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Llama & Alpaca Show MARCH 20-23,

2014

Entry Deadline: Feb. 5 LATE Entry Deadline: Feb. 15

Questions?

Contact Show Superintendent · Danette Mars · hdmccleary@sbcglobal.net

OR livestock@rodeohouston.com · 832 . 667.1125 Entry forms will be available on the Show’s website by Nov. 1. All entries must be submitted on the paper forms.


“for all your llama supplies.... call Carolyn�

806.676.6659 Lakeview, TX 79239 cmyers@lyntegar.com www.Llamathings.com


Fall 2013 Contents General Interest A quarterly publication of the South Central Llama Association.

www.scla.us/scla.html

SCLA OFFICERS (Term 09/2011- 09/2013)

President: Sean Price • 281-830-2368 • figranch@flash.net Vice President: Christie Stewart • 972-476-1597 • christie.stewart@cmc.com Secretary: Mary Nell Doyle •940-488-3163 • mndoyle@marikollamas.com Treasurer: Bob Lyons • 210-497-3151 • boblyons1@satx.rr.com

REGIONAL DIRECTORS

Region One: (Area codes: 210-361-512-737-830-956) Susan Leslie (09/2011-09/2014) (830)401-0819 leslielanellamas@gmail.com Region Two: (Area cades: 214-405-430-469-479-501-580903-918-972) Sharon Carrier (09/2010-09/2013) (972) 348-9151 dblcranch2645805@aol.com Region Three: (Area codes:254-325-432-682-817 806-940-915-505) Deborah Ignacio (09/2012- 09/2015) 817-454-8882 deborah.ignacio@yahoo.com Region Four: (Area codes: 281-318-346-409-504-713832-936-979-985) Robert Roe (2011-9/2013) 979-378-20759 cnrllamas@hotmail.com Director-At-Large: Jim Doyle (10/09-09/11) 940-482-3192: cell 940-391-1862 JDoyle@marikollamas.com

SCLA COMMITTEES

Activities.................................................... No chair at this time Membership..............................................................Karen Conyngham Nomination . ............................Marcie Saska-Agnew-chairperson Property...............................................................Jessie Rierson Fund Raising..................................................................... Open Show............................Jim Doyle • Jessie Rierson • Bob Burton Fiber................................................................Margaret Schulze Youth................................................................ Christie Stewart Finance - Budget..............................Bob Lyons • Dan Johnson Librarian.............................................................Barbara Welch Conference................................................ No chair at this time National Lama Intervention & Rescue Coordination Council (IRC Council)...................................................Sandra Reynolds Scholarship........................................ .........Mary Nell Doyle - Chair .............................Susan Boblyanski, Adryce Mathisen, Brenda Gilmore SCLA Booth............................................... No chair at this time Web site......................................................... Sharon Bramblett By-Laws.................................Jim Doyle, Paul Walters, Bev Johnson

Wilson County 4-H Llama Club Receives Gift From SWLR...... 7 North West Camelid Foundation....................................................................... 8 Alpaca & Llama Insect Spray..............................................................................10 Local 2 Live At Figment Ranch..........................................................................12 Arthritis/Pain Relief For Camelids....................................................................15 Alternative Pain Relief For Camilids................................................................16 Antiparasitic Resistance......................................................................................17 Carroll Takes Senior Grand..................................................................................23 Veterinary Techniques For Llamas And Alpaca...........................................25 Catching And Handling Llamas And Alpacas..............................................26 . Cristina Loscuito Receives Jim Graham Scholarship.................................29 Ask The CSU Vet Team..........................................................................................31 Classic Style Working Llamas.............................................................................34 Gastric Ulcers In Camelids..................................................................................37 Care Of The Geriatric Camelid...........................................................................39

Always Inside

President’s Statement............................................................................................4 VP Views.................... .................................................................................................4 . Editor’s Note..............................................................................................................5 New Members..................................................................................................... ......5 Dates Ahead.............................................................................................................. 6 Classifieds.................................................................................................................42 SCLA Library............................................................................................................43 Display Advertisers................................................................................................45 SCLA Membership Form.....................................................................................46

The Houston Zoo welcomes Ben & Fiesta of Figment Ranch.

SHOWS - Thanks For Volunteering Your Time!

Bob Burton.....................................................State Fair of Texas-Dallas Jim Doyle............................Southwestern Livestock and Rodeo-Fort Worth Stephanie Clark.........................................West Texas Fair & Rodeo-Abilene Margaret and Kristi Schulze......................San Angelo Livestock Show- San Angelo Danette McCleary......................................Houston Livestock Show Ruby Herron and Robin Turell.........................Texas Classic- Conroe

EDITOR/DESIGN/LAYOUT

Ruby Herron 17102 Mueschke Rd., Cypress, TX 77433 713-249-8523 • HummingHerald@FigmentRanch.com

The views expressed herein are those of the authors. Before undertaking any new regime with your llamas, you should always consult with your veterinarian. Only they can tell you what is best for your situation. We invite submission for unpaid articles and photographs. Email to HummingHerald@FigmentRanch.com or mail to: Ruby Herron, c/o Humming Herald,17102 Mueschke Rd., Cypress,Tx., 77433


President’s Statement

VP Views

Christie Stewart, Vice President

Sean Price, President

Hey guys! Time for you to enjoy this awesome weather! It is time to do things with your llamas ............ hikes, shows, parades, PR stuff, and of course whatever else you can think of to do with your llamas. By the way, I am famous, have you heard? Channel 2 news did an interview with me, the llama whisperer, and the girls here at Figment Ranch. (I’m noticing an increase in interest in llamas and alpacas.) You can see this entire article by looking in this issue of the Humming Herald for the link. The 2013 Show Season has begun. There is a list of all the shows that are close to us inside this issue. I hope that many of you support our association and the llama community by attending as an exhibitor or a friend! I also would like to point out that the annual meeting of the SCLA is coming up. It will be held during the State Fair of Texas in Dallas Texas on Sunday September 29, 2013, at 9:00 am in the Pan Am Room. I hope to see you all there. And as always, please contact me with any of your questions and/or concerns. Talk to you soon. Sean 281-830-2368 or sean@figmentranch.com 4

Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013

Thanks for allowing me to be the VP of SCLA. I wish everyone well in the future and good luck in the upcoming shows. I hope you summer was enjoyable. I hope to see all of you soon. Until next time, Christie Stewart SCLA VP


Editor’s Note Hello Everyone. I hope all of you had a wonderful and uneventful summer with your llamas! I know we all love the fall weather ESPECIALLY our llamas, right? I wanted to let you all know how your Humming Herald has been doing online. The company that publishes the Humming Herald, ISSUU, has shown us that other than our membership of SCLA, there have been over 1200 impressions, (people that have clicked on this magazine to read). That is up 600 impressions from the first issue of the Humming Herald. This is showing us how remarkable and desirable the Humming Herald is and that others want to read it! Not bad, huh? This also should let you know that if you want to sell your llamas OR something else, it would be a good marketing tool for you! (And we have been looking for a marketing tool!) I have noticed another increase in interest in llamas. Inside this issue, you will see an article about our ranch, Figment Ranch. We were approached by Channel 2 News here in Houston Texas. They televised this and OH MY – the response! I was told by Channel 2 that there has been a BIG interest in llamas throughout the entire US. In fact, we were in another article that was for a NY newspaper.

New Members May 7 – August 25, 2013 Compiled by Karen Conyngham, Membership Secretary. Current member information is always available on the SCLA web site: http://www.scla.us SCLA Address: PO Box 163654, Austin, TX 78716

New Members: Jennifer Hardy, Samantha & Kathryn 7074 Fauna St. Houston, TX 77061-3918 (713) 478-4050 omnimassage@gmail.com

Member Contact Updates: New email address: Nancy & Joe Brahm shamanllamas@gmail.com Cell phone: (713) 724-9875

I’ve got your backside bro’

The llama industry may have been on a downward slope, but look around. Take you blinders off and see what is happening! I see it going up and up! Ruby

713-249-8523 5


Dates Ahead September 10, 2013

West Texas Fair & Rodeo Llama Show Taylor County Expo Center – Griffin Arena 1700 Hwy 36 Abilene, TX Entry deadline: August 15, 2013 Late entries: August 22, 2013 with added fee of $25 per head. Superintendent: Sam McClure (817) 929-7852 Judge: David Allen Arrival: Sept. 9, 2013 between 1 and 5 PM Show: Sept. 10, 2013 8 AM start. Show rules: http://www.taylorcountyexpocenter. com/documents/Gen.LivestockRulesandHealthRegs_004.pdf Online Registration: http://wtexas.fairmanager.com/ General info: http://www.taylorcountyexpocenter. com/taylorexpo_wtfr.html ------------------------------------

September 20-22, 2013

State Fair of Oklahoma Llama Show 3001 General Pershing Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73107 Show Contact: Joy Swihart –swihart@pldi.net Pat Bodkin Judge: TBA Entry Deadline: August 15, 2013 Full information: http://okstatefair.com/sites/default/files/imce/Division%201018%20Open%20Llama.pdf ------------------------------------

September 20-21, 2013

ALSA Central Regional Championship Oklahoma State Fair Park 3001 General Pershing Blvd. Oklahoma City, OK 73107 Show Contact: Penny Thomas - pooder33@att.net Judge: Bill Schultz 6

Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013

September 27-29, 2013

State Fair of Texas Llama Show Fair Park – Livestock Judging Pavilion West Dallas, TX Show Contact: Terri Bruening - bunchabruenings@ hotmail.com Karla Sikes – ksikes@bigtex.com Judge: TBA Entry Deadline: September 1, 2013 Full information: http://www.bigtex.com/sft/LiveStock/OpenLivestockShows.asp This year’s Texas State Fair Llama Show returns to opening weekend. Friday Sept. 27th – Sunday Sept.29th. Come join us to witness the expected large turnout for the return of Big Tex. Don’t forget this will be your first opportunity to qualify for 2014 ALSA Central Regionals. So please plan on coming to join us - get in that final show practice before Nationals. There will be a raffle for a hand painted Adirondack Chair with the show logo to be awarded Sun. after the SCLA business meeting. Please contact the show superintendent Terri Bruening at bunchabruenings@hotmail.com with any questions. ------------------------------------

September 29, 2013

SCLA Annual Membership Meeting 9:00 AM Pan Am Room State Fair of Texas, Dallas - in association with the llama show. ------------------------------------

October 25-26, 2013

16th Annual ALSA Grand National Show Heart of Oklahoma Exposition Center Shawnee, Oklahoma Move in: Oct. 24, 2013 Show: Oct. 25-26, 2013


Move out: Oct. 27, 2013 Show Contact: Jim Doyle – jdoyle@marikollamas.com Judges: Halter/Performance - Phil Feiner, Barb Harris, Patti Morgan Fiber - Cindy Ruckman Full information: http://www.alsashow.net/national.html ------------------------------------

November 8-10, 2013 Kid n Ewe and Lamas Too Kendall County Fairgrounds Boerne, TX http://www.kidnewe.com

Wilson County 4-H Llama Club Receives Gift from SWLR Susan Leslie, Region One director and avid youth supporter, received a wonderful gift from F.E.Baxter, treasurer for the Southwest Llama Rescue group and home provider for 12 rescues at her ranch in Mountain Home, TX. Baxter formerly lived in New Mexico with her pack llamas. Susan and her daughter Anna shear the llamas for Baxter each year. This year Baxter decided to give Susan 4 sets of no longer used pack saddles and panniers for the Wilson County 4-H llama kids. Susan is the club sponsor and the kids use many of Susan’s llamas in their projects and for showing. This most generous gift from Baxter will allow more of the kids to practice putting pack gear on their llamas and negotiating the obstacle training course without having to wait for their turn to use one set of gear. Baxter said, “I am happy if the equipment will help with the next generation of llama owners.” A huge thank you to Baxter!!

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Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013


www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWBhP0EQ1lA


Product Review:

Alpaca & Llama Insect Spray By Candace Wingo L.M.T., C.A.T. (Licensed Massage Therapist, Certified Animal Therapist, Holistic Practitioner)

• Fiber loss in large patches. • Small specs that look like sand but move when disrupted. Lice can be a problem for alpacas and especially at shearing time. Shearing day is going along good and then someone yells, "Lice on this one!" Biting lice are white or light tan and look like small specs of sand that move when disrupted. Many people use Adams Flea Mist that they spray all over the area where they've seen the lice. Don't use it! It smells terrible and is very toxic to you and the animal!

• • • • • Excerpted from Natural Remedies for Ticks, Mites, Lice & Fungus, Alpacas Afield On-Line Magazine March 2010 issue.

NOTE: Though there is much more information available for other uses, in this review we will talk about lice.

There are two kinds of lice that attack alpacas (and llamas) 1. The sucking louse which feeds entirely on blood and can cause anemia. 2. The biting louse which feast on hair and debris on the alpaca's skin surface.

Signs to look for if you think your alpaca might have lice • Rubbing or scratching the affected area. • Dandruff

What's the natural approach? The best thing I've found is the Alpaca & Llama Insect Spray

Kills the lice instantly. Safe for the animals - pregnant and cria too. Safe for you. It smells like a cedar chest and not chemicals. Spray a quick mist across the open bag of fiber to keep moths away while the fiber is airing out. • Spray across the alpaca's back after shearing to keep flies and mosquitoes off until they grow some fiber back. • Spray on yourself to repel flies, mosquitoes, chiggers, etc. If you suspect that your alpaca has lice, treat the animal with the Alpaca & Llama Insect Spray - it kills the lice immediately. Put the nozzle on spray instead of jet stream and spray the entire animal, covering the eyes when spraying the face. Be sure to spray up under the armpits, front of legs under the chest, around & under the tail, on the ears & around the base of the ears and across the back of the head. These are the areas that get lice & can also get mites too. Any rough scabby areas will need to be brushed to prep the skin so the Alpaca & Llama Insect Spray can get to the mites or lice under the scabs. We spray for two days and


wait a month to spray again. The Alpaca & Llama Insect Spray can make eggs prematurely hatch and die, but spraying a month later helps get any that have survived that first spraying. Check animals periodically and repeat the two day spraying if necessary.

Some people treat the alpacas with a topical dust or pour on medication, which can be very toxic. Ivermectin injections are used for sucking lice but are not effective for biting lice. If using Ivermectin, please get with your veterinarian for dosage info.

Lone Star ranch Exotic Imported Show Llamas, Texas Longhorns & Scottish Highland Cattle

Gorgeous Argentine

LlAmAs With rAre genetics

P.O. Box 1184,Durant , OK 74702 3477 Co. Rd. 338, Melissa, TX 75454 lonestarranchoktx@gmail.com

Ranch 580.745.9202 Ranch 469.742.0110 Fax 580.745.9292

The information in this article and any product mentioned is not intended to diagnose, treat or cure any animal and is not intended to replace the advice of your veterinarian. I have found these therapies and products work for our herd of alpacas. When I work with owners and their animals I work closely with their veterinarian as their agent. Always consult with your veterinarian when your animal is ill and consider using some natural therapies and products to compliment their care. http://www.alpacallama-insectspray.coin/

BLUEBONNET HILL LLAMAS

Reprinted from The Lama Letter, newsletter of the Pennsylvania Llama & Alpaca Association; vol. 18, #3, August 2013.

Bob & Joan Lyons San Antonio, Texas 210.497.3151 11


Figment Ranch in Cypress,Texas is home to more than 60 llamas

therapy. "I just believe that is the llamas personality, that they just can feel you, feel the person," said Turell. "They are special whether you are in a bad mood or sad. They just tend to be there for you." "They are easy keep, low maintenance and inexpensive," said Herron, while two of her llamas kept a watchful eye on her. The breeder said the llamas like to forage, and that makes up 90 percent of their diet, but she said she spoils her llamas by always having a pocketful of treats.

There is a llama with a different personality every where you look on Figment Ranch in Cypress. "They are so smart and so sensitive. They are just like potato chips, and you can't have one, you've got to have a bunch of them," said Ruby Herron, owner of the 20-acre ranch. Herron and Robin Turell started out with just one

llama named Domino, who started a domino effect, because they now have 60-70. Herron and Turell bought their first llama at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo because they needed a tax write off for their land, but the animals quickly became their passion. "What llamas can do is help make people happy," said Turell, who also owns the ranch and was a former special education teacher. The pair helps others by using their animals for 12

Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013

"We have some that will give kisses and we have some that will stand off like a cat and say 'you want what? nah,'" said Herron, trying to get one of the llamas to give Local 2's Owen Conflenti a kiss. The International Llama Registry statistics account for more than 11,000 llamas in Texas. More than 162,000 llamas are used as show animals, to guard property and, more recently, as pets.


"We can take them into the house and they love to watch TV, " said Herron, as they took one of the llamas inside and turned on Local 2. Herron said the llamas really run the Ranch and the rest of us are allowed to live here with them. Sixteen of the llamas on Figment Ranch are babies, aged three to five months old. Two, currently on the ranch, are headed to the Houston Zoo when they get big enough, and then they will be PR Llamas. Sean Price is one of the llama's handler. He is also known as the llama whisperer. "They are so smart. You can get them to do anything," said Price.

"You know spit happens, and if you get in the line of fire every once in a while, it just happens, but they normally don't just come up and spit at you," said Herron as our Local 2 crew took a step back. One llama, B’mer, will be defending his title at the Alpaca Llama Show Association this fall in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Until then, he will be enjoying the good life as a pet on Figment Ranch

To view the live interview click on link below

He showed us how the llamas go through an obstacle course at competitions, and then he let Owen Conflenti try the course with one of the llamas. They made it through with only knocking one pole down and no llama spit.

http://www.click2houston.com/news/figment-ranch-in-cypress-home-to-more-than-60-llamas/-/1735978/21173330/-/ntu8x1z/-/index.html

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" Hello to all of our llama friends from Henry Hills....hope to see you down the road!"

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Henry Hills Llamas Margaret & Jay Henry 1874 FM 1510 Brookston, Texas 75421-9719 903-784-8257 WWW.HenryHillsLlamas.com henryhillsllamas@gmail.com

Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013

FFF Lula and her daughter Chabella


NSAIDS Arthritis/Pain Relief For Camelids

By Charlene Arendas, DVM

The following medications are all considered NSAIDS, or Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs. Think of them as being in the same class of drugs as Advil, Aleve, and Aspirin for us. They can be very effective for controlling the pain and inflammation of arthritis, but as with any drug there can be side effects, especially with long-term use. FLUNIXIN MEGLUMINE (Banamine) - Veterinary Only RX - 1cc per 100# body weight SQ every 12-24 hours. Good for shortterm use for 3-5 days. Can be useful for colic, post-op/castration, limping, and fever. At a lower dose has some"anti-endotoxin" effects which could help an animal with diarrhea or sepsis (overwhelming infection). Long-term use or consistently high doses could increase the risk of ulcers. MELOXICAM (Mobic, Metacam) - Human & Veterinary RX - one 15mg tablet per 30# body weight orally every 72 hours. Very inexpensive if purchasing the generic human tablet (at our local Giant Eagle it is 90 tabs for $10). Thus far appears to be very safe for use in camelids, and is convenient that only needs to be dosed every 3 days. Could be useful for long-term arthritis pain relief. ETODOLAC (Etogesic) - Human & Veterinary RX - tablet or capsule - dosed at 450mg per 100# orally once a day for up to 7 days, then every other day for up to 2 weeks. Good for short term orthopedic pain, post-op after orthopedic surgery. PHENYLBUTALONE ("Bute") - Veterinary RX - tablet, paste, powder, injectable - studies show it is likely ineffective in camelids because it varies greatly how much is absorbed, and if therapeutic blood levels are reached, they are effective for only about an hour. I do NOT recommend using bute for pain control in camelids. KETOPROFEN (Ketofen) - Veterinary RX - injectable - an older class of anti-inflammatory than flunixin. There is much more data on the effectiveness of flunixin in camelids. I do not recommend using. **PLEASE NOTE, DUE TO THE VERY NATURE OF NSAIDS (NON-STEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS), ALL CAN POTENTIALLY INCREASE THE RISK OF GASTROINTESTINAL ULCERATION OR BLEEDING, AND ALSO CAN POTENTIALLY AFFECT THE LIVER AND KIDNEY FUNCTION OF ANY ANIMAL OR HUMAN**

Reprinted from The Lama Letter, newsletter of the the Pennsylvania Llama & Alpaca Association; vol. 18, #3, August 2013 15


Alternative Pain Relief For Camelids

By Charlene Arendas, DVM

GABAPENTIN (Neurotin, generics) - Human RX - comes in a capsule or tablet in many different mg sizes - In humans

is used for seizures and "neuropathic" pain (pain arising from nerve damage). Could be useful in animals with nerve/spinal cord damage (such as those with lasting meningeal worm symptoms). Dosed at 100-200mg per 50# body weight, orally, once a day. Can be used in conjunction with any of the NSAIDS or other joint supplements. At higher doses may cause "ataxia" (wobbly walking, tiredness). Human generics are pretty inexpensive.

PSGAG's aka Polysulfated Glycosaminoglycans - (Adequan, generics) - Veterinary RX - injectable. Dosed at 0.5cc per 100#

body weight IM once a week for 4 doses. Adequan comes in an equine and canine variety. It is the same product but I recommend the canine variety because it comes in a smaller vial. PSGAG's are shown to increase production of components of healthy joint fluid and cartilage (collagen, hyaluronic acid). Can be fairly expensive.

HYALURONIC ACID (Legend, generics) - Veterinary RX - injectable by IV route ONLY. Dosed at 1-2cc IV weekly for 3 weeks.

Hyaluronic Acid is a com¬ponent of cartilage and joint fluid and after injection can increase the lubrication inside joint spaces and inhibit inflammation. Can be fairly expensive, and since is given IV, needs to be administered by a veterinarian.

PENTOSAN -Veterinary RX - Injectable (IM) - Licensed product currently not available in the United States. Very similar to PSGAG. Shown in other species to decrease cartilage damage, but dosage, usage, and safety is camelids is currently unknown. Can be compounded in the United States by Wedgewood Pet RX pharmacy. DR. POLLARD'S HERBS - Oral herbal product that can be sprinkled onto feed daily. Smells good and usually no trouble get-

ting them to eat it. No RX necessary, can order and view dosage/ingredients at www.LlamaDocHerbs.com. Two formulas available: Arthritis Blend, and Tendon Repair (for animals "down in the pasterns"). Dr. Rob Pollard is a veterinarian in California who actually owns camelids.

ARNICA MONTANA (Leopard's Bane, Mountain Tobacco, etc.) - herbal product for humans. Can help with pain &

inflammation. Very WIDE dosing range! Concentra¬tions of the tablets or liquid is listed as a number of X's on the bottle or 5C, 10C, 20C, 30C, etc. For a camelid, I would try 4-5 tablets of the 30C concentration up to 3 times a day, as needed. Could be useful for short term pain (i.e. dystocia), but it would be difficult to dose 3x daily for any length of time due to the work involved with this. Can pur¬chase at any health food store. **NOTE - try to avoid skin contact with the tablets, as the oil on your skin can decrease its effectiveness.

OTHER JOINT SUPPLEMENTS - Many joint supplements are available for horses, but there are none specifically labeled for

camelids. In general, most of these supplements contain glucosamine, MSM, and sometimes chondroitin. Some may contain other ingredients like Hyaluronic Acid, Vitamin C, Avocado, Essential Fatty Acids (Omega-3 and -6 Fatty Acids), Manganese, etc). I've had no safety problems with any of the variety of equine products I've tried on camelids, and usually these products are very palatable. Fortunately, they come in all sorts of varieties to get even the pickiest camelid to eat it! Powders, treats, pellets, liquids, etc. Some brands I've tried include Glyco-Flex, Cosequin, Pala-Tech Soft Chews, 4CYTE, and also even over the counter human joint supplements (Osteo Bi-Flex, glucosamine/msm generics, Cosamin, etc). In general, I dose camelids with about 1/3-1/2 of the horse dose listed on the container, depending on their body weight. If using a glucosamine/msm product only, alpacas should receive about 1500-2000mg of each ingredient daily; llamas about 2000-2500mg of each daily. These products are all very safe, and the only side effects I've seen are diarrhea, decreased appetite, and mild colicky signs with overdosage.

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Reprinted from The Lama Letter, newsletter of the the Pennsylvania Llama & Alpaca Association; vol. 18, #3, August 2013.

Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013


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Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013


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Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013


Clipper sales repair serviCe - parts Blade sharpening Most Brands

and

Models

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217-414-8126

Jay C. Brown 1119 South 4th Street Springfield, il 62703

Figment Ranch Llamas

Since 1988 Specializing in performance animals. We breed pets, show, guard and just-for-fun llamas. Members of SCLA-ALSA-ILR

17102 Mueschke Rd Cypress, Tx 77433 281-351-1820 Home

www.FigmentRanch.com figranch@flash.net Ruby Herron Robin Turell Sean Price

713-249-8523 713-249-3893 281-830-2368

Diamond D Llamas Rick & Darlene Matthiesen 259 PR 3512 Hondo, TX 78861 Home: 830.741.7023 email: diamonddllamas@gmail.com www.diamonddllamas.com

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Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013


took grand champion that year. “At competition in Fort Worth and Houston, I got reserve right under Cody who gets grand,” Loscuito said. “I call us the Navarro County Expo team, because we kind of take the awards everywhere we go.” Junior Grand Champion was awarded to Payton Carroll of Collins Catholic School 4-H with his animal Ruff, and junior reserve champion was Katie York of Corsicana 4-H, in her first year to show with Troubador. Bryar Steele of Dawson FFA and Cole Anderson of Kerens FFA both showed llamas in a special needs division, where they tied for first place. Judge Bill Feick of Geronimo returned as llama judge at the NCYE.

Carroll Takes Senior Grand In Llama Show Corsicana — When it comes to llama competition, the top two winners kept their placings intact as Cody Carroll of Blooming Grove FFA took senior grand champion with his llama Babycakes, and Cristina Loscuito of Kerens FFA took reserve honors with Candy Man. Carroll is a veteran llama exhibitor, showing llamas since the Navarro County Youth Expo first added the competition. Loscuito showed llamas for the first time last year, and

Junior competitors are judged on showmanship, obstacle course and public relations (PR). Senior competitors have the same categories with a quiz and verbal essay included.


“They are judged by how well they handle the llama, not the llama itself,” said Kristen Rierson, llama chairman. “They walk the animal around slowly, showing it to the best of their ability, but not blocking the judge’s view of the animal.” Obstacle courses with hurdles, streamers, ramps, and even an egg carried in a spoon and cracked into a bucket test the youngster’s ability to handle the llama while performing other tasks. In addition to an acrylic award, banner, and belt buckle, Cody Carroll also won a $500 scholarship sponsored by Pat and Eddie Blank and Jean Sanders. Also competing in the llama competition were Gracie Ayers of Mildred 4-H with Venus; Elana Chu of Mildred 4-H with Pizzaz; & Jamie Williams of Rice 4-H with Raggedy Andy.

Deanna Kirk is a Daily Sun staff writer and editor of Explore. She may be reached via e-mail at dkirk@corsicanadailysun.com. Source: http://corsicanadailysun.com/news/ x620880380/Carroll-takes-senior-grand-inLlama-show This article has been reprinted with permission from the Corsicana Daily Sun and Ms. Deanna Kirk. Further reprint is not allowed without written permission from the author and the Corsicana Daily Sun. 24

Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013

Lone Star ranch Exotic Imported Show Llamas, Texas Longhorns & Scottish Highland Cattle

Gorgeous Argentine

P.O. Box 1184,Durant , OK 74702 3477 Co. Rd. 338, Melissa, TX 75454 lonestarranchoktx@gmail.com

LlAmAs With rAre genetics

Ranch 580.745.9202 Ranch 469.742.0110 Fax 580.745.9292

RANCHES Texas & Colorado

Suri, Silky, & Argentine Llamas 512-751-5363 www.sapavecoranch.com

3966 Estate Drive Vacaville, CA 95688 707-447-5046 707-471-4020 f llamainfo@gmail.com www.llamainfo.org


New Llama/Alpaca Veterinary Procedures Book Available

Veterinary TechniquesDavidforE. Anderson, Llamas and Alpacas Meredyth L. Jones, Matt D. Miesner

ISBN: 978-0-8138-1987-7 Paperback 360 pages May 2013, Wiley-Blackwell US $79.99 from Wiley or Quality Llama Products (http://www.llamaproducts.com)

Veterinary Techniques for Llamas and Alpacas provides a step-by-step guide to performing procedures in llamas and alpacas. Organized by body system, the book presents concise, visually oriented information to enable clinicians to treat these animals with confidence. With coverage ranging from basic maintenance such as restraint and catheterization to more complex procedures such as minimally invasive surgery, Veterinary Techniques for Llamas and Alpacas describes the full range of techniques required for the medical management of these species. Each procedure is described in detail, with a consistent format for ease of use and accompanying photographs to illustrate the concepts described. A companion website offers videos of many of the procedures discussed in the book. Veterinary Techniques for Llamas and Alpacas is an essential resource for any veterinarian or technical staff member treating South American camelid patients. Hallmark Features •Presents a complete, well-illustrated patient-side manual for veterinary techniques in llamas and alpacas •Offers authoritative guidance on how to perform varying procedures, based on the authors’ wide range of experience •Covers techniques ranging from basic to advanced •Provides color photographs throughout to depict specific steps •Aids veterinarians and technicians in confidently performing veterinary techniques in these species •Includes a companion website offering videos of many of the procedures described at http://www.wiley.com/go/andersonveterinary For Table of Contents and additional information, see: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0813819873,descCd-description.html 25


Catching and Handling Llamas and Alpacas prepared by the National Lama Intervention & Rescue Coordination Council (IRC Council)

Animal control and animal welfare authorities are sometimes called upon to remove llamas and alpacas from situations where their welfare is compromised or to capture loose animals when their presence is a hazard to traffic safety. Learning a bit about camelid behavior will help make catching and handling them easier and less traumatic for all concerned.*

Local Help Many llama and alpaca owners are willing to help catch, halter and transport llamas and alpacas in need of rescue, re-homing or capture. They are used to the behaviors and motivations of such animals, which differ from other livestock in a number of ways, and can be of great help to animal control and welfare authorities. Most states have one or more llama and alpaca organizations that maintain a membership list with contact information. Ideally, local animal control authorities should have one or two names from their area llama and alpaca community they could contact to request help or advice for specific situations involving camelids. It would be good to have this information ahead of time and establish a working relationship before help is actually needed.

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If you do not have contact information for local camelid owners, you can contact one of the regional coordinators for the National Lama Intervention & Rescue Coordination Council (IRC Council) who will be able to provide advice, camelid contacts and even halters and leads if needed. They include: Northwest, Charlene Schmidt (509-722-5466, charlene@prosperitypal.com); West, Jan Sherrill (805-238-2628, pacamom@lightspeed.net); Rocky Mountain Area, Olin Allen (970-493-2886, olinallen@earthlink.net); Midwest, Sheila Fugina (715-246-5837, bsfugina@frontier.com); Southeast, Susan Ravan (sdravan@gmail. com); South Central, Sandra Reynolds (580-745-9202, lonestarranchoktx@gmail.com); and Northeast, Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013


Marc Page (978-724-3273, home; 508-246-0424, weekdays 8 to 4; sputtermill@hughes.net). Catching Though they are among the earliest domesticated animals and generally very comfortable around humans, llamas and alpacas are very intelligent and intuitive; if they feel threatened or afraid, their first response is flight. Avoid pushing or panicking them into the flight mode. Slow, calm, confident movements are key to keeping them interested and engaged rather than suspicious and wary. Many of the llamas and alpacas involved in rescue situations may not be used to being handled or haltered, but there are ways to move them, contain them and transport them without always needing to halter each one. Above all, remain calm and be flexible.

Make the site work for you. Preview the site ahead of time if possible to determine your catching and loading options. If you are not able to assess the site before you need to move the animals, do so as soon as you arrive. Determine where and how secure the boundaries are (fences, buildings, etc.) and where you want the animals to end up for loading. See if there are materials on site that may be used to help contain animals—cattle panels, portable panels or gates—items that you can move where you need them. If you’ve had a chance to see the site ahead of time, you have the opportunity to bring needed materials and equipment.

Funnel the animals. Even llamas and alpacas in a large open field can be moved in the direction you need them to go by funneling them into increasingly smaller areas. You can use a variety of visual barriers to help you herd the animals—a human chain (slow and calm), lightweight poles extended horizontally, a rope held between two people. Camelids don’t like being separated from their herdmates so it is important to keep them together. They also cue off one another so be alert to potential jumping or breaking away. This behavior can also work in your favor if the lead animal or two are headed where you want the group to go. If you are dealing with a single animal in a large space, another llama or two can be used as “bait”. This is when it’s especially helpful to know a local llama or alpaca owner. Do not use the following strategies. Do not use dogs to herd llamas and alpacas. Camelids usually view a strange dog as a predator and will flee rather than be herded. Do not try to herd llamas and alpacas on horseback. They often feel like they are being chased and will be pushed into the flight mode and become almost impossible to catch. Do not try to rope or lasso a llama or alpaca. You may cause serious injury or snap a neck. Do not chase llamas and alpacas or get so close they feel forced to flee or jump rather than be herded. Contain the animals. By herding the llamas or alpacas into increasingly smaller spaces, you can contain them in a safe space either for haltering or for herding into a trailer without haltering them. There may already be corrals or catch pens at the site into which you can herd the animals. If not, you can create temporary catch pens with portable panels and the sides of buildings or trailers. When you are catching camelids in

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a smaller space, one person needs to be in charge and directing the others where to go and what to do so you are not at cross purposes. Encircle the animals in a non-threatening manner as you continue to make the circle smaller until the animals are able to be caught. Watch for aggressive behavior. Some llamas and alpacas have not learned to respect a human’s space. Though not common, if you come upon a llama that rushes the fence toward people, screams or has a history of biting or jumping on people, contact one of the regional IRC Council coordinators for help. It is usually intact males who have been over handled when young that exhibit this abnormal behavior, and they require special handling by a knowledgeable camelid person. Handling Load the animals. If the animals are used to being haltered, or knowledgeable camelid owner help is available, you may be able to halter the llamas and alpacas and then load them into a trailer. If they are not used to being haltered, or no halters are available, you can use the same funneling technique already mentioned to direct them into a trailer. An open trailer can be used as the fourth side of a catch pen. By shifting panels and making the catch pen smaller, the animals can be moved closer and closer to the open trailer and will often jump in on their own. If they don’t jump in, alpacas and small llamas can be physically lifted and put into the trailer. With larger llamas, if their front legs are lifted into the trailer, they often will jump in the rest of the way, especially if you keep a panel directly behind them and don’t give them room to back up. Llamas sometimes lock their legs and lean back, sliding their front feet under the trailer, so use care not to injure their front legs. Llamas and alpacas often can be transported in vans (even mini vans), especially if you are dealing with only a few animals. Remove the back seats of the van and cover any holes or metal hardware on the floor with old carpet. Transport the animals safely. Never tie llamas or alpacas when transporting them. Camelids usually lie down when being transported, and they can suffer severe injury or death if tied. Properly fitted halters should fit snugly behind the head, and the noseband should ride high on the nose just under the eyes. If the noseband slides down onto the soft cartilage of the nose it can cut off breathing. The noseband fit should also allow for chewing. Do not leave halters on llamas and alpacas when they are released to their living environment. Get as much information as possible. If the llamas or alpacas are being moved and re-homed, try to get health records and any registration information or papers. These records will be very helpful in dealing with the animals’ future needs and placement. *Definition The word “lama” is used when referring to the South American “camelid” family that includes both “llamas” and “alpacas” (as well as the wild guanacos and vicunas). “Llama” is used when referring to the specific species, the llama. When we use the word “lama” in the U.S., we are usually referring to the two domesticated species, the llama and the alpaca. We also often use the word “camelid” to refer to llamas and alpacas together. .

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Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013


Cristina Loscuito Receives the 2013 Jim Graham Scholarship

The Jim Graham Youth Scholarship Committee is pleased to announce that Cristina Loscuito of Powell, Texas has been awarded the 2013 scholarship. Cristina is a youth member of SCLA with Jessie and Kristen Rierson as her adult member sponsors, and is also an active ALSA youth. The committee received 3 glowing references from people who know her well. Cristina graduated second in her class at Kerens High School where she also held the position of class vice president. She was president of both Kerens FFA and Kerens 4-H and is an active member of many more organizations. She is very busy with her llamas Candy Man and Andy, sharing them with her community, participating in many ALSA shows and the yearly Navarro County Youth Expo. Cristina exemplifies the qualities that the committee looks for in scholarship candidates. Please watch for Cristina and her llamas at the fall shows and give her your congratulations! “The first time I saw llamas shown I begged my parents for one and the answer was ‘no’. Several years passed ‘till I finally persuaded them on how great these animals are and to let me show a llama. The summer before my junior year I visited a llama breeder. The breeder had me look at and walk several older llamas thinking they might be easier to train with as I had no experience with llamas, but I just did not click with any of them. I asked about a young 6 month old llama I spotted in the herd and was told he was not for sale nor halter broken. After convincing the breeder to give me a chance, he caught and haltered the llama. The first time on a lead we clicked, and I fell in love with one young llama named Candy Man. I worked that summer with the breeder learning to train and show my llama. I also learned about llama nutrition, health and grooming needs. Our first show did not go well in the ring but the other llama showers where so friendly and supportive I knew I wanted to continue. Returning home, I built obstacles and we trained hard for the next shows. Candy Man and I became good friends and partners. We entered obstacles, PR, pack, and showmanship. We also made a splash with our Dalmatian and fire hydrant costume. We improved with every show we entered, achieving two Reserves and ending with three Senior Championships, Houston, our county show where I received my first buckle and scholarship, and Conroe where I earned another scholarship. We had the most fun at the Conroe show where I brought a friend and introduced her to showing llamas. The next season we continued to excel and earned Senior Grand Champion at the Texas State Fair. One of the most exciting recognitions was that Candy Man and I made the 2012 ALSA Top 10 High Point Llama Senior Performance list. At our county show we have a special needs division where Candy Man and I have worked with a young man the past two years. As a result, this youth is now involved in 4-H showing animals. Candy Man has also been a hit each summer at educational programs for elementary students. I enjoyed showing Candy Man so much that I purchased another llama named Andy my senior year. In my second year of showing, I showed Andy in novice classes and Candy Man in the youth. In the two short years I have been showing llamas, I have had more fun and met the nicest and friendliest people at llama shows. It is truly a Llama Family. I have been accepted to Tarleton State University where I will earn a Bachelor’s degree in Animal Science with a minor Agricultural Business. Then I plan to complete a Masters in genetics and possibly a Doctorate at Texas A&M. I plan to teach and work for a University or research laboratory devoted to animal genetics. I also want to raise registered Angus show cattle for future FFA and 4-H’ers. I wish to return to my community and volunteer as a 4-H leader and help youth with their cattle and llamas, where I will continue to promote, train and show my llamas.” Cristina Loscuito 29


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Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013


Ask the CSU Vet Team

By Kathy Stanko & The Colorado State University Camelid Vets & Interns

We are delighted to have Tim Holt, DVM join us in this issue to tell us how Laser therapy can be used as an alternative therapy for pain control and healing in camelids. Dr. Holt, please take the stage! Laser therapy in the Alpaca or Llama is a new method of therapy now being implemented with traditional therapies and also al¬ternative therapies to help control acute and chronic pain as well as speed and improve healing of tissue injuries. There is still lacking evidence of the complete understanding of the effectiveness of the Laser in the camelid but evidence pulled from human research as well as other veterinary patients is encouraging. At this time Laser therapy should always be considered as an alternative therapy complementing traditional medical diagno¬sis and treatments of conditions seen in the camelid. At this stage of treating options, Laser therapy has been used with suc¬cess in the camelid for a number of issues including, pain con¬trol, healing superficial and deep muscle and skin trauma, repro¬duction failure especially when associated with pain, nerve pa¬ralysis, and postsurgical pain and incisional healing. The word Laser is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimu¬lated Emission of Radiation, and there are many different kinds of Lasers utilized for Laser therapy. There is low-level Laser therapy (LLLT), low-intensity Laser therapy (LILT), and low¬energy Laser therapy (LELT). Lasers are classified as Class I, II, Illa, Illb, and IV. They are classified in this fashion to describe the potential damage they can cause to the human retina if used incorrectly. Class I and II are very low powered with little tissue penetration and can be used safely with good direction and care. Class III and IV are powerful Lasers and can cause sig¬nificant tissue injury as well and retinal damage and blindness if used without proper care and protective glasses. In brief Laser therapy reduces pain, inflammation and acceler¬ates healing. Laser through its effect on the nerve cell and pain receptors can reduce and control pain by increasing the pain threshold and reduce the neural impulses as well as increase the release of tissue endorphins and hormonal chemical sub¬stances that helps block the perception of pain. At the same time Laser can reduce inflammation by reducing and decreasing the release of prostaglandins and inflammatory mediators. Prostaglandins are a known inflammatory molecule and cause vessels to dilate thus increasing blood flow. They are often altered to regulate pain in individuals suffering from joint or muscular pain. Laser therapy can decrease healing time by reducing swelling and edema following tissue trauma and injury. Healing is accelerated by increasing blood flow to the treated region and by increasing the release of the fibroblasts and colla¬gen producing cells to decrease the time of healing. 31


The effectiveness of the Laser is not magic and the thought of light therapy is not new. When a Laser is applied to tissue it penetrates deeply into the tissue depending on the class of the Laser. The light photon then stimulates the physiological pro¬cess at the cellular level; this is termed photobiostimulation. This photo stimulation increases the health and energy of the cell. The photons are absorbed by only the unhealthy cell. Once the photon is absorbed by the injured or abnormal cell the photon is absorbed into the energy portion of the cell, the mito¬chondria. This absorption into the mitochondria results in an increase in production of ATP (the cell’s energy source) which leads to normalization of cell function thus pain relief and heal¬ing. This is a very brief and simplified version of a very complex cellular action. But in summary the abnormal often painful or slow healing cell is stimulated by the Laser photons to regain normality and normal function thus reducing pain associated with healing and decrease the amount of time needed for com¬plete healing. Although Laser therapies can be used to replace acupuncture therapy, they are often less effective in treatment of pain (especially pain that is not caused by a superficial injury), and reproductive issues. This is because the light has often already scattered before reaching a deeper acupuncture point or point of injury or pain. Although Laser is less effective in managing specific types of pain, it can be used to modulate pain in the absence of other therapies including medication and other al¬ternative therapies such as acupuncture and manual therapy. Laser can also work to modulate inflammation, and therefore pain, in many other parts of the body, including back pain and osteoarthritis that causes joint pain in the camelid. Laser is especially indicated in treatment of musculoskeletal conditions such as strain or sprains, chronic arthritis, tissue injury from trauma, and wound healing. One of the largest areas of Laser therapy in humans and now in other veterinary species is its affect and benefit on wounds and ulcers. Because the photons from the Laser can activate macrophages (a cell that specifically helps clean up wounds) and increase the production of ATP (the cell’s energy source), it is very effective in increasing healing activities in a superficial wound or ulcer. In recent human and veterinary clinical studies, Lasers decrease edema after trauma and increases lymphatic flow to and from the affected tissue. Because Laser therapy is one of the more recent components of complementary and alternative medicine practices, it is often one of the least researched and used therapies on the market today. Laser has already showed its merits as an effective pain modulator and wound healer. Soon camelid veterinarians will find this tool as useful as small animal veterinarians have. Laser therapy at this time lacks much of the research necessary to gain the acceptance of veterinarians and human medical profession¬als alike, but is a promising new therapy that can help with many problems commonly seen in veterinary medicine specifically the area of camelid medicine. Understanding these basic concepts we can now see how Laser therapy may be use in the Camelid species: 1. Anti-inflammatory: Helps control and reduce swelling and inflamma¬tion by increasing venous and lymphatic drainage and controlling the release of prostaglandins. 32

Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013


2. Pain Control: Laser therapy can block and reduce pain transmission to the nerve conduction sys¬tem as well as centrally (brain) by increas¬ing the release of endorphins and enkeph¬ alons, the bodies naturally occurring pain control mediators. 3. Improve Healing: Laser therapy can penetrate the repairing cells and accelerate cellular reproduction and growth. This can be beneficial in tis¬sue trauma, surgery and injury both in muscle injury as well as ligament and ten¬don. 4. Trigger Point therapy: (painful muscles) Laser therapy can be used for sore muscles for any reason, over work, conformation, and trauma. Often Laser therapy can be used in the camelid in situations where acupuncture may not be used such as low¬er limb injuries or pain. At this time Laser therapy is best utilized in the camelid in conjunction with other therapies including, anti-inflammatory medication, physical therapy, acu¬puncture, manual therapy, massage and routine TLC. Reprinted from The Journal, newsletter of the Rocky Mtn. Llama & Alpaca Assoc.; Summer 2013.

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Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013


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Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013

Reprinted From American Livestock Magazine


CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital to Study Gastric Ulcers inByCamelids Stacey Byers, DVM, MS, DACVIM The veterinarians at the CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital are studying methods to diagnose and treat C3 gastric ulcers in camelids. Currently, there are no reliable methods to accurately diagnose gastric ulcers in live llamas and alpacas. So, veterinarians rely on animal behavior, clinical signs, and gut instinct (sorry for the pun) to make a presumptive diagnosis. Further, because we cannot accurately diagnose gastric ulcers in camelids, we do not know if our preventatives and treatments are successful. There hasn’t been any published research identifying the rate of occurrence of gastric ulcers; however they are commonly found on postmortem examinations in camelids that died or were euthanized for unrelated causes as well as in animals where they were suspected. Our planned research has several phases: • Phase 1: Investigate several products that can be administered orally and have different absorption between normal camelids and camelids with gastric ulcers. Then a simple blood test can be performed after administration to detect ulcers. • Phase 2: Develop a model to induce and visually evaluate gastric ulcers through a surgically placed gastric cannula. This will allow us to visually monitor ulcer development and the response to various treatments, and compare our visual findings to the results from the blood test. • Phase 3: Evaluate the ulcer test and ulcer treatment methods in camelid patients with suspected naturally occurring gastric ulcers. We received a generous donation several years ago from a client that lost an alpaca due to a perforated ulcer and peritonitis. Only recently have new methods and resources become available to actually move forward with this research. This original donation will support Phase 1 research to identify a potential diagnostic test for ulcers. However, these funds are not sufficient to cover all of the research costs for Phases 2 and 3 to investigate the efficacy of different treatments and to show the value of the test in every day patients. Currently we are only using 4 animals to reduce costs during Phase 1 of the research. This is expected to take at least 6 months. Additional research animals and resources will be required as we progress into Phase 2 and 3. We expect additional costs to complete this research to approach $7000-10,000. This is higher than originally mentioned in an email sent to RMLA members due to additional charges that we discovered we will need to cover. The funds will be used to help pay for the following: • Animal care and housing costs • Laboratory supplies, medications for ulcer treatment and prevention • Laboratory sample testing • Student salaries to assist in animal care 37


• Laptop computer for data collection and analysis, and preparation of manuscripts for publication of results We expect to complete the first 2 phases in less than 2 years. As discussed above, phase 3 will be a clinical study, and we will be enrolling client-owned animals to verify our diagnostic and treatment protocols. This phase will take an additional 1-2 years depending on the time needed to recruit sufficient animals into the study. As this project continues, we will keep RMLA members informed on our findings through articles in the Journal. If you are interested in assisting with the funding for this research by providing a tax deductible donation, please visit the CSU VTH website (http://csu-cvmbs. colostate.edu/vth) and follow the Make a Gift link. From there, you can select the “Camelid Research and Education” fund from the Information drop down menu (about 2/3rds the way down the list). Once making your donation, if you write ‘ulcer research’ in the comment box, it will get to the correct fund. Thank you everyone. It is exciting to finally be pursuing this research in memory of the many llamas and alpacas that have suffered or even died from complications associated with gastric ulcers. We are grateful to Dr. Stacey Byers for contacting the Stankos regarding this important camelid research project. Look for project updates in future issues of the RMLA Journal. In the interim, please direct questions or comments about this project to Glenn & Kathy Stanko at turkeytrots2@ gmail.com. These will be forward to the appropriate person at CSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital.

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Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013


Care of the Geriatric Camelid

From a Presentation given to the PLAA (Pennsylvania Llama & Alpaca Association) on March 16, 2013 By Charlene Arendas, DVM

**Disclaimer: The information contained in this article and drug recommendations/dosages do not constitute a veterinary recommendation for your particular animal. Make sure you discuss your individual situation with your local veterinarian who is familiar with your herd before asking for any RX product or beginning any treatment regimen** As our camelids age, there are many things to take into consideration. A few initial observations of the older camelid bring attention to the following: • Slower to move due to weakness, arthritis, injury, stiffness, pain • Slower to heal from wounds • Thinner due to weight loss or muscle wasting • Vision impaired due to age, cataracts • Hearing impaired due to age • Slower to re-grow fiber, thinning fiber • Higher at risk for cancer • Decreased immune system function & higher risk of disease • Slower to equilibrate their temperature (heat stress, hypothermia) • Decreased absorption of nutrients from feed, pasture - increased risk of deficiencies • Changes in social dynamics of the herd creates new bullies & challenges for feed, barn space ARTHRITIS: Arthritis simply means inflammation of a joint space. It occurs for several reasons: chronic inflammation, conformation of the animal, tendon laxity

("down in the pasterns", obesity, and even just normal wear and tear on the joints. The joint normally is filled with a thick fluid called synovial fluid and lined with tough slippery tissue called cartilage. These help cushion the bones and create a nice smooth slippery surface for movement. As inflammation and other causes force the joint to function abnormally, cartilage can be lost and rubbed thin, joint fluid can be lost, and bone on bone will start to cause pain and begin to remodel the joint. How to help arthritis pain: 1. Appropriate body condition score/keep them lean!!! Fat animals have undue stress on their joints! 2. Soft bedding/footing 3. Control pain & inflammation (NSAID'S) 4. PSGAG's (Polysulfonamated Glycosaminoglycans) 5. HA (Hyaluronic Acid) 6. Nutraceuticals (supplements) The great thing about nutraceuticals (over the counter products like glucosamine, herbal products) is that you kind find them every¬where, there are tons of options, they generally have little or no side effects, and you don't need an RX to get them. The bad thing is that because they are not considered "drugs", they 39


are very loosely regulated, if at all. So, many products may label that they contain 500mg of this or that, and unless they have very strict guidelines and product testing, that may not be accurate. A particular ingredient from one brand may be made from the flower of the plant, another from the leaves, and that may also change its effectiveness. So, while these supplements can be a great addition to pain relief, keep in mind that whether you or your herd is taking them, the label may not be 100% accurate! TEETH: Oral health of our older camelids is very important! Teeth that are excessively overgrown or that have sharp or uneven surfaces can not only cause oral pain, but our animals canÂŹnot grind hay and grass properly so that they can absorb the nutrients as well. Long incisors can make it difficult for some animals to even graze and pluck grass. Plant matter can also lodge between teeth, and exposed teeth are more prone to injury. Watch for quidding (dropping cud), cheek pouches consistently holding cud, and ulcers inside the mouth. Frequently, back teeth (molars) can be filed if needed. Front teeth (incisors) can also be dremmeled if they are too long. If animals have worn their teeth down, if could become necessary to feed them chopped hay or grass. Some supplements can aid general digestion if teeth problems do occur: Probiotics (the "good" bacteria in the gut), Fiberevive by Oxbow, Nutrena Empower Boost, The Missing Link (equine powder), Succeed (equine paste). There are many brands of Probiotics out there, and some of the better ones I've used include ProBios, Lira Gold, Master Blaster, and Turval 5. ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS: 40

Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013

Older camelids may have less stable footing, so make sure that ditches, ruts, and holes are filled in. Also, areas that become excessively muddy or icy can prove to be very dangerous. Also, make sure that entrances to barns/ sheds are well-lit. Older camelids can develop clouding in their eyes called cataracts, which makes vision very difficult in dim lighting. You also may notice changes in the herd dynamics as some camelids age. There may be new bullies and old bullies may be kept out of shelter and away from food. Always take the time to observe how behaviors change within the herd, and adjust your herd groups accordingly. Remember an older camelid is not only slower, but if they get injured it's a much longer road to recovery! In the summer, older camelids may be slower to move indoors to shade or fans, so heat stress can occur quicker. Make sure these animals are shorn appropriately, but keep in mind how much fiber regrowth will occur before winter. Fiber regrows slower in the older camelid, so remember to shear, but not too early or too late! A full-body shear might not be a good idea for a thin older camelid. As camelids age, they tend to lose some muscle mass and become thinner. This also makes them more prone to hypothermia. Watch for shivering, and when in doubt, monitor their rectal temperatures. I get concerned when a rectal temp falls below 98, but keep in mind that "beans in the way" can falsely lower it! Blanket older camelids if you think necessary in the winter, and make sure they have access to thick, warm bedding. Concrete floors may be great to keep nails worn down and be easy to clean, but think of how those arthritic animals feel laying on it all day. I would consider at least bedding a portion of the barn with straw so the older animals have the option to lie there.


SKINNY ANIMALS We mentioned that older camelids tend to be thinner and lose muscle mass. How can we try to bulk them up before the cold winter? Beet Pulp can help add calories and carbohydrates, but some animals simply won't eat it. It comes as shreds or pellets, but the thing to remember is to SOAK IT IN WATER before you feed it! It is very dry and expands quite a bit once exposed to moisture. Think of stuffing 5 saltine crackers in your mouth without a cup of water! And, because it expands, a "piggy" or fast eater could easily choke on beet pulp as it starts expanding in their esophagus. Another good supplement is Rice Bran - it is basically a high-fat by grain product. They generally like the taste of it, but because it is so

high-fat it can become rancid or spoil very easily. I recommend buying a rice bran product that is "stabilized" or "fortified" - this will help keep the vitamin levels and increase the shelf life. Finally, a product I LOVE is an equine weight gain supplement made by Nutrena called Empower Boost. It is basically a high-fat rice bran product that also has added vitamin E, selenium, prebiotics/ probiotics, and other trace minerals. Our llamas love it, but remember it is not to be used in place of their regular feed. Alpacas could receive 1/4

-1/2 pound a day, llamas 1/2-1 pound a day. Start with a small amount and gradually increase it, because the high fat content could potentially cause diarrhea! PREVENTATIVE HEALTHCARE: These are some good reminders for any of the camelids in your herd, but remember pay special and more frequent attention to your older animals. Keep up on CD&T vaccinations annually, and Rabies vaccines if a problem in your area. Remember to shear enough or not too much depending on the camelid, your weather, and the fiber type. Check the teeth for overgrowth or sharp points, and look inside the mouth for ulcers or bleeding. Feel the skin for lumps, bumps, or abscesses. Check males' testicles for uneven size, swelling, or injuries. Anytime you catch a camelid you should check its body condition score over the spine, ribcage, between the thighs, and the sternal fat pad between the front legs. Give meningeal worm preventatives as recommended by your local vet if deer are present in your area. Keep toenails trimmed to improve footing. Check the rectal temperature on an animal that is "off" (normal ranges from 99-102). Watch for changes in behavior, appearance, fiber, gait, and personality. Pull down the lower eyelid to check the tissue color (should be a nice pink - evaluate according to the FAMACHA scoring system). Check a fecal sample on any thin or anemic (pale) animal. If animals present with abnormalities, call your local vet for a physical exam and bloodwork or biopsies if appropriate. Reprinted from The Lama Letter, newsletter of the Pennsylvania Llama & Alpaca Association; vol. 18, #3, August 2013.

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Ashford Drum Carder with awl for $300.00. Used less than 1 hr.

cnrllamas@hotmail.com 979-378-2075 or 979-966-9006 ___________________________________________ Eagle Llama Cart & Harness Marcie Saska Agnew Bob Burton 817-999-1875 P.O. Box 211 Sunset, Texas 76270 5415 CO Rd 59 Florissant, Colorado 80816

Triple V Ranch Rick & Sharon VanHooser 600 Red Top Road Poolville, Texas 76487

817-596-9644

E-mail: Sharonav@peoplepc.com t Quarter Horses t Llamas t Miniature Donkeys t t Miniature Horses t Dwarf/Pigmy Goats

Chuk & Vicki Guzman Southern G Llamas 740 Bear Creek Rd LaGrange, Texas 78945

979.242.3858 42

Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013

$800.00 plus shipping. Will bring to Grand Nationals

figranch@flash.net 713-249-8523 or 713-249-3893 ___________________________________________ Antique Cradle Picker -

$500.00 plus shipping. Will bring to Grand Nationals

figranch@flash.net 713-249-8523 or 713-249-3893 ___________________________________________


SCLA Library

Barbara Welch, Librarian

(830) 885-2388 • dbldare@gvtc.com

Books A Guide to Raising Llamas – Gale Birutta (10132) A Well Trained Llama – By Paul & Betty Barkman (10167) Along Came a Llama -- Welsh farmer adds a llama to her farm (10041) ALSA Llama Judging Clinic (10098) Aunt Millie’s Guide to Llama Fiber - By Mike Brown (10166) Body Scoring Llamas & Alpacas, by Bob Beede, DVM (10128) Before and After Llamas -- humor (10086) Building Small Barns, Sheds and Shelters -- Monte Burche (10116) Camel's Zoo Book 2 -- children (10023) Caring for Llamas, A Health and Management Guide (10043) Caring for Llamas and Alpacas - 2nd. ed. (10043) Evaluating a Llama Pack for Comfort and Function (10122) Fifty Things to Do With a Llama by B. James (10147) Felt making Techniques & Projects by I. Evers (10149) Handbook for Llamas -- first aid (10017) Hands On Spinning -- Lee Raven (10107) Harley – by Star Livingston Illustrated by Molly Bang (10173) Heat Stress; Prevention & Management, by Myra Freeman -- (10130) I Care About My Animals – animal rights guide (10124) If I was a Llama -- children (10112) Llamas & Alpacas as a Metaphor for Life - by Marty McGee – (10148) Llama&AlpacaNeonatalCare,byB.Smith,DVM;K.Timm,DVM;P.Long,DVM.--(10131) Llama Babies -- Up, Dry & Nursing -- Anderson (10133) Llama Driving – By Ron Shinnick (10169) Llama Nutrition Clinic Notes -- LaRue Johnson, DVM (10138) Llama Packing for Youth, by the ILA Youth Committee -- (10129) Llama Training on Your Own – Helen Bodington (10168) Living with Llamas -- Rosana Hart (10020) Llamas Can Beat the Heat -- Texas cooling techniques (10035) Llama Medicine and Surgery -- Texas A&M (10022) Llama Medicine, Veterinary Clinics of North America -- (10082) Llama Training, Who's in Charge -- (10027) Llamas: Their Personality and Expressions -- (10114) Llama Tricks -- Step by Step Method -- by Linda Hayes -- 10142 Leaders Manual for 4-H Llama Activities (10156) Love a Llama -- children (10097) Making the Most of Your Llama – By Linda Beattie (10165)

Medicine & Surgery of South American Camelids -Fowler (10135) Medicine & Surgery of South American Camelids – 2nd ed., (10153) Packing with Llamas -- (10048) Raising Llamas in Alberta, Why Are They So Popular? -- (10123) Roberts Rules of Order (10152) Ruminations from the Back Forty - by John Mallon (10178) SCLA 1992 Conference -- ring binder (10104) SCLA 1993 Conference -- ring binder (10079) SCLA 1994 Conference -- ring binder (10100) SCLA 1995 Conference – ring binder (10080) SCLA 1996 Conference – ring binder (10130) SCLA 1998 Conference – ring binder (10150) SCLA 2000 Conference – ring binder, (10163) Scraping Heaven - by Cindy Ross, donated by Teresa King (10179) Secrets of the Andes (10040) So You Share Your Life with a Llama - by Susan Peterson (10177) Speechless Brothers (10106) Spinning Llama & Alpaca -- by Chris Switzer (10134) Spinning Llama & Alpaca 2nd Edition – By Chris Switzer (10171) The Camelid Companion (Handling and Training your Alpacas and Llamas) – by Marty McGee Bennett (10172) The Field Guide ... In Search of the Ideal Llama – conformation info (10113) The TTEAM Approach -- McGee (10117) The (Mis)adventures of the Llamas at Hunter Hill – Hubbard, Ryberg (10174) Today and Tomorrow Llama Investment Analysis --1990 (10047) Turning Wool into a Cottage Industry -- (10042) The Waldo Chronicles -- a training log -- (10129) Veterinary Llama Field Manual - By Norman Evans (10145) Youth Llama Project -- 4H guidebooks (10045) 4H Instructions -- SCLA (10118) Packing with Llamas 4th edition - Stanlynn Daugherty (10161) Notes from Dr. Norman Evans' llama conference on 4/1/2000 (10164) 3rd Annual Camelid Health Program - Ohio State University (10170)

Newsletters and Magazines SCLA Humming Herald Red Hot Llamas -- Smithsonian 8/94 (10101) Newsletters from other llama associations

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Video Tapes All About Llamas I -- Llama Basics (10007) All About Llamas II, Breeding, Birthing and Newborns -- (10008) Animals on the Farm -- Video aimed at children/4-H clubs - (10134) Basic T.T. E.A.M. with Llamas - by Marty McGee (10005) Camelid Handling Secrets Volume 1 Medical Management - (10025) Click & Reward -- Training Video -- (10141) Click and Reward – Vol. II –(10159) The Competitive Edge in the Showring -- ALSA guidelines (10073) Felt Making by Hand -- Basic Process -- Vickrey (10143) Fences, Barns and Feeders (10085) Five Star Llama Packing (10001) Grooming and Basic Training -- SCLA (10063) How to Use the Kwick and Slick Grooming Tool – (10160) ILA Marketing Video (10111) In Search of the Ideal Llama -- conformation (10095) Inside 4-H Llamas – By ILA (10155) Llama Reproduction -- Part I & II (10009/10) Llama Training with Bobra Goldsmith -- (10003) Mallon Method, The - Difficult to Halter (10180) Mallon Method, The -- The First 24 Hours (10125) Mallon Method, The -- Halter Training Basics (10140) Rolfing a Llama -- (10103) SCLA 1995 Ft Worth Sale -- (10108/09) SCLA 1994 Conference Awards -- (10102) SCLA 1998 Conference Videos (two) – (10151) SCLA Seminar -- (Jensen) heat stress, nail trimming (10011) Spinning Wool, Basics and Beyond -- by P Zawistoski (10139) Step by Step Shearing -- for alpacas and llamas (10126) Texas A & M Seminar -- (Fowler) infectious disease & heat stress (10013) Teaching Your Llama to Pack – Marty McGee with Stanley Daugherty –video – TWO COPIES: --(10158) Texas Country Reporter – featuring John & Linda Keltgen (10157) Training Llamas to Drive -- (10044) Treasures of the Andes -- PBS (10090) "Treating" your Llama Kindly -- handling techniques with Dr. LaRue Johnson and Marty Mcgee (10128) TTEAM Approach to Herd Management -- McGee (10070) Vermonters Just Like to Felt Hats – video (10154) What Do You Do with a Llama? -- photography, Ley (10119) Why llamas? -- (10014) 44

Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013

Wonderful World of Llama Wool, The -- McGee (10121) Working In the Round Pen (3 tapes) John Mallon - 10124 Working with Difficult Llamas....by Ken Ploeser, (10162)

DVDs Llama Talk -- Cathy Spalding, Gentle Spirit Llama Training with Bobra Goldsmith Running of the Llamas: a documentary by Heidi Freier c. 2008 (10200) Spinning Luxury Fibers (3 DVD set) Judith MacKenzie Spinning Wool, Basics and Beyond -- by P Zawistoski Mallon Method, The -- Difficult to Halter Mallon Method, The -- The First 24 Hours Mallon Method, The -- Halter Training Basics Vermonters Just Like to Felt Hats -- The Herd of Northern Vermonters Wonderful World of Llama Wool, The -- McGee Working In the Round Pen (3 DVD set) John Mallon

Equipment Tooth-A-Matic rental $20 plus deposit SCLA members can check out items by emailing or calling Barbara Welch, Books may be kept for one month and video tapes for two weeks. Items are mailed at SCLA's expense. You pay the return postage. Please return to: Barbara Welch 12830 Rebecca Creek Rd. Spring Branch TX 78070 Email Barbara at dbldare@gvtc.com or phone: 830-885-2388. Updated June 2011


Display Advertisers Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo..................... Front Cover Red River Llamas/Llama Things............... Inside Front Cove Henry Hills Llamas............................................................... 14 Live Oak Pet Services.......................................................... .33 Brown’s Clipper Service....................................................... 22 Henry Hills Llamas............................................................... 14 Red River Llamas/Llama Things......................... Back Cover

Advertising Rates Payment will reserve your placement and will be accepted for up to four consecutive issues. Please include $7.00 for each “loose” photo accompanying your ad. Please do not submit ink jet printouts of photos as the quality is sub-standard.

Member Rates:

Front Cover...................... $125.00 Inside Covers.......................$80.00 Back Cover..........................$90.00 Full Page..............................$65.00 Half Page.............................$55.00 Quarter Page........................$45.00 Business Card......................$30.00 Insert Your Flyer.................$75.00 Classifieds.................25¢ per word ($ 3.50 minimum)

Non-Member Rates:

Photo By Corky Dubois

Front Cover...................... $175.00 Inside Covers.......................$95.00 Back Cover....................... $105.00 Full Page..............................$75.00 Half Page.............................$65.00 Quarter Page........................$55.00 Business Card......................$35.00 Insert Your Flyer.................$85.00 Classifieds.................40¢ per word ($ 5.00 minimum)

Humming Herald Deadlines

Specifications Print Ready Ads: Acceptable print ready ad formats are files at 300 dpi as a Press Quality PDF, TIF, EPS or PSD file. Please zip or stuff your file for faster email transmission. Digital Photo Submission: When taking digital photos, it is always best to set your camera to its highest settings, which will give you the least amount of pictures on your memory card. Email the photo - in its original condition - to hummingherald@figmentranch.com for review. If your photo is not of the proper resolution, you will be notified. Full Page Ad: Half Page Ad: Quarter Page Ad: Business Card Ad:

7.5” x 10” 7.5” x 4.725” 3.62” x 4.725” 3.62” x 2.25”

Spring...........................February 1 Summer............................... May 1 Fall...................................August 1 Winter........................ November 1 Mail Print-Ready Copy to: Ruby Herron 17102 Mueschke RD Cypress, TX 77433

Contact her with questions at 713-249-8523 or figranch@flash.net Additional copies of the Humming Herald are available at a cost of $5.00 each plus $2.25 per copy for shipping. Copies must be ordered by deadline date. Send check, made payable to SCLA at the address above.

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Membership Application Form

South Central Llama Association (www.scla.us) Name:____________________________________________________________________________________ Ranch Name:______________________________________________________________________________ Address:__________________________________________________________________________________ City:_________________________________________ State:____________ Zip___________________________ Phone : ( ______) _____________________ Email:_____________________________________________ _____Please DO NOT print my name in the Membership Directory (handed out to the public) Annual Membership Fee: $40.00 per household. All memberships expire January 31st of each year. $20.00 for first-time members who join after July 1. Please mail a copy of this membership form with your check (payable to SCLA) to: SCLA MEMBERSHIP P.O. Box 163654 Austin, TX 78716

Associate Youth Membership Application Form South Central Llama Association (www.scla.us)

Youth Name:_______________________________________________________________________ Ranch Name:_______________________________________________________________________ Address:___________________________________________________________________________ City:__________________________________ State:________________ Zip___________________ Phone : ( ______)_______________________

Email:_____________________________________

Date of Birth______________________________ Name & Address of Adult Sponsor: ____________________________________________________________________________________ _____Please DO NOT print my name in the Membership Directory (handed out to the public) Youth Associate Memberships are non-voting and expire December 31st of each year. Annual Membership Fee: $10.00 per youth, ages 5-19. $5.00 for first-time members who join after July 1. Please mail a copy of this membership form with your check (payable to SCLA) to: SCLA Membership P.O. Box 163654 Austin, TX 78716

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Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013

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Only if we can learn to work together will we realize our strength in numbers. Free your mind and think. Figment Ranch

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“for all your llama supplies.... call Carolyn�

806.676.6659 Lakeview, TX 79239 cmyers@lyntegar.com www.Llamathings.com

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Humming Herald Newsletter Fall 2013

Humming Herald Fall 2013  

Humming Herald Fall 2013

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