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“for all your llama supplies.... call Carolyn�

806.676.6659 Lakeview, TX 79239 cmyers@lyntegar.com www.Llamathings.com


Summer 2013 Contents General Interest A quarterly publication of the South Central Llama Association.

www.scla.us/scla.html

SCLA OFFICERS (Term 09/2011- 09/2013)

President: Sean Price • 281-830-2368 • figranch@flash.net Vice President: Christie Stewart • 972-476-1597 • christie.stewart@cmc.com Secretary: Mary Nell Doyle •940-488-3163 • mndoyle@marikollamas.com Treasurer: Bob Lyons • 210-497-3151 • boblyons1@satx.rr.com

REGIONAL DIRECTORS

Region One: (Area codes: 210-361-512-737-830-956) Susan Leslie (09/2011-09/2014) (830)401-0819 leslielanellamas@gmail.com Region Two: (Area cades: 214-405-430-469-479-501-580903-918-972) Sharon Carrier (09/2010-09/2013) (972) 348-9151 dblcranch2645805@aol.com Region Three: (Area codes:254-325-432-682-817 806-940-915-505) Deborah Ignacio (09/2012- 09/2015) 817-454-8882 deborah.ignacio@yahoo.com Region Four: (Area codes: 281-318-409-504-713-832936-979-985) Robert Roe (2011-9/2013) 979-378-20759 cnrllamas@hotmail.com

Sharon Carrier LANA Award.............................................................. 7 Camelid Emergency Preparedness................................................................... 8 Antiparasitic Restistance.....................................................................................14 Karen Kinyon 2013 Bobra Goldsmith Memorial Award...........................15 How Close Is Too Close........................................................................................16 When The Kids Leave Home..............................................................................20 Wilson County 4H..................................................................................................23 January In The Colorado Banana Belt.............................................................25 Smoky Mountains Llama Treks - Llama Story..............................................27 Ask The CSU Vet......................................................................................................30 . Leaping Llamas 5K in Seguin.............................................................................37 Show Results...........................................................................................................40

Always Inside President’s Statement............................................................................................4 VP Views.................... .................................................................................................4 . Editor’s Note..............................................................................................................5 New Members..................................................................................................... ......5 Dates Ahead.............................................................................................................. 6 SCLA Library............................................................................................................71 Classifieds/Display Advertisers.........................................................................73 SCLA Membership Form.....................................................................................74

Director-At-Large: Jim Doyle (10/09-09/11) 940-482-3192: cell 940-391-1862 JDoyle@marikollamas.com

SCLA COMMITTEES

Activities.................................................... No chair at this time Membership..............................................................Karen Conyngham Nomination . ............................Marcie Saska-Agnew-chairperson Property...............................................................Jessie Rierson Fund Raising..................................................................... Open Show............................Jim Doyle • Jessie Rierson • Bob Burton Fiber................................................................Margaret Schulze Youth................................................................ Christie Stewart Finance - Budget..............................Bob Lyons • Dan Johnson Librarian.............................................................Barbara Welch Conference................................................ No chair at this time National Lama Intervention & Rescue Coordination Council (IRC Council)...................................................Sandra Reynolds Scholarship........................................ .........Mary Nell Doyle - Chair .............................Susan Boblyanski, Adryce Mathisen, Brenda Gilmore SCLA Booth............................................... No chair at this time Web site......................................................... Sharon Bramblett By-Laws.................................Jim Doyle, Paul Walters, Bev Johnson

SHOWS - Thanks For Volunteering Your Time!

Bob Burton.....................................................State Fair of Texas-Dallas Jim Doyle............................Southwestern Livestock and Rodeo-Fort Worth Stephanie Clark.........................................West Texas Fair & Rodeo-Abilene Margaret and Kristi Schulze......................San Angelo Livestock Show- San Angelo Danette McCleary......................................Houston Livestock Show Ruby Herron and Robin Turell.........................Texas Classic- Conroe

EDITOR/DESIGN/LAYOUT

Ruby Herron 17102 Mueschke Rd., Cypress, TX 77433 713-249-8523 • HummingHerald@FigmentRanch.com

The views expressed herein are those of the authors. Before undertaking any new regime with your llamas, you should always consult with your veterinarian. Only they can tell you what is best for your situation. We invite submission for unpaid articles and photographs. Email to HummingHerald@FigmentRanch.com or mail to: Ruby Herron, c/o Humming Herald,17102 Mueschke Rd., Cypress,Tx., 77433


President’s Statement

VP Views

Christie Stewart, Vice President

Sean Price, President

Hey guys. I hope you are all doing well! SHEARING is on my mind and I hope it is on all of yours! Please make sure your animals are summer ready. If you don’t have a shearer in mind, you can find a list on the SCLA website, www.scla.us that will help you. Of course, “yours truly” shears. Please let me know if you need help! I also wanted to mention what a good job the Southeast Llama Rescue does. I personally was out in East Texas at the Lost Acres Ranch shearing last weekend. If you ever need help with a llama/alpaca rescue in our area, this is the place. Contact Bill & Kay Simpson at 409-625-0309 or visit www. southweastllamarescue.org . Let’s all relax and enjoy the summer........ we can’t do much else with the llamas/alpacas, right? If you have any questions or concerns, don’t hesitate to give me a call. I’ll talk to y’all soon. Sean

281-830-2368 sean@figmentranch.com 4

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013

Dust off the shears and let’s get those llamas and alpacas ready for the summer. Yes, it is that time again. How the year has just flown by. It has been good seeing everyone at the shows. Until next time,

Christie Stewart SCLA VP


Editor’s Note Hello Everyone. I hope you enjoyed your new version of the Humming Herald. I did receive a lot of compliments. Please let me know what you think. I only know of one person that had a problem opening it, but it was fixed! Y’all let me know if you have a problem!

New Members February 16 – May 10, 2013 Compiled by Karen Conyngham, Membership Secretary. Current member information is always available on the SCLA web site: http://www.scla.us SCLA Address: PO Box 163654, Austin, TX 78716 New Members:

So far the weather has been tolerable. We have had a fair share of rain and green, but we know it will get hot. Make sure your animals are shorn and ready for the summer!

Gerry & Terri Bruening 3B Llamas 6836 Woodale Dr. Watauga, TX 76148-4208 (817) 800-1295 bunchabruenings@hotmail.com

Our thoughts go out to the people in Oklahoma ....... we hope everyone is safe during their bad weather. If you know of a situation that needs to be spread, I’m one of the right people to do this – contact me!

Ronald & Elizabeth Kast 301 CR 253 Bertram, TX 78605-4561 (512) 355-3769 rekast44@ecpi.com

I also wanted to mention that my thoughts and prayers are with you, Penny Thomas. I am very proud of the way the SCLA banded together to help her! Kudos to us all! And a special thank you to Karen Conygham and Brenda Foulks for heading this up! I hope y’all have a great summer. Ruby 713-249-8523

SCLA has a new telephone number: (512) 328-8715

Belinda & Hunter Snow Hunter’s Hopes and Dreams 245 Valley Brook Dr. Athens, GA 30606-2467 (770) 380-6491 belindas364@gmail.com Member Contact Updates: New address and email address: Marcie Saska-Agnew & Bob Burton 2Bit2 Llamas 870 CR 1792 Sunset, TX 76270-4106 Email: 2bit2ranch@gmail.com (no change to phone #) Mailing address: Marcie Saska-Agnew & Bob Burton 2Bit2 Llamas PO Box 211 Sunset, TX 76270-0211 5


Dates Ahead 7- 11 – 14, 2013 International Camelid Health Conference Magruder Hall and Large Animal Hospital Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon This is the premier camelid health conference for veterinarians. It will be a joint effort of OSU Veterinary College, the Australian Veterinary Group, and the North West Camelid Foundation. Watch for details: http://oregonvma.org/international-camelidhealth-conference and http://www.nwcamelidfoundation.org/index. html 08 - 4, 2013: Camelid Community 2013, Kansas City, Missouri Open to everyone in the llama and alpaca community, this annual gathering focuses on challenges and opportunities in the camelid world. All llama and alpaca organizations are encouraged to send a representative to this open forum, and interested individuals also are welcome. For registration information and agenda updates, contact Barb Baker (bebaker@ earthlink.net or 740-397-1736) or Sheila Fugina (bsfugina@ frontier.com or 715-246-5837). Materials and reports from Camelid Community are available at www.icinfo.org (the website for the International Camelid Institute) in the Camelid Community section. 09 - 21-12, 2013 State Fair of Oklahoma Llama Show 3001 General Pershing Blvd. 405-387-9413 Oklahoma City, OK73107 Show Contact: Joy Swihart Pat Bodkin swihart@pldi.net Judge: TBA Other Judges: 09 - 27-29, 2013 State Fair of Texas P.O. Box 150009 Dallas, Tx 75315 6

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013

Show Contact: Lance Lozano 214-421-8723 Karla Sikes ksikes@bigtex.com Info: http://www.bigtex.com Judge: TBA 09-20-21, 2013 Central Regional Championship Oklahoma State Fair Park, 3001 Pershing Blvd. (918)521-0766 Oklahoma City, OK73107 (918)521-0766 Show Contact: Penny Thomas pooder33@att.net Judge: Bill Schultz Show 10/24-27, 2013 2013 ALSA Grand National Heart of Oklahoma Exposition Center (940)391-1862 Shawnee, OK74802-1466 Info: http://www.alsashow.org Show Contact: GN Committee / Jim Doyle, Chair jdoyle@marikollamas.com Judge: Halter/Performance Phil Feiner, Barb Harris, Patti Morgan Other Judges: Cindy Ruckman-Fleece


Sharon Carrier Receives LANA Service Award

Sharon Carrier of Seagoville received the LANA Hummdinger Award in recognition of her years of service working as chairperson of the Youth Committee for SCLA, years of service working at the ALSA Grand National and for her support of LANA programs in Texas. [Sharon is also the current Director of Region Two, has coordinated several Region Two youth shows and is past superintendent of the State Fair of Texas Llama Show.] LANA awards the Hummdinger Award in recognition of: • Long-term commitment to LANA • Actions embodying the mission and philosophy of LANA • Exceptional commitment, service and support of LANA and the lama community. Congratulations Sharon!

Source: LANA News, newsletter of the Llama Assoc. of N. America, issue #113, March 2013. 7


Camelid Emergency Preparedness Compiled by Karen Conyngham

Why Camelid Owners Need to Be Prepared Transporting animals to safety when disaster strikes can be difficult. Disaster preparedness is important for all animals, but it is particularly important for livestock because of the animals’ size and the requirements needed to shelter and transport them. Even if you think you are in an area relatively safe from natural disasters, remember that disasters can happen anywhere and include barn fires, hazardous material spills, propane line explosions, and train derailments, all of which may necessitate evacuation. It is imperative that you be prepared to protect your alpacas and llamas, whether by evacuating or by sheltering in place.

gather and load the animals? * Create a list of emergency telephone numbers, including those of your employees, employer, neighbors, your veterinarian, state veterinarian’s office, county extension service, a contact phone number for yourself

Some state legislatures are considering legislation that would require first responders to take animals into account when evacuating areas threatened by flooding waters, earthquakes, wildfires and other life-threatening disasters. Monitor your state legislature or state veterinary medical association’s web site to determine if such a bill is under consideration for your area. Make a plan ahead of time Make a disaster plan to protect your property, your facilities, and your animals. Where will you go, how will you get there, what supplies will you take, how long will it take to 8

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013

other than your cell phone (e.g. close friend or family who are outside the impacted area). Have a copy of this list ready to give to each person helping in your evacuation. * Have a designated person who can implement your plan in case you are not home when an emergency happens. If you up-


date your plan, be sure this person also has a copy of the latest version. * Keep a current copy of your association’s membership directory in your vehicle. * Have several alternative destinations de-

* Make sure every animal has identification. Microchip ID is fine but also have halter or neck tags with your name and phone number ready in case all animals are not chipped. * Have a halter and lead for each animal; keep ID tags on each halter. Organize halters and lead ropes on a peg board in barn hallway. Dog collars can serve as an emergency substitute for halters; be sure the collar fits snugly enough that the llama or alpaca cannot slip it off over its head. Train all animals to lead and load into a trailer. * Include a picket line, bungie stakeout lines and stakes in case there is no pen or enclosure at the receiving area. * Maintain permanent health and I.D. records for your animals in a safe place. Take them with you if you evacuate. Backup software programs at least monthly. Store a backup of the data file either on disc and keep it in your safe deposit box/home safe or email the backup file to a friend or relative. * Print up a list of all of your animals and make copies. Photograph your herd and keep it with your master list. Organize your herd into groups (geldings, studs, moms and babies).

pending on type and extent of disaster (within a 15 – 40 mile radius recommended). Keep a current state roadmap in your vehicle. Possible evacuation sites: pre-arranged farm/ ranch of a friend who is not in the affected area; show/fair grounds, sale barns, equestrian centers, veterinary colleges, racetracks.

* Identify an alley, lane or pen that can easily be used to confine animals and is readily adjacent to where a trailer or truck can access them. * Know who can transport animals if necessary and where animals can be relocated, or be prepared to leave them behind if you must. 9


* Find out if anyone nearby has equipment which may be shared, such as trailers, generators, water tanks or portable pens. * If you own too many animals to evacuate in one trip, decide ahead of time what the priority evacuation list will be. Some may have to be left behind. * Truck and Trailer - Check your truck and trailer regularly to make certain they are ready to transport camelids. Check the floor, tires, brakes, lights and hitch to be sure they are in working order. Make sure you have a full tank of gas. Do not carry full gas cans in your trailer. Always back your vehicle into your driveway facing the exit, in front of your trailer if possible. Keep your trailer in an easily accessible place. Supplies to take with you if possible: • Water buckets • Feed pans • Hay/feed for at least 3 days • Medicines for any animals currently under treatment; syringes if needed (3- day minimum) • Animal and people first-aid kits (see “First Aid Kits for Camelids”, below) • Clippers to treat broken toenails • Tweezers to remove thorns • Scissors • Brush for grooming • Microchip reader If you need to shelter in place * Install a hand pump and obtain enough large containers to water your animals and

family for at least a week (municipal water supplies and wells are often contaminated during a disaster.) * Identify alternate water and power sources. A generator (4 hp minimum) with a safely stored supply of fuel may be essential, especially if you have electrical equipment necessary to the well-being of your animals. * Have 48-72 hours of water and feed on hand for animals. Use child's plastic swimming pool, boats, trash cans, bath tubs to store water. * Turn off power and gas lines in advance. * Keep the following emergency supplies on hand: 1. Plastic trash barrel with lid 2. Tarpaulins 3. Water buckets 4. First aid items for animals and people 5. Portable radio, flashlight and extra batteries 6. Fire-resistant non-nylon leads and halters 7. Sharp knife and wire cutters 8. Leg wraps (disposable baby diapers make good emergency wraps or bandages) 9. Duct tape, magic markers 10. Lime and bleach (disinfectants) 11. Portable pens/fencing or crates if appropriate * Film - Obtain film for your camera and camcorder to document storm damage. If time permits, take pictures of your structures prior to the storm. Review your insurance policy to determine storm coverage then document damage accordingly.


* Water purification – Iodine or chlorine treatments and an actual physical filter (paper towels, clean cloth, coffee filters for filtering brackish water) may be needed if water sources are contaminated. Iodine dosage: using ordinary 2 percent tincture of iodine from the medicine chest, 3 drops per quart of CLEAR water, or 6 drops to each quart of cloudy water, and stir thoroughly, allow water to stand for at least 30 minutes before using or filtering for additional protection. Chlorine dosage: 8 drops(1/8 tsp. or .5ml) for 1 gallon of CLEAR water; 18 drops(1/4 tsp/1.25 ml) for CLOUDY water. When storing water in 55 gallon drums or inflatable bags, use 55 ml or a stingy, 1/4 cup per 55 gallons of capacity. Average potable water needs are 1 gallon per person per day; llamas/alpacas may need 2 gallons or more each per day. After the Disaster * Watch for unstable roads and highways. * Looters and vandals could be in the area. * Survey the area around your barn and pastures to identify sharp objects, dangerous materials, contaminated water, downed power lines and dangerous wildlife such as snakes. * Walk fence lines. * Handle livestock quietly, calmly and in a manner they are familiar with. * Release animals into safe and enclosed areas only. * Reintroduce food in small servings, gradually working up to full portions if animals have been without food for a prolonged period of time. * Allow uninterrupted rest/sleep for all animals

to recover from the trauma and stress. Practice your plan at least once a year!! First Aid Kits for Camelids By Dr. Kristy Brown (originally published in LANA News, Fall 2004) I have several first aid kits made up and I'd like to share ideas with you to create your own. I have a standard size toolbox (about 8" high and deep and 18" long) in the back of the truck with emergency supplies while we're “on the road”. I like to keep the emergency kit in the truck, not the tack box, so that it is available every time the trailer is hooked up, not just when we're headed for a show. (This box would work for the barn as well.) I have a friend that uses the small, flip top coolers as an emergency kit ¬anything small enough to store and carry easily, yet large enough to hold a few essentials will work. Bubble wrap sheets work great to wrap around medicine bottles to prevent breakage and is readily available at most office supply stores. Or better yet, reuse the wrap from packages you receive. Ziplock bags work great to protect and organize items in the tack box. GENERAL SUPPLIES: 1. Vetwrap – to wrap wounds or support joints. 2. Diapers - these work great to place over wounds, they are very absorbent and won't stick to wounds. 3. 2" PVC pipe - cut length wise to use as a splint-cut the pipe as long as will fit in your emergency kit. If you don't have PVC pipe 11


available or can't cut it, the same length of 1" dowel rod will also work-keep 2 pieces of dowel rod in your kit to wrap one on each side of the injured area for support. 4. Duct tape - the "miracle bandage." Duct tape can be used to waterproof a bandage, hold a splint, pull the fiber away from a wound, secure a bandage, and any other creative use you can come up with. This will annoy my husband because he is an HVAC contractor and thinks duct tape is only for one specific use for his sheet metal projects, not an all purpose item. 5. Contact lens (sterile saline) solution - this can be used to rinse out an inflamed eye or a wound. Saline is "tissue friendly" and will flush a wound well without leaving a residue that could prevent your veterinarian from stitching the wound. Buy the cheap generic bottles and discard them after they are opened. 6. Eye salves - keep a couple of tubes of nonÂŹsteroidal antibiotic salves in your kit. Again, they are safe for a scratch on the eye or to place on superficial wounds. Do not put cream into deep wounds if you can get to a veterinarian within a couple of hours. 7. Antibiotic injectable - consult with your veterinarian for their favorite drug for your use. I keep both Penicillin (good for wounds) and LA200 (good for respiratory infections) in my travel kit. 8. Banamine - Banamine is good for colic, inflammation and pain. Consult your veterinarian for the appropriate dosage and to dispense an appropriate volume of drug for your use. 12

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013

9. Gastroguard - this product is used to treat ulcers. It is not something to use without your veterinarian's approval, but may be appropriate to use on an animal that is stressed while on the road. 10. Antihistamine injectable - antihistamines can be used for insect bites, snake bites, allergic conditions and respiratory conditions. 11. Injectable steroid - this should be used only for snake bites, shock or severe allergic reactions. Consult your veterinarian. 12. Epinephrine - antidote for drug reactions and insect/snake bites-again, consult your veterinarian. 13. Vegetable oil - a pint of vegetable oil is useful for constipation or colic on the road. Vegetable oil has flavor and can be syringed into the animal's mouth and they will swallow it. Mineral oil has no flavor and is easily aspirated. Again, consult with your veterinarian for an appropriate dosage. 14. Syringes and needles - a variety pack. I keep an extra Ziplock for garbage (used needles/ syringes). When I empty the used items, I know exactly what I need to restock the kit with. 15. Hand towels - can be used to support an injured leg or to clean a wound. 16. Bottled water - to give animal to drink or to flush a wound or rehydrate yourself. 17. Betadine or Nolvasan surgical scrub - a small shampoo container of either of these fits nicely into a kit and can be used to clean a wound. Your veterinarian can possibly still suture a wound if cleansed with these products because tissue residue is not a concern.


This kit fits easily in a vehicle or a llama pack for use on the trail. You may prefer a backpack or cooler or other container; anything that is easy to grab and run with in an emergency and anything you can easily

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Sources: American Veterinary Medical Association http://www.avma.org/disaster/default.asp Clemson University http://www.clemson.edu/ep/A_E_instructions.htm Colorado State University Extension Caring for Livestock: Before, During and After Disasters http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/livestk/publive. html Emergency Water Purification Techniques http://www.aquatechnology.net/emergencywaterpurification.html and http://www.epa.gov/safewater/faq/emerg.html Llama Association of North America Rocky Mtn. Llama & Alpaca Assoc. http://www.rmla.com/Fire_Flood.htm Univ. of Florida, Small Ruminant Emergency Preparedness: http://disaster.ifas.ufl.edu/PDFS/CHAP07/DPR0724-web.pdf Although the following is written for equine owners, all of the recommendations and procedures will apply to llama and alpaca emergency preparedness as well: What Do I Do With My Horse in Fire, Flood, and/or Earthquake? http://www.etinational.com/docs/Red%20 Book%20Revision%209-2004.pdf

BLUEBONNET HILL LLAMAS Bob & Joan Lyons San Antonio, Texas 210.497.3151 13


Helpful Information for Veterinarians Antiparasitic Resistance in Cattle and Small Ruminants in the United States: How to Detect It and What to Do About It Introduction



Internal parasite infections and external parasite infestations harm animal health and can result in significant production losses in food-producing species, such as cattle, sheep, and goats.

Parasites in untreated animals, called hostbased refugia.



Eggs and larvae already on the pasture when the animals are treated, called environmental refugia.



Life stages of the parasite that are unaffected by drug treatment, such as some larval stages.

Antiparasitic animal drugs are used to treat and control parasitic infections and infestations in animals. The parasites that a given drug is effective against are listed in the indication on the drug’s label.

Why is preserving refugia important? Preserving refugia maintains drug-sensitive (susceptible) parasites. The presence of some drugsensitive parasites decreases (dilutes) the proportion of resistant parasites within the parasite population on a farm.

Antiparasitic resistance is the genetic ability of parasites to survive the effects of an antiparasitic drug to which they were previously susceptible. Antiparasitic resistance becomes a problem when an increasing percentage of a parasite population carries resistance genes, allowing the parasites to survive treatment with an antiparasitic drug that has been effective in the past.

The I m p or ta nce of Pre se rvi n g Re f u g ia

Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and South America have struggled with antiparasitic resistance in livestock species for the past few decades. Recent scientific data indicate antiparasitic resistance is now emerging in livestock species in the United States.

Refugia After an animal is treated with an antiparasitic drug, the susceptible parasites die and the resistant parasites survive to pass on resistance genes to their offspring. If not enough susceptible parasites remain in the environment and in the animal, they cannot dilute the increase in resistant parasites that occurs after treatment. This scenario occurs when there is a lack of refugia.

What is refugia? Refugia is the proportion of the total parasite population that is not selected for antiparasitic drug treatment—essentially, those parasites that are in “refuge” from the drug. Therefore, there's no selection pressure on these parasites to develop resistance. Refugia maintains a proportion of susceptible parasites on the farm and includes:

Key: Susceptible parasite

1

14

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013

Resistant parasite


Karen Kinyon Receives 2013 Bobra Goldsmith Memorial Award

By Jerry Dunn, Bear Track Farm, Golden, CO

Karen Kinyon of Wellington, Colorado was selected to receive the 2013 Bobra Goldsmith Memorial Award at the National Western Stock Show Llama Show. Karen's first experience with llamas was at the NWSS nearly 25 years ago when she and her husband Bob had the opportunity to lead their first llama. They fell in love on the spot with the idea of becoming future llama owners. They purchased two llamas

and tragically lost both of them to unusual circumstances. The loss did not stop them from pursuing new experiences with llamas. Karen's passion and love for llamas turned toward fiber and all of its potential uses. Today she educates people in the llama community through workshops and the presentation of her own artistry. Karen is an ALSA Fiber Judge and eagerly pursues opportunities to share her knowledge with others about fiber. Congratulations Karen And Thank you for All you have Given to the Lama Community! Reprinted from The RMLA Journal, newsletter of the Rocky Mtn. Llama and Alpaca Assoc.; Spring 2013.

15


How Close Is Keeping your young animal at arm's length By Jerry Dunn Bear Track Farm Golden, CO

Too Close During the past few years I have had the opportunity to experience and attempt to work with animals that displayed inap-

An animal is too close when they walk into your

propriate behavior. The animals have been

personal space uninvited and stick their

alpacas, paca-vicunas, and llamas. In many

nose in your face; an animal is too close

of the cases, the displayed behavior was the

when they hit you from behind with their

result of the animal's which were handled

chest, an animal is too close when they walk

in ways that forced them to function in an

into your space and spit in your face, an ani-

intimate environment with humans at an

mal is too close if they nibble at your cloth-

early age. Examples are: not allowing the

ing or your skin. The animal is treating you

babies to bond naturally with their mothers

as if you were a member of his herd. This

in the first 24-48 hours of life, bottle feeding,

may be stating the obvious; these behaviors

hand feeding, and constant cuddling as if

are inappropriate and are not cute. In many

they were puppies or human babies. These

instances it goes ignored with no correc-

actions are very confusing for the young

tions made for the invasion of the human's

animals. "Am I a human or am I a camelid?"

personal space.

Granted there are exceptions which exist where the examples given have little effect

16

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013


in changing their behavior to become negative. Are you confused about the causes, think of the animal and their confusion? Rather than trying to identify the

become balky and spit at her. At the family's request I took Prancer on as a project to attempt to modify and understand his behavior.

questionable causes of all bad behavior I will discuss how I am attempting to manage the behavior of one young llama in particular.

The first couple of months were tough for Prancer. He attempted at every turn to control my space. At feeding time he would

Prancer, a young

stand in front of the wheel barrow filled with

llama at about

hay and refuse to move out of the way. I

two years old,

began bumping him with the wheel barrow

came to my

until he would move his feet. I would pick

farm as a llama

up a flake of hay to feed and he would be

that had been

right there refusing to move. If I did not put

overscaized at

the down hay fast enough in the feeding

an early age. He

tubs he would spit at the back of my head.

developed into

Being in control seemed to be more impor-

an animal that preferred humans to llamas

tant than eating. He would not eat until I left

in his family group and treated the human

the paddock area. The herd members were

accordingly. He first greeted me by walking

less willing to let him slip in to and eat after

right up to me and sticking his nose in my

they had established their own eating spot.

face. I had to ignore him and walk away. His

Life was hard! He would follow me every-

ears went flat as I walked away. He seemed

where as I was doing chores. Animals within

to work well with his young owner as long

my herd would attempt to force him to

as she was doing things he wanted to do.

play. He would try to ignore them and hold

His reaction to an unwanted request was to

his own, never to give in and eventually 17


go to the back

him away forcing him to move his feet away

of the pasture

from my space. This procedure continued

away from the

for several weeks until I no longer needed

herd. Whenever

to carry the racquet to get my daily work

I returned to the

done. He was respecting my space and I in

pasture for one

turn respected his space. After some time I

reason or anoth-

was able to use just use the hand motion to

er he would be

make him move his feet.

right there pushing my personal space. On occasion when he would

Then it became time to train the family to

not move I would use Bobra Goldsmith's

respect Prancer's space. The young owner

"shake and bake" method. Getting a firm

would come by on a regular basis to work

grip of wool with two hands and shaking

with Prancer. She had to learn to actively

him back and forth vigorously for a few

maintain her personal space. This was tough

seconds then walking away without a look.

as she was accustomed to being in Prancer's

That certainly got his attention! Prancer

space with hugs and squeezes regularly.

would walk away

The young owner had to move down the

seemingly confused by my response. Older

lead rope away from Prancer to establish a

llamas within a herd are very good about

positive personal space. When she moved

immediate corrections of young llamas.

into his space to do obstacles, he responded with ears flat and if she didn't pay attention he would spit. She learned to become more

I began to use another technique to establish my personal space by carrying a racquet

patient, move away, and allow him more

ball racquet everywhere during feeding and

time to react in a positive manner and move

chores. I would hold the racquet at face level

his feet. Eventually behaviors began to

and move it in a pulsating motion to keep 18

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013

improve on both sides.


Prancer and his young owner return several of times a year for a refresher course. Prancer interacts with the other llamas in my herd on a limited basis. Prancer has become much better at respecting human space. Prancer gets appropriate hugs and "Atta boy" for good behavior. Hopefully there will be a time as Prancer matures that the more familiar touching and hugging will once again be okay.

Marcie Saska Agnew Bob Burton 817-999-1875

Based on my experience I would say Prancer is just a spoiled llama and I would not deem

P.O. Box 211 Sunset, Texas 76270 5415 CO Rd 59 Florissant, Colorado 80816

him dangerous. However, I think it is important that we continue to monitor his behavior until he is fully mature. Finally, evaluate the personal space you share with your young animal. Learn to identify the different behaviors. Undesirable

Triple V Ranch Rick & Sharon VanHooser 600 Red Top Road Poolville, Texas 76487

817-596-9644

E-mail: Sharonav@peoplepc.com t Quarter Horses t Llamas t Miniature Donkeys t t Miniature Horses t Dwarf/Pigmy Goats

behaviors left uncorrected at an early age may turn aggressive and dangerous as the animal matures. Work to achieve an arm's length relationship for an enjoyable well behaved animal. Reprinted from The RMLA Journal, newsletter of the

Chuk & Vicki Guzman Southern G Llamas 740 Bear Creek Rd LaGrange, Texas 78945

979.242.3858

Rocky Mtn. Llama and Alpaca Assoc.; Spring 2013.

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When The Kids Leave Home We have been selling llamas for over 25 years and it never gets easier when they leave a go to a new home. You feel happy but sad, too, because you always think that the llama will be upset when they leave their pals and their home and go to a new location. We recently sold five llamas that were going to a 370 acre exotic ranch to guard against anything that dug under the game fencing. (the llamas were a gelding, 3 adult females, and one cria). This land had a predator problem at that moment and the llamas were being placed on the land to stop the attacks! The coyotes and other predators had actually killed some offspring of these exotic animals that were only there for the land owners’ pleasure. To add to our anxiousness, the land owners came over to the ranch to select the llamas they were going to buy and just fell in love with Merlot. Merlot was born here on the ranch and became one of our performance boys. He traveled with us to all the shows for more than five years and was a good performance boy but he never became one of our best performance boys. We had more or less retired him to the ranch to help with weaning our babies and just be a guard. With much reluctance they talked us into selling them Merlot. We were also concerned because their 20

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013


land was not cross fenced. Could five llamas guard 370 acres or would they find a little section and just stay there? Sean delivered them and when he returned said it was a gorgeous place and they would be just fine. Robin and I felt O.K. but we still wondered how they were. Recently we were invited out to visit the llamas and tour the ranch. The ranch was a beautiful place and being that we are animal lovers, we were in awe. The owner had fallen in love with the llamas and was so excited that the llamas would come up to her and she could pet them. (She has all kinds of exotics but none would come up to her except the llamas!) We also were surprised to find out that the llamas, as she puts it, patrol the entire property. She can see this on her game cams. They have not lost a thing since the llamas arrived, and they have only seen one coyote. They told us that one of the females, Wendy, rarely stays with the other four and stays in one corner of the ranch. Since llamas are herd animals our first thought was that she was hurt or sick. We drove to the back side of the ranch where she hung out and we checked her out. She had her own stream, belly deep in grass and plenty of shade. She had no reason to leave ....... would you? The owners said there were some wild dogs that hung out in the woods on the other side of the fence and she was always watching them from her new domain. The other four llamas come to visit, but Wendy chooses to stay in her area. Well I guess some people are loaners. So to make a long story short, we had a really good time and feel really good about where our kids now live! Figment Ranch


s ’ a m a Ll

Llamas are like potato chips......... You Just Can’t Have One

3966 Estate Drive Vacaville, CA 95688 707-447-5046 707-471-4020 f llamainfo@gmail.com www.llamainfo.org

RANCHES Texas & Colorado

Suri, Silky, & Argentine Llamas 512-751-5363 www.sapavecoranch.com 22

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013


Wilson County 4H 3rd Annual Llama and Alpaca Show

by Sharon Bramblett

The Wilson County 4H 3rd Annual Llama and Alpaca Show took place at the LaVernia Chamber of Commerce Arena on Saturday, April 13, 2013. It was sponsored by Leslie Lane Llamas and in memory of Helen Feick. Twenty-one youth in four age groups competed using fourteen llamas and two alpacas in obstacle and showmanship classes. Bill Feick served as judge. All participants were awarded trophies and ribbons, with first place winners receiving llama belt buckles. A silent auction, with many donated items, a woven llama shawl raffle, contributed by the Llama Mama Fiber to Fashion spinning and weaving team, raised scholarship funds, expenses to llama shows, and show awards. Linda Anderson of LaVernia won the llama shawl, which brought in $650.


Clipper sales repair serviCe - parts Blade sharpening Most Brands

and

Models

Brown’s Clipper serviCe

217-414-8126

Jay C. Brown 1119 South 4th Street Springfield, il 62703

Figment Ranch Llamas

Since 1988 Specializing in performance animals. We breed pets, show, guard and just-for-fun llamas. Members of SCLA-ALSA-ILR

17102 Mueschke Rd Cypress, Tx 77433 281-351-1820 Home

www.FigmentRanch.com figranch@flash.net Ruby Herron Robin Turell Sean Price

713-249-8523 713-249-3893 281-830-2368

Diamond D Llamas Rick & Darlene Matthiesen 259 PR 3512 Hondo, TX 78861 Home: 830.741.7023 email: diamonddllamas@gmail.com www.diamonddllamas.com

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January in the Colorado Banana Belt!

By Kathy Stanko Iron Horse Ranch Whitewater, CO

Yep, Western Colorado is supposed to be the banana belt of Colorado, with warm temps and winds coming off the Pacific from Southern California. But not this year. For 6 weeks our daytime highs were never above 20 degrees and the lows were consistently below zero. We were colder than Alaska! So what's a llama lady supposed to do when she can't go outside to train, clean barns, or groom? How about fiber? Well, it became my life for these 6 weeks. I even rejoiced when my husband decided to go to the National Western Stock Show for 4 days. Now I could really take over the house! Can you relate fiber lovers? Looking at the bags of fiber and the ‘yet to be completed’ projects, I settled on 3: re-knit a hat, untangle the very fine cria coat, and wet felting. I like to rotate projects depending on my energy level, the natural lighting, and my inspiration at the moment. Our local yam store has a ‘knit helmet liners’ for our troops program. So in December I decided to make a couple of helmet liners since I was itching to knit a hat or two, but I had never made one. I am a visual kind of person: I needed to make one to see how hats went together. So what better way than to start with a couple of helmet liners ... perhaps a military person in Afghanistan would really benefit and I would learn as well. Win/win as they say.

With the helmet liners made and on their way to a new home, I found a hat pattern and of course I didn't need to look far for yarn. In a short time, the hat was done. Yeah... but no ... it didn't fit how I wanted: too loose in the ribbing and not long enough to cover the ears comfortably. I tried it on 3 different people; same result; same comments. So after thinking about how I could correct these imperfections (which was indeed possible), I ripped it out and started over, making the changes to the pattern that I deemed were needed for my satisfaction. So it is now the middle of February, the hat is complete and I am very happy with it this time. On to the very tangled cria fiber... oh my, this is definitely a lesson in PATIENCE. Last summer,

I sheared our cria, Phoebe Snow, and ‘processed’ her fiber how I normally process cria fiber. But Phoebe's fiber is as fine as cashmere (I once had cashmere goats) and much of the staple length was 8-12 inches. These 2 factors made a tangled, matted mess when I very, very gently soaked it in cold water just as I always do. I spent hours and hours and even more hours in January hand combing, picking, recombing and carding the fiber. At the end, I had a spectacular batt of 0.7 ounces! I took it to my Spin Day group to 25


show it around. The oohs and aahs made it all worth while. I told the ladies that they could expect about an ounce a month; nothing like a little build-up and anticipation to wet the appetite. And, “patience” is my current mantra. On to, my third project: wet felting. About 6 years ago I took a wet and dry felting class from one of our favorites: Karen Kinyon. Since then I had not had much time to explore and practice felting. However, I had purchased a number of felting books for ideas and inspirations. Looking through the book on inlay techniques, I decided to try this method to make felted napkin rings. Best to start out with something small ... i.e., hats are a major project. Well, following the instructions, I didn't like the results. The felt was way too thick for a napkin ring. I started to explore and go my own way. Just creating flat felted pieces from the various natural and dyed fibers I had available. I reduced the layers from 5 to 3 and voila! The results were fantastic. OK, so now I was really into ‘the creative zone’. Let's add some swirls of yarn to the mix, a little Angelina (sparkles), and more colors; let's try this fiber with this fiber; or, how about these colors together. I was having a great time just playing and learning. I especially learned how every llama fiber I have reacts differently to the felting process. I kind of knew that but now I was experiencing it. Next stumbling block: what to do with all of 26

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013

these flat felted pieces? Lot's of projects came to mind: bags, purses, journal covers, pin cushions, etc. and etc. But I was not inspired to make any of these products. I just wanted to create felt. In the end, I said okay, for now, just create felt. I can make end products later on or I can sell the felted pieces to others who want to create

end products. Again, I took a couple of the flat felted pieces to the Spin Day group. Again, the oohs and aahs were very much appreciated. But even better, my friends encouraged me to go ahead, just create and sell the felt to others. There is a market for everything! (I have already sold a couple of the pieces.) In conclusion, I had a wonderful adventure just creating during our very cold weeks. I learned so much about so many things. Now, with Spring coming on us, I am even kind of sad that I must show some discipline (hate that word!) and shift gears to other projects. But, next winter I know just where to go! And who knows, I may get some time to create even before next winter. Reprinted from The RMLA Journal, newsletter of the Rocky Mtn. Llama and Alpaca Assoc.; Spring 2013.


Smoky Mountain Llama Treks- Llama Story Story by Sandy Sgrillo In the beginning, God created all the world and all the animals. There were big animals and there were small animals, colorful animals and scary animals. All kinds of different creatures. But, God knew that He had to create just one more...but He was so tired He just couldn’t think of what to make. As He sat in the forest alone, thinking, a Jack Rabbit hopped up to him. “God” he said, “ I think that I have the nicest ears. Why don’t you make something with my ears?” And God said, “Mmmmm... you do, I’ll think about it”. Then a little fawn tiptoed up and said, “ I have such beautiful eyes, can you make something with my eyes?” God nodded yes. A couple of sheep that were grazing nearby came up and asked, “We’re so very hot in the sun, can you take some of our fluffy fur and make an animal with it?” And God thought this was a very good Idea, too. Then a big tall Camel strolled over and asked God to make something with his unique nose, mouth and feet. “ But, leave off the hump, only I get to have a hump!” God laughed, and said, “just for that, I’ll give you two!” That’s why some Camels have one hump and some have two! And last but not least, a giraffe came over to join the group. “If you make something with a long neck, don’t make it as long as mine. It’s too hard to bend down and drink!”So after a nice long rest, God went up into the the cool high mountains of Peru, Chili and Bolivia and created 2 beautiful llamas. They trekked down the mountain and God presented them to all the others who cheered in happiness! The llamas had little pieces of all the other animals put together! He named them “Dali and Romeo”, and they went on to create all the other little llamas of the world.

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Ask the CSU Vet Team

By Kathy Stanko & The Colorado State University Camelid Vets & Interns

Over the Winter one of our girls developed a facial abscess. In conversations with several other llama owners, we learned they were also treating facial abscesses. The light bulb came on! So with a huge thanks to Dr. Andi Lear, CSU Livestock Resident and Dr. Robert Callan, CSU Livestock Faculty, the following explores the whats and whys of abscesses. And if you are not squeamish, be sure to check out the accompanying photos with descriptions. Abscesses are a common condition in all animals, particularly livestock including llamas and alpacas. An abscess is a well-encapsulated structure that contains a mix of organic material including portions of blood, white blood cells, and inflammatory products otherwise known as pus. It is usually seen as a swelling that can occur at any part of the body, inside or out. Abscesses do not necessarily have to contain bacteria; any foreign or irritating material such as a piece of stick or broken piece of bone (sequestrum) can result in its formation. Abscesses are a result of the body trying to wall off and destroy the foreign material or bacteria. Many abscesses start as external wounds where bacteria or foreign material is able to gain entry to deeper tissues. Puncture wounds are particularly common types of injuries that can cause an abscess. However, abscesses can also begin internally when bacteria gain entry to the blood and seed an area of tissue where they multiply and form an abscess. This is common in the liver, particularly following grain overload (acidosis), or in the lungs following pneumonia. Brain and spinal cord abscesses can also occur, most likely from bacteria in the blood. Abscesses can also occur following surgery due to infection. A variety of bacteria can be present within an abscess and the type of bacteria can influence what the internal exudate (i.e., pus) looks and smells like. The most common bacterium found in livestock abscesses is named Trueperalla pyogenes (formerly Arcanobacterium pyogenes). It is a common bacterium in the environment, on the skin, and in the GI tract of camelids and ruminants. Anaerobic bacteria such as Fusobacterium necrophorum are also common in livestock abscesses. Many people associate malodorous abscess exudate (i.e. bad smelling pus) with the presence of anaerobic bacteria, but this is not always the case. Another specific bacterium that causes abscesses is Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and is the specific cause of caseous lymphadenitis (CL). This organism tends to result in very thick, "caseous" purulent exudate. Many other bacteria can be found in abscesses and may influence both the consistency and smell of the exudate. However, you never really know what bacteria are there, and what antibiotics they will be susceptible to unless you perform an aerobic and anaerobic culture with antibiotic susceptibility testing. Aerobic bacteria require oxygen to grow and multiply. Anaerobic bacteria grow best in an environment without oxygen or with very 30

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013


low amounts of oxygen. Thus, in order to check for both types of bacteria, the laboratory needs to incubate the sample in conditions with and without oxygen. If you just request a routine bacterial culture, it will be generally only include an aerobic culture. In general, the main tenants of treating an abscess, in the order of importance, are: 1. Removal of any inciting foreign body such as a grass awn, other plant material or twig, wire, infected tooth root, or piece of dead bone (sequestrum). 2. External drainage of the abscess if possible. 3. Repeated lavage (rinsing out the inside) and debridement (removing the superficial dead tissue) of the interior of the abscess. 4. Systemic antibiotics. While antibiotics can be an important adjunct to treating an abscess and preventing further spread, many abscesses can resolve without antibiotics if the first three criteria above can be achieved. Antibiotics are most important when the abscess canÂŹnot be adequately drained to the exterior. Also, an abscess will not resolve if an inciting foreign body is present and is not re-moved. This is particularly true for tooth root abscesses and bone sequestra. Facial abscesses are relatively common in llamas and alpacas. Facial abscesses are initially noted as local discrete swelling somewhere over the lower (mandible) or upper (maxilla) jaw. Facial abscesses can be caused by trauma of the oral mucosa from eating rough or stemmy feed. The feed causes small oral punctures that are then seeded with oral bacteria and can form an abscess. These external trauma induced abscesses will often be moveable over the bone and that can sometimes help differentiate them from tooth root abscesses. Tooth root abscesses are a familiar and frustrating problem for both camelid owners and veterinarians. Llamas and alpacas appear to be more susceptible to this condition compared to our other ruminating species; however we do not know why. Retrospective studies of cases presented to veterinary teaching hospitals show the average age of these animals are 5 years of age. These studies also tell us that certain teeth, the molars (cheek teeth) on the bottom jaw or mandible seem to be most affected. There are many theories of why this condition occurs in cameÂŹlids. It is suspected that rough or long stemmed forage during the time of permanent teeth eruption can predispose animals to these conditions. This can lead to gingivitis or early deciduous (baby tooth) cap removal from the permanent teeth underneath before they have matured and hardened fully. This allows bacteria normally living in the mouth, to enter the surrounding area and cause an infection. The most common sign of tooth abscesses that owners notice include a firm, sometimes painful, swelling on the jaw or near the mouth. The swelling is often very hard, like bone and is not movable over the underlying bone. Drainage of pus may also be noticed originating from the suspected abscess. If the upper cheek teeth are affected, nasal discharge can also occur due to infection into the sinuses. Most animals do not tend to have issues eating or weight loss, but in some cases, the pain from the abscess will decrease feed intake, resulting in poor body condition that can confound the problem and worsen the prognosis. 31


Tooth root abscesses are not always the only cause of these swellings seen over the face. Other possible causes include salivary gland blockage or infection, cancer, abscess due to a wound or highly-pathogenic bacteria such as Corynebacterium pseudo¬tuberculosis, sebaceous cyst, enlarged or infected lymph node, hematoma, drug or environmental agent reaction, retained deciduous (baby) teeth, broken jaw, and the list goes on and on. The importance of a good physical examination is critical to determine the diagnosis and appropriate treatment. If a tooth root abscess is suspect diagnostic imaging such as radiographs of the jaw are important to confirm the diagnosis and determine future therapy. Radiographic appearances for tooth root abscess can vary greatly. Severe cases may show complete loss or lysis and infection of the affected teeth and surrounding jaw¬bone, while mild cases may show an isolated area of abnormal bony growth due to inflammation. Culture of the abscess or training tract can aid in choice of anti¬biotic for adjunctive treatment. The most commonly isolated bacteria from tooth root abscess include bacteria that live in the mouth normally, such as Trueperella pyogenes (previously Arcanobacterium pyogenes), Fusobacterium necrophorum, Actinomyces sp. and Actinobacillus sp. Other oral and environmental bacteria can also be found in the lesion such as E. coli, Prevotella/Porphyromonas sp. Psuedomonas sp., Streptococcus sp., Clostridium sp., and Corynebacterium sp. Just as each individual animal is different, so are therapeutic choices to treat these conditions. With chronic or longterm abscess existence, extensive abnormal bone growth is common. As you would expect, lancing or opening this abscess is not a simple task. Medical therapy requiring long-term (weeks to months) antibiotic use is commonly tried first with any facial abscess. It is also less invasive and less expensive than surgical treatment. Antibiotic choices vary between culture results and your veterinarian's favorite choice. Common antibiotics include penicillin, ceftiofur (Excenel, Naxcel, Excede), florfenicol (NuFlor) , and tulathromycin (Draxxin) . With medical therapy, reoccurrence or lack of response to therapy, are common. This is because the infected tooth root serves as a nidus [point of origin] for recurrence, and until the tooth is removed, the infection and problem will persist. Surgical removal and debridement of the affected teeth and bone can also be performed. For this therapy, diagnostic imaging such as radiographs are required. Surgery for this condition is easier said than done. Although the abscess may seem extensive and chronic, camelid teeth are not easily removed. Thus, surgery may not be the initial choice of therapy for every patient or tooth root abscess. After surgery, wound care requiring packing of the surgical wound with gauze and daily lavage is common. Longterm (2 to 6 weeks) antibiotic therapy is also required post-operatively. Surgical removal, debridement, and aftercare does allow for the best chance of full recovery of the abscess because it allows for removal of the infected tooth root nidus. Tooth root abscesses are frustrating for everyone involved. Animals that are systemically healthy with a good body condition have the best prognosis. All abscesses can be frustrating, but with an appropriate diagnosis, a combination of surgical and medical treatment, and some patience, these conditions can routinely be resolved!

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An abscess surgically removed en bulk, meaning that the abscess was removed without opening and draining. This is important for Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis abscesses in order to minimize contamination of the environment and transmission to other animals.

Swelling at the caudal aspect of the mandible suggestive of an abscess. This could be caused by an infected tooth root.

Open drainage of an abscess on the shoulder of an alpaca. Note from Kathy: not pretty, but very real You should see what's on the floor! 33


A bone sequestrum of the metacarpus. This is a condition where a portion of the bone is fractured away from the main bone and the fragment loses its blood supply and dies. The body then treats it as a foreign body and tries to get rid of it. These will generally result in chronic draining wounds that will not resolve until the bone fragment is surgically removed.

The top arrow (pointing to the left) is pointing to the sequestrum (fragment of dead bone that appears white) The bottom arrow (pointing to the right) is pointing to the involucrurn, which consists of necrotic bone material and pus.

Radiograph of a jaw abscess caused by an infected mandibular molar tooth root. The arrow on the left points to the lucency (blackness) surrounding the tooth root. The arrow on the right points to the lucency and proliferation of the mandible showing the draining tract and the distended soft tissue of the abscess below the jaw bone.

Reprinted from The RMLA Journal, newsletter of the Rocky Mtn. Llama and Alpaca Assoc.; Spring 2013.

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Lazy - Crazy - Days of Summer

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Houston 2013


photos, see Kristen’s blog: http://www.llamaleap. blogspot.com/ The proceeds from the race go to Red Vida de Esperanza, which provides medical, educational and church support in rural communities of Potosí.

Llama Leap 5K in Seguin

By Karen Conyngham

On March 31st, the 3rd annual Llama Leap 5K charity run took place in Seguin, TX. The event is organized by local resident Kristen Polcyn who became interested in llamas during several trips to Potosi, Bolivia over the past few years. The run is for people, but each year SCLA Region One director Susan Leslie, her husband Ray and some of their 4-H llama club kids attend the race with live llamas along to add color and “hugability”. For some nice

( Mr. Leslie and one of his well mannered llamas )

Yeah Bekah! On April 10th th San Antonio Express News carried a short article about the race with a bit of background information on llamas too. “Getting to Know the Llama” can be read at: http://tinyurl.com/dyymnf4 Many thanks to Susan, Ray and their 4-H club members for donating their time and llamas for this neat activity.

Interaction with the llamas makes this a one of a kind event! 37


Zens Market Cooked To Order Not Your Usual Carnival Food * Brisket stuffed jalapenos * Quesadillas, tacos * White queso nachos We offer catering services for private parties, community gatherings, trade days, llama shows and etc.

Bill & Kay Simpson

owners

409-625-0309 N5YA@N5YA.com 972-978-6229 (cell)

Thanks to Kay & Bill Simpson for a East Texas Cordinators of the S Owners and manager 38

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013


all they do to help the llamas. Southeast Llama Rescue. rs of Zens Market


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SCLA Library

Barbara Welch, Librarian

(830) 885-2388 • dbldare@gvtc.com

Books A Guide to Raising Llamas – Gale Birutta (10132) A Well Trained Llama – By Paul & Betty Barkman (10167) Along Came a Llama -- Welsh farmer adds a llama to her farm (10041) ALSA Llama Judging Clinic (10098) Aunt Millie’s Guide to Llama Fiber - By Mike Brown (10166) Body Scoring Llamas & Alpacas, by Bob Beede, DVM (10128) Before and After Llamas -- humor (10086) Building Small Barns, Sheds and Shelters -- Monte Burche (10116) Camel's Zoo Book 2 -- children (10023) Caring for Llamas, A Health and Management Guide (10043) Caring for Llamas and Alpacas - 2nd. ed. (10043) Evaluating a Llama Pack for Comfort and Function (10122) Fifty Things to Do With a Llama by B. James (10147) Felt making Techniques & Projects by I. Evers (10149) Handbook for Llamas -- first aid (10017) Hands On Spinning -- Lee Raven (10107) Harley – by Star Livingston Illustrated by Molly Bang (10173) Heat Stress; Prevention & Management, by Myra Freeman -- (10130) I Care About My Animals – animal rights guide (10124) If I was a Llama -- children (10112) Llamas & Alpacas as a Metaphor for Life - by Marty McGee – (10148) Llama&AlpacaNeonatalCare,byB.Smith,DVM;K.Timm,DVM;P.Long,DVM.--(10131) Llama Babies -- Up, Dry & Nursing -- Anderson (10133) Llama Driving – By Ron Shinnick (10169) Llama Nutrition Clinic Notes -- LaRue Johnson, DVM (10138) Llama Packing for Youth, by the ILA Youth Committee -- (10129) Llama Training on Your Own – Helen Bodington (10168) Living with Llamas -- Rosana Hart (10020) Llamas Can Beat the Heat -- Texas cooling techniques (10035) Llama Medicine and Surgery -- Texas A&M (10022) Llama Medicine, Veterinary Clinics of North America -- (10082) Llama Training, Who's in Charge -- (10027) Llamas: Their Personality and Expressions -- (10114) Llama Tricks -- Step by Step Method -- by Linda Hayes -- 10142 Leaders Manual for 4-H Llama Activities (10156) Love a Llama -- children (10097) Making the Most of Your Llama – By Linda Beattie (10165)

Medicine & Surgery of South American Camelids -Fowler (10135) Medicine & Surgery of South American Camelids – 2nd ed., (10153) Packing with Llamas -- (10048) Raising Llamas in Alberta, Why Are They So Popular? -- (10123) Roberts Rules of Order (10152) Ruminations from the Back Forty - by John Mallon (10178) SCLA 1992 Conference -- ring binder (10104) SCLA 1993 Conference -- ring binder (10079) SCLA 1994 Conference -- ring binder (10100) SCLA 1995 Conference – ring binder (10080) SCLA 1996 Conference – ring binder (10130) SCLA 1998 Conference – ring binder (10150) SCLA 2000 Conference – ring binder, (10163) Scraping Heaven - by Cindy Ross, donated by Teresa King (10179) Secrets of the Andes (10040) So You Share Your Life with a Llama - by Susan Peterson (10177) Speechless Brothers (10106) Spinning Llama & Alpaca -- by Chris Switzer (10134) Spinning Llama & Alpaca 2nd Edition – By Chris Switzer (10171) The Camelid Companion (Handling and Training your Alpacas and Llamas) – by Marty McGee Bennett (10172) The Field Guide ... In Search of the Ideal Llama – conformation info (10113) The TTEAM Approach -- McGee (10117) The (Mis)adventures of the Llamas at Hunter Hill – Hubbard, Ryberg (10174) Today and Tomorrow Llama Investment Analysis --1990 (10047) Turning Wool into a Cottage Industry -- (10042) The Waldo Chronicles -- a training log -- (10129) Veterinary Llama Field Manual - By Norman Evans (10145) Youth Llama Project -- 4H guidebooks (10045) 4H Instructions -- SCLA (10118) Packing with Llamas 4th edition - Stanlynn Daugherty (10161) Notes from Dr. Norman Evans' llama conference on 4/1/2000 (10164) 3rd Annual Camelid Health Program - Ohio State University (10170)

Newsletters and Magazines SCLA Humming Herald Red Hot Llamas -- Smithsonian 8/94 (10101) Newsletters from other llama associations

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Video Tapes All About Llamas I -- Llama Basics (10007) All About Llamas II, Breeding, Birthing and Newborns -- (10008) Animals on the Farm -- Video aimed at children/4-H clubs - (10134) Basic T.T. E.A.M. with Llamas - by Marty McGee (10005) Camelid Handling Secrets Volume 1 Medical Management - (10025) Click & Reward -- Training Video -- (10141) Click and Reward – Vol. II –(10159) The Competitive Edge in the Showring -- ALSA guidelines (10073) Felt Making by Hand -- Basic Process -- Vickrey (10143) Fences, Barns and Feeders (10085) Five Star Llama Packing (10001) Grooming and Basic Training -- SCLA (10063) How to Use the Kwick and Slick Grooming Tool – (10160) ILA Marketing Video (10111) In Search of the Ideal Llama -- conformation (10095) Inside 4-H Llamas – By ILA (10155) Llama Reproduction -- Part I & II (10009/10) Llama Training with Bobra Goldsmith -- (10003) Mallon Method, The - Difficult to Halter (10180) Mallon Method, The -- The First 24 Hours (10125) Mallon Method, The -- Halter Training Basics (10140) Rolfing a Llama -- (10103) SCLA 1995 Ft Worth Sale -- (10108/09) SCLA 1994 Conference Awards -- (10102) SCLA 1998 Conference Videos (two) – (10151) SCLA Seminar -- (Jensen) heat stress, nail trimming (10011) Spinning Wool, Basics and Beyond -- by P Zawistoski (10139) Step by Step Shearing -- for alpacas and llamas (10126) Texas A & M Seminar -- (Fowler) infectious disease & heat stress (10013) Teaching Your Llama to Pack – Marty McGee with Stanley Daugherty –video – TWO COPIES: --(10158) Texas Country Reporter – featuring John & Linda Keltgen (10157) Training Llamas to Drive -- (10044) Treasures of the Andes -- PBS (10090) "Treating" your Llama Kindly -- handling techniques with Dr. LaRue Johnson and Marty Mcgee (10128) TTEAM Approach to Herd Management -- McGee (10070) Vermonters Just Like to Felt Hats – video (10154) What Do You Do with a Llama? -- photography, Ley (10119) Why llamas? -- (10014) 72

Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013

Wonderful World of Llama Wool, The -- McGee (10121) Working In the Round Pen (3 tapes) John Mallon - 10124 Working with Difficult Llamas....by Ken Ploeser, (10162)

DVDs Llama Talk -- Cathy Spalding, Gentle Spirit Llama Training with Bobra Goldsmith Running of the Llamas: a documentary by Heidi Freier c. 2008 (10200) Spinning Luxury Fibers (3 DVD set) Judith MacKenzie Spinning Wool, Basics and Beyond -- by P Zawistoski Mallon Method, The -- Difficult to Halter Mallon Method, The -- The First 24 Hours Mallon Method, The -- Halter Training Basics Vermonters Just Like to Felt Hats -- The Herd of Northern Vermonters Wonderful World of Llama Wool, The -- McGee Working In the Round Pen (3 DVD set) John Mallon

Equipment Tooth-A-Matic rental $20 plus deposit SCLA members can check out items by emailing or calling Barbara Welch, Books may be kept for one month and video tapes for two weeks. Items are mailed at SCLA's expense. You pay the return postage. Please return to: Barbara Welch 12830 Rebecca Creek Rd. Spring Branch TX 78070 Email Barbara at dbldare@gvtc.com or phone: 830-885-2388. Updated June 2011


Display Advertisers State Fair Of Texas................................................ Front Cover Red River Llamas/Llama Things............... Inside Front Cove Live Oak Pet Services.......................................................... .15 Brown’s Clipper Service....................................................... 24 Zens Market.......................................................................... 38 Southeast Llama Rescue.......................................................39 Red River Llamas/Llama Things......................... Back Cover

Advertising Rates Payment will reserve your placement and will be accepted for up to four consecutive issues. Please include $7.00 for each “loose” photo accompanying your ad. Please do not submit ink jet printouts of photos as the quality is sub-standard.

Member Rates:

Front Cover...................... $125.00 Inside Covers.......................$80.00 Back Cover..........................$90.00 Full Page..............................$65.00 Half Page.............................$55.00 Quarter Page........................$45.00 Business Card......................$30.00 Insert Your Flyer.................$75.00 Classifieds.................25¢ per word ($ 3.50 minimum)

Non-Member Rates:

Front Cover...................... $175.00 Inside Covers.......................$95.00 Back Cover....................... $105.00 Full Page..............................$75.00 Half Page.............................$65.00 Quarter Page........................$55.00 Business Card......................$35.00 Insert Your Flyer.................$85.00 Classifieds.................40¢ per word ($ 5.00 minimum)

Specifications Print Ready Ads: Acceptable print ready ad formats are files at 300 dpi as a Press Quality PDF, TIF, EPS or PSD file. Please zip or stuff your file for faster email transmission. Digital Photo Submission: When taking digital photos, it is always best to set your camera to its highest settings, which will give you the least amount of pictures on your memory card. Email the photo - in its original condition - to hummingherald@figmentranch.com for review. If your photo is not of the proper resolution, you will be notified. Full Page Ad: Half Page Ad: Quarter Page Ad: Business Card Ad:

7.5” x 10” 7.5” x 4.725” 3.62” x 4.725” 3.62” x 2.25”

Humming Herald Deadlines

Spring...........................February 1 Summer............................... May 1 Fall...................................August 1 Winter........................ November 1 Mail Print-Ready Copy to: Ruby Herron 17102 Mueschke RD Cypress, TX 77433

Contact her with questions at 713-249-8523 or figranch@flash.net Additional copies of the Humming Herald are available at a cost of $5.00 each plus $2.25 per copy for shipping. Copies must be ordered by deadline date. Send check, made payable to SCLA at the address above.

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Membership Application Form

South Central Llama Association (www.scla.us) Name:____________________________________________________________________________________ Ranch Name:______________________________________________________________________________ Address:__________________________________________________________________________________ City:_________________________________________ State:____________ Zip___________________________ Phone : ( ______) _____________________ Email:_____________________________________________ _____Please DO NOT print my name in the Membership Directory (handed out to the public) Annual Membership Fee: $40.00 per household. All memberships expire January 31st of each year. $20.00 for first-time members who join after July 1. Please mail a copy of this membership form with your check (payable to SCLA) to: SCLA MEMBERSHIP P.O. Box 163654 Austin, TX 78716

Associate Youth Membership Application Form South Central Llama Association (www.scla.us)

Youth Name:_______________________________________________________________________ Ranch Name:_______________________________________________________________________ Address:___________________________________________________________________________ City:__________________________________ State:________________ Zip___________________ Phone : ( ______)_______________________

Email:_____________________________________

Date of Birth______________________________ Name & Address of Adult Sponsor: ____________________________________________________________________________________ _____Please DO NOT print my name in the Membership Directory (handed out to the public) Youth Associate Memberships are non-voting and expire December 31st of each year. Annual Membership Fee: $10.00 per youth, ages 5-19. $5.00 for first-time members who join after July 1. Please mail a copy of this membership form with your check (payable to SCLA) to: SCLA Membership P.O. Box 163654 Austin, TX 78716

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Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013

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Only if we can learn to work together will we realize our strength in numbers. Free your mind and think. Figment Ranch

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“for all your llama supplies.... call Carolyn�

806.676.6659 Lakeview, TX 79239 cmyers@lyntegar.com www.Llamathings.com

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Humming Herald Newsletter Summer 2013

Humming Herald Summer 2013  

Humming Herald Summer 2013

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