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Image : Margaret River Region - Humpback Whale - credit David Ashley

SUM ME R 201 8

FO R RU R A L , R EG I O N A L & R EMOTE WE S TE R N AU S TR A LI A N WOME N

REACHING

for the skies

BUSINESS & ADVENTURE

Summer reads HEALTH & WELLBEING

#USTOO THE MOVEMENT TO END

sexual harassment


Great Southern Denmark - Australia’s South West - image Frances Andrijich


I have recently celebrated the one-year anniversary of being

from a Government funded body to an incorporated entity.

the new RRR Network’s first employee, when the organisation

Whilst this rebranded magazine received great feedback, we

became incorporated into an independent entity.

have unfortunately been unable to continue to supply the printed and posted hard copy of the magazine for free due to

Together with an amazing and hardworking board, we have

escalating costs. We will move to a paid subscription model

achieved a lot in a short space of time. We delivered our first

from this edition onwards. We are very happy to report that the

Regional Leadership Masterclass in October in partnership

RRR Network Magazine is not dead, and we will still produce

with Curtin University and the Muresk Institute; we have been

the magazine and make it widely available for free in electronic

a leading voice calling for the end of sexual harassment in WA

format.

workplaces; and we have delivered the Rural Women’s Award

So, whilst the RRR Network has changed, we are doing our best

announcement event.

to honour the legacy of the Network as it was envisaged back in

In 2019 we plan to deliver more Regional Leadership Masterclass

1996.

programs at Muresk, and are seeking to expand the program for delivery in other regional centres across the state. We will again

Jackie Jarvis

host the Rural Women’s Award announcement event In March 2019 and, for the first time, host a Rural Women’s Conference in Perth on the same day as the award event

Chief Executive Officer The Rural, Regional, Remote Women’s Network

In 2018 we relaunched the RRR Network Magazine, which had

of Western Australia

not been printed for about 18 months during the transition

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COVER Catherine Marriott #USTOO The movement to end sexual harassment in West Australian workplaces. Image: Daniel Carson • dotDXF

Teran Black, reaching for the skies

THE BOARD

THE MAGAZINE

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

SUBMISSIONS, ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES

Jackie Jarvis (Margaret River)

GENERAL ENQUIRIES & SUBSCRIPTIONS CHAIR

admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

Lyn Farrell (Bunbury)

PRODUCTION, DESIGN & ARTWORK

DEPUTY CHAIR Anna Dixon (Northam)

Wilderness Publishing

SECRETARY

PRINTING

Cath Lyons (Perth)

A+L Printers, Bunbury WA

TREASURER

Sarah Lang

(Busselton)

PUBLISHED BY

COMMITTEE

RRR Regional Network

Jo Barrett-Lennard (Dunsborough) Nicole Batten (Yuna)

RMB 790 Wirring Road, Margaret River WA

Elizabeth Brennan (Wongan Hills)

www.rrrnetwork.com.au

Sue Middleton (Wongan Hills)

All content is subject to copyright and may not be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. Opinions represented in RRR Regional Network Quarterly are not necessarily those of the publisher. RRR Regional Newtwork Quarterly is published seasonally. PEFC Certified Printing

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Nanette Williams 2015 WA Women’s Hall of Fame Inductee

BUY WEST, EAT BEST 10th Anniversary Awards

CONTENTS

WELCOME

THE QUARTERLY

The Summer Issue

01

#USTOO The movement to end sexual harrasment in WA workplaces

04

REACHING FOR THE SKIES Teran Black reaches for the sky

10

EVERLASTING LOVE Building a thriving business in the face of adversity

14

NEWS & REVIEWS

BOOKS, PODCASTS AND SOCIAL MEDIA The interesting & entertaining

19

WHAT’S ON

WHAT’S ON & THE NETWORK CALENDAR All the dates & details of events you will love

20

AROUND THE REGIONS

BUY WEST, EAT BEST The 10th anniversary celebration

24

THE ART OF MEDICINE New hands-on learning for regional, rural and remote doctors

28

32

TRAVEL & ADVENTURE

THE PORONGURUP NATIONAL PARK The great southern

SHINING BRIGHT The intriguing history of lighthouses in Western Australia

32

THE WORK PLACE

THE REGIONAL LEADERSHIP MASTERCLASS 34

RURAL & REGIONAL WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP SUMMIT 36

WA WOMENS HALL OF FAME A call for nominations for 2019

38

WE SHINE The Wheatbelt Business Network inititave

42

FLEUR MCDONALD Writer and advocate empowering women with writing skills

44

CELEBRATING WOMEN

DISTANCE EDUCATION JOURNEY Deb Edwards graduates from Curtin University WA

HEALTH & WELL BEING

48

ALYSIA KEPERT When cancer is a full time job

52

YOUR GUIDE TO UTI’S Jean Hailes for Womens’ Health

54

SEASONAL PRODUCE

SUMMER ON A PLATE Celebrating the fruits of Western Australia

56

WRAP UP

Subscriptions & reader contributions

58

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#USTOO

written by JACKIE JARVIS Images DANIEL CARSON – dotDXF

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THE QUARTERLY # USTO O

N

early 200 guests attended the recent #USTOO event in Perth

to show their support in ending sexual harassment in WA workplaces. Two State Government ministers, as well as the WA Nationals leader and deputy leader, four other state backbenchers, and two federal senators attended the event which was organised by the RRR Network.

‘‘People impacted by sexual harassment have told us they are seeking three things - an acknowledgement that it happened, an apology, and an assurance that it will not happen again; to them or to anyone else”

harassment – starting as teenager when a patron at the roller skating rink where she worked grabbed her and forcefully kissed the then-14-yearold. Consequently, Tracey’s first kiss is seared into her memory for all the wrong reasons. She went on to build a 30-year career as journalist, which was unfortunately peppered with stories of inappropriate comments and physical harassment. While Tracey spoke of her for passion for social justice, the audience enjoyed her down-to-earth

Held at The Westin Perth, #USTOO aimed to shine a light on the higher rates of sexual harassment in rural, regional and remote areas and featured three key-note speakers.

style and wicked sense of humour; particularly when she outlined the difference between workplace harassment and consensual flirting by telling the story of “having a drunken pash” at the work Christmas party with the man she eventually married.

Tracey Spicer AM gave a frank account of her experience of sexual

Catherine Marriott R R R N E T WO R K

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THE QUARTERLY # USTO O Dr Skye Saunders, author of Whispers from the Bush - the Workplace Sexual Harassment of Australian Rural Women, provided some alarming figures from her research into rural workplaces. She detailed that 73 per cent of employees she surveyed said they had been sexually harassed at work. In agriculture, that figure rose to 93 per cent of women interviewed. Much of her research was conducted in regional WA. Undoubtably, the star of the show was Broome agribusiness professional Catherine Marriott. Catherine called on the assembled guests to “stand up, and stand together in stamping out harassment, bullying and discriminatory behaviour in our workplaces”. Catherine gave a moving account of the trauma she endured having a confidential sexual harassment matter become national headlines. She spoke with grace, dignity and, at times, humour. At the end of

RRR Network CEO Jackie Jarvis said “We know that a one-size-fitsall approach does not work, and whilst all sexual harassment in the workplace is unlawful, most cases are not criminal matters. her speech, Catherine received a standing ovation from the crowd. Finally, RRR Network CEO Jackie Jarvis took a solutions-based approach to her presentation, outlining a plan to help employers manage sexual harassment claims. She said employers find dealing with claims challenging, particularly as the definition of sexual harassment under the Sex Discrimination Act can range from hurtful, embarrassing and offensive comments, right up to sexual assault. “We know that a one-size-fits-all approach does not work, and whilst all sexual harassment in the workplace is unlawful, most cases are not criminal matters. People impacted by sexual harassment have told us they are seeking three things – an acknowledgement that it happened, an apology, and an assurance that it will not happen again; to them or to anyone else,” Jackie said. The RRR Network is looking to train a panel of independent mediators who can step into an organisation as soon as a claim is

Dr Skye Saunders R R R N E T WO R K

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THE QUARTERLY # USTO O

L-R Terry Redman MLA, Jacqui Boydell MLC, Mia Davies MLA, Colin de Grussa MLC

Jackie Jarvis R R R N E T WO R K

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THE QUARTERLY # USTO O

L-R Jackie Jarvis, Dr Skye Saunders, Tracey Spicer AM, Catherine Marriott, Sue Middleton

Tracey Spicer AM

made to support the complainant, work with the organisation, and work constructively with the person who is the subject of the complaint.

The RRR Network’s plan to provide independent mediation services in

When this type of independent mediation is used in workers

sexual harassment and workplace bullying matters will offer a low cost,

compensation matters, around 80 per cent of cases are settled within

informal, timely and effective way to deal with complaints across WA –

90 days. The Productivity Commission has found that finalising these

conducted in a way alleviates further trauma for all involved.

matters through the courts typically takes four and half years.

Employers or organisations who wish to be part of the pilot study of this

As Jackie explained, the current formalised processes used by many

new approach should contact Jackie Jarvis by email: ceo@rrrnetwork.

companies managing sexual harassment claims are often time-

com.au

consuming and costly. There is also a very real, often unmeasured

If you have been impacted by sexual harassment, support is available:

impact on staff morale, productivity and organisational culture. Both the complainant and the subject of the complaint may take extended

https://www.humanrights.gov.au/complaints/make-complaint

sick or stress leave – or may simply leave the organisation, increasing

https://www.1800respect.org.au/

the costs of recruitment and training. In many cases, it is women leaving uncomfortable workplace situations. A recent survey from the U.S. found that harassment can have lasting effects on a women’s career prospects, as well as on her future earning potential. R R R N E T WO R K

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THE QUARTERLY # USTO O

L-R Kim Travers; Senator Sue Lines; Jessica Shaw MLA, Hon Simone McGurk MLA

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THE QUARTERLY T E R A N BL AC K - L E A R N I NG TO F LY

Taking FLIGHT

T E R A N B L AC K

Written by FLEUR CHAPMAN

images supplied

While the thought of flying leaves some of us feeling rather nervous, up in the sky is where Teran Black is most at home.

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THE QUARTERLY L E A R N I NG to F LY

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lthough she has always had a love for flying, sparked by her father and older brother’s interests, as a teenager Teran never imagined she could pursue a career in aviation. At age 20 she landed a job with QANTAS as a flight attendant, and her passion grew as opportunities opened up for her to forge her own path in the skies. While with QANTAS, she was fortunate enough to be part of the exciting new A380 startup, before moving on to work with other large carriers Emirates, Strategic Airlines and Virgin Australia.

as her tailwind, Teran completed her Commercial Licence in just over 10 months. Studying aviation never felt like a chore – she loved every page of every textbook and would charge into her next lesson fully prepared. Getting to fly was the ultimate reward for long hours reading, and she always strived to get the most from her lessons. Study doesn’t stop in the aviation game. Teran has also completed a course on Aeronautical Physics through Dr Steve Holding and Multi Engine Command Instrument Rating. She is finishing her final subject of an Air Transport Pilot’s Licence.

Teran took every opportunity she could to fly. During her time with Virgin, her older brother was completing his commercial pilot’s licence and Teran loved the chance to go up with him. While on international flights, the crew sometimes had the chance to sit in the jumpseat up at the flight deck and she took every opportunity here she could too. While she really enjoyed her role as cabin crew, Teran was keen take her aviation journey further with a new challenge and responsibility; so moving over to the pilot’s seat was just the next logical step.

“Learning as a pilot never stops and you’re always put to the test with exams and check flights. It’s so satisfying to pass them and know that your hard work pays off.” While cabin crews are often female-dominated, as a whole, the aviation industry is still a man’s world. This is slowly shifting as more women take up the challenge, and as Teran noted; “… there’s no reason they shouldn’t. We all have to go through the same process, tick the same boxes and pass the same exams and flight tests, and females are very capable of doing that.”

Teran finally booked a one-hour trial introductory flight to test herself, and it was quickly clear she had made the right decision. “From that moment on I was hooked. I finally just felt like I was doing what I was meant to do!” she said.

As a pilot for Aviair in Kununurra, Teran was occasionally on the receiving end of a startled look from passengers when they realised she going to fly the plane, but her professionalism, friendly nature, expertise and passion shone through and they always left beaming from the experience.

With total support from both her parents and her brother, Teran gave away her job as a flight attendant to focus on learning to fly and enrolled full time at Air Gold Coast in Coolangatta. With incredible passion

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THE QUARTERLY L E A R N I NG to F LY until you reach the ground. Come the wet season, there is unpredictable weather, regularly reduced visibility and all-too-regular fires that provide additional challenges.

Her passengers were treated to a spectacular birds-eye-view of Lake Argyle, the Bungles, El Questro, the Cockburn Ranges, ‘croc spotting’ at sunset along the lower Ord River and day tours around the Argyle Diamond Mine. No two days are the same in this industry, which is part of the charm for Teran.

“After moving remote, I really encourage every pilot to jump out of their comfort zones of living in cities and go experience flying in rural Australia and experience living life somewhere different,” Teran said.

Moving from her home on Queensland to the Kimberly was at first daunting, but Teran quickly grew to love it.

Moving into the future, Teran would love to fly floatplanes and do an “I can honestly say my time in Kununurra was better than I ever aerobics rating, however her biggest goal is to one day return to the imagined. The Kimberley region is absolutely large airlines where her aviation journey began. stunning and I’m so happy I was able to She encourages everyone – men and see and do the things I did. Driving out to women – who have a passion for flying to I really encourage every pilot to the beautiful El Questro station, Home pursue the career as she did. Valley station, walking stunning gorges to jump out of their comfort zones “There’s a very indescribable feeling of the most spectacular waterfalls, taking flying an aeroplane and I would cruises on Lake Kununurra and Lake of living in cities and encourage anyone to do it if they are Argyle, walking Cathedral Gorge at the thinking about it! Aviation is rewarding. As go experience fl ying in rural Bungles, helicopter tours with Helispirit. cabin crew I was able to see so much and There is so much to do!” Australia and experience living work with people from all over the world. I always kept in mind that some guests While not currently working with Aviair life somewhere different.’’ would literally save for years to be able while she completes her latest studies, to buy a ticket and take ‘that holiday’, and Teran is eager to return in 2019. The I’d always do my best to make their journey remote Kimberley region gave her an unmissable opportunity to hone easy and unforgettable. Now as a pilot, I still get to do that plus fly the her piloting skills, with varied conditions so different and unpredictable aircraft and always push myself to be the best, safest, knowledgeable compared to city or regional flying. Working the tourist (dry) season, pilot I can be.” she has had to contend with short dirt runways, unfamiliar terrain and uncontrolled airspace where you are solely responsibility for all decisions

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THE QUARTERLY Jen Wa rbuton - E V E R L A ST I NG LOV E

Love

EVERLASTING

Written by FLEUR CHAPMAN

images supplied

The iconic Australian native everlasting flower is a sight to behold. With uncomplicated yet spectacularly bold petals, these beauties make an impact wherever they pop up.

A

s a plant, they are hardy and waterwise, with exceptional germination rates. Everlastings readily self-seed, making for a guaranteed display year-in-year-out with little effort. Despite these qualities, everlastings were once inaccessible to the home gardener in any decent quantities. In 2004, Kojonup farmer Jen EgertonWarburton and her husband Rob were given a packet of seed by a co-worker which the couple hand-sowed over an acre. The result was such an incredible display, that Jen set forth to commercialise everlasting seed production to finally give the flower the attention it deserved. Lucinda’s Everlastings was born, named after their baby daughter, and has since become the trusted name in premium quality everlasting seeds Australia-wide. The hot pink and white varieties have become a firm favourite of many loyal customers and Lucinda’s has amassed a firm following over the past 16 years through consistent, quality seed supplied to small garden centres.

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Building the business has had its challenges, not least Jen’s diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. While she has escaped physical disability so far, she remains acutely aware of her limitations and is smart about how she works. Much of the seed sowing process has been mechanised now with the help of Jen’s father. The nature of the everlasting seed made it a little tricky to mechanise due to a fluffy coating, but over time, Jen’s father has cleverly worked out a way to get the flow and mix just right. Harvest is labour-intensive, but this has also been mechanised to make the job a little easier. Jen readily employs other people to help and is quite happy to outsource anything that is too taxing on her body or simply too time-consuming for the family to do themselves. When their second daughter Zara was born four years after Lucinda, they began cultivating a golden everlasting flower at the farm.

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THE QUARTERLY Jen Wa rbuton - E V E R L A ST I NG LOV E

Unfortunately, this variety proved much more difficult to manage. While they do still stock some of Zara’s, Lucinda’s Everlastings remain their focus.

relationships, firmly believing that happy customers make for a happier, more successful business. This is a valuable lesson her girls can embrace no matter where their own lives take them.

Lucinda and Zara attend boarding school but have become valuable members of the farming team when they are home. Lucinda, now 16, has shown interest in the business and is studying accounting and finance as one of her school subjects. She has just started learning to drive the header to assist with harvest and is openminded about her future and the opportunities that await. The ultimate goal of Jen’s is for Lucinda to take over the everlasting business when she is ready, but the priority right now is school.

The Egerton-Warburton’s also run sheep and canola crops on their farm which are primarily under Rob’s care. As an agronomist in a past life, Jen helps where she can but much of the work is too physically demanding. She will often drive the chaser bin and is able to stand and assist with sheep work for short periods of time. Jen never makes a big deal about living with MS; she maintains a positive outlook and just gets on with whatever needs to be done. Walking long distances is problematic due to fatigue in her legs but she has learnt to listen to her body and manage her symptoms effectively.

By being involved in farm life, the girls have learned so much about the business world, the value of hard work, and positive customer interaction. One of Jen’s keys to success has been her innate ability to nurture relationships and operate through generosity and respect to everyone around her. For example, she will give free packets of seed to customers, offer friendly follow-up calls and go out of her way to keep costs down. Her strength is marketing and business

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She will break up longer walks, take time out with a cup of tea when the fatigue sets in, or find ways to stay active and efficient while not overdoing it. Undue stress can make her symptoms worse, so Jen has been smart about what she takes on and pulled back on things that stress her out.

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THE QUARTERLY Jen Wa rbuton - E V E R L A ST I NG LOV E The everlastings don’t stress her out – she loves them and her passion shows. Her wonderfully successful fundraising luncheon this past October showed just how much she adores the flowers and is thriving in the business. Initially reluctant to fundraise for ‘her own cause’ –MSWA – Jen ended up raising $7,000 and all 120 of her guests were treated to an unbelievable night. Since the event, she has been constantly asked when the next one is. While the initial plan was to dine amongst the flowers in the field, inclement weather forced a change of plan and the shed was decked out in beautiful adornments instead. The tables set with quality glassware, napkins and crockery, with Jen’s attention to detail ensuring a splendid, successful and sophisticated event. Jen was overwhelmed by the support she received on the day to pull off the fundraiser – friends and family rallied around to help and ensure the evening went smoothly, and it did. Many guests were from the local area, but others travelled from as far as Perth to see the flowers and support the cause. Jen hopes she can organise a similar event next year but hasn’t made any promises just yet. What’s next for Lucinda’s Everlastings? Jen’s passion and enthusiasm are as bold and bright as her product, with several exciting ideas in development right now. Her business will continue to grow in coming years and do an exceptional job at showcasing this beautiful flower across the country and beyond. LEFT: Jen Egerton-Warburton presented a cheque to Marcus Stafford, CEO of the MSWA Society

Anna Chitty

L-R Lucinda Egerton-Warburton, Zara Egerton-Warburton, Jamilla Radys and Holly Radys

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THE QUARTERLY Jen Wa rbuton - E V E R L A ST I NG LOV E

Jen and Janie or visit their website for more information: www.everlastings.com.au/MSWA supports people living with neurological conditions in WA. To find out more, visit: https://mswa.org.au

Follow Jen’s journey on Facebook: www.facebook.com/lucindaseverlastings or Twitter: https://twitter.com/everlastingsfun

Chef Sophie Budd

Rob Egerton-Warburton used ‘the beast’ to help cook for the luncheon.

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I

IMAGE: Frances Andrijich Southern Forests and Valleys, Pemberton. Warren River Loop walk www.australiassouthwest.com.au R R R N E T WO R K

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NEWS + REVIEWS

A DIAMOND IN THE DUST by Frauke Bolten-Boshammer with Sue Smethurst - Simon & Schuster Within minutes of landing in Kununurra, Frauke Bolten had made up her mind to get on a plane back home to Germany. It was 1981 and the dusty frontier town was no place for a woman. However, Frauke stayed, determined to help her husband carve out a new life farming. Tragedy struck just three years later when Friedrich took his own life and she was left to raise their family alone. Twenty-six years after she sold her first necklace off the back porch, Kimberley Fine Diamonds in Kununurra is now home to one of the world’s largest collections of Argyle pink diamonds.Frauke is credited for not only pioneering an industry, but for putting the tiny outback town and its precious diamonds on the map. A tale of love and loss, hardship and heartache, but ultimately the inspiring story of how a young girl from Germany overcame tragedy to pioneer a diamond empire in one of the most unforgiving terrains on earth.

CONFESSION BOOTH Everybody has a deep, dark secret - until they tell an entire roomful of people eager to hear about the most embarrassing, appalling or surprisingly touching moment of their lives. Hear stories from Tracey Spicer, Brendan Cowell, Lewis Hobba and more. Be awed, horrified and enthralled by the things that they’ve done and feel relieved that you’re not the only one with a shameful little secret. www.radio.abc.net.au

RUSTED OFF by Gabrielle Chan - Penguin Books Australia In 1996 – the same year as Pauline Hanson entered parliament – Gabrielle, the city-born daughter of a Chinese migrant, moved to a sheep and wheat farm in country New South Wales. She provides a window into her community where she raised her children and reflects on its lessons for the Australian political story. A fresh take on the old rural narrative, informed by class and culture, belonging and broadband, committees and cake stalls, rural recession and reconciliation. Along the way, Gabrielle recounts conversations with her fellow residents so we can better understand lives rarely seen in political reporting. She describes communities that are forsaking the political process to move ahead of government. Though sometimes facing polar opposite political views to her own, Gabrielle learns the power of having a shared community at stake and in doing so, finds an alternative for modern political tribal warriors.

TWITTER @ArtGalleryWA The State Gallery of Western Australia is known for works by Indigenous and WA artists. Through the exhibitions and events, you are invited to see things differently.

WHERE THE RIVER RUNS by Fleur McDonald - Allen & Unwin

Ten years ago, thirty-year-old Chelsea Taylor left the small country town of Barker and her family’s property to rise to the top as a concert pianist. With talent, ambition and a determination to show them all at home, Chelsea thought she had it made. Yet here she was, back in Barker, with her four-yearold daughter, Aria, readying herself to face her father, Tom. The father who’d shouted down the phone ten years ago never to come home again. With an uneasy truce developing, Chelsea and Aria settle into the rhythm of life on the land with Tom and Cal, the farmhand, who seems already to have judged Chelsea badly. Until a shocking discovery is made on the riverbed and Detective Dave Burrows, the local copper, has to tear back generations of family stories to reveal the secrets of the past. Reviews favour Australian writers and content. Featured books are also available as eBooks.

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INSTAGRAM @westernaustralia Follow Tourism Western Australia, to get insights into the landscapes, locations, the lives and wildlife of Western Australia.


WHAT’S ON S OM ET H I NG for E V E R YON E

BOORNA WAANGINY : Kings Park O ver four extraordinary nights, Kings Park is magically transformed into a cathedral

of light, sound and imagery in which the trees

come to life. State of the art technology and the natural world come together for this spectacular walkthrough experience. The event culminates with a light installation dedicated to the protection of the beautiful part of the world we live in – made in collaboration with thousands of young people across Western Australia. Created in association with the Noongar community, scientists and botanists, Boorna Waanginy explores the inter-connectedness of all life, the fragile beauty of South West Australia’s landscape and the threats it now faces. Bring the family along for an unmissable free festival experience that is truly aweinspiring. 8 - 11 FEBRUARY 2019

Boorna Waanginy created in association with the Noongar community, scientists and botanists. Image Jess Wyld

perthfestival.com.au

INFINITY AWARDS 2018

T

he WA Waste Authority Infinity Awards acknowledge and celebrate the outstanding achievements of Western Australia’s

working towards a better waste future through improved waste practices and innovative waste solutions. Great Southern region local, Lisa Morrison, was awarded the 2018 Regional West Australian Media Award for publishing a series of reports over a six-month period to localise the popular national War on Waste campaign for her Great Southern audience. Her reports, showcasing lifestyle and community change in waste management practices, were designed to inspire others to avoid, protect and recover for the good of the entire community. They were well researched, well written and used a good mix of news platforms to inspire change at an individual, school and community level. While A Highly Recommended award was presented to Emma Young for taking readers ‘behind the plastic bags ban’ with a series of cleverly constructed pieces, written from a personal viewpoint with a generous dose of humour - taking policy initative and translating it into an irresistible read for a broad audience. For

Lisa Morrison with Mt Manypeaks Primary School children waste worriors

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more information visit http://www.wasteauthority.wa.gov.au/programs/cie/infinity-awards

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WHAT’S ON S OM ET H I NG for E V E R YON E

THE GOODS SHED Designed by C Y O’Connor and built in 1898, the Goods Shed has recently been restored by the Collie Heritage Group to welcome locals and visitors alike to gather for markets on alternate Sunday mornings. The markets offer a variety of stalls, including fresh fruit and vegetables, herbs, preserves, candles, soaps, books, jewellery, children’s toys, clothes and much more. The Coach Café, offers Devonshire teas and espresso coffee and wander through the Bill Weir Rolling Stock Shed which houses many vintage wagons, restored by enthusiastic volunteers from the Collie Heritage Group. More information visit:

www.collierivervalley.com.au/event/goods-shed-markets

Boyup Brook

COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL

MEMBER SIGN-UP Support the RRR Network and actively engage with rural, regional and remote women to support and contribute to the economic and social wellbeing of their communities. VISIT www.rrrnetwork.com.au/join-us EMAIL admin@rrrnetwork.com.au PHONE (08) 6316 0407 or POST PAYMENT TO: RRR NETWORK 790 Wirring Road

T

he 34th Annual Boyup Brook Country

Australia. Saturday kicks off with a free street

Music Festival, presented by LiveLighter,

carnival, full of captivating buskers, charming

is the premier country music event in Western

stalls and delicious food. This is followed by the

Australia held over four days. This fantastic

Ute and Truck Muster, with a roaring parade

event is held annually on the third weekend

through the streets before heading down to the

in February in the south west town of Boyup

festival for a full 12 hours of boot-scooting and

Brook. The Festival is known not only for

singing along to premium country music artists.

its amazing headline acts, but also for its

Sunday starts with Australia’s largest Bush Poets

incredibly diverse line-up that always has

Breakfast then heads into another day packed

something for everyone. The West Australian

with delightful country music.

Country Music Awards on the Friday night

15-17 FEBRUARY 2019

showcases the sensational talent of Western

countrymusicwa.com.au

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Margaret River WA 6285


CALENDAR W H AT’S ON in W E ST E R N AUST R A L I A

16 March, Katanning K ATANNING HARMONY FESTIVAL

Experience something different, learn something new and taste something delicious at the 2019 Katanning Harmony Festival. This street festival showcases the positive aspect of Katanning’s cultural diversity as the community comes together to offer a festival that promises colour, culture, connection and excitement. Wander through Clive Street and enjoy live entertainment, cooking demonstrations, kids zone, hands on activities, displays, market stalls and an international food village. www.katanning.wa.gov.au/events/katanning-events/harmonyfestival.aspx

4 Oct - 25 April, Albany THE FEILD OF LIGHT : AVENUE OF HONOUR The Field of Light: Avenue of Honour is an immersive art installation created by internationally acclaimed artist Bruce Munro. Highlighting the region’s unique sense of place and identity, Field of Light: Avenue of Honour symbolises wild beauty, sacrifice, courage, hope and honour. 16,000 shining spheres line Albany’s Avenue of Honour at Mount Clarence paying homage to the 41,000 troops who departed from Albany for the Great War. The 16,000 glass spheres have been planted along the avenue at Albany Heritage Park by local volunteers and they gently illuminate the tree-lined path with an artwork blooming at night like wildflowers after rain. https://www.fieldoflightalbany.com.au

4 Jan, Margaret River SHAKESPEARE IN THE VINES A MIDSUMMERS NIGHT DREAM

On a idsummer’s night, four young lovers find themselves wrapped in the dream-like enchanted forest where sprites play and fairies rule. Leading mischief-maker Puck is onhand to ensure that the course of true love is anything but smooth and games of fantasy, love and dreams ensue in Shakespeare’s most wondrous comedy. Shakespeare in the Vines is a performed in front of the Voyager Estate Cellar Door where the performers move around the audience in an intimate performance. You are invited to bring a picnic, your low-rise chair and enjoy dinner on their manicured lawns before or during the performance. TICKETS https://bit.ly/2qTAXmc

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image Mark Pickthall Photography

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CALENDAR W H AT’S ON in W E ST E R N AUST R A L I A

What’s on?

18 Jan - 17 Feb, Perth FRINGE WORLD FESTIVAL

The city of Perth comes alive in summer with 31 days of entertainment. The big program of events offers something for absolutely everyone, from comedy, circus, theatre, cabaret and more, each presented by Western Australian artists along with performers from all over the world. The Pleasure Garden features the biggest variety of shows and is home to the FRINGE WORLD Mermaids. Enjoy free street performances every night, experience the balmy outdoor food and drink spaces and check out a show in a Spiegeltent (circus tent).FRINGE WORLD is the third largest Fringe in the world and annually features around 700 events at more than 130 venues all over Perth. TICKETS https://fringeworld.com.au

image Aaron Walker Photographer

19 - 20 January, Karridale WESTERN AUSTRALIA CIRCUS FESTIVAL Held over two glorious days, set in the unique and pituresque surrounds of Karridale in the south west, the forest comes alive with markets, workshops and the whoops, whistles and cheers for the entertainment. The incredible line-up features international circus cabaret, comedy stars, and live bands from all over the world. Enjoy an authentic festival experience and get up close and personal with acrobats, aerialists, and sideshow superstars.

TICKETS www.lunarcircus.com

1 - 4 March, Nannup NANNUP MUSIC FESTIVAL

Come and join the 30th annual Nannup Music Festival. Enjoy street shows, meditation, workshops, poetry, delicious food and handmade wonder. A family friendly event with kids activities, busking, jamming, street art, sculpture walks, performers and workshops as well as mental, environmental and health discussions and activities. The music varies from wild rock shows to emotive solos and of course the Emerging Artist Award dedicated to discovering, encouraging and promoting new talent. TICKETS http://nannupmusicfestival.org

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AROUND THE REGIONS BU Y W E ST, E AT BE ST

Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Buy West Eat Best program

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ollaboration was a key ingredient at the 10th anniversary of the Buy West Eat Best program in Perth recently. Founding member and innovator of Buy West Eat Best Jim Trandos from Trandos Farms said the program is in a unique and necessary position to bridge the needs of industry and policy makers. “Buy West Eat Best brings together organisations in the interests of food integrity and promotion through Regional Development Commissions and Regional Food Councils; growers and producers with retailers and restaurants. It is a vitally important label that ultimately reflects the needs of the most important stakeholder of all, the consumer,” he said.

Since formally launching as a program under the then Department of Agriculture and Food in 2008, Buy West Eat Best has provided West Australians and visitors to the state with a trusted food and beverage brand mark.

awareness amongst consumers, with 71 per cent of survey respondents recognising the brand, and 90 per cent of respondents more likely to consider buying a product with the logo.

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development Director of Food Deborah Pett said the program has only gone from strength to strength over the years.

“When retailers applied the Buy West Eat Best logo to a shelf sticker in store, research showed a sales increase of 10 per cent, with one-infour consumers actively looking for the logo when grocery shopping,” Ms Pett said.

“The success of the Buy West Eat Best program pays tribute to the hard work of those involved and highlights that food provenance remains a vital consideration for WA consumers.” Recent independent market research demonstrated strong Buy West Eat Best brand

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“It must be acknowledged that the noncompetitive involvement from all major retailers has changed the way consumers see this program. Buy West Eat Best is now an essential value of being a West Australian. This has allowed membership to grow from 38 founding partners to more than 175, including major

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AROUND THE REGIONS BU Y W E ST, E AT BE ST

retailers, small growers, artisan producers, large-scale processors, restaurant and food service providers.” Visiting Australian demographer and social researcher Mark McCrindle noted at the anniversary presentation that in conducting the Woolworths Trolley Trends Report and other notable reports for the food industry, a counter trend has also emerged. As well as a shift to purchase more local products, Australians are also looking for something that’s wholesome. “Australians are on the hunt for value, when they discuss value it is broader than just price. It’s value in terms of what they value, so it is about sustainable supply chain, it is about nutrition and the quality of the food. They want real food, not just empty food. “That’s where the source of the food comes in. There is a premium that they place on local. There is a trust factor and indeed a premium they place around certain regions and an expectation of a certain quality,” he said.

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AROUND THE REGIONS BU Y W E ST, E AT BE ST

Buy West Eat Best team, L-R Sarah Gordon, Kristy Hopkins, Melissa Worthington, Deborah Pett

Wesley College Moorditj Mob students

L-R Jim Trandos, (Trandos Farms) and the Hon. Alannah MacTiernan MLC

L-R The Hon. Alannah MacTiernan MLC and Sue Daubney(Bannister Downs)

“So, that’s where there are great opportunities for foods from WA.” Buy West Eat Best has developed excellent working relationships with all major WA retailers, as well as influential chefs and food producers. Doriana Mangili from Sweeter Banana Co-Operative based in Carnarvon said the program has played a significant part in the success of their business. “We value the opportunities for all producers, big or small, to network, gain access to markets, attend events and engage in cross-collaboration. The Buy West Eat Best program has been a large part of the success of Sweeter Banana over the past 10 years.”

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Strict criteria and compliance requirements behind the distinctive trademarked logo ensures credibility and assurance across the industry. In order to use the logo, the product must be grown, farmed or fished in Western Australia and processed and packaged right here as well. Through continued collaboration across the WA food industry and ongoing support from consumers, the benefits of the innovative program will be here to stay. Through Buy West Eat Best, local suppliers have discovered new opportunities to expand their business, and at the same time the WA community enjoys a quality, fresh and trusted source of food. For more information on the program, visit www.buywesteatbest.org.au

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fter working in the Agriculture Industry for the past 25 years, it gives me great pleasure to be able to assist rural-based individuals and groups to achieve their goals. The opportunity to assist communities within my region, the North Midlands, with sponsorships include: MORAWA NETBALL CLUB

- A donation of fertiliser for their recent cropping project, raising funds for new courts and shelter. STATE SANDGREENS

- Jurien Bay, supporting their Club grounds project. THREE SPRINGS GOLF CLUB

- Assisting the purchase of night golf equipment, keeping their members on the greens in the warmer months! The list goes on..

A recent initiative came about after a progressive and enthusiastic teacher at the WA College of Agriculture, Morawa approached me to do a trial at the College involving the students. There are many employment opportunities which involve understanding how to design, establish and monitor trials to evaluate results, providing an opportunity to mentor future agronomists. We have a nitrogen by variety trial which looks at using N Gauges to provide a top-up nitrogen rate to achieve the predicted yield and within protein windows. The aim is to not only maximise the accuracy of nitrogen applications for yield, to then hit the protein targets across several crops and varieties. The four students were each responsible for their own variety of crop, participating in the trials of:

www.summitfertz.com.au |

Although the students will have graduated by the time the trial is ready for harvest, the Morawa Farm Improvement Group, led by Katrina Sasse, will make good use of the trial on a spring tour and in February at crop update time when we have the results ready. SUMMIT FERTILIZERS gives me the flexibility to support various individuals and groups, help them make the most of every opportunity that presents itself and help build stronger rural communities.

SUMMIT FERTILIZERS Juliet McDonald

Juliet McDonald jmcdonald@summitfertz.com.au 0429 945 332

INCREASE BUSINESS PROFITS THROUGH SAFE CHEMICAL HANDLING Delivering quality and vitally important programs to the farming and associated industries using agriculture and veterinary chemicals for more than 20 years • 40 courses scheduled across WA in 2018 • Accreditation for 5 years • 1 day re-Accreditation courses • National connections & tailored training delivered by RTO’s • Tailored half day ‘Introduction to Chemical Safety’ courses for Women in Agricultrue www.auschemwa.com.au

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• Soil sampling and understanding the soil analysis • Sowing, using a cone seeder • Tissue testing and analysis • NDVI with hand held greenseeker

LOOK AFTER THE FARMS MOST IMPORTANT ASSET - YOU! All of Safe Farms WA’s activities are focused on supporting the farming industry. We do this by providing information and tools that are vital in improving and implementing SAFE farming systems and building a strong safety culture. Healthy, safety and wellbeing has never been more important, working with industry to reduce deaths and accidents to provide simple and effective solutions. INSPIRING SAFE FARMING www.safefarms.net.au

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SECTION E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

the ARTof

MEDICINE Written by RURAL HEALTH WEST - images KATE FERGUSON

Professor Donna Mak leaving for Mt Barnett Station

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unting for boab nuts, vaccinating cattle and installing fence posts are not activities you would typically expect to see on the curriculum of a medical degree, however they form an important part of The University of Notre Dame’s Kimberley Remote Area Health Placement Program. For ten days each year, second-year medical students from the University live and work alongside west Kimberley people in family-owned and community organisations, such as cattle stations, schools, radio stations, local shires and small business. Through this work, they gain an appreciation of the lives of people living in remote communities.

That’s what this program aims to capture. ”Student Vince Figliomeni completed his placement at Wangki Yupurnanupurru Aboriginal radio station in Fitzroy Crossing. “You pick up bits and pieces from textbooks and lectures, but being on the ground and talking to people gives you different perspectives. Putting that personal experience and insight together will be invaluable when we start to practise,” Vince said. “I asked one lady what can white fella doctors do to improve trust among the Aboriginal community. She told me ‘you being here – coming here and taking an interest – that’s a good start.’’

Founded in 2006 by Professor Donna Mak, the program gives students an opportunity to engage with and learn from local people to inform the care they provide once they start to practise. “This program starts to teach the students the art of medicine. They are learning the science side of medicine through their classroom studies, but the science part – prescribing, diagnosing – doesn’t vary much between city and country patients,” Professor Mak said. “The art of medicine is understanding that person in context; how they live, their relationships, their access to care.

Fellow student Juan Stephen worked at Mowanjum Art and Culture Centre in Derby. “A lesson for me was the complex family structure in Aboriginal communities. “Understanding cultural practices such as avoidance; it can be hard to wrap your head around, but as a future doctor this is something that’s critical to know,” Juan said. “You begin to appreciate why it may be difficult for a patient to have a complete family medical history and can explore other ways to fill in the gaps.

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AROUND THE REGIONS T he A RT of M E DIC I N E would in her own country with her own people. I may not have appreciated this aspect of care provision without the Kimberley placement.

”Professor Mak said ongoing evaluation of the program since its inception has demonstrated the influence it is having on clinical practice and career choices. “Our research has shown that these programs help the students to make informed decisions about their future careers and that the students are more responsive to the needs of rural patients accessing urban services when they begin practising. “They also report that they have greater appreciation of the circumstances and resilience of rural people, and that their immersion experiences helped them to establish future professional networks.”

”Professor Mak said another advantage of Notre Dame’s approach is that it enables a broader spectrum of students to be influenced than other similar programs. “Programs like [UWA’s] Rural Clinical School are incredibly important in preparing students for future medical practise, but not all students will have the opportunity to be involved, ”Professor Mak said. “This program is compulsory for all of our students; we’re not just exposing the ones who are already interested in rural medicine or the ones from rural backgrounds. “We know that not every doctor will work out bush – and nor should they – but regardless of where they work, they need to be able to relate to people from the country and to deliver the best care for that person. This program gives every student a chance to develop that ability.”

‘‘The art of medicine is understanding that person in context; how they live, their relationships, their access to care.’’

One former student shared this account when approached for their feedback on the program: “Less than two months into my employment as a doctor in a tertiary hospital in Perth, I had an Aboriginal patient in my care whose treatment goal had been changed to ‘palliative intent only’. The lady was uncommunicative due to her condition, but we discussed her care options with her partner. It was agreed by all that the most sensitive and culturally appropriate place for her palliative care

A video of the program is available on the Rural Health West YouTube channel at https://youtu.be/4MD4SMFS9qs

Jessica Watson, Tom Godfrey and Annabel Mrshall

Elizabeth Tierney, Michael Genoni and Joshua Briotti at Mimbi Caves

Want to share an event or happenings taking place in your West Australian town or neighbourhood? Please submit your story, approx. 500-600 words and high resolution images to admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

Miachel Genoni at Mimbi Caves

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE PORONGU RU P N AT ION A L PA R K

The GREAT

Southern

The massive ancient granite domes of Porongurup National Park give exhilarating views of the landscape, not to be missed. SOURCE Department of Parks and Wildlife Western Australia IMAGES Tourism Western Australia

PORONGURUP NATIONAL PARK

Summers of the Great Southern are ideal for family adventuresand a fascinating place for picnicking and bush walking for everyone.

Porongurup National Park protcts the Porongurup Range, an extremely ancient and largely levelled mountain range formed over 1,200 million years ago. The range is no more than fifteen kilometres from east to west and consists of granite peaks, leelled into dmes. the highest point in the Porongurup Range is ‘Devils Slide, at 670 metres, while several other peaks are above 600 metres, which is about 400 metres above the surrounding range. Much of the Porongurup Range was

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an island surrounded by the sea, with the Stirling Range forming the southern coastline. FLORA AND FAUNA High rainfalls explain the survival of karri forests, located quite a distance from their main stronghold between Manjimup and Walpole. The karri forest is one of the major attractions of the Porongurups and occur chiefly on the upper slopes of the range on deep red soils known as ‘karri loam’. Though not nearly as rich biologically as the more

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE PORONGU RU P N AT ION A L PA R K ranges; a perfect view from your campsite.

northerly Stirling Range, there exists ten endemic species of plant in the Porongurup Range, the best known being the mountain villarsia.

Enjoy breakfast, lunch or afternoon tea from the general store just a few hundred metres from the Park, taste the region’s fine wines just a short distance away or visit the nearby coastal town of Denmark.

Visitors will find paths that lead to several peaks. Other paths cross the range and a nature trail leads through the first near the ‘tree in the rock’ picnic area. The ‘castle rock’ picnic area is also the start of a 4.4 kilometre return walk to the Granite Skywalk, with its incredible views! Or take it all in and enjoy impressive views from a 23 kilometer drive around the entire ranges.

PLAYING SAFE Take care and be cautious of slippery, rough and uneven surfaces.

Nature lovers will enjoy the challence of identifying over 1,000 species of flowering plants and 78 species of birds, including the majestic wedgetail eagles to the electric blue splendid fairy wrens.

Carry two to three litres of drinking water per person when walking for half or full days. Be prepared for sudden weather changes. Wear boots or sturdy footwear, weather-proof clothing and sun protection. Eucalyptus trees can shed branches at any time, be especially aware on windy days.

STAY A LITTLE LONGER Enjoy the walks and everything the region has to offer from the beautiful and peaceful Porongurup Range Tourist Park. Situated opposite the entrance of the National Park, the grassed camping and caravan sites are nestled amongst shady trees with a backdrop of the

For more information visit www.australiassouthwest.com.au and https://parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au/park/porongurup

We recognise and acknowledge Wagyl Kaip people as the traditional custodians of Porongurup National Park.

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE W E ST AUST R A L I A N L IGH T HOUS E S

SHINING

bright

Western Australia has some of the most remote and harsh coastlines in the world. It was one of the last states to be lit, with most lighthouses dating from the turn of

I

MAGE: Elements Margaret River - Australia’s South West Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse www.australiassouthwest.com

the 20th Century.

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TRAVEL & ADVENTURE W E ST AUST R A L I A L IGH T HOUS E S

OPEN LIGHTHOUSES

American whalers frequented the coast in great numbers during the 1840’s. During January 1841, there were 17 ships in Geographe Bay, nearly all were whalers. Three American whalers were wrecked on the south west coast of Western Australia on 8 July 1840 in a gale: the Samuel Wright, the North America and the Governor Endicott.

The grounds of most lighthouse are open to the public, however there may be periodic restrictions. The following lighthouse towers are open to the public throughout the year or at special events, including Cape Leeuwin, Cape Naturaliste, Rottnest Island and Point Moore.

The light was particularly remote and the living conditions were cramped, with the two lighthouse keepers living in one cottage with their families. The keepers had to be self-reliant, growing a garden of vegetables and hunting goat and fish for food. The remoteness was relieved with regular socialising between the families of the nearby Ningaloo Pastoral Station.

BABBAGE ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE

JARMAN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE Up until now, this was one of the most endangered lighthouses in Australia. The Jarman Island Lighthouse is one of two segmented cast iron sea lights in Western Australia, created using newlydeveloped pre-fabricated cast iron towers imported from England. The other cast iron lighthouse, manufactured by Chance Brothers, is located at Point Moore near Geraldton.

A wooden tower 60 feet high on a site 42 feet above sea level held a fourth-order dioptric light visible at 15 miles in good conditions. The tower was developed by the Northwest Branch of the Public Works Department, with the lantern house and light supplied by the firm of W.T. Douglas. It was converted from paraffin (kerosene) oil to acetylene illumination in 1909. By 1913 it carried in two red sector lights that flashed every three seconds. This was replaced by a new light on a steel framework tower in the early 1960s, which was present and working in 1994. The original light is now on exhibition in the grounds of the lighthouse keeper’s cottage museum.

CAPE NATURALISTE LIGHTHOUSE The year 1907 was an eventful one for this lighthouse, with the wreck of the Carnarvon Castle and the impact of a fireball on the tower and quarters. At least 12 ships have come to grief in the strong currents and dangerous reefs which lie off Cape Naturaliste’s sharp point.

POINT CLOATES LIGHTHOUSE

The Halcyon was completely wrecked in 1844. The Day Dawn, the Gaff and the Dao all went ashore during gales at Quindalup or near Toby’s Inlet. The Phoenix, a 684-tonne Danish ship loaded with jarrah, was swept ashore in 1895, and the Paragon met with the same fate.

The abandoned tower of the Point Cloates Lighthouse stands starkly on a sandhill ridge near Ningaloo in north Western Australia.

VLAMINGH HEAD LIGHTHOUSE Vlamingh Head Lighthouse was built on the northwest tip of North West Cape, 61 metres above sea level, and was completed in 1912. Quarters for two lightkeepers were built below the hill to the north of the lighthouse. A tramway with horse-drawn trolleys was provided for bringing stores from the beach landing situated to the southwest. The light was discontinued in 1967 and a new light established on one of the radio communication towers near Point Murat. The ruins of a WWII radar tower are a short distance north of the light tower. In 2012, the lighthouse celebrated 100 years of service and the original lens (worth £5,090 back in 1915) was lit with kerosene to mark the occasion.

Built in 1910, the light is one of five built with Commonwealth funding before the anticipated Commonwealth takeover in 1915. For more information on the history and details of all lighthouses in Western Australia, please visit https://lighthouses.org.au/wa

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THE WORKPLACE R EGION A L L E A DE R SH I P M A ST E RC L A S S

REGIONAL LEADERSHIP

MASTERCLASS

Written by MARION McRAE Image TOURISM WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Written by Jackie Jarvis images: Strange Images Photography

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Day two saw the start of a program delivered by Professor Julia Richardson, Deputy Head of the School of Management at Curtin University, who had designed a two-day regional leadership masterclass specifically for WA rural and regional women in consultation with the RRR Network.

n May 2018, the RRR Network launched an online survey to determine the personal and professional development opportunities being sought by WA women. The results clearly showed that WA women in regional areas were actively seeking new learning opportunities, with 81 per cent of respondents stating they were considering undertaking some form of personal or professional development, training or further study, within the next two years.

Julia was a hit, with one participant saying “This was my first leadership class and Julia made it all sound so easy and logical with various methodology scenarios. I thoroughly enjoyed it.’’

When asked to identify the type of training they would like to undertake, the top three areas of learning identified were leadership, effective communication, and influencing decision makers. Our readers listed the main barriers to further study as being busy in their current job roles, the cost of undertaking high level development, and being the primary carer of children. Seeing a clear need, the RRR Network has partnered with the Curtin Business School Executive Education team to develop a range of opportunities for WA women, commencing with a Regional Leadership Masterclass that was delivered at the Muresk Institute in Northam in October 2018. Twenty WA women come together for this residential program that started with a cooking demonstration, featuring acclaimed WA chefs Don Hancey and Sophie Budd. Good food and wine followed, and the participants had the opportunity to network with each other, the RRR Network board and the course presenters.

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Participants also did a communications workshop with well-known agricultural events and PR consultant Esther Jones (nee Price) and participants described as “excellent”, “incredibly valuable” and with one even saying “I wish I had heard this presentation 20 years ago.” Small business operators Zoe Ednie-Brown and Jahna Trethowan gave a unique and entertaining insight into the evolution of the start-up business Orchid Valley Pet Co who produce international award-winning eco-friendly pet caskets. A panel session followed, featuring a range of recognised regional leaders including Wongan Hills farmer and Chair of Country Arts WA Sue Middleton, MLA Director Erin Gorter, and Northam based business strategist Anna Dixon. The program was an overwhelming success and three more are planned in early 2019. See our website for more details: www.rrrnetwork.com.au

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THE WORKPLACE R EGION A L L E A DE R SH I P M A ST E RC L A S S

The RRR Network partnered with the Curtin Business School Executive Education team to present the first Regional Leadership Masterclass, delivered at the Muresk Institute in Northam in October 2018.

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THE WORKPLACE Women i n L E A DE R SH I P Su m m it

THERE IS A BIG CONVERSATION ABOUT LEADERSHIP, WITH DIVERSITY, EQUALITY AND INCLUSION BEING A FOCUS FOR MANY COMPANIES

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AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP communicating, empowering and connecting with others in the workplace.

t the Rural and Regional Women in Leadership Summit held in October in Sydney, these topics were explored in a room full of women, with many stepping forward for case studies, keynote speeches and panel discussions. There was a focus on career advancement for women, particularly in male-dominated industries such as fire management services, transport, energy, law, telecommunications and pastoral, to name a few. Leadership roles in companies and government organisations were also discussed, such as in education, health and banking. A number of powerful messages came through over the two days. One of the most important was that the qualities of leadership are less defined by position, role or training, but are more about the ability of the leader to demonstrate self-awareness and ‘soft’ skills. These include leading by example, vulnerability, authenticity, courage, being more comfortable with being uncomfortable, being open to giving and receiving feedback, and collaboration with others. The ‘energetics’ of leadership wasn’t discussed directly but was exceptionally clear in the room. What does a great leader look like? Each speaker eloquently addressed their journey to leadership, which is a place they had to go naturally (even though, at times, uncomfortably) for career advancement. They often found them themselves in situations that would be unworkable or unmanageable without leadership skills, and so needed to step up. Through past experience, challenges and having to find what works, they agreed a great leader has the following qualities: • Self-awareness – they know who they are, what they believe in and their own strengths and weaknesses. They are authentic (unapologetic and uncompromising) in how they choose to show up. • Focus on others instead of themselves and committed to R R R N E T WO R K

• Leading by example and calling out things that are not OK in the workplace. Great leaders are open to giving and receiving genuine feedback. • The ability to create harmony with work-life and self, and show others how to do this too. To advance in career (and this could be extrapolated to business or community roles), many of the speakers touched on leaping out of their comfort zone. This is doing things they were nervous about or fearful of, seizing opportunities, tuning out the negative self-talk, having a growth mindset and accepting challenges. To get out of your comfort zone, you need to become more comfortable with the uncomfortable. This leads into vulnerability and authenticity, and the importance of being seen and showing your true self to the people around you (including managers, staff and clients). Dr Brené Brown (author and shame researcher, mentioned by several presenters) defines vulnerability as ‘‘uncertainty, risk and emotional exposure.’’ She also says that ‘‘vulnerability is the birthplace of love, belonging, joy, courage, empathy and creativity’’ – the very things we all crave in our workplaces/lives to enable us to connect and contribute fully. There is a bigger conversation to be had about vulnerability and how to truly harness it as a superpower, but at the Summit it arose frequently as a leadership skill. Dictatorial or empirical management styles with little human connection may still exist, but there has been a major shift in many organisations.

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RURAL & REGIONAL

Women in Leadership

SUMMIT Written by FLEUR PORTER - images SUPPLIED

CONNECTION AND COLLABORATION Understanding the inner self and working with a coach or mentor to support this process was another key topic discussed at the Summit. Each speaker touched on their personal journey and acknowledged important people who supported them – starting with the influence of their mothers, and then other inspirations and sponsors along the way. They also touched on the self-awareness required to lead, allowing them to face difficult situations and challenging people from a much stronger place. Connection and the ability to be open to (and receptive of) others was key to being a great leader. This connection fosters empathy, understanding and clear communication. They also

One of the most important messages raised was the qualities of leadership that are less defined by position, role or training, but are more about the ability of the leader to demonstrate selfawareness and ‘soft’ skills. had mentors, boards, and sponsors at various stages of their leadership journey. They noted that recognising other’s strengths and weaknesses and collaborating with people who have complementary skills created great teams. Women love to network and have real conversations with other women about how they manage all their roles (work, family, self, community). There is incredible power to be found in a room full of women who are open to conversations about change. WHERE TO FROM HERE? The next step is extending the topic of leadership for women in rural, regional and remote communities to include not just career, but also business and community roles. Vulnerability is a superpower, and we should talk about it more. Why not pioneer this in Western Australia? R R R N E T WO R K

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SECTION E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

WA Women’s

HALL of FAME Written by GINA CHURCH - images supplied

Nanette Williams 2015 WA Women’s Hall of Fame Inductee

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CELEBRATING WOMEN WA Women’s H A L L of FA M E

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nternational Women’s Day is celebrated in numerous countries around the world and dates to 1909 when the first day was observed in the USA.

child-care, volunteering, and providing positive role-models and

In 1910, at a Socialist International (SI) meeting in Copenhagen,

government. The Hon Simone McGurk MLA, Minister for Women’s

a ‘Women’s Day’ was established to acknowledge the movement

Interests said: “I am committed to gender equality and initiatives that

for women’s rights and support universal suffrage for women.

recognise and celebrate the achievements of women across our state.

International Women’s Day was celebrated for the first time in Europe

The WA Women’s Hall of Fame is an important way to acknowledge

by over a million women and men attending rallies in March 1911. It has

the efforts of women in WA, across a diverse range of endeavours,

been celebrated annually since that time.

and I am pleased to offer my support.”

The United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)

The WA Women’s Hall of Fame Inc. encourages everyone to consider

was formed in 1977 to develop strategic programs to foster the

nominating a woman they know. It may be their mother or another

empowerment of women. The Australian committee was formed in

relative, a colleague, a friend, a neighbour, or simply someone they

1989 and the Western Australian Chapter in 2008. In 2010, the

admire. In nominating them, they acknowledge their achievements

name was changed to UN Women.

and the difference they have made to the lives of other Western

encouragement to the young women of our future. It is now endorsed by women’s organisations, business, industry and

Australians.

On the centenary of International Women’s Day in 2011, the UN Women Perth launched the WA Women’s Hall of Fame. The Perth UN Women’s Chapter closed in 2012, however the Hall of Fame

Nominations

continued under the stewardship of the Collaboration of International

Open 21st November 2018

Women’s Day until 2017, when the WA Women’s Hall of Fame Inc.

Close on the 7th February2019

was established. To date, 178 extraordinary Western Australian women from all regions in this state who have left their mark in our communities through

Nominating a woman is easy and can be done online. www.womenshalloffame.com.au

business; growing industries, leading movements, mentoring, building communities, fundraising, working in science and research, the arts,

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CELEBRATING WOMEN WA Women’s H A L L of FA M E

Throughout our State’s history some extraordinary Western Australian women have left their mark in our cities and regions; previous inductees share their thoughts...

Annette Howard 2012 WA Women’s Hall of Fame Inductee

IMAGE: Royal Agricultural Society of WA

Reverend Pamela Halbert 2016 WA Women’s Hall of Fame Inductee

Mary Nenke 2012 WA Women’s Hall of Fame Inductee

Dr Erica Smyth 2016 WA Women’s Hall of Fame Inductee

MARY NENKE

ANNETTE HOWARD

Kukerin, pioneer and leader in the yabbie industry,

Wannamal, Wheatbelt, piggery farmer & industry

farming champion advocating for family and Agri-

leader.

tourism.

‘‘It is essential to recognise the amazing leadership of women in regional WA in augmenting change. Through this recognition it helps educate the city about the enormous contribution of the regions to our state’s economy and well-being through agriculture and fisheries, tourism and mining, as well as

REVEREND PAMELA HALBERT

‘‘So many regional women through sheer determination and hard work are doing amazing things in their communities. Their stories and contributions are so important to our rural communities with demonstrations of unselfishness, inspiration and connections, that they all deserve recognition.’’

‘‘I believe country women should be encouraged to nominate rural women for the Women’s Hall of Fame as they show there is nothing as strong as gentleness and nothing as gentle as real strength. These values are the creative energy that is required for the courage, integrity and commitment in their chosen field of national and/or community involvement and achievement. Often with imagination towards creative forward progress of our civilisation.’’

highlighting that ‘without farmers we don’t eat.‘‘ R R R N E T WO R K

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SECTION E DI TOR I A L SU BT I T L E OR DI S C L A I M E R

Throughout our State’s history some extraordinary Western Australian women have left their mark, in our cities and throughout the regions. Women who have forged forward to create new settlements, strong communities, become pioneers of industry and business innovators. It was not an easy path for our forebearers, but their courage; resilience, resourcefulness and integrity, is what helped build this great State. There are so many ‘inspiring’ women in regional WA who have effected change and provided a better pathway for the women who followed. Now is the time to acknowledge them. Nominate a woman you know, past or present, for the WA Women’s Hall of Fame.

NOMINATE NOW www.wawomenshalloffame.com.au

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n i e h WE S written by Amanda Walker Images: Stranges Images Photography

B

usinesswomen, entrepreneurs and leaders from across the Wheatbelt region gathered at the picturesque Faversham House in York recently for a unique event designed to connect and inspire. According to WBN Executive Officer Caroline Robinson, around two-thirds of all Wheatbelt businesses have a female director, partner or senior decision-maker. An increasing number of women are now also starting their own business in addition to their usual day-to-day tasks. “The economic impact of women entrepreneurs in the Wheatbelt continues to rise each year,” she said. “WE Shine is about coming together as a

community of business women to create connections and foster relationships that will ensure wheatbelt businesses can thrive.” The event focused on growing businesses and networks in the area and fostering a cohesive, supportive community. Every woman has their own strengths and talents, and these can be used to great effect in building up not only their own business, but those around them. As MC for the day and innovation strategist, entrepreneur and Women in Technology WA Chair Pia Turcinov highlighted; “Women with strong professional networks are more likely to succeed.” From the budding entrepreneur to the experienced businessowner, there was

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something for everyone at WE Shine. Keynote speakers started the day, providing an abundance of knowledge, insights and inspiration to the group. Attendees heard from Dr. Melissa Langdon, academic and founder of BOSSMAMA.com, about fostering an entrepreneurial mindset and the unique challenges faced by remote, regional and rural business women. Networking specialist Ron Gibson spoke to the group on how important networking is to build resilience within the broader community and practical ways to make it work. After a delicious lunch catered by Mukinbudin-based Wild Strawberry Catering, WE Shine attendees had the opportunity to

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CELEBRATING WOMEN W E SH I N E Women E nt repreneu r s of th e W heatb elt turn their newfound knowledge and inspiration to the practical in the Skills2Shine masterclasses. Delivered by some of WA’s leading business women, the masterclasses provided a range of techniques and strategies each woman could take away and implement as they embark on the next steps in their business development. Marie Cloughley of WA Cleanskin Cellars, Danielle McNamee from Perth-based consultancy ProcessWorx, ‘Funky Kids’ retail chain founder Anna Abelha and ‘The Goodnight Nurse’ Emma Pollard were just some of the incredible ladies there to help participants find their own ways to shine.

their own insights and advice; Julie Walsh of Topp Dogg in Moora; Merredin multi-small business owner Tracey McFarlane; and personal trainer Lisa O’Neill from Groan and Tone in Northam. To conclude the day, the networking continued in a more relaxed fashion with sunset drinks and WA wine tasting to the smooth sounds of local entertainer Georgie Sadler. Attendees left with not only the information they needed to continue growing their business, but practical skills and a networking boost to aid them in their journey forward. If you would like to learn more about the Wheatbelt Business Network and upcoming local business-related events, head to www.wheatbeltbusinessnetwork.com.au

“Women with strong professional networks are more likely to succeed.”

An interactive business ‘Q and A’ session was also squeezed into the day, facilitated by Curtin University Entrepreneurship Director Danelle Cross. A panel of three successful local ladies offered

2 WBN ‘WE Shine’ Committee: L-R Lisa O’Neil, Nicky Brennan, Chloe Tienhoven, Melissa Welsh, Caroline Robinson, Danelle Smith, Tori Kopke and Amanda Walker

‘WE Shine’ MC Pia Turcinov and RSM representative Danelle Smith

Emily Scanlan and Kasse McCummiskey

‘WE Shine’ Business Panel L-R Danelle Cross of Curtin University; Louise O’Neil (Groan and Tone); Tracey McFarlane (Subway Merredin & Café 56); Julie Walsh (Topp Dogg Moora).

R R R N E T WO R K

De Strange (Strange Images Photography) and Malene Brownley

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Empowering

WOMEN through writing Written by ISABELLE O’BRIEN- Allen & Unwin - Images supplied

N

E

ever in Fleur’s wildest dreams did she imagine she would grow up to write twelve novels and sell over half a million copies. The bestselling author’s rural fiction novels, including the wildly popular Red Dust, Fools Gold and Suddenly One Summer, have all been heavily influenced by her life spent living and working in regional Australia. Fleur says ‘‘painting pictures (of the outback) with words and making the reader have the sensation of sun on their skin and dust in their eyes, all from their lounge room’’, is just magic.

mpowering rural women through writing Australian author Fleur McDonald was born on Glenroy, a working farm in the small town of Orroroo in the Flinders Ranges. Like all the other local kids, she loved roaming free with her brothers and sisters, mucking in on the farm and riding her bike.

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CELEBRATING WOMEN E M POW E R I NG WOM E N T H ROUGH W R I T I NG

It hasn’t always been smooth sailing for Fleur. After she left school she did a stint selling meat with well-known Australian cook Maggie Beer in Meningie, SA. She then tried her hand at jillarooing for twelve months on an Angus stud farm. Fleur always knew she wanted to stay in farming, but found it so hard to get work as a female in agriculture. As a result, she moved across the border to Western Australia, where she found there to be more land and more opportunities. Many of Fleur’s books focus on the experiences of rural women overcoming adversity. Fleur says to empower women ‘‘is one of my big aims of my writing’’. Her books always feature a strong female lead, and Fleur says ‘‘when women see other women are achieving, I hope it makes them feel they can too.’’ There are many unique challenges faced by rural women and these feature heavily across Fleur’s writing. ‘‘While there are more women in farming now, women just aren’t as prominent. To avoid isolation, you have to find a great network of people to be your sounding board and to talk things through. Don’t ever be afraid to be the only woman in the room.’’ But, at the end of the day, in the words of Fleur’s character Fiona in Sapphire Falls, ‘‘We’re country women, we just get on and keep going. No one else is going to do it for us.’’ Fleur says there’s no better industry to be involved in. ‘‘Other than writing’’, she laughs.

children, and a Jack Russell terrier called Rocket. So, what’s next for Fleur? ‘‘More books!’’ she says. Twelve novels down, Fleur is yet to run out of storylines. She says she gets a lot of her best ideas from radio programs and news headlines. Her novel Silver Clouds came straight out of an ABC Radio program with Barry Nicholls when a caller rang up with a story about two gold rings left on the side of a billabong. Fleur says, ‘‘I usually just ask myself ‘‘what if?’ and go from there!’’ Her latest novel, Where the River Runs, was inspired by an old newspaper clipping Fleur’s nanna held onto after many years. There’s a mystery unfolding across several generations and, of course, a strong female protagonist in lead character Chelsea Taylor. We can’t wait to dig in. Fleur McDonald’s latest novel, Where the River Runs, is available now through Allen & Unwin ($29.99).

Never one to sit back, Fleur has created an online interview series called Bush Lanterns, celebrating exceptional Australian women in agriculture. She also channels her passion for supporting women through her not-for-profit organisation Breaking the Silence for domestic violence awareness. Fleur says women in small communities need somewhere they can go for help while remaining anonymous, so the foundation’s website provides localised information for rural women escaping abusive relationships. Today, Fleur lives in Esperance with her husband, her two

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OPEN LETTER TO SUBSCRIBERS New Subscription Fee for Magazine I am writing to advise that we are no longer able to print and post the RRR Network Magazine for free.

The electronic version of the magazine will remain FREE and available online at www.rrrnetwork.com.au

The Rural, Regional, Remote Women’s Network of WA (RRR Network) was, from 1996 until 2016, a WA State Government Advisory Body. For 20 years the cost of publishing and posting the Network News magazine was covered by the WA State Government. In 2016 the members of the RRR Network Reference group elected to accept a WA State Government Royalties for Regions funding grant to transition the RRR Network to an independent entity. The grant was provided on the basis that the RRR Network must use the funds to become financially selfsufficient.

In addition, the stories you love from magazine will be shared more regularly via our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts.

In March 2018 we re-launched the RRR Network magazine and hoped that advertising revenue would cover the cost of continued free distribution to our 4,000 subscribers. Unfortunately, it has not been enough and we have made the difficult decision to stop posting the magazine for free. We thank those advertisers who did support our re-launch and continue to support us.

If you wish to still receive a printed copy of the magazine posted to your door, the annual subscription fee is $40 per annum (4 editions per year). Subscriptions can purchased on our website. If you do not have access to the internet you can post a cheque or money order for $40 to RRR Network 790 Wirring Road Margaret River WA 6285. We thank you for your continued support of the RRR Network. YOURS SINCERELY JACKIE JARVIS CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER - THE RURAL, REGIONAL, REMOTE WOMEN’S NETWORK OF WA

www.rrrnetwork.com.au

@rrrnetwork

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/rrrnetwork

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@rrrnetwork

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CELEBRATING WOMEN D i st a nce educ at ion i n We st er n Au st r a l i a

DEB EDWARDS:

DISTANCE EDUCATION JOURNEY Written by VAL MOREY - Director of Learning & TeachingSchoOl of Education - Curtin University Images supplied

M

any people say that when you have kids, everything changes; your priorities and interests shift in ways you may never have predicted. Deb Edwards, who worked in financial planning before she had her children, was no exception. Once she had children of her own, she understood profoundly how precious children are to their parents, how parents want the very best for them, and how much parents want their children’s unique talents and needs both understood and met. This realisation led her to recognise that a return to the world of financial planning was not for her. Instead, she undertook TAFE certificates 3 and 4 in education support that allowed her to seek employment as an education assistant in a primary school, where she could take a role in meeting the needs of the children in her community. Deb, a long-term resident in Albany in the Great Southern region of Western Australia, was employed as an education assistant in a local Catholic primary for eight years. The potential of effective education assistants is often recognised by teaching colleagues, such was the case for Deb. She was urged by teachers in that school to upgrade her qualifications to a Bachelor of Education degree so that she could work as the teacher in a classroom, not the assistant. She graduated when she was 44 years old. “‘When working as an education assistant, I felt so involved in the

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teaching and learning process, but I had to hold back from thinking ‘well, I would have done that differently’. Becoming a qualified teacher would allow me to think about how to improve teaching by taking the ‘bigger picture’ view of each child and their background,” she said. Tertiary studies would not have been within Deb’s reach if not for the online study mode offered through Curtin University OUA. “I could not possibly have gone on campus,” she said. “I was working three days a week, running a family and a small business and besides, my husband’s employment is in Albany. I needed the flexibility that online study offers. Over the summer school holiday study period I could drop down to one unit and have a proper summer holiday with my kids and I could then burn through that unit later.’’ However, online study is challenging and Deb acknowledges that determination, motivation and discipline are absolutely essential to success. “Once I start something, I have to finish it and I was absolutely determined to finish my degree, even though it did mean taking my laptop on family holidays to meet some assignment deadlines.” Deb undertook her internship (10-week professional placement) in a local Albany school. Despite initial common challenges, she found collegial support from others within the school who recognised her

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CELEBRATING WOMEN D i st a nce educ at ion i n We st er n Au st r a l i a

capacity and commitment and was supported along the way from Curtin University staff as well. In the end, the internship was so successful that she was subsequently offered employment in that school. Just as Deb was encouraged by friends and colleagues to embark on and persist with online study, she is now supporting others in her community to do the same. She has given practical advice on enrolment processes and how to navigate the requirements of online tertiary study to several others in the Albany community. “If you don’t start, you don’t finish,” she tells those who are contemplating this path. Deb’s commitment is to the Albany community. Her extended family lives in Albany and she understands the importance of building relationships of trust within the parent body of the school community by being both professional and approachable.

It is women like Deb

Edwards who are proving to be the solution to Western Australia’s perennial problem of attracting and retaining skilled and committed teachers to the regional workforce. Online study enabled her to stay in the region while she studied and, importantly for her and her community, after graduation.

Deb Edwards : Graduation day at Curtin University Western Australia

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BRINGING FASTER, MORE RELIABLE SERVICES TO REGIONAL AND REMOTE WA Proudly partnering with the following leading telecommunications companies

Leigh Ballard - Principal Sales Consultant (08) 6809 2100

email: lballard@regionalcomms.com.au

ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES please contact: admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

DO YOU NEED BETTER INTERNET?

CRISP WIRELESS provides safe, secure, fast, reliable internet to regional and remote communities. Packages for residential and business users – for people in towns AND on farms. BETTER, FASTER, NOW!

CRISP WIRELESS (08) 6809 2100 www.crispwireless.com.au

www.rrrnetwork.com.au

@rrrnetwork

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/rrrnetwork

@rrrnetwork


CBH GROUP PROUDLY SUPPORTING GRAIN GROWING COMMUNITIES. WA growers and their communities are the lifeblood of our industry. No-one understands this better than the CBH Group. That’s why every year, CBH invests more than $1.5 million to contribute to the vitality, development, wellbeing and safety of these regions. cbh.com.au PUBLIC Silo Trail Albany, 2018, Photograph by Bewley Shaylor

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My

CANCER was a

FULL-TIME

job

B

eing a teacher was an important part of Alysia’s life. It wasn’t just her source of income – it was part of who she was. Alysia lived in a small rural town in WA. School was not only her workplace, but a social hub within a caring community and her support network as a single mum of two small children. Her idyllic country life was turned upside down in May 2010 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 33. Alysia had to travel about two hours each way to Perth for her appointments. She knew it would be impossible to keep working through her treatment, which included a double mastectomy and chemotherapy. “I immediately went on sick leave and, when that ran out, I went on leave without pay while I continued my treatment,” she said. R R R N E T WO R K

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Alysia was very unwell during this time. “I could not live independently, and was certainly in no position to return to work. “Living on a farm and being isolated from people was not good for my emotional health or for accessing my treatment, so I moved to Perth with my two children and lived with my parents,” she said. After treatment, Alysia was able to return to the workforce, starting with casual contract work seven months after her diagnosis. A couple of months later, she started working two days a week in a curriculum-based role. “It gave me a modest income while I was still recuperating,” Alysia says. “It was a good distraction, and an opportunity to feel a bit ‘normal’ after such an abnormal experience.”

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HEALTH + WELLBEING A LY SI A K E PE RT - M Y C A NC E R WA S A F U L L -T I M E JOB Over the next couple of years, Alysia was able to gradually add more working days to her role, before finally resuming fulltime work. “Now – eight years later – I generally function well, but there are still some cognitive scars. Some concepts that I would have picked up quickly before breast cancer now take much longer, or simply remain confusing,” she said. Alysia is disappointed by the stories she hears of workplaces being inflexible to accommodating people’s needs after a breast cancer diagnosis. “Employers need to understand that mental health and wellbeing is very closely tied to self-image, including how a person affected by breast cancer perceives their value in the workplace. When their

Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA) is committed to improving support for people in the workforce diagnosed with breast cancer.

HAVE YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH BREAST CANCER? Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA) provides free information and support for people diagnosed with breast cancer, their partners, family and friends. HELPLINE BCNA’s Helpline includes experienced cancer nurses who provide free and confidential information, support and referral. Call 1800 500 258. INFORMATION Whether diagnosed recently or many years ago, the new My Journey online tool gives people at all stages of their breast cancer journey up-to-date information tailored to their situation and diagnosis. This includes information specifically for people living in rural and regional areas. Visit myjourney. org.au. ONLINE NETWORK BCNA’s online network connects people diagnosed with breast cancer with others who understand what they’re going through – at any time of the day or night. Visit bcna.org.au/ onlinenetwork.

world has been turned upside down, going to work can be the only stabilising part of their day.” While there is a well-established support system in Australia for injured workers, there is no system to support people to stay in or return to work after a cancer diagnosis. Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA) is committed to improving support for people in the workforce who have been diagnosed with breast cancer. BCNA’s new online work and breast cancer hub includes a range of information for people diagnosed with breast cancer on: * How breast cancer treatments may affect your ability to work.

WEBCASTS Bringing together leading experts and personal experiences, BCNA webcasts connect people all around Australia in realtime. Recordings of the webcasts can be watched anytime, anywhere from a computer, laptop or tablet. Visit bcna.org.au/ webcasts.

Information and tips are also available for employers and colleagues. To access the hub, including a series of recorded webcasts, visit bcna.org.au/work-and-breast-cancer. This article first appeared in BCNA’s The Beacon magazine.

*Effective communication between you, your employer and work colleagues. * How to access financial supports. * Your rights and responsibilities in the workplace. * Facing breast cancer if you are self-employed.

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YOUR GUIDE TO

UTI’s

{Urinary Tract Infections}

Published with the permssion of JEAN HAILES FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH

Jean Hailes gynaecologist Dr Judith MacNaughton explains the causes of UTI’s and why women are more at risk than men.

A

re UTIs (urinary tract infections) just part of being a woman?

While UTIs can happen to anyone, they are more commonly seen in

Something we have to put up with? By the time they turn 24

women who are sexually active or menopausal, or those with health

years of age, one in three women will have had a UTI, and they affect

conditions such as diabetes or urinary incontinence. It is important to

more than 50 per cent of all women during their lifetime.

note that these factors do not directly cause UTIs, but may play a part

Recurrent UTIs are also common, with some women getting an

and add insight as to why they are occurring.

infection again and again, impacting many aspects of life – from sex

Women using spermicides or diaphragms as contraception are also

and relationships, to work or study.

more at risk of UT Infections. and may want to consider alternative

UTIs can affect any part of the urinary system, with the bladder being

options if they get recurrent UT Infections.

the most common site. A UTI affecting the bladder is also known as

Antibiotics are very effective at treating UT Infections.. It’s important

cystitis, or a bladder infection.

to follow your doctor’s instructions and take the full course of

Read on to find out what causes a UTI, how to manage and treat a UT Infections. and how to reduce their frequency of recurrent UT Infections..

antibiotics, even if your symptoms clear up sooner. This helps decrease the risk of the UTI coming back. “A good option for women with recurrent UTIs is to take a smaller dose of antibiotics ongoing, or as a preventative after they have sex, if sex is

CAUSES & RISK FACTORS

a trigger for them,” says Dr MacNaughton.

Jean Hailes gynaecologist Dr Judith MacNaughton explains the causes

“There is also another medication called Hiprex, which suppresses

of UTIs and why women are more at risk than men. “UTIs are caused

and eliminates the bacteria that can cause UTIs. However, both these

by bacteria that enter the body, usually through the tube where urine

options need to be discussed with your doctor.”

comes out [the urethra],” she says. “In women, this tube is much shorter than in men, and it’s a lot closer to the bottom, where bacteria live. This means that these bugs don’t have as far to travel and therefore the risk of getting a UTI is higher.” R R R N E T WO R K

Many women treat UTIs at home with urinary alkalinisers (powder sachets available over the counter at chemists). While these products can help to relieve some of the symptoms of UTIs such as painful

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WELLBEING JEAN H A ILES for WOMEN’S HEA LTH and frequent urination, Dr MacNaughton reminds us that they don’t

As always, discuss any supplements you are taking, or thinking about

actually treat the infection, and that a proven UTI should always be

taking, with your GP and a qualified naturopath.

treated with antibiotics.

ADDITIONAL TIPS

CHANGING TIMES

These self-help tips may help to reduce the frequency of UTIs:

At menopause, many things are changing, and some women find they get more UTIs than before. This is usually due to a drop in levels of the hormone oestrogen. Oestrogen levels decrease during menopause and

• Wipe yourself gently from front to back (urethra to anus) after going to the toilet.

the vaginal and vulval tissues are often affected – becoming thinner,

• Drink plenty of water and fluids.

drier and more susceptible to infection.

• Treat vaginal infections such as thrush or trichomonas promptly.

“If this seems like it’s happening to you, speak to your doctor about the

• Go to the toilet when you feel the urge to urinate, rather than holding on.

suitability of a topical oestrogen cream [oral oestrogen is not effective for UTIs] and ensure you use a natural lubrication for sex,” says Dr MacNaughton.

• Urinate after sex to flush the urinary system.

UTI’s ARE COMMON, BUT BE CAUTIOUS

The phytoestrogens in soy and linseeds may also improve vaginal

It’s important to remember that although UTIs are common, they can

dryness. See Jean Hailes naturopath Sandra Villella’s linseed, banana and date muffins recipe for an easy way to get the required amount of phytoestrogen in your daily diet.

develop into more serious kidney infections if left untreated. If your symptoms persist for more than 24 hours and include fever, chills, back pain, nausea or vomiting, you should see your doctor immediately. Your symptoms should completely resolve within a few days of starting a

THE CASE FOR CRANBERRY

course of antibiotics. If this is not the case, it’s important to go back to

There is conflicting information on whether cranberries can reduce

your doctor.

the frequency of UT Infections.. Some research suggests that

Also, UTIs can be more dangerous for pregnant women due to an

cranberry supplements are useful; however, as Sandra says, it’s

increased risk of kidney involvement. If you are pregnant and you

important for women to know that not all cranberry supplements are the same. Research suggests that it depends on the amount of certain compounds in the cranberry supplement. These key compounds are called proanthocyanidins, or PACs. “PACs may help with recurrent UT Infections., as they prevent the unfriendly bacteria from sticking to the walls of the urinary tract. If they don’t stick, they don’t grow – instead they are flushed out and the

think you have a UTI – even with mild symptoms – see your doctor immediately.

SIGNS & Symptoms

infection may not occur,” says Sandra.

WHILE NOT EVERY UTI CAUSES SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS, WHEN THEY DO, THEY MAY INCLUDE:

In line with the research, Sandra recommends checking the labels

• Burning sensation when passing urine

on supplements for one that contains a daily dose of 36mg of PACs. “Don’t worry too much about the total amount of cranberry fruit in the supplement; more is not necessarily better – it’s the amount of PACs

• Lower abdominal pain when passing urine • Passing urine more frequently than usual

in it that you really want to pay attention to,” she says. “Good products will specify.”

MANAGEMENT & TREATMENT

NEW KID ON THE BLOCK Another supplement option called Mannose, or D-Mannose, is showing promise in the management of recurrent UTIs. Mannose is a natural sugar that occurs in many fruits, and a recent study found that taking it in the form of a supplement was similar to an antibiotic in its

VISIT THE URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS WEBPAGES TO LEARN MORE www.jeanhailes.org.au

effectiveness for reducing UTIs.

R R R N E T WO R K

If you are experiencing these symptoms or suspect you have a UTI, it is important to make an appointment with your GP as soon as possible. Your doctor will likely ask you for a urine sample and, if an infection is present, prescribe a course of antibiotics.

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SEASONAL PRODUCE C E L E BR AT I NG SU M M E R

Delicious

SUMMER fruits

Craig Kin der Fo od P

One of the best things about the arrival of warmer weather is the abundance of delicious summer fruits. While there is no arguing that the season’s bounty can be enjoyed with little more preparation than a wash and pat dry, it is also really easy and incredibly satisfying to incorporate fruit into meals.

hy rap og t ho

Jenny Mercer from WA Farm Direct says that in Europe, fruit is a common salad ingredient and the concept is finally starting to gain momentum in Australia. BLUEBERRIES Often referred to as a superfood, blueberries are currently in plentiful supply and they’re packed with powerful nutrients. They make a fantastic addition to salads. Toss together a handful of baby spinach, a handful of almonds, half a finely sliced red onion, 100g feta, some snow pea sprouts and a punnet of fresh WA blueberries. Drizzle with olive oil and the juice of one lemon. Season well and serve. NECTARINES Sweet and juicy, nectarines are a summer favourite because their skin is smooth and palatable, making them a winner with adults and children alike. Their firm flesh also makes them an ideal addition to summer stir-fries. Simply chop a selection of your favourite vegetables, such as Asian greens, capsicum, snow peas, baby corn, onion, fresh chilli and garlic, and saute together in a hot

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wok or frypan seasoned with a little oil. When the vegetables are softened, add some firm tofu pieces, a splash of your favourite stir-fry sauce and some chopped nectarine. Cook for another minute and serve immediately with rice or noodles. PEACHES Rich in vitamins A, C and E, peaches are one of those rare treats that are both delicious and exceptionally nutritious. Peel them or wash them well and rub gently to remove some of their fluff. Thanks to their juicy flesh, they are fantastic served in salads, especially when teamed with anything salty and firm. Try tossing together some mesclun mix, sliced jalapeños, baby bocconcini, marinated green olives, spring onions and some washed and chopped peaches. Drizzle generously with balsamic glaze and season well. PLUMS In plentiful supply during summer, there are several varieties of plums to try. Cook some couscous as per the instructions on the packet. Add a sprinkle of cinnamon, salt and pepper and mix well. Top the couscous with some shredded barbecue chicken, some chopped plums, a handful of pepitas, some chopped cucumber and some chopped spring onion. Mix together 2 tablespoons of the following ingredients, plum sauce, lemon juice, olive oil, white vinegar and 1 tablespoon brown sugar. Whisk and drizzle over the salad. Serve immediately.

Source: Buy West Eat Best. Image source: Genuinely Southern Forests and Craig Kinder Food Photography

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SEASONAL PRODUCE C E LRE FA BRRAT MRMKEET R YOU MIENG R S’SU MA

Pavlova

Keep it simple when celebrating or gathering with family and friends this Summer. INGREDIENTS

6 egg whites 300g caster sugar 2 teaspoons white vinegar 1 tablespoon cornflour + 300ml thickened cream Seasonal fruits. STEP 1.

Preheat oven to 150°C. Line an oven tray with non-stick baking paper. Draw a 20cm circle on the paper to provide a guide - ink side down. STEP 2.

Use an electric mixer to whisk the egg whites in a clean, dry bowl until soft peaks form. Slowly add sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, beating well after each addition, until meringue is thick and glossy and sugar is dissolved. Rub a little meringue between your fingers, if it’s still gritty, continue to whisk. Add the vinegar and cornflour and fold gently with a metalic spoon until just combined. Use a spatula to spread meringue over the circle, smoothing the surface and sides. Reduce the temperature to 120°C. Bake for 1 hour - 1 hour 15 minutes - the pavlova should be dry to touch. Turn off the oven and leave to cool completely. Once cooled and ready to serve, lightly whip cream and spread over teh pavlova, topping with your choice of this season’s delicious fruits and berries. Cut into wedges and serve.

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WRAP UP WITH THANKS

BECOME A MEMBER Join the RRR Network as a member; become actively engaged with rural, regional and remote women to support and contribute to the economic and social wellbeing of their communities. The annual membership fee is $220. Members over the age of 18, who have paid their membership by the 30th June, can nominate for a position on the RRR Network Board (also known as the “committee�, as detailed in the constitution). Members receive discounts on events, training and invitations to member-only events.

SUBSCRIBE

Anyone can subscribe to the RRR Network and register to receive a digital copy of the quarterly RRR Network Magazine via our website. Subscribers can elect to receive a printed hard copy of the magazine at a cost of $40 per annum for 4 editions per year, posted to your door.

JOIN US! Here are the many ways to sign up to be a part of the RRR Network: VISIT

www.rrrnetwork.com.au/join-us

EMAIL

admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

PHONE (08) 6316 0407 POST PAYMENT TO: RRR NETWORK 790 Wirring Road Margaret River WA 6285

Members Margaret Agnew Angela Anspach Jo Barrett-Lennard Nicole Batten Steph Bligh-Lee Maria Bolten Magnay Elizabeth Brennan Annabelle Bushell Tara Chambers Karen Chappel Robyn Clarke MLA Jane Coole Katrina Crute Anna Dixon Debbie Dowden Nicole Egginton Anna Eyres Lyn Farrell Georgina Ferreira

SUPPORTERS & MEMBERS Jo Fulwood Sybril Grigsby Maree Gooch Prue Jenkins Amanda Johnston Lisa Judson Alysia Kepert Leonie Knipe Sarah Lang Belinda Lay Janelle Leiper Amanda Lovitt Cath Lyons Renee Manning Billeagh Marcus Fleur McDonald Alys McKeough Anna Oades Fiona Palmer

Cara Peek Debra Pearce Kelly Pearce Monica Radomiljac Maria Redman Sr Pat Rhatigan Carmel Ross Marilyn Rulyancich Helen Shanks Shelley Spriggs Erica Starling Larissa Taylor Fleur Thompson-Porter Georgia Thomas Carly Veitch Mandy Walker Tara Lea Whitney Anne Wilkins

Carol Redford Cr Pauline Bantock Allison Steber Yvonne Gray Fleur McDonald Anne Henderson Kay Gerard JennyPoett Sarah Hawksley Monika Zechetmayr Marian Offer Margaret Stretch Ida Turner Melva Mitchell Margaret Vallentine Maggie Edmonds Liz Janney Joanne McCubbing Yola Bakker

Sian Pladdy JoanneAlilovic Debra Stacey Nicolie Eaton-Nolan Shayanna Crouch Jenny Donaldson Wendy Hood JM Norman C Evans Michelle Donaldson

Supporters Sue Moss Susanne Mcgrath Vicki-Anne Smith Naomi Purser Nicole Batten Peta West Rita Marshall Roni Davies Sharyn Sinclair Helen Woodhams Ian Longson Jackie Jarvis Jacquie Moses Jeanette Mcqueen Jenny Latham Karen Crouch Katherine Jane Dolores Aitken Elizabeth Blyth


WRAP UP S A Y H E L LO

our readers’ snap shots

hello!

SAY HE LLO Simply photograph yourself somewhere in WA then visit www.rrrnetwork.com.au and follow the links on the MAGAZINE tab. We’d love to see your backyard!

LEFT:

Always breathtaking, the north west’s Horizontal Falls. @Horizontal Falls Seaplane Adventures. Image: Yane Sotiroski

In the south west of Australia, the Nyoongar seasonal calendar includes six different seasons in a yearly cycle. Each of the six seasons represents and explains the seasonal changes we see annually. The flowering of many different plants, the hibernation of reptiles and the moulting of swans are all helpful indicators that the seasons are changing. The Nyoongar seasons can be long or short and are indicated by what is happening and changing around us rather than by dates on a calendar. This six-season calendar is extremely important to Nyoongar people, as it is a guide to what nature is doing at every stage of the year, as well as understanding respect for the land in relation to plant and animal fertility cycles and land and animal preservation.

The Mookaroo Community Festival held in Bunbury shared cultural displays and workshops on local bushtucker. Keep an eye out for the 2019 Festival in August. Image:: Australia’s South West RIGHT:

MUKURU – The season of fertility and the first rains DJILBA – The second rain, wetlands and

conception

KAMBAGARANG – Wildflower season,

birth and new life LEFT: LEFT

Motorbike frog in our olive tree. Visit here to listen and identify frogs in your area! http://museum.wa.gov.au/explore/ frogwatch/frogs/motorbike-frog Image: Peta Lemmes

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SUM MER 2018 / 19

BIRAK – The first summer, season of youth, warmth and play BUNURU – The second summer, season of heat, fire and coming of age DJERAN – Adulthood, the season of ripeness, knowledge and maturity SOURCE

http://www.noongar.org.au


THE LAST WORD UNTIL NEXT TIME

T

HE RURAL, REGIONAL, REMOTE WOMEN’S NETWORK OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA ACKNOWLEDGES THE AUSTRALIAN

ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES OF THIS NATION. WE ACKNOWLEDGE THE TRADITIONAL CUSTODIANS OF THE LANDS ON WHICH OUR COMPANY IS LOCATED AND WHERE WE CONDUCT OUR BUSINESS. WE PAY OUR RESPECTS TO ANCESTORS AND ELDERS, PAST AND PRESENT. THE RURAL, REGIONAL, REMOTE WOMEN’S NETWORK OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA IS COMMITTED TO HONOURING AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES’ UNIQUE CULTURAL AND SPIRITUAL RELATIONSHIPS TO THE LAND, WATERS AND SEAS AND THEIR RICH CONTRIBUTION TO SOCIETY.

SOURCE: www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/spirituality/welcome-tocountry-acknowledgement-of-country IMAGE: www.australiassouthwest.com

I

MAGE: Frances Andrijich - Australia’s South West Manjimup cherries www.australiassouthwest.com


Australia’s South West image Frances Andrijich


Image : Margaret River Region - Humpback Whale - credit David Ashley

W

e have a proud 21-year history of supporting and celebrating

Western Australian women and their families who live and work outside of the Perth metropolitan area. In 2016 the RRR Network transitioned from a WA State government advisory board to an independent incorporated entity. Our focus is every woman living in a rural, regional, or remote community in Western Australia. We have a subscriber base of over 10,000 individuals, businesses and community organisations who receive this quarterly glossy magazine from us and an active social media following.

FOR RUR AL , REG IONAL & REMOTE WES TERN AUS TR ALIAN WOMEN WA’s pre-eminent communication network for inspiring & connecting regional women; championing their role in our communities and advocating on their behalf.

Join the RRR Network, it ’s as simple as registering your details via our website.

www.rrrnetwork.com.au

admin@rrrnetwork.com.au

@rrrnetwork

/rrrnetwork

@rrrnetwork

RRR Network Quarterly - Summer2018  

RRR Network Quarterly publication is for Rural, Regional and Remote West Australian Women. WA's pre-eminent communication network for inspir...

RRR Network Quarterly - Summer2018  

RRR Network Quarterly publication is for Rural, Regional and Remote West Australian Women. WA's pre-eminent communication network for inspir...