orchid. under threat, near Lake Grace. ABOVE:

Keren Baker of Bullaring Taken at Sewell Rock, 25km South of Corrigin. ABOVE:

Tony Wheatcroft of Albany with Holly and Tika. Tony says ‘‘See ‘Oodle’ breeds are as good as ‘real’ dogs!’’ Taken at Cheynes Beach 60km NE of Albany. ABOVE RIGHT:

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Wooromal Station Coastline


ISLANDER PEOPLES’ UNIQUE CULTURAL AND SPIRITUAL RELATIONSHIPS TO THE LAND, WATERS AND SEAS AND THEIR RICH CONTRIBUTION TO SOCIETY. SOURCE: www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/ spirituality/welcome-to-country-acknowledgement-of-country IMAGE: Frances Andrijich Great Southern - Denmark www.australiassouthwest.com

HE RURAL, REGIONAL, REMOTE WOMEN’S NETWORK OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA ACKNOWLEDGES THE AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES OF THIS NATION. WE ACKNOWLEDGE THE TRADITIONAL CUSTODIANS OF THE LANDS ON WHICH OUR COMPANY IS LOCATED AND WHERE WE CONDUCT OUR BUSINESS. WE PAY OUR RESPECTS TO ANCESTORS AND ELDERS, PAST AND PRESENT. THE RURAL, REGIONAL, REMOTE WOMEN’S NETWORK OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA IS COMMITTED TO HONOURING AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT

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THE LAST WORD UNTIL NEXT TIME

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Countryman

Main picture: Justine Rowe


W

e have a proud 21-year history of supporting and celebrating

Western Australian women and their families who live and work outside of the Perth metropolitan area. In 2016 the RRR Network transitioned from a WA State government advisory board to an Image courtesy of www.jillaroojess.com

independent incorporated entity. Our focus is every woman living in a rural, regional, or remote community in Western Australia. We have a subscriber base of over 10,000 individuals, businesses and community organisations who receive this quarterly glossy magazine from us and an active social media following.

FOR RUR AL , REG IONAL & REMOTE WES TERN AUS TR ALIAN WOMEN WA’s pre-eminent communication network for inspiring & connecting regional women; championing their role in our communities and advocating on their behalf.

Join the RRR Network, it ’s as simple as registering your details via our website.

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Profile for RRR Network WA

RRR Network Quarterly - Winter 2018  

RRR Network Quarterly for Rural, Regional and Remote West Australian Women WA's pre-eminent communication network for inspiring and connecti...

RRR Network Quarterly - Winter 2018  

RRR Network Quarterly for Rural, Regional and Remote West Australian Women WA's pre-eminent communication network for inspiring and connecti...

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