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Different Types of Pharmacist Jobs – Responsibilities and Roles


Introduction Contrary to popular belief, the profession of pharmacist can take many a different path and be as varied as that of say a surgeon (who can be an orthopedist, a cardiologist, a pediatrician, and so on.) If you are curious about that line of work or strongly consider joining the ranks, follow us through this presentation as we discuss the many facets of the pharmacy world, the diverse environments you could be evolving in and the particularities of each specialization.


Dispensary Pharmacist When talking about pharmacists, the first image to pop in people’s mind is often that of the professional in a white coat, standing behind his counter and providing his expert advice on the best drugs to take to treat the most common ailments or giving you the required medicine according to your doctor’s prescription. A dispensary pharmacist should, before anything else, be a people person and should enjoy interacting with others as the social aspect is very important in this profession.


Hospital Pharmacist Contrary to pros working in a retail pharmacy, hospital pharmacists are almost never in contact with patients. The bulk of their work consists in reviewing and preparing the treatment devised by the doctor in charge. As experts in medications, they can detect when one compound found in a drug might negatively interact with another. So, their job is to inform the doctor if that is the case and propose safer alternatives.

With access to a large panel of chemicals, hospital pharmacists benefit from a more varied job than their dispensary colleagues as the affliction to treat can range from simple appendicitis to cancer and rare diseases.


Industrial Pharmacist For the ones who want to make a difference in this world and leave their mark, industrial pharmacy could very well be the road to take. This is where you will be creating new medications that could save a lot of lives or at least ease the pain and suffering of people affected by harsh conditions. As part of his duties, the industrial pharmacist can also be asked to conduct the trials that will determine whether the drug is safe to use and ready to be launched on the market.


Pharmacist-Biologist If laboratories is where you feel comfortable and fulfilled, you might want to look into becoming a pharmacist-biologist. In that role, you will be responsible for the analysis of blood, urine and other such samples, and the interpretation of the readings following the testing.

As an assistant to doctors, you will play a big part in helping to diagnose the patients. You are an expert in haematology, bacteriology‌ and, as such, you decide what tests to run or exclude. On the other hand, given that an error in that context could have devastating repercussions, it is crucial to be meticulous and always ensure that all results be validated.


Academic Pharmacist Last but not least, there is the professional who spends half his time in Universities, passing on the knowledge to would-be pharmacists (the remainder of his schedule being filled with researching new compounds and publishing his findings in academic papers or working in the private or public sector.) An academic pharmacist must be passionate about teaching and sharing his experience with others. He should also have a strong sense of responsibility as he will set the example and act as a model for the next generation.


Conclusion We hope that this presentation will have opened your eyes to the exciting world of pharmacy and the numerous opportunities that await you in this industry. Whatever your character and ambitions in life, whether you love to interact with people or prefer working on your own and exercising your analytical mind, you will find a path for you in pharmacy.


To learn more about pharmacy staffing and any open position in the field, visit: http://www.rphonthego.com/ RPH on the Go 8001 N. Lincoln Avenue, Suite 800 Skokie, IL 60077 1-800-553-7359


Different Types of Pharmacist Jobs – Responsibilities and Roles