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QPR

The Facts: t t t t

Ask a Question, Save a Life

Talking about suicide does not cause someone to become suicidal Suicide is the most preventable kind of death, and almost any positive action may save a life. Most suicidal people communicate their intent during the week preceding their attempt. Asking someone directly about suicidal intent lowers anxiety, opens up communication, and lowers the risk of an impulsive act.

The Problem:

Many suicides are preventable. Most suicidal people desperately want to live; they are just unable to see alternatives to their problems. Most suicidal people give definite warning signals of their suicidal intentions, but those in close contact are often unaware of the significance of these warnings or unsure what to do about them. The risk of suicide can be decreased if those closest to the individual in crisis recognize the warning signs and know how to help. That is why everyone - friends, family members, coworkers, teachers, everyone -needs to know suicide warning signs and basic intervention steps. In as little as one hour, QPR Gatekeeper training can teach anyone the steps to help save life from suicide. This Gatekeeper Instructor program makes basic suicide prevention skills easy to learn and easy to teach.

The Training:

QPR is an emergency mental health gatekeeper training intervention that teaches lay and professional gatekeepers to recognize and respond positively to someone exhibiting suicide warning signs and behaviors. Like CPR, QPR uses a “chain of survival� approach in which the gatekeeper learns to recognize early suicide warning signs, Question their meaning to determine suicide intent or desire, Persuade the person to accept or seek help, and Refer the person to appropriate resources. The training is delivered in a standardized 1-2 hour multimedia format by certified QPR gatekeeper instructors. QPR gatekeepers receive a QPR booklet and wallet card as a review and resource tool that includes local referral resources.

Traning Objectives:

After training, QPR participants should be able to: t Recognize someone at risk for suicide t Intervene with those at risk t Refer them to an appropriate resource The Mental Health Association in Tulsa has certified QPR Instructors. We can offer this free training at any time to your school, organization, work, church, family, or even just one on one. If you are interested in this training please contact Becca Cowles by e-mail at bcowles@mhat.org or by phone at (918) 382.2405.


Columbia TeenScreen The Facts: t t t t

Ninety percent (90%) of people who die by suicide are clinically depressed Suicide is the second leading cause of death of 10 to 24 year olds in Oklahoma, but third nationwide. Among teen and young adult suicide, 81% of deaths were among males and 19% were female Firearms are used in 50% of youth suicide

The Program:

Developed at Columbia University as a health assessment for students, Tulsa was the 2nd location outside of New York to offer the program to area high school students. The Columbia TeenScreen program is a free and voluntary adolescent screening tool that assesses physical and emotional well- being. It is a reaction to growing concerns over high incidence of depression, violence, alienation, substance abuse, intolerance and daily stress in our schools today. The screening, conducted by a licensed mental health professional with the student’s parental consent, detects emotional problems experienced by teens while the issues are still in their early stages. Columbia TeenScreen is a proactive step designed to ensure our students’ safety and get them help when needed. After a brief presentation to students in area schools, students are handed a consent form that their parents must sign in order for the student to be screened. Students who bring back consent forms with the parents’ signature saying their student can participate, will be pulled from class for the screening which is taken on a computer. If the student is screened positive for any mental or physical health issues, the student’s parents are contacted and are then connected to services in the area.

How It Works:

The TeenScreen program works by creating partnerships with communities across the nation to implement local screening programs for youth. Because schools are in a unique position to offer the venue necessary to ensure appropriate and confidential screening and to openly communicate concerns with parents, the majority of local TeenScreen programs are located in middle and high schools. Other communities have chosen to implement the program in doctor’s offices, clinics and juvenile justice facilities– in short anywhere teens gather. Mental Health Association in Tulsa operates primarily in high schools. Screening must take place in a private space where things can be kept confidential. The Mental Health Association in Tulsa has a licenced Mental Health Professional that does the screening. This service is free and voluntary to those it is offered to. We can offer this screen at any time to your school or organization. If you are interested in this program please contact Becca Cowles by e-mail at bcowles@mhat.org or by phone at (918) 382.2405.


SafeTeam The Truth:

Suicide and violence-related deaths are the second and third leading causes of death among youth in America. Nearly one of every five American high school students thinks about killing themselves. Ninety percent of young people who commit suicide had been suffering from depression or another diagnosable mental or substance abuse disorder. It is often feelings of hopelessness or loneliness that result in these deaths. Teenagers sometimes feel like it is them against the world; and the world is winning. But what if those same young people have been able to talk to someone? What if there had been a support group they could have relied upon? What if their depression had been diagnosed and treated earlier? SafeTeam was created in response to area suicides, and is one of the programs recommended from the work of the Suicide and Violence Prevention Committee in Oklahoma. The project was first implemented in two Tulsa area high schools and has since expanded to include other high schools as well as an elementary school.

The Program:

SafeTeam uses the eyes and the ears of the students within a school to essentially look out for each other. SafeTeam students are trained on issues affecting their peers, and are given tips on how to handle such situations. They also have activities (fundraisers, awareness weeks, speakers, etc.) throughout the school year. The SafeTeam Coordinator is a non-disciplinary adult who oversees the student group and who is there for the student population in general, as needed. Without needing parental permission, the student group refers students they are concerned about to the SafeTeam Coordinator (typically a counselor, DHS school based service worker, nurse, or social worker), and the SafeTeam Coordinator acts as a triage to determine if the students needs additional services or if things can be talked out in a non-clinical setting at the school. The last component is the staff SafeTeam. This is comprised of a group of staff (be it teachers, janitors, cafeteria workers, secretaries, etc.) who genuinely care for their students’ safety and a representation of adults in their school whom the students trust. There are currently 16 schools in the Tulsa area that have active SafeTeam programs.

The Activities:

Some of SafeTeam’s activities have included holding functions within the school community and inviting a guest speaker to present on a specific topic, providing mentoring programs within the schools, peer mediation, fundraisers, providing education for other schools, regular faculty meetings, regular student meetings. Educational forums, awareness campaignes, life skill trainings, among other items. The Mental Health Association in Tulsa offers SafeTeam as a free service. We can offer this training at any time to your school, organization, work, church, family, or even just one on one. If you are interested in this training please contact Becca Cowles by e-mail at bcowles@mhat.org or by phone at (918) 382.2405.


The Facts: t t t t t t t

EmPower Urself People who are bullied have a greater chance of harming themselves or others around them harassment and bullying has been linked to 75% of school shooting incidents, including Columbine kids who are bullied are five times more likely to be depressed bullied boys are four times more likely to become suicidal, bullied girls are eight times more likely to become suicidal suicide is the second leading cause of death among Oklahoma’s youth between the ages of 10-19 young people who are bullied and at risk of attempting suicide are LGBTQ or those perceived to be Gay, lesbian and bisexual youth are two to three times more likely to attempt suicide than their heterosexual counterparts

The Problem: “While trying to deal with all the challenges of being a teenager, gay / lesbian / bisexual and transgendered teens additionally have to deal with harassment on a daily basis. They hear anti-gay slurs such as “homo”, “faggot” and “sissy” about 26 times a day or once every 14 minutes” (Counseling Today, September 1998). One school study in 2002 reported that students who have been harassed or attacked at a school because someone perceived them to be gay or lesbian are more than six times as likely as their peers to report having carried a gun to school in the past month (Public Health – Seattle & King County). The reality is that there is a significant need to provide anti-bullying training to students and school faculty emphasizing the prevalence of bullying toward LGBTQ youth and its ramifications on this vulnerable population. The mental health and education, not to mention physical well-being, of LGBTQ youth are at risk and something must be done about it. The Program: Bullying creates an atmosphere of tension and intolerance for all students and would like school staff, administrators and teachers to consider a group of students who are frequently left out of anti-bullying policies: gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (GLBTQ) youth or those that are perceived to be. These students face issues at schools that are a threat to their mental health; furthermore it is our belief that this is one factor in Oklahoma’s high adolescent suicide rate. For young people struggling to come to grips with a sexual orientation other than heterosexual, Oklahoma is a rugged environment in which to “come out”. While the number of suicides among GLBTQ youth is difficult to measure accurately, some researchers contend that as many as 1 in 3 suicides may be attributed to the fear and self-hatred that often accompanies coming to understand one’s self as gay in a hostile, anti-gay environment. EmPower Urself is a program designed to increase awareness of and sensitivity to GLBTQ youth bullying and create an atmosphere at school that is intolerant of this behavior by any student, staff, teacher or administrative official. This program is geared to equip school officials with the resources to identify bullying when it occurs, intervene appropriately, and facilitate an equal opportunity for GLBTQ youth, or those perceived to be GLBTQ, to thrive in the classroom. How it Works: A Group of students who are identified as (GLBTQ) as well as other students whom want to participate will begin EmPower Urself by conducting a survey and discussions as to what kind of bullying they see specifically in their school. They will spend a semester putting together a presentation, where at the end of the school year the students will present this information to faculty and staff at their own school to give their teachers and principals an idea of what really goes on in the halls in attempts to raise awareness of what actually is happening.


The Facts: t t t t

ReDefine

Intimate partner violence among adolescents is associated with increased risk of substance use, unhealthy weight control behaviors, sexual risk behaviors, pregnancy, and suicide. Half of the reported date rapes occur among teenagers. Approximately 1 in 5 female high school students report being physically and/or sexually abused by a dating partner. Teen dating violence runs across race, gender, and socioeconomic lines. Both males and females are victims, but boys and girls are abusive in different ways

The Program:

Redefine is an awareness and education program that educates high school students about healthy dating relationships and dating abuse. Students and educators have identified dating abuse as a growing problem among teenagers that requires better intervention. By providing students with a framework to define a healthy relationship and to recognize the signs of dating abuse, Redefine hopes to decrease the number of teenagers who experience dating violence and provide resources to assist those who find themselves in an abusive situation. Redefine is a student-led program started by the Youth Philanthropy Initiative (ypitulsa.org). The Association’s goal is to educate teens about healthy relationships, and the causes of abusive ones, giving teenagers the resources they need to make healthy decisions in their relationships.

How it Works:

The 4-session curriculum will cover the following topics: 1. Personl Goals and Dating Partner Choices 2. Friendship and Dating Partner Choices 3. Stages of Dating Relationships 4. Abusive Relationship Formal research is a part of the Redefine program to scienfitically assess whether students are in fact learning from the program and changing their attitudes about dating relationships. The research conducted with this program consists of a brief anonymous pre- and post- test, administered to each participating student to assess their knowledgy of the curriculum. No personal identifying information will be collected from your child. There are no foreseeable risks, beyond those present in routine daily life, anticipated in this study. The Mental Health Association in Tulsa offers ReDefine as a free service. We can offer this training at any time to your school or organization. If you are interested in this training please contact Becca Cowles by e-mail at bcowles@mhat.org or by phone at (918) 382.2405.


Our Events Listen Up, Tulsa!

Every other year, Youth Outreach Services hosts Listen Up Tusla!, an event where students present their views, opinions and solutions on issues they face within their schools, communities, and everyday life in front of a panel of community leaders and professionals, as well as their peers. The catch? Members of the adult panel are allowed to respond, but online the form of a question. The event encourages teens to think they can make a difference; it gives them hope that the issues that matter to them will be solved throughout time. It gives students an opportunity for their voice to be heard and empowers their peers are trying to make a difference, so they can join in too. At this event, held every other year, students have the opportunity to speak of an issue they are concerned about to a panel of adult members. The students present in groups of 2-3 on issues such as underage drinking, teen pregnancy, depression, drugs, bullying, getting involved in community activities, etc. and come up with a solution to the problem. The adults, however, are only allowed to speak to the student in the form of a question. This prevents the adults from telling the students what to do, or demanding them to do something. The audience of about 600 students is made up of peers from local schools. Last year, we had approximately 20 presentations on different topics. After the presentations end, lunch is served and the students and panel members are given the opportunity to discuss the issue in further detail and develop a plan to put the issue of concern into play.

Youth Speaker Series

Mental Health Association in Tulsa partnered with a local venue in order to offer a once an annual forum or presentation by a youth, or someone who has worked with youth. In the past, we had featured guests such as, Erin Gruwell, co-author of the Freedom Writers Diary and inspiration for the movie Freedom Writers, as well as Coach Carter. Not only do educators attend the event, there are several students who attend as well. The Association is dedicated to finding speaker’s who can connect with a diverse group of youth in a fun, interactive way, while also teaching an important message that centers around the struggles in life that everyone in one fashion or another encounter.

For information on these events please contact Becca Cowles by e-mail at bcowles@mhat. org or by phone at (918) 382.2405.


SAFETEAM Creating A Culture of Safety

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a voice for youth

The Staticts tell the Story Suicide and violence-related deaths are the second and third leading causes of death among youth in America. Nearly one of every five American high school students thinks about killing themselves. Ninety percent of young people who commit suicide had been suffering from depression or another diagnosable mental or substance abuse disorder.

What If...

those same young people had been able to talk to someone?

What If...

those same young people had friends who could help and support them?

What If...

there was a program to help students through situations like these

What If...

we could tell a different story? 1870 South Boulder Avenue | 918.585.1213 www.mhat.org | www.safeteam.org

SafeTeam is a program desinged to offer teenag­ !"#$%!&'$()*$%+'!$(#$,%!-$)(./0(,!$,%!$*/1234&,$ '!"/+*$+1$(*+&!#!)3!5

Students tell their PEERS First SafeTeam uses the eyes and the ears of the students within a school to essentially look out for each other. SafeTeam students are trained on issues affecting their peers, and are given tips on how to handle such situations. They also have activities such as fundraisers, awareness weeks, speakers, etc. throughout the school year.

“We act as advocates for one another, by helping one another” SafeTeam is comprised of students, parents, teachers, friends, administrators, counselors, security staff, and community members working together to foster trust, communications, and safety.

It is an excellent tool for safeguarding our schools and our children SafeTeam is adaptable to the unique needs of any school. For more information on this program contact the Mental Health Association in Tulsa.

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