Issuu on Google+

S H A W N E E D I S PAT C H . C O M

SCANLON LATEST AREA ANGLER TO JOIN ELITES/PAGE 14

MAKING AN EARLY SPLASH

THE DISPATCH

fyi

ÂŽ

SERVING SHAWNEE AND JOHNSON COUNTY

75 CENTS

JUNE 13, 2012 | SHAWNEE, KANSAS | VOL. 9, NO. 21

24 PAGES

They do not compute

Rob Roberts/staff

Members of a not-so-silent minority sound off about how and why they live without communications advances like smartphones and the Internet. Page 8.

Police to check drivers’ sobriety The Shawnee Police Department and the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office will be conducting a sobriety and driver’s license checkpoint in Shawnee from Friday evening through the early morning hours Saturday. Motorists can expect to be briefly detoured through the checkpoint, which will be set up at an undisclosed location. Anyone suspected of being intoxicated will be subject to a series of sobriety tests. Drivers who are impaired will be arrested. Drivers without a valid driver’s licenses will be ticketed. Go online to shawneedispatch.com for results of the checkpoint operation and other developing news stories.

INSIDE CLASSIFIEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20-24 FOOD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 LETTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 OUR TOWN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 SCHOOLS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5, 10 SPORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-18 STATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 VOICES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Elvyn Jones/staff

Rob Roberts/staff

#/.4!#4 53 4%,%0(/.%    s &!8    s %-!), %$)4/2 3(!7.%%$)30!4#(#/M

Amazing Results!!

4 Week Boot Camp for $40 Offer valid thru June 30, 2012

913-484-4895 kosama.com/lenexa

8625 Hauser Ct., Lenexa (87th & Pflumm, near HyVee)


2

| Wednesday, June 13, 2012 .

PAGE 2

FAMILY IN THE SPOTLIGHT A family of English stonemasons will be the focus of a new exhibit at Monticello Community Historical Museum. Please see page 13.

READ THE LATEST NEWS EVERY DAY AT SHAWNEEDISPATCH.COM

DISPATCH THE

®

POINT OF VIEW/PAGE 6

5questions

BRIEFLY

SUZANNE SCHLICHT

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

Wellness program to explore diabetes, hormones link

DENNIS ANDERSON MANAGING EDITOR

danderson@theworldco.info

SUSAN CANTRELL

VICE PRESIDENT, SALES & MARKETING scantrell@theworldco.info 913-962-3000 The Dispatch, a weekly newspaper, is published Wednesdays by The World Company. Copies are home-delivered in Shawnee, courtesy of the paper’s advertisers. Additional copies are made available at public locations throughout Shawnee, also courtesy of advertisers. From those, one paper per person is complimentary. Extra copies must be obtained at The Dispatch office, 6301 Pflumm Road, Suite 102. A charge of 75 cents per copy may apply.

By mail, single copy price is 75 cents. Subscriptions are $120 a year (plus tax). MEMBER OF THE KANSAS PRESS ASSOCIATION COPYRIGHT 2012

READER SERVICES For questions about delivery of The Dispatch, call Chris Bell, circulation director, at 800-578-8748 or send email to cbell@shawneedispatch.com Have a news tip or news release? Contact us. By phone: 913-962-3000 By fax: 913-962-3004 By email: editor@shawneedispatch.com

News staff Rob Roberts, news editor Stephen Montemayor, sports editor Melissa Treolo, reporter

Retail advertising staff Sally Milgram Diana Lynn

Classified advertising 866-823-8220

Office hours

The Dispatch office, 6301 Pflumm Road, is open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

shawneedispatch.com SHAWNEE AREA WEATHER READINGS 6-5 6-6 6-7 6-8 6-9 6-10 6-11

High 83 84 82 85 89 91 84

Low 61 59 64 55 58 72 65

Precip. .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .00 .83

Year-to-date precipitation: 13.34” Information compiled by Gil Hoag, National Weather Service observer

Submissions policy By submitting opinions, articles, photographs, poems or other creative works, you grant The Dispatch a nonexclusive license to publish, copy and distribute that submitted content, while acknowledging that you are the author of the work. You grant The Dispatch permission to publish and republish this submitted material without restriction, in all formats and media now known or hereafter developed, including but not limited to all electronic rights. Solely by way of example, such rights include the right to convert and store the submitted content on CD-ROM, DVD and other current and hereafter developed formats, the right to place the submitted content in whole or in part on the Internet and other computer networks, and the right to electronically store and retrieve the submitted content in electronic databases.

File photo

VISITORS COOL off at the Baldwin City Municipal Pool in this file photo. Whether at a pool or a lake, swimmers should protect against drowning and illness.

SWIMMING SAFELY

KDHE offers tips for summer in the water This week, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment provides tips on keeping safe while you’re swimming this summer. Q: What sorts of dangers do we need to watch out for when swimming? A: Every year, thousands of Americans get sick with recreational water illnesses, which are caused by germs, chemicals or harmful algal blooms. And nationally, every day, two children younger than the age of 14 die from drowning. Q: What are the best ways to protect against drowning? A: First, make sure that everyone knows how to swim and older children and adults know CPR. In the water, keep swimmers safe by using life jackets for younger or weaker swimmers, and provide continuous, attentive supervision even if there is a lifeguard. Q: If we have a pool at home, how do we keep everyone safe while

we’re not using it? A: Prevent access to the water by installing and maintaining barriers (four-sided fencing and weightbearing covers) and by using locks or alarms for windows and doors. Q: What about illness? How should we protect against that? A: Prevention requires swimmers to take an active role in protecting themselves and other swimmers. Don’t swim when you have diarrhea; don’t swallow any water you are swimming in; shower before swimming and wash your hands after using the toilet or changing diapers. Q: How can I make sure my kids aren’t spreading illness? A: Parents of young children should remember to wash their children before swimming (especially their rear ends), check diapers every 30 to 60 minutes and take your kids to the bathroom every 30 to 60 minutes.

follow us online WE’RE ON FACEBOOK Become a fan of The Dispatch’s Facebook page. Click “Like” at facebook.com/ theshawneedispatch.

RELAY FOR LIFE RECAP

Check online for photos from Friday’s event

SPEAK OUT Registered users of tonganoxiemirror.com can comment on any story that appears in The Mirror and on its website. Share your opinions today!

Check for news updates 24/7 at shawneedispatch.com and at twitter.com/shawneedispatch

A free wellness program focusing on the link between diabetes and hormones is scheduled for noon July 18 in the KU MedWest Community Room, 7405 Renner Road. Dr. Kurt Midyett of the University of Kansas Hospital will lead the program, “How Hormones Affect Diabetes.” Registration is required. To make a reservation or obtain more information about this and other wellness programs offered by The University of Kansas Hospital, call 913-588-1227 or visit www.kumed.com/bewell.

SM North junior places third in yearbook contest Shawnee Mission North High School junior Kristin Enyart recently earned third place in the 2012 Yearbook Design Contest sponsored by Jostens and Adobe. Kristin’s design showcased SM North’s spring play, “Little Shop of Horrors.” It was chosen as a top placeholder among 350 submissions. For her win, Kristin will receive a Kindle Fire.

SMNW grad gets degree in aerospace engineering Lauren Peterson has graduated from the Daytona Beach campus of EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University with a bachelor of science in aerospace engineering and a minor in mathematics. In July, she will begin Air Force navigator training in Pensacola, Fla. Peterson formerly attended Shawnee Mission Northwest High School.

Correction In the cover story for last week’s issue of The Dispatch, the school that Bluejacket-Flint Elementary sixth-grader Luke Goff attends was incorrectly identified. A clarification also needs to be made to the story: A district would forfeit its federal and state reimbursement for the meal if a student chooses not to take a fruit or vegetable with lunch.

ON THE COVER

WHAT IN THE WORLD do they do without the Web? Clockwise from top, Tom Steele prefers riding his Harley and spending time with family, Andra Gonzalez likes sewing and in-person chats, and Viola and Truly Ernest Schlupp, foreground, said cards trump computers.


|

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 3

Shawnee Relay for Life sheds light in cancer fight tax and financial analysis for the government website hosting firm. “But we blew through that,” Reyn“More birthdays.” olds said. “We’ve always had a culture That American Cancer Society slo- of giving back.” gan inspired the name of the new team And NIC employees have been esKelly Greiner formed for the Relay for pecially motivated about the relay due Life of Shawnee. to personal experiences some of them “I’ll be 50 in September,” said Grein- have had with the disease. er, captain of the Birthday Candles. Kim Frazier, a business analyst for “Last year, I found out I had cancer NIC, was diagnosed with breast canright before my 49th birthday.” cer on a Thursday in October 2005. On Twenty-two teams involving 221 the following Monday, she underwent participants have signed up for this the first of eight surgical procedures year’s all-night relay, which will be- resulting from the cancer. She also gin at 6 p.m. Friendured radiation day at Swarner and aggressive Park. Greiner is chemotherapy. thankful to be But she survived. The public is encouraged to attend one of those who “When I talk the Relay for Life of Shawnee, a benefit will kick off the about it seven for the American Cancer Society set American Cancer years later, it still for 6 p.m. Friday to 6 a.m. Saturday Society fundraiser brings tears to at Swarner Park, 63rd Street and with a survivors’ my eyes,” Frazier Lackman Road. lap. said. “The first Admission is free to the relay, which “My cancer thing I thought will begin with opening ceremonies and a treatment endwhen I was diagsurvivors’ lap. The relay teams will then ed in February, nosed was that I begin walking, with at least one memso this sounded was going to die. ber of each team on the track until the like a good idea,” I equated the Cevent’s conclusion. said Greiner, word with death. After dark, there will be a luminaria who recruited I’ve learned so ceremony, in which candles will be lit her 12-member much since then. inside sand-filled bags, each bearing the team by emailing But the thing name of a person touched by cancer. friends in Shawthat scared me The event also will include a silent nee and Lenexa. the most was my auction, food and games. Greiner was kids not having a pronounced canmom.” cer-free during Frazier was a recent follow-up examination. But 41 and had 9-month- and 3-year-old in the wake of her battle, she has re- daughters when she was diagnosed. solved to help others — including fu- Her best friend, Ingrid Maehl, learned ture generations — avoid the disease. she had breast cancer five months latGreiner has two sons, Justin, 30, and er. On her nightstand, Maehl keeps a Drew, who will celebrate his 26th photo of herself, Frazier and two other birthday on the opening day of relay. friends. It reminds her of the imporAccording to the American Cancer tance of working toward a cancer cure. Society, half of all men and a third of “They say it’s one in eight women women in the United States will de- who will have breast cancer,” Maehl velop cancer in their lifetimes. But said. “I have a picture of four women, Greiner didn’t suspect cancer could and three of them had breast cancer.” be the culprit when she began sufferAnd one died, Maehl said. ing from low back pain, shortness of Janiece Yonke of Shawnee said canbreath and other symptoms last year. cer took two of her grandparents and “It’s one of those things where you afflicted several aunts and uncles. So think to yourself, ‘I’m getting old. I’m she, too, takes the fight for cures pergaining weight,’” she said. “But the key sonally. Yonke has chaired the Shawis that symptoms that last longer than nee event the past two years, is captwo weeks are not normal.” tain of a relay team and led individual Eventually, doctors diagnosed fundraisers last week with more than Greiner’s condition as primary peri- $3,200 in donations. toneal cancer, marking the start of her During this year’s relay, a candle medical ordeal. Treated like an ovar- will be lit in memory of Yonke’s grandian cancer patient, Greiner underwent mother Lois Corbin, who died after a surgery at the University of Kansas second bout with cancer in 2003. Hospital in Kansas City, Kan., and che“When they light those candles and motherapy at the hospital’s outpatient have that silent lap, there won’t be cancer treatment center in Westwood. very many dry eyes,” Yonke said. Now she’s looking forward to more But that’s not to say Relay for Life birthday and more relays. events are somber affairs, said Camille The fundraising goal for this year’s McClain, a member of the Shawnee Relay for Life of Shawnee is $80,000, Business Community relay team. of which nearly $7,000 had been McClain, who has been involved in raised through last week by the NIC several relays, said the participants Inc. team of Olathe celebrating more birthdays bring a The fundraising leaders heading spirit of camaraderie and resolve. into the homestretch, the NIC em“Cancer survivors have the best atployees had set out to raise just $1,500 titudes because attitude has played through pledges and fundraising such a big part in their recovery,” she events, said Al Reynolds, director of said. “They’re fighters.”

CANCER SURVIVOR Kelly Greiner, captain of the Birthday Candles relay team, is looking forward to the Relay for Life of Shawnee this Friday and her 50th birthday in September.

By Rob Roberts

rroberts@theworldco.info

Rob Roberts/staff

SHOW SUPPORT

Your Comfort is Our Business

A/C SPECIAL $ 95

79

913-268-6700 www.envirotechks.com

Air Conditioning tune-up and clean Valid thru 7/15/12


4

| Wednesday, June 13, 2012 .

Missie’s Discount Liquors

SHAWNEE

CALENDAR To submit a calendar item, send by email to editor@shawneedispatch.com. Deadline is noon Friday before publication. There is no charge. For future events or more information about listings, see our online calendar at shawneedispatch.com/events.

thru Aug. 12

12,000 sq. feet & 53 cooler doors Excellent selection of premium wines, spirits & cordials

15% Off

thru Aug. 8

Any Wine Purchase

COMMUNITY 6/13 | Wednesday • Shawnee Chamber of Commerce Weekly Summer Networking Group, 7:30 a.m., Edward Jones Investments, 5725 Nieman Road, Suite D • Sizzlin’ Summer Used Book Sale, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., June 13-16, Metcalf South Shopping Center, 9635 Metcalf, Overland Park • Shawnee Chamber of Commerce membership luncheon, 11:30 a.m., Shawnee Town Hall, 11600 Johnson Drive. Program will include Shawnee Tomorrow graduation and announcement of Betty Charlton Scholarship winner.

6/14 | Thursday • Shawnee/Lenexa Chapter of Business Network International meeting, 7 a.m., First Watch, 11112 Shawnee Mission Parkway • Theatre in the Park presents “Sweeney Todd,” 8:30 p.m., Theatre in the Park, 7710 Renner Road

10% Off

p.m., Theatre in the Park, 7710 Renner Road

Any Spirit Purchase

6/18 | Monday

Senior Day Every Monday

• Shawnee Mission Optimist Club, noon, First Watch, 11112 Shawnee Mission Parkway

Some restrictions apply due to Kansas State Law. Offer can be used with most sales items. Coupons not good for beer.

• Vacation Bible School begins, 6 p.m., Reformed Presbysterian Church of Shawnee, 6835 Pflumm Road

NW Corner of Shawnee Mission Pkwy & Quivira

• Shawnee Planning Commission, 7:30 p.m., Shawnee City Hall, 11110 Johnson Drive

913-962-4893

6/19 | Tuesday • Biz 2 Biz Connections, 8 a.m., Edward Jones Investments, 5725 Nieman Road, Suite D

Call John Barnes 200 West Street Tonganoxie, KS

A Premier Company. An Independently Owned and operated Member of the Reece and Nichols Alliance, Inc.

• Shawnee Chamber of Commerce ribbon cutting, 8:30 a.m., Barley’s Brewhaus, 16649 Midland Drive • Shawnee Kiwanis Club, noon, First Watch, 11112 Shawnee Mission Parkway,

913-775-0577

A Premier Company. An Independently Owned and operated Member of the Reece and Nichols Alliance, Inc.

• “An Intro to Wellness for the Cancer Survivor,” 4 p.m., Kansas City Cancer Center-Shawnee Mission, 9301 W. 74th St.

E RIC ! RP N JO TIO MA EDUC R

• Kaw Valley Chorus rehearsals, 7 p.m., Basehor United Methodist Church, 18660 158th St.

6/15 | Friday • Shawnee Rotary Club, 7:15 a.m., Shawnee Town Hall, 11600 Johnson Drive, • Job Club, 8:30 a.m., Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church, 5501 Monticello Road

6/20 | Wednesday

• Friday Films, 1 p.m., Shawnee Civic Centre, 13817 Johnson Drive

• Shawnee Chamber of Commerce Weekly Summer Networking Group, 7:30 a.m., Edward Jones Investments, 5725 Nieman Road, Suite D

• Shawnee Relay for Life, 6 p.m., Swarner Park, 63rd Street and Lackman Road

• Shawnee Lions Club, 6:30 p.m., Power Play, 13110 W. 62nd Terrace

• Theatre in the Park presents “Sweeney Todd,” 8:30 p.m., Theatre in the Park, 7710 Renner Road

6/16 | Saturday • Shawnee Farmers’ Market, 7 a.m., Shawnee City Hall, 11110 Johnson Drive • Winesong at Riverfest, 4 p.m., Riverfest Park, 33440 W. 79th St., De Soto

6/21 | Thursday • Shawnee/Lenexa Chapter of Business Network International meeting, 7 a.m., First Watch, 11112 Shawnee Mission Parkway • Johnson County Community College Board of Trustees meeting, 5 p.m., Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd.,

• Theatre in the Park presents “Sweeney Todd,” 8:30 p.m., Theatre in the Park, 7710 Renner Road

6/22 | Friday • Great Lenexa BBQ Battle, 5 p.m., Sar-Ko-Par Trails Park

6/17 | Sunday • Theatre in the Park presents “Sweeney Todd,” 8:30

• Theatre in the Park presents “Legally Blonde,” 8:30 p.m., Theatre in the Park, 7710 Renner Road

MUSEUMS AND LIBRARIES JOHNSON COUNTY LIBRARY SHAWNEE BRANCH 13811 JOHNSON DRIVE, 913-826-4600 • 6 by 6: Ready to Read Early Literacy Spaces. Drop in through Aug. 31 with your preschooler and use a picture book to explore activities that enhance children’s prereading skills. • Read to a Dog, 10:30 a.m., June 19. Children 5 through 12 can practice their reading skills reading to specially trained Pets for Life dogs. JOHNSON COUNTY MUSEUM OF HISTORY 6305 LACKMAN ROAD, 913-715-2550 • “Bill Owens: Suburbia,” a 1960s and ’70s photo exhibit continues through Sept. 1. • Summer Arts Program, 10 a.m.-noon June 15. Dropin art activities for children 4 to 8. Today’s theme: Popsickle-stick art. $3 per child, $2 for members. • Summer Arts Program, 10 a.m.-noon June 22. Dropin art activities for children 4 to 8. Today’s theme: Popsickle-stick art. $3 per child, $2 for members. • Pop ’n Play, 9-11 a.m. June 27. Drop-in activities for 9-month- to 3-year-olds. $1 per child, or free for members. • Summer Arts Program, 10 a.m.-noon June 29. Dropin art activities for children 4 to 8. Today’s theme: Popsickle-stick art. $3 per child, $2 for members. SHAWNEE TOWN 1929 11501 W. 57TH ST. 913-248-2360 • Summer on the Farm, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursdays and

Saturdays through Aug. 11, with the exception of June 23. Interpreters will help visitors experience summertime on a 1920s Shawnee farm. $3 per adult, $1 per child 5-17, free for children under 5. Reservations required. • Garden Party, 10 a.m.-noon June 23. An afternoon of teacakes, crafts and games for young ladies, mothers and grandmothers. $18 per person, $15 for members. Reservations required. WONDERSCOPE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM 5705 FLINT ST., 913-287-8888 • Wonderpalooza: Okee Bokee Brothers, 10:30-11:30 a.m. June 15. Free with museum admission. • Come Sign with Me Story Time, 10:30-11:30 a.m. June 21. Children can learn sign language and hear a story every third Thursday. Free with museum admission. • Come Sign with Me Story Time, 10:30-11:30 a.m. July 19. Children can learn sign language and hear a story every third Thursday. Free with museum admission. • Wonderpalooza: Sugar Free Allstars, 10:30-11:30 a.m. July 17. Free with museum admission. MONTICELLO COMMUNITY HISTORICAL MUSEUM 23860 W. 83RD ST., LENEXA, 913-667-3706 • Pancake Breakfast, 8-11 a.m. June 16. Enjoy pancakes and see a new short-term museum display on the Garrett family. Donations accepted. • Field trip to Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Aug. 2. Reservations requested at least one month in advance.

BRIEFLY Cancer survivor wellness program set “An Intro to Wellness for the Cancer Survivor,” a free program, will take place from 4 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Tuesday at the Kansas City Cancer Center-Shawnee

Mission, 9301 W. 74th St., Suite 100. Registration is required. To make a reservation or obtain more information about this and other wellness programs offered by the University of Kansas Hospital, call 913-588-1227 or visit kumed. com/bewell.

905-907 Shawnee

511 E. Cynthia, McLouth $113,950

1520 State Ave. - New Price $275,000

23713 McLouth Rd. $197,000

ATTENTION INVESTORS!!! Duplex, 2 bedrooms each side, with large city lot. MLS # 1707837 905/907 Shawnee Duplex for $127,000

TRUE RANCH ONE LEVEL LIVING! THE PRICE IS RIGHT $113950! Ideally located for commutes to all areas, 3 bedroom with easy accessibility-no steps. All appliances stay, 2 storage sheds, beautifully landscaped yard, vaulted ceiling.

If Location, Location, Location are important, here is a business opportunity in Tonganoxie! 2.66 acres for prime development. Property has a large building being sold in it’s present “As Is” condition. Two road entrances to property. MLS # 1722795

10 ACRE RAISED RANCH ON ASPHALT ROAD IN TONGANOXIE! 3 Bdrm. 2 bath with Great Room, WBFP, 2 car att. garage. All steel constructed 30X60 detached garage/workshop (a mechanics dream) insulated, heated, A/C, bath, with 14’ tall doors for large machines, 12x14 storage shop with concrete floor and electric. Freshly painted interior throughout. MLS #1742074

NEW LISTING. Turner Schools LARGER HOME IN HIGHLAND C R E S T SUBDIVISION AT A VERY AFFORTABLE 5223 Alma $64,950 PRICE! 3 Bdrms., 2 Bath, over 1,400 sq. ft. of living space. Features larger living room and bedrooms, real wood burning fireplace, and updated exterior siding, 12x20 1 1/2 story Storage Shed. Fenced yard.

LAND (Haigwood Rd., Tonganoxie) $82,500 - 9.76 acre tract with water meter already set. Great for walkout basement home. Walkout building site. (211th Donahoo St., Tonganoxie) Deer Ridge Ranch Subdivision. Bring your builder!!! Only 2 tracts left, approximately 5 acres each with water meter included.

(205th Sandusky Rd., Tonganoxie) New Price! $130,000 NEW LISTING. IMAGINE! Energy efficient - 20 Acres – possible split on resort style home, entertaining family/ land. Creek on west side.

friends from cover patio, cooking in screened in porch, swimming in 20/40 pool, fishing 30 yards from front door, viewing wild life from home and walking 17682 203rd. Tonganoxie $359,950 in your own park. Unbelievable 3800 sq. ft. Ranch updated throughout, includes all appliances, 3 car att. gar and 2 car detach gar shop. A Rmks: Garage/Workshop. 24x48 outbuilding workshop with rest room facilities, 12x20 1 1/2 story storage shed, 20x40 energy efficient inground pool. 1 1/2 acre lake.

22.9 ACRES Tonganoxie Drive $144,950 Wooded land for seclusion conveniently located near Leavenworth/Lansing.

LISTINGS NEEDED!


|

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 5

SMNW grad hopes to reach Rolex eventing competition By Melissa Treolo mtreolo@theworldco.info

Jessica Ptak, 19, has been riding horses for as long as she can remember — and even before that. “I’ve been on horses forever,” she said, noting that her horse-enthusiast parents would let her sit on the back of their horse as a toddler — while safely holding her, of course. “I’m sure I thought it was awesome. I mean, I don’t remember, exactly. But obviously I liked it enough, because here I am today.” Ptak today is the winner of a number of awards for the horse trials, or eventing, she has been participating in since she was 13. With the help of her horse, Kaycee, Ptak in May won first place at the There preliminary level of the Mill Creek (are) so many Pony Club Horse different Trials. Last phases in it year she earned that it requires the Grand Prix so much from Award, which you and your included a $1,000 horse; so much prize toward trust, so much furthering her athletic ability riding training, and was named from both of Preliminary Na- you.” tional Champion at the U.S. Pony — Jessica Ptak, SMNW Club Champion- Class of 2011 graduate ships. “There (are) so many different phases in it that it requires so much from you and your horse; so much trust, so much athletic ability from both of you,” Ptak, who graduated from Shawnee Mission Northwest in 2011, said of why she likes competing. She is now a pre-nursing major at Kansas State University. “And then the adrenaline, also, from the cross-country course is something you don’t experience other places.” Ptak began taking riding lessons on her mom’s horse, Raffy, when she was 5, got involved in showing horses through the 4-H Club when she was 7 and began riding new horse Kaycee — bought by her parents so that the family could have a second horse to ride

trails on — at age 9. She joined the Mill Creek Pony Club at 10. The eventing, which has been funded over the years by both Ptak and her parents, has allowed Ptak to travel throughout the Midwest and Kentucky and Georgia. Eventing involves three phases of competition over two to three days: a dressage, or training, phase, where the horse and rider are judged on their ability to execute certain riding movements; the crosscountry phase that includes 25 jumps; and the show jumping phase. “She’s had to really work hard and lots of hours in the saddle and all kinds of awful weather,” said mom, Michelle Ptak. “She’s got some natural talent and then she applies dedication and she’s got a very strong work ethic. So it’s cool to see her be able to be successful at something she really loves.” Ptak said she won’t be participating in eventing for awhile, however — Kaycee, who is 20 years old now, suffered injuries to two ligaments in his front right leg after a recent competition in Oklahoma. He’s spending his days recuperating at Twin Mill Farm, a boarding stable in western Shawnee. Ptak said it’ll be “six months before I can really start riding again,” and she even had to withdraw from a competition in Colorado scheduled earlier this month. Despite this setback, Ptak said she and Kaycee plan to come back strong next summer. Her ultimate goal is to compete in the top dog, or horse, of all eventing competitions: the Rolex Kentucky Three Day Event, a four-star competition featuring competitors in the top of the field. This is a dream she’s had since she was in elementary school, when a family vacation included a stop at the Kentucky Horse Park. That’s where the Rolex is staged each year. “I’m going to be at this level someday,” Ptak promised herself at the time. Kaycee, who Ptak said has “a really cool personality,” won’t be along for that ride when and if it happens — Ptak said he’s “too old” to withstand that level of competition. For now, she said, when it comes to eventing, “he seems to enjoy it.”

BRIEFLY Shawnee student earns place on President’s list Carley Hamilton of Shawnee was named to Oklahoma Baptist University’s President’s Honor Roll for the spring 2012 semester, the university announced this week. Hamilton is a senior studying early childhood education.

SMNW grad receives Legacy scholarship from Mizzou Jake Gipple of Shawnee recently received the Mizzou Alumni Legacy Scholarship and the Engineering De-

partmental Scholarship at the University of Missouri. The two scholarships are awarded to incoming freshmen based on a number of factors, including academic record, as well as school and extracurricular involvement. The Shawnee Mission Northwest High School 2012 graduate also received the Shawnee Mission Education Foundation’s Leadership Award, one of two awarded annually to high school seniors for academic achievement and leadership in their schools and across the community. The award includes a scholarship to the university of their choice underwritten by U.S. Bank.

JESSICA PTAK and her horse, Kaycee, demonstrate their jumping skills during the Mill Creek Pony Club Horse Trials last month. Ptak has been riding and participating in eventing competitions since she was a youth.

Contributed photo

Enjoy great music & drink specials! (Shawnee location)

Banquet Room Available for all your gatherings

61st & Nieman Shawnee, KS 66203 913.631.5716 34th & Gibbs Kansas City, KS 66106 913.677.1844

Oldest t in Restauranee n w a h S 9 Since 196

• Live music 1st and 3rd Thursdays • Matt Snook, national country recording artist June 26, July 24 and August 28

Order on line at www.shawneepizza.com


6

| Wednesday, June 13, 2012 .

VOICES

QUOTEWORTHY As long as a man stands in his own way, everything seems to be in his way. Ralph Waldo Emerson

SUBMIT LETTERS TO EDITOR@SHAWNEEDISPATCH.COM

COMMENT

Enough of the single life I’ve been playing bachelor for a my excesses with a restless, exhaustweek now, and I guess about the best ing night. My diet has since returned I can say about the experience is that to something pretty close to what it it’s a mixed blessing. was when she was doing the cooking. The wife flew back to Virginia last I have managed to keep the home week to help our youngest daughter fires burning, so to speak, without acmove into a new home. I had a few of tually setting anything on fire except what pass for comthe charcoal in the mitments in these JOHN BEAL grill out back. days of diminished The garden, such responsibility — i.e., as it is, is flourishretirement — so I ing, and I’ve hooked stayed behind. up the drip irriga(Her experition system to the ence reminded me faucet so everything of much that I disstays watered. Mindlike about air travel. ful though I am of all I’ve always considered She was booked on a the perils that may flight through Dallas- myself a fairly selfyet lie in wait, the Fort Worth and was sufficient person and so, tomatoes so far apsupposed to land at truth be told, I was sort of pear to be thriving. Dulles International looking forward to having All the plants have Airport at 9:30 p.m. the house to myself for a lots of little tomaUnfortunately, the few days.” toes, which I take as weather that day in a harbinger of big tothe Dallas area was matoes later on. bad, so the plane was Work is progressheld on the ground in Kansas City for ing on my current home-improvement several hours. Instead of taking off at project, some new furniture for our 3:30 p.m., it was more like 6:30 p.m., bedroom. The headboard needs only a and the delays only multiplied after few more coats of shellac and the final that, the end result being that she land- rubbing, then all that will remain is to ed sometime after 3 in the morning.) lug it up the stairs and install it. But back to the topic at hand. I’ve The evenings have been quiet, with always considered myself a fairly self- no need to debate or discuss what to sufficient person and so, truth be told, watch on television. I was sort of looking forward to having In a way, I remind myself of a carthe house to myself for a few days. toon I saw years ago in The Saturday I can’t claim to have acted all that re- Evening Post or Collier’s or one of sponsibly once I was on my own. The those long-defunct magazines. first thing I did was to stop by my faA big dog, a Great Dane or some vorite barbecue joint on the way home similar breed, was chasing a sports car from the airport and pick up some ribs as two women watched. One said to for dinner. I also got some real potato the other, “Don’t worry. He wouldn’t chips (you know, the kind fried in ac- know what to do with it if he caught tual grease, not the so-called “healthy” it.” variety) and some ice cream. I guess I’ve had about enough of this Let the record show that I paid for single life. The house is too quiet.

POINT OF VIEW The Dispatch’s 2012 Point of View panelists respond to weekly questions. See more responses and add comments of your own at shawneedispatch.com.

Q:

What book are you currently reading?

“In keeping up with Queen Elizabeth’s 60th Jubilee, I am reading ‘The Lives of the Kings and Queens of England,’ edited by Antonia Fraser.”

“‘Outliers,’ by Malcolm Gladwell. It’s a really interesting dive into modern success stories — so far every bit as good as his other books!”

Gloria Bessenbacher

Stephanie Meyer

Shawnee

Shawnee

“‘Target: Patton,’” an analysis of whether or not there was a plot to assassinate Gen. George Patton. Ray Erlichman Shawnee

LETTERS The boring ’20s To the editor: I am so disappointed with this new version of Old Shawnee Town. It is not unique like the old version, which was based on 100-year-old history. This 1920s version is so common, one can receive the same effect by just driving through any town in the surrounding area. It is shameful how this old Midwestern town is being modernized instead of reminding everyone of our roots. Even today’s children still play “Cowboys and Indians” versus pretending to survive the Great Depression. I would also like to know what happened to all the antiques that were

donated to Old Shawnee Town. My grandmother donated a dress to help bring this old town to life. Where is it now? I, along with many other people, felt greatly disappointed when we attended Old Shawnee Days. It is shameful to say, but the rides and free concerts are the only things that really interested the children and adults. The only ones who benefited from this project were the vendors. Since now there is little public interest in Old Shawnee Town, we might as well have the carnival at the grocery store parking lot. At least then, we are supporting our local grocery stores. Diana Gruver,

This is your story, Shawnee, and we love to tell it. In photos and stories, we bring you the news of our community; high school sports, local government and much more.

ShawneeDispatch.com 6301 Pflumm Road, Suite 102 • 913.962.3000

Shawnee


|

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 7

Sawyer’s bid, Donohoe’s exit among deadline day surprises for the court’s decision to keep the rroberts@theworldco.info city of Shawnee within one state Senate district — something she fought Rep. Brett Hildabrand was a Mer- for as an intervenor in the redistrictriam Republican last Thursday night, ing case. when new maps for Kansas’ state legThe judges’ decision left candidates islative districts were released by a wishing to file only a day and a half to panel of federal judges given the redis- determine which of the four U.S. contricting task the Legislature could not gressional districts, 125 state House accomplish. districts, 40 state Senate disNow, Hildabrand is a tricts and 10 state Board of Shawnee Republican running Education districts they and for a new 17th District state potential opponents were in. House seat. And most voters still don’t As part of the redistricting know what districts they effort, Hildabrand explained, now reside in. he was drawn out of his old But according to Johnson 23rd District, which covered County Election Commispart of Shawnee. Instead, he Brett Hildabrand sioner Brian Newby, votwent to bed Thursday in a ers should be able find out new 24th District, which does not in- within the next two weeks by going to clude any of Shawnee but does include jocolection.org and plugging their adportions of Overland Park and Mis- dresses into a search function. sion — areas Hildabrand was unfamilNewby said he was glad the judges iar with. So he moved. assigned the redistricting task got it “The maps came out at about 10:30 completed in time to retain the June Thursday night, and I was in a leas- 11 filing deadlines. Had they not, the ing office in Shawnee at 10 August primaries for state the next morning,” said Hiland U.S. congressional races dabrand, who will face Remight have had to be pushed publican Jason Lieb, chair of back. That would have meant the Lenexa Chamber of Comtwo August primary election merce, in the Aug. 7 primary. dates, because the county And that wasn’t the only charter says primary elecsurprise the noon filing deadtions for county offices must line for state offices brought. take place on the first TuesNeal Sawyer, a Ward 2 Neal Sawyer day in August. Shawnee City Councilman, The last-minute redistrictfiled as a Republican for the 18th ing decision left plenty of room for District state representative’s seat confusion and criticism, however. currently held by John Rubin, also a Rep. Rubin, who was involved in the Shawnee Republican. Milack Talia of redistricting case as an attorney, said Shawnee filed for the seat as a Demo- House redistricting created 25 districts crat. that do not include an incumbent and In another surprise move, 23 districts including two sitRep. Owen Donohoe, the Reting House incumbents. publican incumbent in the Rubin remained the sole 39th District, withdrew his incumbent in the 18th Discandidacy Monday. trict, which was left entirely As the noon deadline apwithin Shawnee city limits proached, Donohoe said he after the redistricting effort had recruited a Republican carved Lake Quivira out of to file for the seat, which the district. represents much of western Owen Donahoe Here’s what happened Shawnee. The only candidate with other Shawnee House for the seat listed on the Kansas Secre- districts: tary of State’s website at the time was • Rep. Kelly Meigs, R-Lenexa, was Marlys Shulda, a Shawnee Democrat. the incumbent in the old 17th District. But Charles Macheers and Stephanie She was moved into the new 23rd DisMeyer, two Shawnee Republicans, got trict, which retains a portion of southin before the deadline. ern Shawnee but now includes a highDonohoe, a House Taxation Com- er percentage of territory in Lenexa. mittee member, declined to discuss Dave Pack, a Lenexa Democrat, also reasons for his withdrawal before in- filed for the seat Monday. forming acquaintances of his decision. • The new 17th District includes “I let only my wife know Saturday part of Shawnee and Lake Quivira. It and my daughter Sunday,” he said. included no sitting House incumbents In other filing news, Sen. Mary until Hildabrand moved there. Pilcher-Cook, R-Shawnee, got an op• The 38th District continues to inponent in the 10th District. She will clude a small portion of far western face Tom Wertz, a Lake Quivira busi- Shawnee. But incumbent Anthony nessman, in the August primary. Mark Brown, R-Eudora, was drawn out of Greene, a Shawnee Democrat, also the district and is now in a new 10th filed for the seat. District along with another House inPilcher-Cook said significant voter cumbent. David Anderson, R-De Soto; confusion could be created by the new Willie Dove, R-Bonner Springs; and Shawnee House districts drawn by the Pete Henderson, D-Basehor, are runjudges. But she said she was thankful ning for the 38th District seat. By Rob Roberts

TIRE TOWN INC. • AUTO • TRUCK • FARM • COMMERCIAL BLEMS, OVERSTOCKS & SPECIAL PURCHASES

ST155/80R13 $25.00 NEW N/A

P185/70R14 P215/65R15 P215/70R15 P215/70R16 P235/70R16 P245/65R17

235/85R16 $145.00 10 PLY A/S

$55.00 $65.00 $78.00 $110.00 $125.00 $145.00

LOTS OF OTHER SIZES!!!

GUARANTEED SLIGHTLY USED TIRES * Lifetime Balance *

* Free Rotation *

Mon. - Fri. 8:00 - 6:00

Saturday 8:00 - 4:00

Shawnee gardens Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center

Discover our truly innovative

Express Recovery

concept in post acute care. • Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy • Speech Therapy For more information, please call or visit our center today.

SHAWNEE 21000 MIDLAND DRIVE (913) 441-4500

6416 Long Street Shawnee, Kansas

(913) 631-2146

LEAVENWORTH 1825 S. 4TH ST TRFWY (913) 682-3201

of helping the less fortunate in Johnson County Bread, shoes and clothing are available and free to anyone who walks through our doors. We also work with other agencies to prevent homelessness by assisting with rent and utilities. We are building a bigger and better facility. You can help by donating time, money, good or services. Look for details on events throughout the year. 11110 W. 67th | Shawnee, KS | www.scsks.org

DEALERS WANTED The Ridge Round-Up

Saturday, June 23, 2012 • 8 am – 5 pm 100 outdoor booths in the parking lot

Purchase a booth to sell your vintage, retro or unique jewelry or collectibles... only $25!!

Call for details!

Antiques & Collectibles 75th & Nieman Shawnee, KS • (913) 268-7979


8

| Wednesday, June 13, 2012 .

Not all view Web, other tech tools as advances By Rob Roberts rroberts@theworldco.info

In 1812, a group of English textile workers known as Luddites destroyed new laborsaving equipment threatening their livelihoods. Two hundred years later, the term “Luddite” survives, with a broader definition as one opposed to technological changes such as the Internet. According to internetworldstats. com, only 21 percent of the North American population does not use the Internet — meaning no email or Facebook, no Skyping or surfing. Statistics for Northeast Kansas were not available. But a search using old-fashioned means identified a few residents of the region doing without modern communication advances for reasons ranging from financial to philosophical. Tom Steele, 67, of Basehor said he steers clear of the Internet due to concerns over privacy and his own temperament. “I go to the library once in a while and fiddle on their computer,” the retired grocery hauler said. “If I get mad there, I won’t tear it up. But if I had a laptop at home, I’d probably throw it.” During one brief period after an employer stopped mailing pay stubs, Steele recalled, he began using a computer at work to access payroll data. “You had to change your password every 30 days, and the third time you hit the wrong button it would kick you out,” he said. “I finally said, ‘Heck with it, I’ll go to the bank for the information.’” But even if computers were hasslefree, Steele would have little use for them. “As far as people paying their bills by Internet, that’s about the dumbest thing going,” he said. “Someone got hold of my wife’s Social Security number, and we ended up having to put a credit lock on.” Being able to see grandkids live on Skype would be “cool,” Steele acknowledged, adding that he could “see a whole world of advantageous things, like genealogy, you could look up on the computer.” “But it just doesn’t fit my category,” he said. “My daughter and son-in-law use their smartphone to find out what

DATA GAP BETWEEN ONLINE, OFFLINE POPULATIONS WIDENING Residents without Internet access can still get most information they desire from public agencies. But as the offline population dwindles and online communication tools proliferate, the data gap between those with and without computers is widening. That means some information is now provided by request only, and some isn’t available at all to those without computers or smartphones. “Individuals who do not have access to a computer can request information from their school or at the district office, and a paper copy can be provided,” said Leigh Anne Neal, the Shawnee Mission school district’s associate superintendent for communications. But recognizing the scope of the computer-savvy public it serves, the district has “focused on moving our communication paperless where we can, but retaining printed options that go out more broadly on a limited basis.” Delivered to every home in the district three times a year, “Inside: Shawnee

restaurants are closest to them and how many calories are in this or that. I say, ‘Just go eat.’” According to Steele, he has an “antique” cell phone, which doesn’t text or take photos. And he’s dreading the day the battery wears out, forcing him to upgrade. “I just have no interest or patience for stuff like that,” Steele said. “I’d rather ride my motorcycle, work in the yard and spend time with my family.” Andra Gonzalez, who lives at the Bluejacket Lodge Apartments in Shawnee, said she prefers to communicate the old-fashioned way — through letters, landline or face to face. While working on one of the 100 lap robes she donates each year, Gonzalez chatted recently with neighbor Cena Burge, who rued the fact she could no longer afford Internet service. Burge, a Christian Scientist, said she especially missed online church programs and the ability to look up things like recipes. “If I need a recipe,” Gonzalez said, “I go to the library and find a cookbook.”

Let us take care of your family’s complete dental needs!

6302 Monrovia St. • Shawnee, KS • (913) 631-2400 www.greenhalghdental.com

Mission” is an example of the district’s effort to keep patrons apprised of news and events via hard copy. Examples of data exclusive to those with Internet or texting capabilities include board meeting agenda packets and school emergency and weather alerts. Gordon Davis, an information specialist with the Johnson County Area Agency on Aging, said it relies on frequent mailings and telephone conversations to keep the county’s computerless seniors informed about support services it provides. “But in today’s world, certain publications and certain information are now only available online,” he said. That sends many people to the library, where staff can help patrons access online information and, better yet, teach them how to use computers, Davis said. But despite the fact that computers could open whole new worlds for seniors largely confined to their homes, many decline to adapt by dint of resources or resistance to change, he said. For others, “the library has become the

A retired nurse, Gonzalez used to use a computer in the clinic. But she doesn’t miss the learning curves associated with annual updates of the operating system — “It used to be called Windows,” she said.

place for people to test something like the Internet, Facebook or ebooks” and then purchase it for home use, said Kim Beets, director of the Bonner Springs City Library. It offers 24 computers with public Internet access. The Johnson County Library system offers 362 computers with Internet access across its 13 branches, said Marsha Bennett, community relations manager. Job seekers are among the many patrons the computers attract, she said, because many employers now accept online applications only. In addition, most state forms required to qualify for and remain on unemployment are completed online. People of all ages and income levels rely on the Bonner Springs library’s computers, Beets added. And that information fuels the library’s own communications policy. “We continue to do a lot of our traditional print stuff, marquee signs, word of mouth,” she said. “There’s probably not anything we put online that we wouldn’t communicate by other means.”

Like Steele, Gonzalez also has security concerns. Her son’s bank account was tapped to the tune of several thousand dollars by a hacker, she said. Please see LUDDITES, page 9


Wednesday, June 13, 2012

New director has helped city make quantum tech leap

|9

By Rob Roberts rroberts@theworldco.info

Shawnee’s new information technology director joined the city as a network manager in 1999, when there wasn’t much of a network to manage. Mel Bunting, promoted May 28 to succeed recently retired IT director Jerry Doherty, said Shawnee had only three computers with Internet access in 1999. And connecting to the web was achieved through a slow, dial-up system. The city didn’t have a wide area network either, meaning there were no computer connections between municipal buildings when Bunting joined the IT staff as its second member. But that was rectified a year later, and in the dozen years that have followed, Shawnee city government became more and more wired — and wireless. “I realized (Shawnee) had a late focus on IT when I started here,” Bunting said. “But you come in with the mind set that it’s an opportunity to grow and build.” Today, Bunting supervises an eightmember department responsible for maintaining 1,500 devices (10 times more than in 1999) and 68 servers (compared to 10 in ’99) that run more than 20 software programs to handle 100 terabytes of data each month. Designed to connect the city’s 271 employees with that data, one another and Shawnee’s 63,000-plus residents, the system includes five websites that receive 65,000 page views a month and a program that processes more than 700,00 emails (55,000 legitimate and 650,000 spam) monthly. “We don’t directly service the public. But we serve our users, who provide those services to the community,” Bunting said. “So this is a rewarding job from that context. But there is also a lot of responsibility.” In addition to keeping the system up, Bunting keeps pace with the astonishingly fast pace of change. For

Luddites CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

But Gonzalez’s main reason for remaining offline, she said, is that “there are better things to spend time and money on.” Viola Schlup, who lives east of Baldwin City, said she hasn’t needed any innovations since marrying Truly Ernest Schlup and moving to a new home decades ago. “We had a refrigerator, a black-andwhite TV and an inside bathroom,” Viola said. “No, I take that back. I still had to beat a path until I got pregnant with our first child and we moved to a house with a bathroom.” Truly Ernest, 83, and Viola, 71, don’t have the Internet or even cable or satellite dish for television reception. “We get (channels) 4, 5 and 9, which is more than we need,” Viola said. “I

Rob Roberts/staff

MEL BUNTING, information technology director for the city of Shawnee, is responsible for keeping these servers up and running. instance, he noted, “Apple began taking pre-orders for the iPad in 2010, and they’re already on their third generation of iPad.” According to Bunting, Shawnee has embraced mobile devices such as iPads and smartphones during the past couple of years. Currently, he said, about 80 are being used by employees in departments such as police, parks and public works who spend much of their workday in the field. In contrast to small handheld devices, the mainframes Bunting began his career working with had disc drives as big as dishwashers, he recalled. Bunting, 51, has 32 years of experience in his field, having spent the 1980s and most of the ’90s in banking and health insurance IT positions in Topeka, where he is from. Now Shawnee residents, Bunting and his wife, Trisha, have two grown children. Bunting is a 2010 graduate of the Shawnee Tomorrow Leadership Program and is now working toward a master’s degree in business administration with a concentration in management information systems. “Mel is a skilled professional with extensive experience,” City Manager Carol Gonzales said. “I have a tremendous amount of trust in Mel’s ability to move the city’s IT department in the right direction.” do have a cell phone in case I go out and have a breakdown. But as far as the Internet, we don’t need it, don’t want it, not going to get it.” The Schlups prefer to spend their free time playing cards, watching a little TV and playing with their Pomeranian, Tinkerbelle. “My children all have the Internet, and I think it’s good for the right things,” Viola said. “But take all these men who think they’re talking to 14-year-olds who are actually talking to detectives. That destroys families.” Like one of the Schlups’ children, Michael Repp of Nieman Chiropractic in Shawnee uses the Internet in his business. But like older Luddites, Repp said he didn’t like the interpersonal direction of modern communication. “I don’t tweet or Facebook, and I don’t have an iPhone,” Repp said. “I’m ‘so 29 seconds ago’ — which, by the way, is my least favorite commercial slogan.”

$325,000 OR A REASONABLE OFFER

|

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 9

1 ½ Story, 4 brms, 3 ½ baths. Built in 2003. Approx. 4,650 sq ft. of finished living space. LIVING ROOM: Large carpeted living room, one wall w/oak built-ins and glass shelving with centered fireplace. Cathedral ceiling, ceiling fan. KITCHEN: 12x24 kitchen with lots of oak built-ins. Lazy Susan corners, pull out base shelves for easy storage. Corning top stove, double oven, built in Microwave, dishwasher, double sink, side by side refrigerator, breakfast bar,& large dinette area. Real oak flooring, utility room off kitchen with washer & dryer & deep freeze. ROOMS: Office computer room with hookup and telephone jack, carpeted formal dining room, carpet floors, walk in closets, TV hook up. Phone jacks & ceiling fan. BATHROOMS: Tile floors in all 3 ½ baths. Master bath has a Jacuzzi, large shower, 2 sinks with center vanity stool, high rise stool and auxiliary heat. FAMILY ROOM: 19x25 carpeted family room, built ins and sink, fireplace, ceiling fan, TV hook ups, wall telephone, 19x25 Rec. room, vinyl floor, built-ins. Pool table ceiling lights. Central Vac. System, 2 furnace with humidifiers, 2 hot water heaters, 2 air conditioners, wired for Direct TV, water softener and shallow stairs inside & out.. Wheel chair accessible doorways on 1st floor. GARAGE: Large 24x24 attached garage with 2 extra tall overhead doors. Patio off kitchen, front porch with swing. House has Anderson dual panel lay-in windows for easy interior-exterior cleaning. 2 ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS, 1 serves the home the other for lawn lighting. Lawn sprinkling system. Tall oak shade trees.

Mary Knapp - Reece and Nichols Premier Realty 1106 N. 155th Street Basehor, KS 66007 Office Line: 913-724-2300 Fax Line: 913-724-1136 Direct Line : 816-835-4976 Email: knappm@reeceandnichols.com Licensed in Kansas


10

| Wednesday, June 13, 2012 .

Perceptive Software study idea prompts council debate By Rob Roberts rroberts@theworldco.info

Ray Erlichman, a resident who attends and blogs about Shawnee City Council meetings, proposed during the governing body’s June 11 meeting the creation of a volunteer “lessons learned task force” to determine why Lenexa was able to lure the Shawnee headquarters of Perceptive Software. One lesson Erlichman might have learned: Don’t suggest a city task force be led by the man who challenged the mayor during a recent, hotly contested campaign. Erlichman suggested the group be led by Eric Jenkins, who, in addition to falling to Mayor Jeff Meyers in April, served on the Shawnee Planning Commission for 21 years and participated in lessons-learned evaluations during careers with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the military. Erlichman said he was not suggest-

ing the independent task force be formed “so we can hang somebody by the neck or kick somebody in the head.” He said the goal would be to find out what Shawnee officials did right and wrong “so if we have a situation like this going forward, we have something to look back on.” Ward 1 Councilman Dan Pflumm said he thought the task force was “a great idea.” But Mayor Meyers and Ward 3 Councilman Jeff Vaught said the city already had a group qualified to evaluate the situation: the Shawnee Economic Development Council. “Our team is on it; they’re on it 100 percent,” Vaught said. Vaught added that beyond himself and Meyers, both of whom spoke out in the media following June 1 reports that Perceptive Software was moving, everyone else — including Jenkins — had remained silent on the issue. And then things got ugly. “I’m a little upset about being called

out at a City Council meeting,” Jenkins said after approaching the podium. Jenkins added that Erlichman had made it clear he was not proposing a “gotcha” task force, aimed only at faulting city officials for the loss of roughly 700 jobs. “I have the credentials” to lead the task force, Jenkins added, directing his comments toward Vaught. “And that kind of disrespect is unacceptable, sir. ... You made a fool of yourself and the City Council.” At that point, Vaught asked Jenkins, “How much experience do you have in economic development?” And when Jenkins didn’t give a direct answer, Vaught repeatedly said, “Answer the question. Answer the question.” Eventually, Jenkins answered “30 years,” referencing his work with FEMA. “Really?” Vaught responded. “I’ve seen your resume. That’s not economic development.”

The heated exchange continued as Vaught asked Jenkins why anyone should not expect the proposed task force to play gotcha. During the recent mayoral campaign, he said, “everything was gotcha. You set the gotcha tone.” Eventually, Meyers gaveled the pair down, and Ward 3 council member Michelle Distler asked if the city was, indeed, planning to evaluate the loss of Perceptive Software. Meyers said a city evaluation would proceed after July 11, when Lenexa is expected to divulge all the incentives it used to attract the company. Distler suggested that the City Council might want to review the city’s evaluation and then determine whether further evaluation is needed. That ended formal discussion of the issue without a motion. ONLINE: See more City Council news online at shawneedispatch.com

DE SOTO SCHOOL BOARD

De Soto school district will work with firm on enrollment, boundary study By Melissa Treolo mtreolo@theworldco.info

The De Soto school district is taking the guesswork out of projecting enrollments and determining boundary lines. On Monday, school board members approved 5-0, with Randy Johnson and Angela Handy absent, a contract for up to $53,700 with RSP & Associates, a planning firm based in Overland Park, for enrollment and boundary studies. This is the first time the district has worked with an outside source to conduct the studies. Previously, district staff had conducted studies based on census data and housing developments in Johnson County, said Alvie Cater, district spokesman. “To be honest, it was just our best guess,” Cater said. The enrollment study, which will begin in July and take five to six weeks, will offer projections for the next 10 years, Cater said, allowing the district to more effectively plan. The boundary study is expected to begin about six weeks after completion of the enrollment study, he said.

Of major concern now, Cater said, is middle school enrollment. Last school year, Lexington Trails Middle School, with about 300 students, had less than half the enrollment of the district’s other two middle schools. “Looking at the middle school numbers, we know something needs to be done,” Cater said. Enrollment in the district is expected to increase next school year by 2 percent. Cater said a more reliable boundary study should also help to limit the number of times boundary lines are redrawn. In the past, that’s happened almost annually. Between 1994 and 2010, the district built a new school almost every year, prompting new boundary lines and meaning some families changed schools up to “four to five times,” Cater said. “And so, moving forward, the board of education and the district wanted to be able to get solid information or reliable data that helps us better project our enrollment and makes better use of our school capacities,” he said. Cater said a boundary study

Pressed for Time? EXTENDED HOURS ARE AVAILABLE! Thursdays until 7pm and Saturdays 9-noon Call to schedule your appointment today! Thompson Eye Clinic

“Where the Focus is on You”

Dr. Robert W. Thompson, Jr. • Dr. Steve Cauble 11005 W. 60th St. Ste 210, Shawnee 913-631-7700 • www.thompsoneye.com

wouldn’t necessarily result in the need to redraw boundary lines. If it does, however, the district would schedule public forums beforehand, he said. “So that parents can see the data,” Cater said, “and at least have a voice in the process.”

Also on Monday, after an executive session, the board unanimously approved a 2 percent salary increase for district administrators and classified employees, which include those in secretarial and maintenance positions, among other support positions.


|

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 11

FOOD

MEALTIME IDEAS AND RECIPES FOR YOU AND YOUR FAMILY

Keep an open mind to Kansas wines Festival to feature samplings from 14 of the state’s 23 vineyards

IF YOU GO

By Sara Shepherd sshepherd@ljworld.com

If you’re heading to the new winetasting event Saturday in De Soto, you won’t find wines that taste exactly like your favorite Napa Valley cabernet or Argentinian malbec. However, organizers say, that isn’t a bad thing. The event, called Winesong at Riverfest, will feature all Kansas wines — with 14, or more than half, of the state’s 23 vineyards expected to be represented. Instead of the typical liquor-store best-sellers, you’ll find grape varietals such as Seyval, Vignole, Chambourcin, Cynthiana and Concord. “Don’t try and compare it, they’re not the same,” said Michelle Meyer, who, along with her father, Les Meyer, owns Basehor’s Holy-Field Vineyard and Winery. “You can’t compare apples to oranges. We are growing different kinds of grapes in this region.” Do expect quality, though, Meyer said. Most Kansas vineyards grow French-hybrid grapes, and a number of the represented wineries, including hers, have won national awards for their products. Tony Kugler, who owns Kugler’s Vineyard in rural Lawrence, earned a bronze medal at the National Norton Wine Festival in St. Louis for his Cynthiana a few years ago. Being small can be an advantage when it comes to making wine, Kugler said. It’s easier to monitor and control the qualities that make good wine, such as sugar and phlevels. Winesong at Riverfest attendees will be able to try multiple wineries’ versions of the same varietal — which can be a good way to narrow your fo-

File photo

Pep Solberg, pictured in 2008, lifts up the canopy on some vines to reveal clusters of grapes at BlueJacket Crossing Vineyard and Winery, located about four miles southwest of Eudora. cus at an event that includes too many choices to try in a day. And unlike many mainstream tasting events where large wineries send representatives across the country, the person filling your glass during Winesong at Riverfest may well be the person who grew the grapes and created the wine themselves. “You will learn a lot, especially if you’ve never patronized or visited regional wineries,” Meyer said. “They (winemakers) want you to be as excited about it as we all are.” The city of De Soto is organizing the event, with profits going to the De Soto Rotary Club. City Administrator Patrick Guilfoyle, himself a wine-lover, said he envisioned the event to attract outsiders to De Soto’s relatively new Riverfest Park — a regional park overlooking the Kansas River that features, among other things, a natural amphitheater for concerts — and to help boost busi-

ness for Kansas wineries. A new law should make the event more worth winemakers’ time, too, Guilfoyle said. As he laid plans for Winesong at Riverfest, Guilfoyle worked with area legislators to pass a new law allowing the wineries to sell wine by the bottle at the event and future events like it. Until now, they might travel hundreds of miles for such an event with no way to sell any wine to festival-goers. Guilfoyle said he hoped the event would help more people share his appreciation of Kansas wine, which he began to hone a few years ago after his first visit to a Kansas winery. “I have to admit, I went into the winery with a little bit of an ignorant, snobby attitude,” he said. “I was blown away by what I experienced.” Guilfoyle said comparing mainstream wines to Kansas wines is kind of like comparing cola to Dr. Pepper. “It’s different, but it is equally re-

Winesong at Riverfest is planned for 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Saturday at Riverfest Park, 33440 W. 79th St. in De Soto. There will be a tent in case of rain. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased in advance at winesongatriverfest.com or at the gate. Attendees must be at least 21. Admission includes 10 sampling tickets and a souvenir wine glass. Wine will be available to purchase by the bottle. The event also will feature a number of area artists, as well as appetizers and live music. Participating wineries are: • BlueJacket Crossing Vineyard and Winery, Eudora • Davenport Orchards and Winery, Eudora • Holy-Field Vineyard and Winery, Basehor • Jefferson Hill Vineyard and Winery, McLouth • Kugler’s Vineyard, Lawrence • Middle Creek Winery, Louisburg • Nighthawk Vineyard and Winery, Paola • Renaissance Cellars, St. Marys • Rowe Ridge Vineyard and Winery, Kansas City, Kan. • Somerset Ridge Vineyard and Winery, Paola • Stone Pillar Vineyard and Winery, Olathe • Wine Barn Winery and Vineyard, Kansas City, Kan. • Wyldewood Cellars, Paxico • White Tail Run Winery, Edgerton

freshing, equally good,” he said. “And you need to drink it for its own intrinsic, unique value.” — Lawrence Journal-World features reporter Sara Shepherd can be reached at 785-832-7187.


#1 AGENT IN SOUTHERN LEAVENWORTH COUNTY

“A Name You Can Always Trust”

HOMES FOR SALE

DAN LYNCH

c: (913) 481-6847 o: (913) 369-3000 danlynch@lynchresidential.com

HOMES WITH ACREAGE FOR SALE

NEW LISTING!!

%UDGIRUW&W 6WK6W

x0DJQLILFHQWDOOEULFNUDQFKZLWKDVSDFLRXV IORRUSODQWKDWIHDWXUHVPDVWHUVXLWHV x)LQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQWVSDFLRXVURRPV xQGNLWFKHQLQEDVHPHQW x+8*(GHFNRXWEDFN IHQFHGLQ\DUG

Basehor Schools

6WK6W x6XSHUIDEXORXVFDUJDUDJHVSOLWHQWU\ x)DPLO\URRP WK%('5220LQEDVHPHQW x+RPHIHDWXUHVJUDQLWHFRXQWHUVKDUGZRRGIORRUVRQWKHPDLQ OHYHOPDLQIORRUODXQGU\RSHQIORRUSODQOUJPDVWHUVXLWHZ ZDONLQFORVHW KXJHPDVWHUEDWK:-(77('78%/2$'6 2)6WRUDJHDUHDLQJDUDJH

x,QFUHGLEOHKRPHRQTXLHWGHDGHQGVWUHHW x1HZFDUSHWLQORZHUOHYHO QHZSDLQWWKUXRXW x*DUDJHFRQYHUWHGLQWRDKXJH[UHFURRP x)DPLO\URRPLQEDVHPHQWGHVLJQHGWREHWKH QHZ PDVWHU VXLWH ZILUHSODFH +XJH  FDU GH WDFKHGJDUDJH Leavenworth Schools

(6WRQHFUHHN$YH %URRNULGJH&W x*5($7EHGURRPUDQFKKRPH x)LQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQWZVSD FLRXVURRPV xQGNLWFKHQLQEDVHPHQW x+8*(GHFNRXWEDFN IHQFHGLQ\DUG

x6QD]]\VWRU\EUZLWKIRUPDOGLQQLQJURRP x/DUJHOLYLQJURRPZLWKISO KXJHPDVWHUEHGURRP x/X[XULRXVPDVWHUEDWKZLWKFRUQHUMHWWHGWXE x6HFRQGXSVWDLUVEHGURRPFRXOGEHH[SDQGHGZLWK ILQLVKHGVSDFHRYHUJDUDJH

Tonganoxie Schools

Tonganoxie Schools

6*UHHQ6W :WK6W 1&KHVWQXW'U

x$GRUDEOH%XQJDORZRQODUJHFRUQHUORW x$:(620([GHWDFKHGJDUDJH x1HZIURQWSRUFKWKHUPDOZLQGRZV x+HDWLQJDQG$LUUHSODFHGLQ x%HDXWLIXOZRRGZRUNWKURXJKRXWKRPH

x%HDXWLIXOVWRU\KRPHLQDJUHDWORFDWLRQ x%HGURRP %DWKURRPV x:HOOPDLQWDLQHGKRPHZLWKDJUHDWRSHQIORRU  SODQ x+RPHEDFNVXSWRZRRGHGDUHD

Tonganoxie Schools

Leavenworth Schools

Eudora Schools

x6XSHUIDEXORXVFDUJDUDJHVSOLWHQWU\ x+DUGZRRGIORRUVLQNLWFKHQGLQLQJURRP x*UDQLWHFRXQWHUVFRUQHUSDQWU\ x%HDXWLIXOILUHSODFHPDLQOHYHOODXQGU\ x/UJPDVWHUVXLWHZZDONLQFORVHW

Tonganoxie Schools

6WK6W

x*UHDWXSGDWHGEHGURRPUDQFKRQDQDFUHORW x+RPHIHDWXUHVDOOPDLQWIUHHYLQ\OVLGLQJDQG QHZWLPEHUOLQHURRI x*UDQLWHFRXQWHUVLQNLWFKHQDQGEDWK x)URQWEDFNFRYHUHGSRUFKHV DERYHJURXQG SRRO Kansas City Schools

60HOURVH/Q 1QG6W

Tonganoxie Schools

x%HDXWLIXOWRZQKRXVHLQLPPDFXODWHFRQGLWLRQ x+XJHNLWFKHQWKDWRYHUORRNVWKHOLYLQJURRP x+RPHIHDWXUHVSDQWU\ODXQGU\RIIWKHNLWFKHQ x*25*(286ILUHSODFHYDXOWHGFHLOLQJV x3ULYDWHEDWKLQPDVWHU ZDONRXWORZHUOHYHO x+XJHEDFN\DUG Piper Schools

60DLQ6W 69LOODJH7HUU

xEHGURRP EDWK x1HZURRIDORQJZLWKQHZVLGLQJ x:DONRXWEDVHPHQW x/DUJHGHFN IHQFHGLQDUHD x7KLVDOVRKDVDH[WUDORWWKDWFRXOGSRVVLEO\ EHVSOLW

Tonganoxie Schools

$QGHUVRQ6W 6:KLOVKLUH'U 6\FDPRUH6W

x$IIRUGDEOHWRZQKRXVHZLWKRYHU x)$%8/28672:1+20( x%HGURRPV %DWKURRPV VTIWRIOLYLQJVSDFH x)LQLVKHGEDVHPHQWLQFOXGHVD-DFNQ-LOO x2SHQWLOHGJRXUPHWNLWFKHQGLQLQJDUHD x0DVWHUEGUPZZDONLQFORVHWYDXOWHGFHLOLQJV PRUH EDWKZGRXEOHYDQLWLHV x%XLOWLQRYHQ PLFURZDYHFRRNWRS FDELQHWVJDORUHNLWFKHQ x+RPHLVLQJUHDWFRQGLWLRQDQGUHDG\IRU LVODQG DTXLFNVDOH DeSoto Schools x*UHDWORFDWLRQIRUFRPPXWHUV Tonganoxie Schools

x%HDXWLIXOEHGURRPUDQFKKRPH x*UHDWRSHQIORRUSODQZLWKKDUGZRRGIORRUV x,VODQGDQGSDQWU\LQNLWFKHQPDLQOHYHOODXQGU\ x:RQGHUIXOPDVWHUVXLWHZQLFHPDVWHUEDWK x)LQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQWZODUJH EHGURRPVDQGIDPLO\URRP Tonganoxie Schools

NEW LISTING!!

1RUWKVWDU&W

x683(5%('522072:1+286( x,PPDFXODWHFRQGLWLRQ UHDG\IRUQHZRZQHUV x/DUJHNLWFKHQZLWK+8*(ZDONLQSDQWU\ x)LUHSODFHDQGYDXOWHGFHLOLQJVLQOLYLQJURRP x0DVWHUVXLWHZSULYDWHEDWK ZDONLQFORVHW x)LQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQWIHDWXUHV Tonganoxie Schools

x+8*(EHGURRP xDFUHV x/$5*(NLWFKHQIDPLO\URRP JUHDWURRP x3DUWLDO\ILQLVKHGEDVHPHQWZUHFURRP x[VKRSDQG[EDUQ

Basehor Schools

.DUHQ/DQH

x*UHDWEUZKRWWXE DERYHJURXQGSRRO xEUuVRQPDLQOHYHOIRUPDOGLQLQJ x*DUDJHFRQYHUWHGWRIDPLO\URRP x %DVHPHQW LQFOXGHV UHF URRP ZEDU RIILFH ZLWK ILUHSODFH DQG  QRQ FRQIRUPLQJ EHG URRPV Lansing Schools

(1(5*<()),&,(17+20( xEHGURRPHDUWKFRQWDFWRQDOPRVWDFUHV x)DEXORXV[DWULXPVN\OLJKW x)HDWXUHVDIRUPDOOLYLQJURRPZIUSODQGIDPLO\ URRPZZRRGEXUQLQJVWRYH x+RPHLV$//(/(&75,& Tonganoxie Schools

*LUDUG6W

x%HGURRRPV EDWKURRPV x:RQGHUIXONLWFKHQGLQLQJURRP x)XOOEDVHPHQWLVEHJJLQJWREHILQLVKHG x/DUJHRSHQIORRUSODQQLFHPDVWHUVXLWH

Tonganoxie Schools

Tonganoxie Schools

Leavenworth Schools

%XU\6WUHHW

Oskaloosa Schools

6WUDQJHU5G x*UHDWEHGURRPUDQFKRQDFUHV x1LFHIORRUSODQZYDXOWHGFHLOLQJVLQOLYLQJURRP x/DUJHNLWFKHQZLWKWRQVRIFDELQHWVWRUDJH x3DUWLDOO\ILQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQW

Tonganoxie Schools

6WLOOZHOO5G

6WLOOZHOO5G WK6W

x6SDFLRXVUDQFKRQDFUHV x/DUJHEHGURRPVDQGIXOOEDWKV x*RUJHRXVPDVWHUVXLWHZLWKDOOWKHXSJUDGHV x&XVWRPNLWFKHQZLWKVROLGVXUIDFHFRXQWHUV x(QMR\WKHDFUHVWRFNHGSRQG

x%HGURRPV %DWKURRP x+RPHLVORFDWHGRQEODFNWRSURDGVZLWKYHU\HDV\ DFFHVVWR/DZUHQFH x$FUHV x[*DUDJHVKRS

Lawrence Schools

Tonganoxie Schools

x%HDXWLIXOFRXQWU\OLYLQJRQDFUHV x%HGURRPVDQGIXOOEDWKV x+RPHDOVRLQFOXGHVDFDUGHWDFKHGJDUDJH x)XOOZDONRXWEDVHPHQWUHDG\WREHILQLVKHG x/RFDWHGRQSDYHGURDGV

Tonganoxie Schools

WK6W )HDWKHU/Q WK6W

x7KLVKRPHRIIHUVPDLQWHQDQFHIUHHYLQ\OVLGLQJDQG WKHUPDOZLQGRZV,WIHDWXUHVEXLOWLQVLQWKHNLWFKHQ ILUHSODFHV7KHKRPHRIIHUVDILQLVKHGEDVHPHQW ZIDPLO\URRPDQGEDWK*UHDWKRPHRQKDUG VXUIDFHURDGWKDWLVIHQFHGZRXWEXLOGLQJ

Lansing Schools

x2XWVWDQGLQJEHGURRPUDQFKKRPHRQDFUHV x%UDQGQHZKRPHLQWKH5RFNLQJ&VXEGLYLVLRQ x*UHDWRSHQIORRUSODQNLWFKHQLVODQGDQGSDQWU\ x+DUGZRRGIORRUVLQNLWFKHQODUJHPDVWHUVXLWH x3HUIHFWZDONRXWEDVHPHQW1RZLVWKHWLPHWRSLFN FRORUVDQGRSWLRQV Tonganoxie Schools

%XU\6W

x6XSHUQLFHFXVWRPEXLOWEHGURRPKRPH x+RPHIHDWXUHVDJUHDWRSHQIORRUSODQ x+8*(OLYLQJURRPDQGDYHU\QLFHPDVWHUVXLWH x:DONLQFORVHW SULYDWHEDWKLQPDVWHUVXLWH x5HOD[WKHDIWHUQRRQVDZD\LQWKHKRWWXE

1WK6W x*UHDWKDQGLPDQVSHFLDORQDOPRVWDFUHV x%HGURRP %DWKURRPV xFDUJDUDJHDWWDFKHG xFDUGHWDFKHGJDUDJH

x6WXQQLQJVWRU\RQDFUHV x+DUGZRRGIORRUVRQWKHPDLQOHYHO x)8//%$7+6 x)XOOZDONRXWEDVHPHQW

Tonganoxie Schools

Tonganoxie Schools

Kansas City, KS Schools

WK6W WK6W

x*RUJHRXVEHGURRPKRPHRQDFUHV x/RFDWHGRQDTXLHWFXOGHVDF x*UHDWNLWFKHQZORDGVRIVWRUDJH x0DVWHUEHGURRPZDFFHVVWRGHFN xILQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQWZUHFURRP Tonganoxie Schools

NEW LISTING!!

xEHGURRPKRPHWKDWLVORDGHGZLWKVTXDUHIHHW x+DUGZRRGODPLQDWHIORRUVIRUPDOGLQLQJURRP x+8*(PDVWHUVXLWHZLWKDOOWKHH[WUDV x)LQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQW x*X\VZLOOORYHWKHFDUWDQGHPJDUDJH x3HUIHFWEDFN\DUGIRUHQMR\LQJWKHZHHNHQGVZLWK IULHQGVDQGIDPLO\

7RSHND6W x*UHDWEHGURRPUDQFKRQDFUHV x*UHDW2VNDORRVDORFDWLRQZLWKLQWKHFLW\OLPLWV x +RPH LV ZHOO PDLQWDLQHG  IHDWXUHV  EHG URRPV VXQ URRP IXOO EDVHPHQW  RYHUVL]HG JDUDJHV KXJH[FRYHUHGGHFN

NEW LISTING!!

'HODZDUH6W :LOOLV'U x6XSHUQLFHEHGURRPKRPH x+DUGZRRGIORRUVLQNLWFKHQ GLQQLQJURRP x%UHDNIDVWEDUODUJHOLYLQJURRP x*UHDWPDVWHUVXLWH x7UXO\DJUHDWKRPHDWDJUHDWSULFH

x7UXHUDQFKZLWKQLFHODUJHURRPV x1HZO\UHPRGHOHGNLWFKHQZRDNFDELQHWV x+XJHJDUDJHZLWKEXLOWLQZRUNEHQFK x:HOOPDLQWDLQHGKRPHLQTXLHWQHLJKERUKRRG x 6PDOO WRZQ OLYLQJ ZLWK /HJHQGuV 6KRSSLQJ DUHDPLQXWHVGRZQWKHURDG Tonganoxie Schools

Basehor-Linwood Schools

%UDQGW5G 6DQGXVN\5G

NEW LISTING!!

x:RQGHUIXOIURQWWREDFNVSOLWHQWU\KRPH x*UHDWRSHQIORRUSODQODUJHHDWLQNLWFKHQ x7LOHIORRUVLQNLWFKHQYDXOWHGOLYLQJURRP x3OXVKPDVWHUVXLWHZZDONLQFORVHW x)HQFHGEDFN\DUGSHUIHFWIRUHQWHUWDLQLQJ

6WLOOZHOO5G

x%HDXWLIXOEUUDQFKKRPHRQDFUHV x/UJHDWLQNLWFKHQZRRGEXUQLQJVWRYHLQOLYLQJURRP x1LFHPDVWHUVXLWH xQRQFRQIRUPLQJEUuV IDPLO\URRPLQEDVHPHQW x*X\VZLOOORYHWKH[EDUQ VWRFNHGSRQG

6RPHUV6W

x%HDXWLIXOEHGURRPUDQFKKRPH x1LFHEHGURRPUDQFKZLWK%DWKURRPV x*RUJHRXVKDUGZRRGIORRUV x+8*(EDFN\DUG x)UHVKSDLQWLQVLGHDQGRXW x/DUJHHDWLQNLWFKHQ x)LQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQWDQGSOHQW\RIH[WUD x)XOOEDVHPHQWZLWKSRWHQWLDOIRUDVDIHURRP XQGHUWKHHQWLUHJDUDJH VWRUDJH x0DWXUHWUHHVRQDTXLHWVWUHHW Tonganoxie Schools Tonganoxie Schools

6*UHHQ6W

x+20(48$/,),(6)2586'$ ),1$1&,1* x&ODVV\ROGHUEHGURRPVWRU\KRPH x1HZO\UHPRGHOHGNLWFKHQZUROORXWVKHOYHV x&XVWRPRDNFDELQHWVUHPRGHOHGEDWK x1HZHUIXUQDFHURRI PDLQWHQDQFHIUHHVLGLQJ 

xEHGURRPEDWKUDQFKKRPHRQDFUHV x5HDG\WRHQMR\OLIHRQDSHDFHIXODFUHV" x.LWFKHQZLWKJDVUDQJHFHQWHULVODQGDQGSDQWU\ x+RPHIHDWXUHVDJUHDWNLWFKHQZLWKJDVUDQJH x+LVDQGKHUVGRXEOHFORVHWVLQPDVWHUVXLWH x+DUGZRRGIOUVLQGLQLQJUPKLVKHUVGRXEOHFORVHWV x5HOD[RQWKH[FRYHUHGGHFN x+XJHIDPLO\URRPLQEDVHPHQW x3OHQW\RIURRPIRUKRUVHVZLWKWKH[EDUQ x5HOD[RQWKH[FRYHUHGGHFN

Pleasant Ridge Schools

&RQOH\$YH *ROGHQ5G 3DUDOOHO5G

x)DQWDVWLFKRPHRQDFUHV x%HGURRPVDQGIXOOEDWKV x)LQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQW x)HDWXUHVLQFOXGHYDXOWHGFHLOLQJVDQGILUHSODFH x*UHDWDFFHVVWR/DZUHQFHDQG.DQVDV&LW\

Tonganoxie Schools

Tonganoxie Schools

x%HDXWLIXOEHGURRP EDWKURRP x+RPHVLWVRQRYHUDFUHVZLWKDOOSDYHGURDGV x)LQLVKHGZDONRXWEDVHPHQW x+XJHNLWFKHQZSDQWU\KDUGZRRGIORRUV  JUDQLWHFRXQWHUV x'RXEOHVLGHGVWDLUVOHDGLQJXSVWDLUV

Basehor-Linwood Schools

x,QFUHGLEOHYDOXHEHGURRPFRXQWU\KRPH x+RPHVLWVRQDFUHV x)HDWXUHVKDUGZRRGIORRUVIXOOEDWKVDQGD VXQURRPXSVWDLUV

Tonganoxie Schools

LOTS and LAND 5(6,'(17,$/ 3LSHU/DQGLQJ±/RWVVWDUWLQJDW3HU IHFWORFDWLRQLQ3LSHU¶VQHZHVWFRPPXQLW\ $XEXUQ+LOOV±%HDXWLIXOZDONRXWORWVRQSDYH PHQW/RWVVWDUWLQJDW 3UDLULH*DUGHQV±FXOGHVDFORWVWRFKRRVH IURPHDFKMXVW 6WRQH&UHHN±&RPHDQGVHHZKDW6WRQH &UHHNKDVWRRIIHU$IIRUGDEOHORWVVWDUWLQJDW  7KH(VWDWHVRI&HGDU/DNH±*UHDWORWV DYDLODEOHZLWKSULPHODNHIURQWDQGODNHYLHZV VWDUWLQJDW :RRGVRQ0XQFLH±6XSHU/RFDWLRQ$IIRUG DEOHORWVVWDUWLQJDWMXVW :RRGVRI:HOOLQJWRQ±IDQWDVWLF/HDYHQ ZRUWKEXLOGLQJORWVIURP 0F*HH0HDGRZV±PXOWLIDPLO\ORWV)LUVW FRXOGEH]RQHGDVIRXUSOH[HV7KHUHVWRIWKH ORWVDUH]RQHGDVGXSOH[HV UG6W±3ULVWLQHYLHZVJRUJHRXVYDOOH\ DEXQGDQWZLOGOLIH /RWQG6W±/DUJHEXLOGLQJORWLQ:DOQXW

5LGJHVXEGLYLVLRQ /RW*HRUJH5G±*UHDWDFUHPOORW 3DYHPHQWURDGIURQWDJHRQVLGHV 35,&(5('8&7,21

/RWWK6W%HDXWLIXODFUHPOWUDFWRI ODQG/RFDWHGMXVWRIISDYHGURDGV &OXEKRXVH'U$OPRVWDFUHVRIODQG ZLWKEHDXWLIXOYLHZVRIDVPDOOODNH

/RWRU*HRUJH5G*UHDWDFUHPOORWV :LOORZ'U$FUHDJHLQWKHFLW\DWD *UHDWORFDWLRQMXVWRIISDYHPHQW(DFK JUHDWSULFH3URSHUW\RYHUORRNVDQHLJKERULQJ SRQG &KLHIWDLQ5G±:RQGHUIXODFUHVPOZLWK 'RQDKRR5GDFUHVPORIKLJKO\ OHYHORSHQVSDFH SURGXFWLYHFURSJURXQGLQ/HDYHQZRUWKFRXQW\ /RWRUWK6W±6DUFR[LH/DNHEXLOGLQJ  ORWVDWDQLQFUHGLEOHRISULFH )DLUPRXQW5G*RUJHRXVDFUHV /RWWK6W±:RQGHUIXODFUHPO POZLWKIURQWDJHRQVLGHVDQGEDUQVVLOR HVWDWHORWLQ6DGGOH&UHHN(VWDWHV DQGROGIDUPKRXVH /RWWK6W±*UHDWFRUQHUORWORFDWLRQ /RW$$$RU%QG6W±DFUH /RWLV]RQHGIRUGXSOH[ORW 1.+Z\±$FUHVRIEHDXWLIXOJURXQG EXLOGDEOHORWMXVWRIISDYHGURDGVHDFK LQFOXGLQJDSRQG

 : WK 7HUU ±  %HDXWLIXO  DFUHV LQ WK6W±3URSHUW\FRQVLVWVRIORWVWKDWPDNH TXLHWFXOGHVDFVXEGLYLVLRQ XSDFUHVLQ&URZQ(VWDWHV .DQVD'U2]DZNLH±+XJHORWUHDG\IRU\RXWR *ROGHQ5G±3URSHUW\KDVEHHQSODWWHGRXW EXLOG3URSHUW\FRQVLVWVRIORWV*UHDWORFDWLRQ LQWRUHVLGHQWLDOORWVZFLW\ZDWHU VHZHU ZLWKSDYHGURDGV  &OXEKRXVH'U±$OPRVWDFUHVRIODQG /RWRUWK6W*UHDWZDONRXWORWDWD ZEHDXWLIXOYLHZVRIDVPDOOODNH IDQWDVWLFSULFHHDFK

&200(5&,$/ UG6W±*UHDWFRPPHUFLDOFRUQHUORFDWLRQLQWKHFLW\RI%DVHKRU  1:HVW6W±$FUHVPOYDFDQWODQGULJKWRII+Z\  6WDWH$YH±%HVWORFDWLRQLQ7RQJDQR[LH$FUHVPO +8*(35,&(5('8&7,21 +RQH\&UHHN)DUPV±)DQWDVWLFFRPPHUFLDOORWVUDQJLQJIURP WR %D\VLGH'U*UHDWDFUHSLHFHRIODQG]RQHGIRUFRPPHUFLDOXVH WKDWIURQWVRQ6WDWH$YH

WK6W x$IIRUGDEOHFRXQWU\OLYLQJRQDOPRVWDFUHV x1LFHEHGURRPUDQFKKRPHZLWK PDLQWHQDQFHIUHHYLQ\OVLGLQJ x$OOEHGURRPVKDYHVSDFLRXVZDONLQFORVHWV x3DGLVDOUHDG\SRXUHGIRUDGHWDFKHGJDUDJH

Basehor-Linwood Schools

0F*HH0HDGRZVPXOWLIDPLO\ORWV)LUVWFRXOGEH]RQHGDV IRXUSOH[HV7KHUHVWRIWKHORWVDUH]RQHGDVGXSOH[HV 6WRQH&UHHNSULPHGHYHORSPHQWORFDWLRQVSHUIHFWIRUKLJKWUDI¿F EXVLQHVVVWDUWLQJDW /RWWK6W2QHRIWKHEHVWORFDWLRQVOHIWLQ%DVHKRUDFUHV PO WK6WDFUHVRQDGHDGHQGURDG3HUIHFWIRUKXQWLQJRUEXLOG LQJ\RXUGUHDPKRPHRQIRU

WK6W x%HDXWLIXO5DQFKRQDFUHVMXVWRXWVLGHWKH FLW\OLPLWV xEUEDWKFXVWRPIORRUSODQORDGHGZLWKH[WUDV x5DGLDQWKHDWHGWLOHIORRUV x*UDQLWHNLWFKHQFRXQWHUWRSVEUHDNIDVWLVODQG

Tonganoxie Schools


Wednesday, June 13, 2012

WWW.LYNCHRESIDENTIAL.COM

| 13

OPEN HOUSES OPEN SUNDAY 2:00 - 4:00

15810 Christie Dr. Basehor, KS

$249,000

OPEN SUNDAY 2:00 - 4:00

24429 Sandusky Rd. Tonganoxie, KS

$284,375

OPEN SUNDAY 2:00 - 4:00

916 Chestnut Dr. Tonganoxie, KS

$209,950

NEW HOME SUBDIVISIONS Â&#x2021;+,''(15,'*( JUST NORTH OF 24-40 ON 166TH, BASEHOR www.hiddenridgelifestyle.com

Â&#x2021;-$&.621+(,*+76 OFF PARALLEL & TONGANOXIE RD., IN TONGANOXIE. GREAT STARTER COMMUNITY. www.jacksonheightstonganoxie.com

Â&#x2021;6721(&5((. JUST NORTH OF 24-40 IN TONGANOXIE www.stonecreektonganoxie.com Â&#x2021;$XEXUQ+LOOV. WK6W%DVHKRU Â&#x2021;0HW]JHU0HDGRZV/HDYHQZRUWK5G WK %DVHKRU²*UHDWVWDUWHUFRPPXQLW\ Â&#x2021;:LOORZ3RLQWH2II7RQJDQR[LH &W\5G RQ6\FD PRUH7RQJDQR[LH²*UHDWVWDUWHUKRPHV

Â&#x2021;3,3(5/$1',1* LOCATED JUST NORTH OF PARALLEL OFF OF 115TH ST. www.piperlandingkck.com Â&#x2021;:LOOLV3DUN'HODZDUH6WLQ7RQJDQR[LH *UHDWVWDUWHUFRPPXQLW\ Â&#x2021;)DOO&UHHN9LOODV6RXWKRI6WDWH$YHRQ6RXWK3DUN 7RQJDQR[LH²5HWLUHPHQWFRPPXQLW\DQGROGHU Â&#x2021;&URZQ(VWDWHV6RXWKRI6SUXFH6WRQWK /HDYHQZRUWK

HOMES NOT PICTURED $QQ$YH EHGV EDWKV

*RGGDUG6W EHGV EDWKV

&RUQHOO$YH EHGV EDWKV

*ROGHQ5G EHGV EDWKV

1QG7HUU EHGV EDWKV

2ULHQW$YH EHGV EDWKV

:/DNH6W EHGV EDWKV

7DPDULVN'U EHGV EDWKV

6KHLGOH\$YH EHGV EDWKV

%XWWHUQXW6W EHGV EDWKV

(/XF\6W EHGV EDWKV

/RWWK6W EHGV EDWKV

(WK6W EHGV EDWKV

WK6W EHGV EDWKV

1'HODZDUH6W EHGV EDWKV

1QG6W EHGV EDWKV

1QG7HUU EHGV EDWKV

*UDQG$YH EHGV EDWKV

12UFKDUG6W EHGV EDWKV

&HGDU6W EHGV EDWKV

11HWWOHWRQ$YH EHGV EDWKV

/DQGDXHU6W EHGV EDWKV

)DOOFUHHN'U EHGV EDWKV

1WK6W EHGV EDWKV

(UG6W EHGV EDWKV

1WK7HUU EHGV EDWKV

/DNH6W EHGV EDWKV

1WK6W EHGV EDWKV

(UG6W EHGV EDWKV

/RWWK6W EHGV EDWKV

*ROGHQ5G EHGV EDWKV

/RW5XE\:D\ EHGV EDWKV

3OHDVDQW6W EHGV EDWKV

6WK6W EHGV EDWKV

(QG7HUU EHGV EDWKV

WK6W EHGV EDWKV

*UDH&W EHGV EDWKV

%HOOHULYH'U EHGV EDWKV

)DOO&UHHN'U EHGV EDWKV

/RW5XE\&W EHGV EDWKV

.LQGUHG$YH EHGV EDWKV

WK6W EHGV EDWKV

:HVW6W EHGV EDWKV

/RW5XE\&W EHGV EDWKV

6RPHUV6W EHGV EDWKV

5XE\:D\ EHGV EDWKV

(6\FDPRUH6W EHGV EDWKV

WK6W EHGV EDWKV

(WK6W EHGV EDWKV

WK6W EHGV EDWKV

6W EHGV EDWKV

*HRUJH5G EHGV EDWKV

(&\QWKLD6W EHGV EDWKV

&RQHO\5G EHGV EDWKV

:HVWYLHZ'U EHGV EDWKV

VW6W EHGV EDWKV

&RXQWU\VLGH'U EHGV EDWKV

/DNH6LGH'U EHGV EDWKV

6W EHGV EDWKV

$OEULJKW'U EHGV EDWKV

,URQZRRG'U EHGV EDWKV

)DLUPRXQW5G EHGV EDWKV

WK6W EHGV EDWKV

WK6W EHGV EDWKV

60HOURVH/Q EHGV EDWKV

%HOULYH&LU EHGV EDWKV

6%OXHJUDVV'U EHGV EDWKV



COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES

(WK6W 7RQJDQR[LH.6 $289,500

)URQW6W 7RQJDQR[LH.6 $229,950

&RPPHUFH'U

7RQJDQR[LH.6 $629,000

68QLRQ6W 0F/RXWK.6 $110,000

Rob Roberts/staff

KEITH GARRETT looks at a photograph of his great-great grandfather Uriah Garrett, who along with his three brothers will be the focus of an exhibit that opens Saturday at the Monticello Community Historical Museum.

Pancake breakfast to kick off Garrett family museum exhibit By Rob Roberts rroberts@theworldco.info

The Garretts, a family of English stonemasons who engraved their names in local history, will be the focus of an exhibit at Monticello Community Historical Museum. The exhibit will kick off in conjunction with the Monticello Community Historical Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pancake breakfast, set for 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday at the museum, 23860 W. 83rd St., Lenexa. The exhibit, which will remain on display for at least a month, was largely the work of historical society and two Garrett family members, Keith Garrett and Bertha Cameron. Cameron, who co-founded the society in 1988, is a great-granddaughter of the first Garrett to settle in Monticello Township. Samuel Garrett arrived in 1849, married into the Shawnee tribe and farmed on the 800 acres near present-day 47th Street and Kansas Highway 7 that his family was allotted by treaty. Keith Garrett is a great-great-grandson of Samuelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother Uriah Garrett and the great-grandson of William Garrett, who founded Garrettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grocery in Shawnee in 1913. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But we wanted to include all four of the brothers, all of the family, including todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s generations that still have businesses in the area,â&#x20AC;? Cameron said. Garrettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grocery, destroyed in a 1985 New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day fire, is no longer part of Shawneeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commercial landscape. And neither is the Hickory Stick, a barbecue place that Keithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uncle Bill Garrett ran for years on Nieman Road. But near the spot where the Hickory Stick stood, Billâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son Jeff Garrett now operates Garrettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar, 6505 Nieman Road. And a few blocks north, at 5703 Nieman Road, stands Bob Garrett Insurance, a longtime Shawnee business founded by a descendant of Sam and Uriah Garrettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother Jack. Uriah, Jack and the fourth brother, Elias, came from Devonshire, England, to Monticello Township in 1858 with their parents, Edward and Elizabeth Garrett.

Shortly thereafter, Jack and Uriah Garrett, perhaps with help from their brothers, built wagon master Dick Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; famous stone house, which stood along a branch of the Santa Fe Trail near present-day Shawnee Mission Parkway and Nieman Road. The Garrett brothers also built the Monticello schoolhouse in 1865 and a home for Samuel Garrettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family in 1876. Today, that home is the centerpiece for Garrett Park on 47th Street between K-7 and Monticello Road. The 1876 Garrett house was built near an earlier stone home, which was torn down in the 1940s, and the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first area residence, a log cabin. According to Cameron, a stone from the cabinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foundation will be among artifacts in the museum exhibit. Other artifacts will include masonry and farming implements. In addition, the exhibit includes several old family photos and letters, a wooden box Samuel Garrett kept important belongings in and an old account book with entries he neatly penned. Though Samuel Garrett was trained as a stonemason like his father and brothers, Cameron said, the Native American land that his family was allotted made him a farmer and stockman first and foremost. In 1863, he also became one of the original incorporators of the Tiblow Ferry at Bonner Springs. And like his friend, Dick Williams, he was a land surveyor and conducted freight wagons on the Santa Fe Trail, Cameron said. Samuel Garrett died in 1891, four years after failing health prompted him to move to Chetopa, a town on the Kansas-Oklahoma border where one of his daughters lived. At the time he headed south, some of the Monticello Township farmland was sold and the remaining 260 acres was passed on to Samuelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s son Frederick Garrett. Upon Frederickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death in 1929, his youngest son, Edward â&#x20AC;&#x153;Babeâ&#x20AC;? Garrett, took over the farm. Babe, who was Bertha Cameronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father, died in 1991, at which time most of the remaining 260 acres were sold. But Cameron and two siblings still own a piece of the farm.


|

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 11

FOOD

MEALTIME IDEAS AND RECIPES FOR YOU AND YOUR FAMILY

Keep an open mind to Kansas wines Festival to feature samplings from 14 of the state’s 23 vineyards

IF YOU GO

By Sara Shepherd sshepherd@ljworld.com

If you’re heading to the new winetasting event Saturday in De Soto, you won’t find wines that taste exactly like your favorite Napa Valley cabernet or Argentinian malbec. However, organizers say, that isn’t a bad thing. The event, called Winesong at Riverfest, will feature all Kansas wines — with 14, or more than half, of the state’s 23 vineyards expected to be represented. Instead of the typical liquor-store best-sellers, you’ll find grape varietals such as Seyval, Vignole, Chambourcin, Cynthiana and Concord. “Don’t try and compare it, they’re not the same,” said Michelle Meyer, who, along with her father, Les Meyer, owns Basehor’s Holy-Field Vineyard and Winery. “You can’t compare apples to oranges. We are growing different kinds of grapes in this region.” Do expect quality, though, Meyer said. Most Kansas vineyards grow French-hybrid grapes, and a number of the represented wineries, including hers, have won national awards for their products. Tony Kugler, who owns Kugler’s Vineyard in rural Lawrence, earned a bronze medal at the National Norton Wine Festival in St. Louis for his Cynthiana a few years ago. Being small can be an advantage when it comes to making wine, Kugler said. It’s easier to monitor and control the qualities that make good wine, such as sugar and phlevels. Winesong at Riverfest attendees will be able to try multiple wineries’ versions of the same varietal — which can be a good way to narrow your fo-

File photo

Pep Solberg, pictured in 2008, lifts up the canopy on some vines to reveal clusters of grapes at BlueJacket Crossing Vineyard and Winery, located about four miles southwest of Eudora. cus at an event that includes too many choices to try in a day. And unlike many mainstream tasting events where large wineries send representatives across the country, the person filling your glass during Winesong at Riverfest may well be the person who grew the grapes and created the wine themselves. “You will learn a lot, especially if you’ve never patronized or visited regional wineries,” Meyer said. “They (winemakers) want you to be as excited about it as we all are.” The city of De Soto is organizing the event, with profits going to the De Soto Rotary Club. City Administrator Patrick Guilfoyle, himself a wine-lover, said he envisioned the event to attract outsiders to De Soto’s relatively new Riverfest Park — a regional park overlooking the Kansas River that features, among other things, a natural amphitheater for concerts — and to help boost busi-

ness for Kansas wineries. A new law should make the event more worth winemakers’ time, too, Guilfoyle said. As he laid plans for Winesong at Riverfest, Guilfoyle worked with area legislators to pass a new law allowing the wineries to sell wine by the bottle at the event and future events like it. Until now, they might travel hundreds of miles for such an event with no way to sell any wine to festival-goers. Guilfoyle said he hoped the event would help more people share his appreciation of Kansas wine, which he began to hone a few years ago after his first visit to a Kansas winery. “I have to admit, I went into the winery with a little bit of an ignorant, snobby attitude,” he said. “I was blown away by what I experienced.” Guilfoyle said comparing mainstream wines to Kansas wines is kind of like comparing cola to Dr. Pepper. “It’s different, but it is equally re-

Winesong at Riverfest is planned for 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Saturday at Riverfest Park, 33440 W. 79th St. in De Soto. There will be a tent in case of rain. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased in advance at winesongatriverfest.com or at the gate. Attendees must be at least 21. Admission includes 10 sampling tickets and a souvenir wine glass. Wine will be available to purchase by the bottle. The event also will feature a number of area artists, as well as appetizers and live music. Participating wineries are: • BlueJacket Crossing Vineyard and Winery, Eudora • Davenport Orchards and Winery, Eudora • Holy-Field Vineyard and Winery, Basehor • Jefferson Hill Vineyard and Winery, McLouth • Kugler’s Vineyard, Lawrence • Middle Creek Winery, Louisburg • Nighthawk Vineyard and Winery, Paola • Renaissance Cellars, St. Marys • Rowe Ridge Vineyard and Winery, Kansas City, Kan. • Somerset Ridge Vineyard and Winery, Paola • Stone Pillar Vineyard and Winery, Olathe • Wine Barn Winery and Vineyard, Kansas City, Kan. • Wyldewood Cellars, Paxico • White Tail Run Winery, Edgerton

freshing, equally good,” he said. “And you need to drink it for its own intrinsic, unique value.” — Lawrence Journal-World features reporter Sara Shepherd can be reached at 785-832-7187.


|

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 15

Johnson CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

experiences I’ve ever experienced, because junior year we finished third and made a goal right there in the offseason we’d put ourselves in a position to win,” Johnson said. Coach Van Rose has coached hundreds of runners since he’s been the coach at SM Northwest. This year’s girls team was not carried by one star runner, but the closeness of this group helped propel the Cougars to earn the Class 6A state championship. “They just kept getting better and better,” Rose said. Since the beginning of last summer, Johnson worked hard in the mornings on her stride to attempt to become a solid runner. It paid off for her with a 12th-place finish in 15:14.40 seconds at Rim Rock Farm in 2011. Johnson’s short, efficient stride allowed her to become an effective runner. She will be a member of the crosscountry and track and field teams at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville this fall. If her SM Northwest career is any indication, Johnson will be a steady force for the Bearcats for years to come. “I think she has such an even personality,” Rose said. “No big highs, no big lows just really steady. I didn’t have to tiptoe around her; we knew what Jessica was going to be like every single day.”

Steady soccer force Although soccer coach Todd Boren saw the potential of Johnson as soon as she stood on the pitch her freshman year, she was not much of a stat sheet stuffer. Boren used her flexibility on the soccer field to make her an efficient player during her three years on the team. “She was able to play a wide variety of positions and play all of them well,” Boren said. During her senior season, while securing the 12th and final letter of her high school career, Johnson took on a much larger role for the Cougars. Mainly playing in the midfield, Johnson became more of an aggressor, establishing herself as one of SM Northwest’s key offensive and defensive contributors. “You always knew what you were going to get out of her,” Boren said. “You always knew it was going to be a quality performance.” With a 9-8-1 campaign for her senior year, SM Northwest ended its season with a 3-0 loss to Blue Valley Northwest in the first round of regionals. But for Johnson it was a difficult way to end it, with a partial tear in her ACL that slowed her down throughout the season. Still, contributions to the soccer program will not be something forgotten anytime soon. “Her emotions never came into play a whole lot, on the field or off the field,” Boren said. “She stepped on the field, practiced her game and always worked hard.”

Big-time turnaround Dramatic change would be an understatement for the Lady Cougars basketball team over the past four seasons as a program. When Johnson arrived at SM Northwest, she had every intention of competing at the highest level on the basketball court. But a freshman season filled with frustration only panned out to a 2-19 record for the Cougars. After a coaching change halfway through her time at Northwest, Johnson and the Cougars saw a dramatic turnaround in her a final go-round. In fact the 16-7 record in the senior season added up to a combined winning total greater than all of the first three seasons put together. Johnson trusted the system implemented by coach Jeff Dickson, who took over the program two years ago. “He put in a lot of time and that made us want to put in time and make us better,” Johnson said. “He also made us relaxed on the court and we really came together as a team. He really cares about all his players, and that’s why we we’re able to be so successful, because we could see his passion.” Having that comfort in their coach allowed the Lady Cougars to advance all the way to the 6A state tournament in March, something that would have been unimaginable by senior players that had seen the struggle to rise to the top place in the state. Johnson was one of the key players for SM Northwest, and Dickson realized early on that she was an invalu-

able piece to the puzzle. “Jess is so unselfish and works so hard and never complains,” Dickson said. “By her being the wonderful person she is and conducting herself the way she always has, it made it hard for anyone else to ever complain about the work expected or the discipline we asked out of the girls.” That unselfishness allowed Johnson to involve many of her teammates in the success-filled senior season. Dickson said that she does all the little things and that most people don’t notice. She’s fundamentally sound, meaning she’ll set the screen, take the extra pass, take the charge or do all the non-glamorous things to help a team win. Johnson and the Cougars’ success continued through the sub-state tournament and into the state tournament. The Cougars dropped a difficult game against Maize, 51-31, in the first round. But after everything Johnson had gone through in her basketball career, just getting a chance to go to the state tournament was a victory in itself. As she now moves on to the next step of her life, Johnson will have plenty of memories and has left an imprint that won’t be soon forgotten by the Cougar community. “She made it all look easy,” Dickson said. “And that may be her biggest accomplishment because, trust me, none of it came easy to her. That level of success only comes from the hardest work and the most dogged determination.”

See all our office’s listings in full color, many with virtual tours and find tons of other helpful real estate info online. 913-724-2300 Basehor

913-369-2300 Tonganoxie

www.ReeceAndNichols.com OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY 6/16/12 1:00 TO 4:00 PM 17682 203rd. Tonganoxie $359,950

GREAT PRICE! 21145 Dempsey Road, Leavenworth, KS $99,950

Energy efficient resort style home, entertaining family/friends from cover patio, cooking in screened in porch, swimming in 20/40 pool, fishing 30 yards from front door, viewing wild life from home and walking in your own park. Unbelievable 3800 sq. ft. Ranch Updated throughout, includes all appliances, 3 car att. gar and 2 car detach gar shop. Garage/ Workshop 24x48 workshop with restroom facilities, 12x20 1 1/2 story storage shed, 20x40 energy efficient in ground pool. 1 1/2 acre lake. MLS#1781635

5705 Slough Creek Drive Oskaloosa, KS 66066

72 Ac, 3 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Bath, Full Basement, 3 Ac Pond and 35 Ac in Brome with 8’x10’ Hunting Blind with Fireplace! MLS #1782693 $335,900

2 bedroom 1 bath home, Tonganoxie schools, detached garage and separate outbuilding. MLS #1768324

John Barnes 913-775-0577

johnbarnes@reeceandnichols.com

1305 S Greenwood Dr, Tonganoxie

Heather Vukas 785-331-9370

911 Church St, Tonganoxie

Janet Shumway • 913-231-2074

View all my listings at: janetshumway.reeceandnichols.com

Betty Wilson 816-807-7313

www.heatherq.reeceandnichols.com

Betty.ReeceAndNichols.com

8415 Kickapoo St. De Soto, Ks 66018

Spacious remodeled 4 bedroom, 3 bath home with inground pool! New roof just completed! Over 2400 Sq Ft finished and lots of storage! Nice landscaping and privacy fence. Seller offering $2000 Gift Card with acceptable offer! Great price at $159,950! MLS 1764752

Wonderful 4 bedroom, 3 bath home with walk out basement! Home has almost 2200 finished Sq Ft and lots of storage! Features include new roof, new water heater, 2 pantries, 2 fireplaces, large master suite, great deck, shed and privacy fence! Great price at $165,000! MLS 1757057

SPORTSMAN’S PARADISE-LAKE PERRY

3 bedroom, 1 bath Bungalow, large living room, formal dining room, whirlpool tub. MLS# 1774558 $99,990

Janet Shumway • 913-231-2074

View all my listings at: janetshumway.reeceandnichols.com

Dana Edmonds 913-683-1931

danaedmonds@reeceandnichols.com

Excited to work with you, for all your real estate needs!!

OPEN HOUSE 6/16/12 2-4 P.M. 21058 251 St. Street McLouth, Kansas

805 Pinehurst Drive, Lansing MLS#1717005

Beautiful true ranch. Finished walkout basement. 8 plus fenced acres with stocked pond. Quiet and secluded. MLS #1777551 $299,900

1914 N. 156th St., Basehor MLS#1743881

Awesome Ranch with Grt Rm w/ fp, lg kit, lg din rm, den plus 2 bdrm, 2 bath on main level. Family room Full bath w/whirlpool tub and possible 3rd bdrm in basement. $219,000

Linda Hobbs 913-449-3964

lhobbs@reeceandnichols.com

F/B split situated on a lg fenced corner lot, Open living area w/3bdrm, 2 baths and room to finish a family rm in basement. $165,900

Mary Knapp 816-835-4976

marybknapp.reeceandnichols.com

Mary Knapp 816-835-4976

marybknapp.reeceandnichols.com


16

| Wednesday, June 13, 2012 .

Bass CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

his pivotal choices, made with fishing in mind. Communications, Scanlon reasoned, would allow him to hone his speaking skills and “represent my sport and my sponsors most effectively.” At KU, he roomed with a few friends next to a local bar, where peoplewatching entertained on weekends. But every year, come late spring, he’d disappear until early fall. Scanlon continued tournament fishing after college, starting a landscaping company — so he could make his own schedule — and relying on tournament winnings to cover the entry fees of the next event. In addition to seeking sponsorships, Scanlon still puts the boats he wins — he’s earned three thus far, valued at up to $45,000 each — for sale online. At 26, Scanlon fished his first tournament under the banner of the sport’s preeminent governing body, B.A.S.S. It was a Central Open event at Lake Lewisville in Texas. Success again presented itself early, as Scanlon placed second, finishing just one pound shy of first place and nearly qualifying for the annual Bassmaster Classic on his first attempt. By the end of Scanlon’s Central Open run, he found himself in sixth place in the standings, one spot out from qualifying for the Elite Series, the highest level of tournament competition. But Scanlon caught a break when the angler ahead of him declined the invitation, giving Scanlon the final berth on the big stage, which receives coverage on ESPN2. Then, this April, Scanlon won his first Open event, at Table Rock Lake in Branson, Mo. His 49.4-pound finish accomplished what he just barely missed out on in his first B.A.S.S. tournament: qualifying for the Feb. 2013 Bassmaster Classic. Some rookie season. ••• Scanlon entered the final day of that tournament in fourth place, using a Strike King 6XD chartreuse Sexy Shad crank bait to reel in the day’s secondheaviest total and vault himself to first place. But it takes little time to realize that

Stephen Montemayor/Staff

A BASS EMERGES from Lone Star Lake after being hooked by Casey Scanlon last month. Scanlon fished the lake in preparation for June’s three Elite Series tournaments. what may work one day doesn’t guarantee success on another. Not even hours of fishing shows or volumes of guidebooks can replace time on the water. “These fish don’t always read the same books we do,” Scanlon said. One little change makes all the difference, he continued, dunking a crank bait in front of Lone Star Lake’s dam. Before fishing a new spot, he’ll study old fishing reports and navigate Google Earth images of the body of water until he can finally take off in his Nitro. Scanlon knows the nuances of his craft and has the latest equipment, from a pair of shallow-water anchors to keep still on windy days to fish finders that meticulously detail the depth, vegetation, temperatures, baitfish and their pursuers — all in views from straight down to that of the boat’s periphery. But what makes the difference, Scanlon said, is an ability to read the water better than the average weekend warrior. The water’s color can determine what color of lure will be most effective; schools of baitfish can provide a glimpse at what the fish are eating. Pieces of cover and brush are also hot spots. “They’re opportunistic,” Scanlon said. “Like if you’re in your living room, you’re going to sit on the couch, not stand in the middle of the room.” On the front bed of Scanlon’s boat a half dozen fishing poles bake in the sun, each outfitted with different lines

Don’t waste your money on an air conditioning breakdown that could be prevented! AIR-CONDITIONER

TUNE-UP SPECIAL

$

74

Guaranteed!

(includes up to the first pound of Freon) Before you turn on your system this year, have it checked out by one of our certified technicians. It’s the best way to prevent costly breakdowns and extend the life of your equipment.

and lures from which Scanlon will alternate to send his bait to varying degrees of depth. When he pulls a fish out of the water, like the bass that later assaults his top-water rubber frog along the bank of a western cove, he hangs around to see what else lurks beneath. Oftentimes, he said, anglers won’t realize just how many bass can be found in one area. Scanlon continues to test the bank with his frog, a BOOYAH Pad Crasher, which he pops along the surface, taunting what he hopes will be a hungry giant. Soon enough, there’s a splash. “Holy cow!” Scanlon says, “I see that bass. That fish back there pretty

much told us we want to stay here.” It’s a game. And like any sport it is won with strategy and technique. Like guiding a frog along a still surface near the bank, or sending a crank bait into the wind, where it will, with hope, meet an opportunistic bass waiting for the current to bring it lunch. “You just go out and look for clues and hope they tell you something,” Scanlon said. ••• At the Toledo Bend battle, the fifth of eight Elite Series events this year, Scanlon didn’t have his best showing, placing 79th with a total of 16.8 pounds of fish caught. Scanlon’s first Elite Series appearance, a 45th-place, 31.9-pound performance, has still been his best and netted him $10,000 in winnings. On Sunday, Brent Chapman, an angler 12 years Scanlon’s senior and himself an alum of Shawnee Mission North, would win his first Elite Series tournament with a commanding 83.3-pound haul. A Lake Quivira resident, Chapman has fished nearly 200 tournaments with four first-place finishes and 28 top-10 appearances. The Elite Series win, just one month shy of his 40th birthday, added another milestone to a career that has seen Chapman bring in more than $1.3 million in tournament winnings. In February, Chapman — now in the lead of the Bassmaster Angler of the Year points race — will fish his 12th Classic while Scanlon makes his debut Please see SCANLON, page 17


|

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 17

Stephen Montemayor/Staff

THE FIGHT NEVER ENDS when bringing in a largemouth bass, like this one Casey Scanlon hooked at Lone Star Lake last month. Scanlon, 28, has been fishing competitively since he was 15.

Scanlon CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16

in the event, which will be fished at Shreveport, La.’s Red River. His first full year still in progress, Scanlon’s 10 B.A.S.S. tournaments have so far produced one first-place finish and three top-10s with more than $86,000 in earnings. It’s an impressive start, a pace no doubt setting Scanlon up for a promising career. Between the eight Elite Series tournaments and three Central Open tournaments, entry fees total nearly $50,000, all of which Scanlon is covering primarily through cash earnings, flipping boats won along the way and recently selling his landscaping business. Scanlon said his participation in Central Open events sometimes draws the ire of less-seasoned anglers seeking to follow his path to the Elite Series, but the each tournament represents another chance to sustain a young career rather than an opportunity to play big fish in a small pond. “They don’t have what I have at stake,” he said. Financing his career, Scanlon said, has been his biggest challenge thus far — which isn’t to say fishing against nearly 100 of the sport’s finest isn’t itself a tall task. You fire up your motor on the first of at least three eight-hour days on the water, seeking to master the lake and its hot spots, read its conditions and negotiate around scores of experienced anglers, each with their

own souped-up systems and precise fish-finding technology. “It’s a humbling sport,” he said. “I was given a dose of reality after fishing awhile. Ups and downs and a lot of disappointments.” Out on Lone Star Lake, Scanlon awaited a curveball. The seventh Elite Series tournament, to be held on a “mystery lake” four days after the June 21-24 event in LaCrosse, Wis., along the Mississippi River, would be revealed that afternoon. He had hoped it would not be what it would indeed become: Lake Michigan on June 28-July 1. As the sun spilled down on Lone Star Lake, Scanlon pulled in a threepound largemouth, held it for a moment and tossed it back into the 195acre lake. He had half-expected Lake Michigan — with a surface area of 29,000 square miles — to be the mystery lake, so he had already imagined navigating a body of water that swallows you like the ocean does, where heavy white bass and wipers can intercept your bait, stealing precious time and energy from the pursuit. A lake whose entry fee doesn’t include the installation of extra bilge pumps and drift socks for safety and utility. Three days just won’t be enough to break down the lake like most on the trail. The tournament will be won on smallmouth bass, Scanlon said, fish that put up an even greater fight than their relatives. “I think my biggest challenge may be ahead of me,” Scanlon said.

Stephen Montemayor/Staff

SCANLON’S BIGGEST CHALLENGES have included securing enough sponsors. Entry fees for the 11 tournaments Scanlon will fish this year exceed $50,000.

SHAWNEE MISSION STRIKE KINGS When Casey Scanlon joined the Bassmaster Elite Series this year, that made for two local Anglers on the circuit. Scanlon, an SM Northwest alum, joined Brent Chapman, an SM North alum, among the sport’s top anglers. Casey Scanlon • Birthdate: 6/2/1984 • Hometown: Lenexa • B.A.S.S. Tournaments: 10 • First-place finishes: 1 • Top-10 finishes: 3 • Total winnings: $86,737 • Bassmaster Classic appearances: Feb. 2013 will be first

Brent Chapman • Birthdate: 7/6/1972 • Hometown: Lake Quivira • B.A.S.S. Tournaments: 197 • First-place finishes: 4 • Top-10 finishes: 28 • Total winnings: $1,361,941 • Bassmaster Classic appearances: 11

Golf Privileges for Residents • Full Size Washer/Dryer Full Size Kitchen Appliances • Fitness Center Clubroom w/TV & Media Center • Swimming Pool Tanning Bed • Basketball & Tennis Courts Business Center • Activity Room w/Billiards, TV and more Playground • Tennis, Basketball and Sand Volleyball Courts Whirlpool & Sauna • BBQ Grills & Picnic Tables Covered Parking Available • On-Site Management Fully Furnished Options & Executive Suites Available


18

| Wednesday, June 13, 2012 .

Five Shawnee athletes star in JUCO series

By Ryan McCarthy Special to The Dispatch

Qualifying for the Junior College World Series is an accomplishment very few programs in the country get to experience every season. The Shawnee area not only had five athletes competing in Grand Junction, Colo., between May 26 and June 2, all are SM Northwest alumni. One of them, Iowa Western Community College pitcher Jake Thompson, has spent two years in the JUCO World Series since being in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Last season, the Reivers fell short, finishing in third place, but this year was a different story. After dropping its first game to San Jacinto, their eventual opponent in the final, Iowa Western CC squeaked out a nail biter in the championship game, winning 6-5 with a ninth-inning rally against San Jacinto. The Reivers’ fivegame win streak finished the most successful season in program history. “We didn’t give in and after we got on a roll in the World Series, we just kept it going,” Thompson said. “We weren’t about to go home without that trophy.” Thompson took the mound against Western Nevada on May 28 and put

together a solid six-inning performance, including four hits and three runs in his worked innings. Throughout his high school career, Thompson was a flamethrower trying to blow everybody by with his low 90s fastball. Now he’s developed more control of his game, especially his breaking ball pitches. “It’s not about strikeouts, it’s about keeping your pitch count down, get ground balls, get quick, easy outs and keep your defense off the field as long as possible so they can get you runs,” Thompson said. For his career as a Reiver, Thompson notched an 18-3 record and helped lead them to six consecutive appearances at the JUCO World Series. Thompson will look to have a chance for the front part of the rotation at Western Kentucky next fall. However, Thompson was not the only former Cougar at the event. Adam Giacalone, a recent draft pick of the Milwaukee Brewers, also made an appearance with the Neosho County Community College ball club. The NJCCA All-American was instrumental in getting the Panthers to their second appearance in Grand Junction, Colo. Like his first year in Chanute, Giacalone finished with remarkable numbers at the plate, includ-

Henning MLB-bound

ing a .396 batting average. He also led the team in their 49-16 season with 12 home runs and 59 RBIs. “We went 1-2, but the experience there was amazing with the fans,” Giacalone said. “We were a big family, so to just spend two weeks together was awesome.” Another SM Northwest alumni, Nick Feighner, transferred in this season for Neosho and instantly became one of the principal contributors for the team, including starting all 55 games he appeared in. Feighner batted .299 on the season with four home runs and 20 RBIs and said he enjoyed his time at Neosho and found himself renewing his passion for the game. “If I could go back in high school and pick where I wanted to go, I definitely would want to go there right out of high school,” Feighner said. Former teammates of Feighner and Giacalone were also on the Panther lineup this season. Matt Milner appeared in 22 games with a batting average of .214. Jacob Walters also had a redshirt year in Chanute. Through all the ups and downs, the former Cougar athletes enjoyed being on the biggest stage possible before moving on in different directions in their baseball careers. “It was great to see everybody from back home and be in that setting,” Thompson said. ONLINE: See more photos online at shawneedispatch.com

BRIEFLY Mill Valley to host wrestling camp this month A former Olympic champion wrestler and team coach, Steve Fraser, is bringing his U.S. Camps system to Shawnee for a World Class Wrestling Camp at Mill Valley High School from June 25-28. Sam Hazewinkel, a 2012 U.S. Olympic Team member, 2012 Olympic Trials champion and two-time U.S. Nationals champion, will be one of two camp clinicians. He also is a three-time World Team Trials runner-up and four-time NCAA All-American at the University of Oklahoma. Hazewinkel will be joined by Rob Herman, the head Greco Roman coach at the U.S. Olympic Education Center and a member of the U.S. Olympic Team’s coaching staff. Herman received the award for U.S. Wrestling Coach of the Year from 19921996 and was a member of the U.S. World Team in 1982, 1983 and 1985. Herman earned the bronze medal at the Pan American Games in 1983 and a silver medal at the World Cup in 1984. He also has four U.S. Nationals Greco Roman titles. The first three days of the camp will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and the final day will take place from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Wrestlers can sign up for the camp at uscamps.net or by contacting Jaguars head coach Travis Keal at tkeal@ usd232.org.

SAVE UP TO 60% OR MORE: DINING • ENTERTAINMENT • RETAIL • SERVICES

Contributed photo by Michelle Gress

CLAYTON HENNING, a Shawnee native who was an outfielder for St. Thomas Aquinas, was drafted by the Tampa Bay Rays in the 11th round of the 2012 MLB First Year Player Draft last week. Henning was a second-team 5A All-State selection this year.

FISH FARM

P.O. Box 85 Fittstown, OK 74842

Delivery of Black Crappie, Channel Catfish, Bass, Hybrid Bluegill, Redear Bream, Coppernose Bluegill, Fathead Minnows, and Triploid Grass Carp are now available for Pond & Lake Stocking!

(800) 433-2950

Wednesday, June 20th • 2:30-3:30pm Baldwin City • Baldwin Feed Company • 1600 High Street Thursday, June 21st • 7:00-8:00am Lawrence • Lawrence Feed & Farm Supply • 545 Wisconsin Saturday, June 23rd • 1:00-2:00pm Bonner Springs • Valley Feed • 600 W. 2nd Off of Front Street • • •

We furnish hauling containers! Discounts/Special Deliveries on large orders! Turtle Traps, Fish Feeders, Fish Traps!

• • •

Live Delivery Guaranteed! Decorative Fountains, Aerators, Windmill Aerators! Vegetation Control, Pond Fertilizers, Floating Docks!

To place an order or for more information, call one of our Aquatic Consultants, your local dealer, or email sales@dunnsfishfarm.com M-F 7am-6pm • Sat 8am-4pm CST 1-800-433-2950 • FAX 1-580-777-2899 • www.dunnsfishfarm.com

FOR THE

JOHNSONCOUNTYDEALS.COM EMAIL AND BE THE FIRST TO KNOW WHEN THE HOTTEST DEALS GO LIVE!

KEEP IT LOCAL: MONEY FROM JOHNSONCOUNTYDEALS.COM STAYS IN KANSAS!

This Print advertisement is not redeemable for advertised deal. Get your deals voucher online at johnsoncountydeals.com.


|

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 19

OUR TOWN SEND YOUR PHOTOS TO EDITOR@SHAWNEEDISPATCH.COM

SHAWNEE SCENE

‘DEMON BARBER’ KICKS OFF THEATER SEASON

MRS. LOVETT (Pam Sollars), left, admits to making “the worst pies in London” to lead character Sweeney Todd (Robert Hingula), otherwise known in the Stephen Sondheim-penned musical as “the Demon Barber of Fleet Street.” Performances of “Sweeney Todd,” which last weekend kicked off Theatre in the Park’s summer season, will continue Thursday through Sunday.

INSPIRED BY the return of his barber razors, Sweeney plots his murderous revenge.

IT’S A SHAVE-OFF between Sweeney and his rival Adolfo Pirelli (Anthony Francisco), left.

Staff photos by Melissa Treolo See more photos online at shawneedispatch.com

ABOVE: THE CHORUS helps move the action along in between scenes. RIGHT: SWEENEY’S DAUGHTER, Johanna (Taylor Harvey), ponders how she can get out of an unwanted marriage.


20 | WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE AT SUNFLOWERCLASSIFIEDS.COM OR CALL 785.832.2222 or 866.823.8220 Auctions

Healthcare

Welding Shop

Equip. & Supplies

Auction

Found Pet/Animal FOUND Dog - Young female German Shepherd showed up Sunday, June 2nd near 183rd & Leavenworth Rd. Please call or text to 913-709-7770

Sat., June 16, 10AM 18504 Stranger Road Leavenworth, KS 66048

From Leavenworth take Eisenhower Rd. west 6 miles to County Rd 29 go south 1 mile to Stranger Rd & go left or east to sale site. Over 50 Yrs of Accumulation

McNeely Steel Excess Inventory Reduction

Auction Calendar WOODWORKING EQUIP. ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLES AUCTION Sat., June 16, 2012 - 10AM Louisburg, KS 66053 Detrixhe Realty & Auction 913-642-3207, 913-624-4644 www.auctionsbyphil.com ESTATE AUCTION Sat., June 23rd - 9:30AM Douglas Co. Fairgrounds 2110 Harper, Lawrence, KS SELLER: HAROLD HOWARD ESTATE & OTHERS Elston Auction Company Mark Elston 785-218-7851 www.KansasAuctions.net ESTATE AUCTION Sun., June 24th - 10AM 1106 Rhode Island Lawrence, KS SELLER: RAYMOND F. BARLAND ESTATE Elston Auction Company Mark Elston 785-218-7851 www.KansasAuctions.net

Auctions

Auction

Bob Jackson Estate

Large Commercial Woodworking Equipment

Antiques & Collectibles

Sat., June 16 10AM

Intersection of KS69 & KS68 Hwys, West of Louisburg Ford Louisburg, KS 66053 Wood & Working Equip: native woods: lathes, jointers; table saws: trim & mold cutter; Delta Miter saw; belt sanders; routers; hole-saw; elect. planers Woodworking & Shop Tools, Stain Glass Equip., Appls., Furn., Misc: Kenmore window AC; Magic Chef refrigerator, china hutch, and much more. Antiques, collectibles: 4’x4’ glass display cases; grain pricing board; tin animated toys: Red Skelton collection. Fishing and Camping: 4hp Chrysler boat motor; reels Many items too numerous to mention. Cash or approved check 5% Buyer’s Premium Detail list at: www.auctionsbyphil.com

25 yrs Experience All Types of Auctions Phil Detrixhe - Auctioneer / Detrixhe Realty & Auction Overland Park, KS 66212 913-642-3207 913-624-4644 (cell) phildetrixhe@yahoo.com

LIVING ESTATE AUCTION Sat., June 16th - 10AM 4450 Stafford Terrace Wellsville, KS Hwy K33 to 7th St., W thru town to auction 2 rings to run

Trailers & Supplies Paint Booth & Supplies e phase 3 Phase & Single Shop Equipment Farm Supplies Bolts-Nuts-U bolts-Misc. Hardware Misc. items & supplies

Branden Otto, Auctioneer

785-883-4263

Need to Sell a Car? Place your ad at ljworld.com or email classifieds@ljworld.com

BANK TELLER Full Time position available at Shawnee location of First State Bank. Teller or cash handling experience required. Fax resume to (913) 268-7598 Equal Opportunity Employer

Computer-IT

Full-Time Position Haskell Health Center Full-time Dental Assistant position available at the Haskell Health Center, Dental Clinic. Experience preferred. Hours of operation: Mon. - Fri., 8am - 5pm. Applications must be made through the website: www.USAJOBS.gov For additional information call 785-832-4805. This position is in a Tobacco-Free Environment. Equal Opportunity Employment

Applications Developer, Sprint Nextel Corp. Requires Actuate Report Design and True Information Phlebotomist Resumes to: Auctioneers Note: This is experience. Full-Time- Lawrence, KS: a 50 year accumulation of www.sprint.com/careers Quest Diagnostics, the Req # 125184BR EOE equipment & supplies that nation’s leading provider are no longer needed. This of diagnostics testing is a very large offering of Driversand services, seeks canshop equipment & supdidate to perform veniplies, so be on time. It will Transportation puncture, capillary and be a very long day & this prep specimens, & COC is a partial list - Bennie collections. Will also obtain billing information & For pictures go to: stay current w/billing www.kansasauctions. procedures, 1 year exp, net/phillips or data entry skills & must Substitutes www.phillipsauctioneers.com have HS Diploma or GED. Needed for rural Terms: 7% Buyers preJoin us on our journey. newspaper routes for mium, Cash, Charge, Please apply to LeCompton & Tonganoxie Check; TELECHECK will be Job ID 3700696 at areas. used to verify checks. Not www.questdiagnostics.com responsible for accidents. EOE. Statements made day of Reliable person & vehicle sale take precedence over a must. Will Work early all printed material. Remorning hours from Manufacturing & freshments will be served. 1AM-6AM. Must have a Assembly valid driver’s license and Auctioneers: insurance needed.

Ben Phillips & Assoc.

913-727-6622 Bennie Phillips 913-927-8570 Clerks: A. Phillips, P. Arevalo, A. Waller, M. Phillips

Estate Sales

Contact Perry at 785-832-7249

Executive Management

Estate Sale

211 Arch Leavenworth, KS June 21, 22, & 23 9 am

Hand quilted quilts (30), Vintage linens, area rugs, Large selection of dolls, buggies, children’s dishes, clothes, Vintage Christmas ornaments, Byers carolers, Iron baby bed, Oil lamps (old), some minatures, wicker furniture, riding mowers (2), sterling, vintage books (military history & children’s), Bissman walnut bedroom set, dining set, china cabinet, Ebonite peer mirror (7’ by 10’, mirror is 54” wide x 75” tall, large mirrors, rope beds, Harker chine, tea carts, tools, primitives, coke trays (old), table & floor lamps, Walnut corner cupboard & 2 smaller cupboards, possum belly, Hoosier style cabinet, Refirgerator, W/D, gas range, porcelain, depression, crystal, old metal trucks, duck decoys, cookie jars, stoneware, clocks (French), Cuckoo, other. Lots & lots of misc.

Sale by Denneys 1-913-547-0584

Cleaning

Housecleaning. Reliable rates. lots of exp. dependNH TN55 & NH TC33D Trac- able, trustworthy. Please tors, 4-Trailers, Artic Cat, phone Kim at 816-590-1450 3pt Equip, Tools, 2 Sheds. PUT YOUR 1973 Mossman Golden Era Guitar, Salzard Violon, 12 EMPLOYMENT AD IN Guns, Knives & Jewelry. TODAY!! Coins, Autographed BaseGo to ljworld.com or call balls, Antiques, Collecti785-832-1000. bles, Furniture, Household UP TO FOUR PACKAGES Forest & Dorothy TO CHOOSE FROM! Laughlin, Owners

www.ottoauctioneering.com

Dental Assistant

Banking

All packages include AT LEAST 7 days online, 2 photos online, 4000 chracters online, and one week in top ads. Days in print vary with package chosen.

Executive Director

Traffic Manager 3-5 yrs logistics exp. Visit our website, www.krafttool.com, for a more detailed job description and requirements.

The KCK Housing Authority seeks qualified candi- Office-Clerical dates for Executive Director. To apply submit a let- Office Assistant needed for ter of interest and de- Bolz Insurance. Hours will tailed resume, be M-F 8-5. No experience on or before June 29, 2012 necessary but insurance lito: Anne McDonald cense or office experience Search Committee would help. Please drop P. O. Box 171811 resume at Bolz Insurance Kansas City KS 66117 at 3502 Westridge Drive Lawrence, Kansas 66049. To learn more visit our Any questions or concerns website: www.kckha.org can contact (800) 400-4336. EOE M/F/H

General Janitorial

Recreation and Sports

Area Service Route Rep Will service restroom LIFEGUARD: SUMMER HELP deodorizers in the Kan- WANTED! Full time sumsas City area. Must drive mer position at the Tall personal vehicle. 6 days Oaks Christian Camp, at per month. Linwood, KS, needed as Call 800-537-1376 & soon as possible. Go to our dial extension 628 website www.talloaks.org - click on job opportunities to leave a voicemail. at home page for informawww.KBS-Clean.jobs EOE tion and application form. Call 913-301-3004 for more info & to set up interview. Healthcare Person must be a fit for Christian Camp atmosphere and be a fully certified lifeguard. A person who is a trained and experienced Challenge Course Instructor might be considered as well.

PA or NP

Looking for Fulltime PA or NP for rural Critical Access Hospital, ER and family clinic. Position is very autonomous. Exceptional working cond. Kansas license required, start ASAP! Exp. preferred but will train right candidate. Resume or apply to: Human Resources Fax: 913-774-3366 or email hr@jcmhospital.org F.W. Huston Medical Center 408 Delaware Winchester, KS 66097 Ph: 913-774-4340 www.jcmhospital.org Need an apartment? Place your ad at ljworld.com or email classifieds@ljworld.com


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 | 21 Trade Skills

Baby & Children Items Ocean Wonders SpaceSaver Swing, promotes comfort w/soothing swinging motion & calming vibrations. includes 6 different songs. Birth to 25 lbs. Retails for $75. asking $25. 785-633-6705

Bonner Springs Huge Antique Sale June 14,15,16 9:00AM to 3:30PM 2113 W. 120th St. Leawood, Kansas NO EARLY SALES

Antiques-Classic

Shawnee

Bonner

Bonner

Bonner

T-Bird ‘67 4DR., Landau, of Shawnee reserves the 105,000 actual miles, right to reject any or all $6,000. Ozawkie area. bids and to waive informalities or irregularities in 816-591-0604 bids.

MACHINE OPERATORS Stouse Inc., a specialty Cars-Domestic Contract documents may printing company in the be obtained from Gardner area listed as Dodge 2007 Caliber SXT, www.questcdn.com. Conone of the Top 20 Area Neighborhood $8,495. Needing a good tract documents may be Manufacturers, is lookGARAGE SALES family car or just starting downloaded for a ing to fill full time posi- Sleigh Style Glider Rocker 12 NEIGHBORS out. Features: 1 owner, 76k non-refundable fee of tions with energetic indi- and Ottoman features a miles (mostly highway), $10.00 by inputting Quest viduals who want to be clean, white finish and SATURDAY JUNE 16th rated 24 city/29 highway project number 2109070 on machine operators. We beige microfiber 8-2P.M. MPG, FWD, clean and well the Project Search page on will train aggressive spot-cleanable cushions. 168th & Evans Rd maintained, new tires the Quest website. Contact self-starters with ma- Very clean-like new! $100. Directions: South of within year, power doors & QuestCDN.com at chine experience or indi- Call 785-633-6705. 166th State Ave to Evans locks, cruise, Manual 1-952-233-1632 or info@ viduals looking for a new Rd, go west 2 blocks to transmission. 785-691-9908 questcdn.com for assiscareer. The position re168th St. or meundju@gmail.com tance with free memberquires a minimum of a Furniture ship registration and high school diploma, Antiques, lots of Furni- Mercury 2008 Grand Mar- downloading the contract some college a plus. We Beautiful Twin over Full ture, Patio Furniture, quis GS, 31K, like new, All documents. Paper copies of considered. offer a competitive ben- sized Futon Bunk Bed from Coke Machine-works, offers the contract documents are efit & wage package NFM. Black metal frame MM collectibles, White 913-788-0111 available for a which includes profit with wooden posts in Washer and Dryer Pednon-refundable fee of 2002 PONTIAC FIREBIRD sharing. Call Fran cherry finish. Twin mat- estals for frontloaders, $25.00 per set from ShawPRICED to SELL FAST! Rumans at 913-764-5757 tress included. Paid over Gymboree clothes size 8 nee City Hall, Public Works 80,800 miles, 2Dr, V6 or send your resume to: $300. price is $70. boys and girls, Nordic Codes Division. Coupe, T-tops, alarm frumans@stouse.com Trac, Weight machine, 913-744-8137. system, transferable ext. Stouse, Inc. Softball equipment, Each Bidder shall file with warranty. Excellent Human Resources Dept. Basketball their bid a cashier’s check, Sofa, slightly Indooor maintenance record. 300 New Century Parkway Blue equipment, Foosball tacertified check, or bid bond cat-scratched, but otherEx. Pewter paint, black New Century, KS 66031 Clothes, Lots of drawn on an acceptable wise in good condition, ble, leather and NEW tires. Drug Free/EEO Employer and misc. bank in an amount not less free! You haul it away, you household Call to arrange appt. than five percent (5%) of can have it. Call Tools, Craftsman radial Serious inquires only saw, lathe, nice Ann Taythe total amount of the bid. 785-842-3078. Cashier’s check only Warehouselor skirts sz 4-8, ComBid Bonds will be returned 913-319-9366 can email puter desk, Harley pipes, Production to the unsuccessful Bidpictures: Downsizing. Vintage 60s- free dirt bike tires, dirt ders, with the exception of sftballplyer@hotmail.com Harvest Trestle Table bike boots size 13, parts the second qualifying Bid72x35 1-Bench 64”, 1 Host ProLogistix cleaner, motorcycle hel- Pontiac 1994 Grand Am for der, at such time as their Chair, 3 Side Chairs- $500. mets, marble slabs gray Jobs Available $1200/offer. It has 194,752 bids are rejected. Tea Cart w/drop leaves70 yrs old, 3 concrete miles & is in running order. KS City, KS Location $225.- Cabinet 41x21x38 deer. Forklift Operators The power steering pump All Bidders shall verify that Dry Sink Effect Bi Fold All Shifts Available needs replaced and there they have considered all doors w/ 2 shelves $125. www.prologistix.com is a minor tick in the en- written addenda. Any writQuality Wood-Antique Har- Kansas City 816-452-5978 gine. There is also some ten addenda issued during vest tone- One owner. Will cosmetic damage to the the time of bidding shall be sell separately, please call vehicle. The car come with covered and included in the 785-766-9978 GARAGE SALE power locks, power steer- bid. There will be no clarifiing, power windows, & CD cations or exceptions alWed, Thurs, Fri. player. 785-917-0642 lowed on the Bid. Bids are Miscellaneous June 13, 14, 15, 2012 for a total bid package 10920 Winchester Dr. based on estimated on-call Carrier, Older model hardKansas City, Kansas Cars-Imports services for a twelve (12) shell rooftop carrier for 2 blocks off Hutton & month period. cargo or luggage - Free. Donohoo Road ACURA 2005 TL, 66,000 mi785-832-0296 les, excellent condition, Each bid shall be made on a Girls’ baby clothes: size 0 Duplexes owner, blue-tooth, printed Proposal form into 18 months; Boys’ one clothes: size 4 to 7; other GPS, & satellite radio. cluded with these docuMusic-Stereo at $16,500. ments. Bids shall be sub3BR, 2 bath, W/D, 1 car garbaby items;children’s Priced age, on bus route, 2903 - 05 mitted in sealed envelopes toys, Women and Mens’ 785-271-5166 Center, clothing, tires size 13 and University Dr. $900/mo. Entertainment and shall be marked “2012 Maple-like wood, TV open- size 18, Air Hockey Table, Avail. Aug. 1st. 785-841-9646 Cable Locating Services Trailers ing, with glass doors on 8 chair Dining Room set Contract”. An officer of the top with lights. Shelves be- with china cabinet and firm making such Proposal Beautiful newly renovated Bonner Springs low with doors, $185. Ex- buffet, TV’s, Kitchen 2006 Dutchmen trailer: shall properly execute all cellent condition. Please Items, Household Items. Bids resleeps ten, 12 foot slide, Proposal forms. call 913-721-3360 2BR apt., quiet 4-plex, 226 E. newer tires, awning, new ceived after the time and 3rd St. FP, fully equipped date above specified shall paint and curtains, Selmer Beginner’s Shawnee kitchen, W/D. $525/mo. 3 Flute, water-saving faucets, be returned, unopened, to with case, $75. person max occupancy. No flute, queen bed, four rear the Bidder. Please call 913-721-3360 dogs. Call 913-208- 0009 bunks, reupholstered Moving sale CITY OF SHAWNEE, KANSAS couch and dinette sleep good prices, 2BR, 1 bath duplex, 1 car Genuine ________ German Violin, two each. Appliances, & fri. june 15 garage, W/D hookup, $725/ with case and bow. Excelheat/air work great. Sat june 16 mo. + $725 deposit. Mow- lent condition, $550. firm. $12,000. Make an offer! 9am-? ing included. No pets. Call 785-842-2126 785-409-8131 23509 W 77nd Terrace 913-441-3724, 913-620-4444 Shawnee 66227 (First published in the

Tiblow Village Apts

Sports-Fitness

Equipment in Bonner Springs Spacious 1BR Apts. Save money on utilities!! Football Equipment, Mill Units are all elect. & water Valley Youth football helis included in rent price. met, pads, pants, $50. Lighted parking, on-site 913-955-7095 laundry, & pool. 1BRs start at $445/mo. To see a unit Golf Clubs, in bag and golf today - call 913-441-6108! club sleeves. one Ladies RH and one men’s LH both As Is. $70 each or De Soto best offer. 913-422-1242 2 & 3BR DeSoto homes avail. W/D hookup, CH/CA, more. No pets. $700/mo. & up. Year lease. 913-585-1211

25124 Linwood Rd Lawrence, KS

2BR, 2 bath ranch on park like setting.

Real Estate sells 7pm

Open House

June 13, Wed 5-8pm June 18 , Mon. 5-8pm Estate items sell 5pm Photos/termson Web

LINDSAY AUCTION SERVICE

913-441-1557 www.lindsayauctions.com

HUGE 4 family Yard Sale with over 60 years accumulation

Baby & Children Items ExerSaucer has colorful pond theme and is a 3 in 1 activity center for 0-24 mo (playmat, exersaucer, and activity table). Very clean - like new! $60. Call 785-633-6705.

13816 Stilwell Rd Bonner Springs Call for questions 913-488-1045 Vintage items, tools, plumbing, crafts and woodwork, furniture, kitchen and household items, linens, farm items, lawn and garden and a whole lot more.

Suzuki 1981 GS650L, 4cylinder, 40mpg. Excellent shape! New battery, carburetor redone, good tires. $1,400 or offer. 785-691-5326

Chevrolet 2009 Tahoe LTZ, 4WD, 29,700 miles, white, leather, DVD, navigation, sunroof, warranty, excellent condition, $12,700. ppeo@netscape.com

Truck-Pickups Chevrolet 2002 Trailblazer 106K miles, black/black leather, $6,800. Call 785-342-7632.

Cedar Creek 2001 - 25’ 5th Vans-Buses wheel, 2 slides. Nice! $8,500. Call 913-369-3766. Dodge 1996 Caravan. Looks Bad, runs well. $400 or best offer. 785-749-4024

Garage/ Estate Sale Friday, June 15, Saturday, June 16, 9am-5pm, 442 Park Drive, Bonner Springs, KS (1/2 block west of Lions Park) Fleetwood 2002 Items: recliners, love Revolution 40C, 330 HP seat, queen size bedCummins ISC Diesel enroom sets, twin bed, cofgine, 2 slides, $32,000. fee table, end tables, Email bear8207@live.com kitchen table with 4 785-538-9245 chairs, hutch, Kenmore sewing machine in cabinet, stereo/ radio in cab- Keystone 2004 Springdale inet, desk, shop vac, TVs, 5TH Wheel 26.5’ Slideout TV stands, commode, with Lots of UPGRADES walkers, transfer bench and EXTRAs!! Clean Condifor bathtub, dishes, tion. Please call and leave message. $13,000. household items. GREAT a BARGAINS! ALL MUST 785-917-1881 GO!

Friday & Saturday June 15 & 16 7-3pm

Motorcycle-ATV

Sport Utility-4x4

Upright Piano, standard Wurlitzer piano stool, RV Good practice piano, $65 5th Wheel 2005 Sierra by or best offer. 913-422-1242 Forest River, One Owner, 32ft., 2 slides, No smoking, pets or kids. Excellent cond. Air Ride hitch, $18,000. Extra hitch for boat on back. 785-748-0810/785-760-3108

Area Open Houses Bonner Springs

Fri., June 29, 5PM

Charter Oak bedroom set, Ethan Allen sofa, bookcases, daybed, and misc. Call 913-645-7942 for information

Isuzu SUVs Isuzu 2002 Rodeo 4X4-119K, Automatic, V6. Silver exterior, gray cloth interior. Power windows Power locks. Cruise control. Roof rack. Tinted windows. Steel wheels. After market stereo. Extremely clean vehicle. Well maintained. Very sharp! $5,200 Call 785-979-1079

Shawnee (Published in the Shawnee Dispatch, Wednesday, June 13, 2012) CITY OF SHAWNEE, KANSAS Sealed Proposals will be received from Bidders by the City of Shawnee, hereinafter referred to as the Owner, at the office of the City Clerk at Shawnee City Hall, 11110 Johnson Drive, Shawnee, Kansas, until 10:00 A.M., Friday June 29, 2012 at which time, the bids received will be opened and publicly read for all materials, supplies, tools, equipment and perform all necessary labor, to provide cable locating services as outlined in these Contract Documents. Bidders will be notified of the results within fourteen (14) days of the date set above for bids to be received. The Contract shall be awarded by the Governing Body of the Owner at the sole and complete discretion of such Governing Body. The City

Shawnee Dispatch, Wednesday, May 30, 2012) THE JOAN BARBARA MROZ TRUST, UTA DATED DECEMBER 10, 2002 NOTICE TO CREDITORS PURSUANT TO K.S.A. 58a-818 TO ALL CERNED:

PERSONS

CON-

1. You are notified that Joan Barbara Mroz died on March 14, 2012. 2. The decedent was the Grantor of the Joan Barbara Mroz Trust, uta dated December 10, 2002. 3. The Co-Successor Trustees are Deborah L. Presley and Nancy Joan McKean. They may be contacted through the office of the Trust’s attorney below. 4. The Co-Successor Trustees have the power to pay the outstanding debts of the decedent from the trust property upon receipt of proper proof of the debts. 5. In accordance with K.S.A. 58a818, creditors of the decedent must present claims for such debts to the co-trustees in writing within the later of four (4) months from the date of the first publication of notice, or thirty (30) days after receipt of actual notice if the identity of the creditor is known or reasonably ascertainable by the Co-Successor Trustees. If a creditor fails to present such claims to the Co-Successor Trustees within such prescribed time period, the creditor will be forever barred as against the Co-Successor Trustees and the trust property. 6. Claims should be submitted to the Trustee’s attorney, Joseph P. Perry, Perry and Trent, LLC, 13100 Kansas Avenue, Suite C, Bonner Springs, KS 66012. Deborah L. Presley Co-Trustee Nancy Joan McKean Co-Trustee Joseph P. Perry #09296 Perry and Trent, L.L.C. 13100 Kansas Avenue, Suite C Bonner Springs, Kansas 66012 Phone: (913) 441-3411 Fax: (913) 441-3656 Attorney for the Trust ________

Let’s stick together. Join the KIDDOS group on wellcommons.com to start sharing your ideas and experiences with other Douglas County parents today:

sponsored by

KIDDOS

It’s like the buddy system… for parents.


22 | WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

NEED TO SELL YOUR CAR? Create your ad in minutes today on

SunflowerClassifieds.com Reach readers in print and online across Northeast Kansas!

1-785-832-2222 or 1-866-823-8220


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012 | 23

BUSINESS Asphalt Services ASPHALT PAVING Driveways Seal-Coating Free est * Sr citizen dis. 913-371-2737

Auctioneers

Carpet Cleaning

Auto Maintenance and Repair

Events/Entertainment

Heating & Cooling

Your locally owned and operated carpet and upholstery cleaning company since 1993! • 24 Hour Emergency Water Damage Services Available By Appointment Only

785-842-3311

For Promotions & More Info: lawrencemarketplace.com/ kansas_carpet_care

Low Maintenance Landscape, Inc.

Eagles Lodge

Janitorial Services Business-Commercial-Industrial Housecleaning Carpet Cleaning Tile & Grout Cleaning The “Greener Cleaner” Locallly Owned Since 1983 Free Estimates

785-842-6264

Banquet Room Available for Corporate Parties, Wedding Receptions, Fundraisers Bingo Every Friday Night 1803 W 6th St. (785) 843-9690 lawrencemarketplace.com /Eagles_Lodge

“Your Comfort Is Our Business.” Installation & Service Residential & Commercial (785) 841-2665 http://lawrencemarketplace. com/rivercityhvac

Financial

LawrenceMarketplace.com/ bpi

Specializing in Carpet, Tile & Upholstery cleaning. Carpet repairs & stretching, Odor Decontamination, Spot Dying & 24 hr Water extraction. www.doctor-clean.com 785-840-4266

Housecleaner

Air Conditioning/ & Heating/Sales & Srvs.

Honest & Dependable Free estimate, References Call Linda 785-691-7999 All Your Banking Needs

Computer/Internet

Carpets & Rugs

Computer Running Slow? Viruses/Malware? Troubleshooting? Lessons? Computer Questions, Advise? We Can Help — 785-979-0838

Your Local Lawrence Bank

Buying Junk & Repairable Vehicles. Cash Paid. Free Tow. U-Call, We-Haul! Call 785-633-7556

Dale and Ron’s Auto Service

Family Owned & Operated for 37 Years Domestic & Foreign Expert Service 630 Connecticut St

785-842-2108

lawrencemarketplace. com/dalerons

Annual TRUCKLOAD

SALE!

Landlords, Property Mgrs, Remodelers, Home To Fix-Up

This is Your Sale!

Free Estimates on replacement equipment! Ask us about Energy Star equipment & how to save on your utility bills.

Roger, Kevin or Sarajane

www.lawrencemarketplace.c om/scotttemperature

Flooring Installation

Concrete

Home Improvements

CONCRETE INC. Your local concrete Repair Specialists Sidewalks, Patios, Driveways, Waterproofing, Basement, Crack repair 888-326-2799 Toll Free

JASON TANKING CONSTRUCTION New Construction Framing, Remodels, Additions, Decks Fully Ins. & Lic. 785.760.4066 http://lawrencemarketplac e.com/jtconstruction

• Soft, Warm Carpet • Durable Ceramic Tile • Natural Wood Laminate • Pre-Finished Wood Plank • Classic Vinyl Flooring • Room-Size Remnants Starting at 48c sq.ft. First Come - First Served Buy BELOW Wholesale.

CONCRETE WORK Driveways, Walks, Steps, Patios, Licensed/Insured Free Est. George Higginbotham 913-262-4265

Dirt-Manure-Mulch Dave’s Construction Topsoil Clean, Fill Dirt

Child Care Provided

Rich Black Top Soil No Chemicals Machine Pulverized Pickup or Delivery

Serving KC over 40 years 913-962-0798 Fast Service

Electrical

Full service preschool & licensed childcare center for children ages 1-12. Open year-round, Monday- Friday, from 7 am to 6 pm

lawrencemarketplace.com/ harrisauto

Hilltop Child Development Center, 1605 Irving Hill Road Lawrence, Kansas 785-864-4940 hilltop@ku.edu twitter.com/HilltopCDC Serving Lawrence since 1972.

Cleaning

Bird Janitorial & Hawk Wash Window Cleaning. • House Cleaning • Chandeliers • Post Construction Rick Cassmeyer • Gutters • Power Washing • Prof Window Cleaning Carpentry & Repairs • Sustainable Options Framing, Trim, Garages, Find Coupons & more info: Custom Decks: houses/pools Licensed, Insured, Free Est. lawrencemarketplace.com/ birdjanitorial 913-707-7121 www.facebook.com/rick.cassmeyer Free Est. 785-749-0244

Employment Services

785-550-5610

Plan Now For Next Year • Custom Pools, Spas & Water Features • Design & Installation • Pool Maintenance (785) 843-9119

Inside - Out Painting Service Complete interior & exterior painting Siding replacement

785-766-2785

inside-out-paint@yahoo.com Free Estimates Fully Insured Lawrencemarketplace.com/ inside-out-paint

Int. & Ext. Remodeling All Home Repairs Mark Koontz

Bus. 913-269-0284

FOUNDATION REPAIR

Mudjacking, Waterproofing. We specialize in Basement Repair & Pressure Grouting. Level & Straighten Walls & Bracing on wall. BBB . Free Estimates Since 1962

Renovations Kitchen/Bath Remodels House Additions & Decks Quality Work Affordable Prices

(785) 550-1565

mmdownstic@hotmail.com Lawrencemarketplace.com/tic

Lawn, Garden & Nursery DVL LAWN SERVICES

Professional Lawn Services

Starting at $35. Includes: Mowing, string edging. Blown off driveways, sidewalks & patios. Optional Services: Fertilization, Overseeding Thatch removal, Ariation Leaf removal & MORE Call Dennis 913-981-3370

ROCK-SOD-SOIL-MULCH

Full Remodels & Odd Jobs, Interior/Exterior Painting, Installation & Repair of:

• Garage Doors • Openers • Service • Installation Call 785-842-5203 or visit us at Lawrencemarketplace.co m/freestategaragedoors

Decks Drywall Siding Gutters Privacy Fencing Doors Trim Insured 20 yrs. experience

913-488-7320

Insurance

Medical-HealthTherapy

Yoga is more than getting on the mat. Live Passionately Yoga Nutrition Classes Relaxation Retreats 1407 Massachusetts 785-218-0174 lawrencemarketplace.com/b reathe

Haul Free: Salvageable items. Minimum charge: other moving/hauling jobs. Also Maintenance/Cleaning for home/business, inside/out plumbing / electrical & more. www.a2zenterprises.info 785-841-6254

Moving-Hauling STARVING ARTISTS MOVING

15yr. locally owned and operated company. Professionally trained staff. We move everything from fossils to office and household goods. Call for a free estimate. 785-749-5073 http://lawrencemarketplace. com/starvingartist

Music Lessons

General Services

Supplying all your Painting needs. Serving Lawrence and surrounding areas for over 25 years.

Locally owned & operated.

Free estimates/Insured. Interior/Exterior Painting

Quality Work Over 20 yrs. exp.

Call Lyndsey 913-422-7002

PAINTING

913-963-9633

Prof. contracting since 1975

Apply at eapp.adecco.com Or Call (785) 842-1515 BETTER WORK BETTER LIFE lawrencemarketplace.com/ adecco

Serving individuals, farmers & business owners 785-331-3607

785-856-GOLD(4653) Jewelry, coins, silver, watches. Earn money with broken & Unwanted jewelry

LawrenceMarketplace.com/ kansasinsurance

Auto-Home- BusinessLife- Health Dennis J. Donnelly Insurance Inc. 913-268-5000 11211 Johnson Dr. insuranceinckc.com

Carpentry

Temporary or Contract Staffing

Evaluation Hire, Direct Hire Professional Search Onsite Services (785) 749-7550 1000 S Iowa, Lawrence KS lawrencemarketplace.com/ express

Drury Place

Live More Pay Less Worry-free life at an affordable price

1510 St. Andrews

785-841-6845

Lawrencemarketplace.com/ druryplace

Learn to play 30-50 songs in the first year with Simply Music! Keys of Joy 785-331-8369 Karla’s Konservatory 785-865-4151

Lawrencemarketplace.com/ keysofjoy STARTING or BUILDING a Business?

NOT Your ordinary bicycle store!

EASY!

Call: 785-832-2222 Fax: 785-832-7232 Email: classifieds@ljworld.com

Complete Roofing

Tearoffs, Reroofs, Redecks * Storm Damage * Leaks * Roof Inspections

We’re There for You!

785-749-4391

Lawrencemarketplace.com/ksrroofing

FOLSOM ROOFING RE-ROOFS, RE-DECKS, & REPAIRS FREE ESTIMATES 913-207-2861

Professional Service with a Tender Touch

Prompt Superior Service Residential * Commercial Tear Off * Reroofs

Stress Free for you and your pet.

Call Calli 785-766-8420

www.cnnmobilepetsalons.com

Free Estimates

Insurance Work Welcome

785-764-9582

Lawrencemarketplace.com/ mclaughlinroofing

Plumbing

RETIRED MASTER PLUMBER & Handyman needs small work. Bill Morgan 816-523-5703

Taking Care of Lawrence’s Plumbing Needs for over 35 Years (785) 841-2112 lawrencemarketplace.com /kastl

Recycling Services 12th & Haskell Recycle Center, Inc. No Monthly Fee Always been FREE! Cash for all Metals 1146 Haskell Ave, Lawrence 785-865-3730 http://lawrencemarketplace. com/recyclecenter Lonnie’s Recycling Inc. Buyers of aluminum cans, all type metals & junk vehicles. Mon.-Fri. 8-5, Sat. 8-4, 501 Maple, Lawrence. 785-841-4855 lawrencemarketplace.com/ lonnies

Re-Roofs: All Types Roofing Repairs Siding & Windows FREE Estimates (785) 749-0462 www.meslerroofing.com

Roofing Contractors Available for all your roofing needs Including sales & installation of Conklin Roofing products. Call First Management Roofing Division at 785-841-7333

Travel Services Lawrence First Class Transportation Limos Corporate Cars Drivers available 24/7

785-841-5466

Lawrencemarkeptlace. com/firstclass

Tree/Stump Removal

Repairs and Services BUDGET TREE SERVICE, LLC. 913-593-7386

Unsightly black streaks of mold & dirt on your roof? Mold/Mildew on your house? Is winter salt intrusion causing your concrete to flake? Mobile Enviro-Wash 785-842-3030

Trimmed, Shaped, Removed Shrubs, Fenceline Cleaned

No Job Too Small Free Est. Lic. & Ins. 913-268-3120 www.budgettreeservicekc.com

Chris Tree Service

20yrs. exp. Trees trimmed, cut down, hauled off. Free Est. Ins. & Lic. 913-631-7722, 913-301-3659

Fredy’s Tree Service

Placing an ad...

IT’S

785-865-0600

Complete Roofing Services Professional Staff Quality Workmanship http://lawrencemarketplac e.com/lawrenceroofing

Pet Services

PIANO LESSONS

Office* Clerical* Accounting Light Industrial* Technical Finance* Legal

Retirement Community

1783 E 1500 Rd, Lawrence

PineLandscapeCenter.com Find us on Facebook Pine Landscape Center 785-843-6949

Moving-Hauling

Snow Removal Driveways & Sidewalks

Int/Ext/Specialty Painting Siding, Wood Rot & Decks Kate, 785-423-4464 www.kbpaintingllc.com

midwestcustompools.com

Breathe Holistic Life Center

Garage Doors

http://lawrencemarketplce.com/ lynncommunications

Westside 66 & Car Wash

Full Service Gas Station 100% Ethanol-Free Gasoline Auto Repair Shop - Automatic Car Washes Starting At Just $3 2815 W 6th St | 785-843-1878 lawrencemarketplace. com/westside66

ADVANCED SYSTEMS Basement & foundation repair Your hometown company Over three decades 785-841-0145 mybasementiscracked.com

For Everything Electrical Committed to Excellence Since 1972 Full Service Electrical Contractor www.quality-electric.net

Get Lynn on the line! 785-843-LYNN www.lynnelectric.com

785-838-4488

Tires, Alignment, Brakes, A/C, Suspension Repair Financing Available 785-841-6050 1828 Mass. St lawrencemarketplace.com/ performancetire

Foundation Repair

www.foundationrepairks.com

Across The Bridge In North Lawrence 903 N 2nd St | 785-842-2922 lawrencemarketplace.com/ battery

Harris Auto Repair

No Job Too Big or Small

Wagner’s 785-749-1696

For All Your Battery Needs

Domestics and Imports Brake repair Engine repair AC repair / service Custom exhaust systems Shock & Struts Transmissions Tire sales / repairs

Hardwood Floor Installation, Refinishing and Repair Locally Owned, Insured, Free Estimates 785-691-6117 www.artisanfloorcompany.com

Concrete, Block & Limestone Wall Repair, Waterproofing Drainage Solutions Sump Pumps, Driveways. 785-843-2700 Owen 24/7

Multi-Warehouse Clearance. Popular Colors and Styles! Jennings’ Floor Trader 3000 Iowa - 841-3838 9-5 Mon-Sat. www.FloorTraderLawrence.com Follow us on Facebook too!

Artisan Floor Company

913-724-1515

Save to 80%

www.lawrencemarketplace.c om/lml

785-843-2244

www.lawrenceautodiag.com

785-842-8665

1210 Lakeview Court, Innovative Planting Design Construction & Installation

Painting

Roofing

www.scott-temperature.com

Bryant Collision Repair Mon-Fri. 8AM-6PM We specialize in Auto Body Repair, Paintless Dent Repair, Glass Repair, & Auto Accessories. 785-843-5803 bryantcollisionrepair@msn.com. lawrencemarketplace.com/ bryant-collision-repair

Landscaping

Kansas Carpet Care, Inc.

BILL FAIR AND COMPANY AUCTIONEERS SINCE 1970 800-887-6929

Automotive Services

Cleaning

Call 866-823-8220 to advertise.

785-832-2222 classifieds@ljworld.com

Advertising that works for you!

Water, Fire & Smoke Damage Restoration • Odor Removal • Carpet Cleaning • Air Duct Cleaning •

One Company Is All You Need and One Phone Call Is All You Need To Make (785) 842-0351

cutdown• trimmed• topped Licensed & Insured. 14 yrs experience. 913-441-8641 913-244-7718 STARTING or BUILDING a Business? 785-832-2222 classifieds@ljworld.com


24 | WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 2012

JUMBLE

BECKER ON BRIDGE THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Place your ad

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

GREEM ©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

SAUEM CIDOIY

ONLINE ADS

target NE Kansas

via 9 community newspaper sites.

CEEADD

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

ANY TIME OF DAY OR NIGHT

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: Yesterday’s

ENHANCE your listing with

(Answers tomorrow) AWARD POTENT STINKY Jumbles: USURP Answer: He was this after finishing his first surfing lesson — WIPED OUT

JUMBLE CROSSWORD

MULTIPLE PHOTOS, MAPS, EVEN VIDEO!

FREE ADS for merchandise

under $100 SunflowerClassifieds WorldClassNEK.com

Chances are, your life is impacted by one or more of these community health issues. DIET & EXERCISE SAFER TRAILS AND PARKS EATING LOCALLY-PRODUCED FOOD FOR HEALTH AND REDUCED POLLUTION AGING WELL ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE SHARING PARENTING TIPS/RESOURCES

f so, we’d like to invite you to take a stroll around wellcommons.com, an online resource focused on key areas of Douglas County health. Read articles, discover resources, join groups (or form your own!) and share ideas about key community health concerns. Let’s live healthier, together. Check out wellcommons.com today.

Sponsored By


Shawnee Dispatch - News and Writing Excellence