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Interna'onal  College  Hong  Kong

INTERNATIONAL  COLLEGE   HONG  KONG Curriculum  Brochure Years  7  to  9 2013  -­‐  2014


2010-2012

Year  7  to  9  Curriculum

Dear  Parents  and  Students, A  school’s  curriculum  includes  all  those  student  ac6vi6es  —  academic  and  non-­‐ academic  —  for  which  the  school  takes  responsibility,  as  they  all  have  a  significant   impact  on  student  learning.   The  purpose  of  this  brochure  is  to  ensure  that  parents  and  students  have  an   understanding  of  the  aims  of  the  various  components  of  our  curriculum,  and  of  the   methods  we  use  to  report  on  student  achievement.   It  also  provides  details  of  our  ac6vi6es  programme,  our  off-­‐site  CAS  Week  and  our   pastoral  support  structures,  each  of  which  plays  an  important  part  in  the  holis6c   development  of  our  students. Please  take  the  6me  to  look  through  this  Curriculum  Brochure  and  feel  free  to  contact   us,  or  the  appropriate  teacher,  with  any  addi6onal  ques6ons  you  may  have. Yours  faithfully, Toby  Newton Deputy  Principal  (Head  of  Lower  School) Email:  tnewton@ichk.edu.hk


Contents

ICHK  Mission  &  Vision

5

Profile  of  an  ICHK  Student

6

The  IB  Learner  Profile

7

Campus  &  Class  sizes

8

Teaching  &  Learning  Philosophy

9-­‐10

Student  Wellbeing  and  Achievement  Team

11

Assessment  and  ReporXng

12

SeZng  &  Textbooks

13

Year  7  to  9  Subjects

14-­‐34

English     Mathema9cs     Science     Language  (Chinese  or  Spanish)   Human  Technologies   Art Drama Movement Humani9es  (Geography  and  History)   ICT  and  Media  Studies Physical  Educa9on     Extra-­‐Curricular  Ac9vi9es  &  CAS  Week

Years  10  to  13:  Looking  ahead  to  GCSE/IBDP

For  details  on  assessment  levels  for  each  subject,  please  see  the  Appendix  to  this   Curriculum  Brochure  via:  www.ichk.edu.hk

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Mission  &  Vision “The  hallmark  of  successful  individuals  is  that  they  love  learning,   they  seek  challenges,  they  value  effort,  and  they  persist  in  the  face   of  obstacles.”     Carol  S.  Dweck  ,  Professor  of  Developmental  Psychology,  Stanford  University

OUR  MISSION         Set  in  a  green  and  spacious  campus,  Interna6onal   College  Hong  Kong    provides  secondary  educa6on   for  students  from  our  primary-­‐school  partners   and  from  other  New  Territories’  families  who   desire  an  interna6onal  educa6on  using  English  as   the  medium  of  instruc6on. Our  Vision ‘Inspiring  students  to  realize  their  poten6al  as   leaders  and  learners.’ ICHK  is  a  genuine  learning  community.  With   teachers  commiTed  not  just  to  their  students’  but   to  their  own  learning  and  improvement;  with   small  class  sizes;  with  a  dynamic  yet  sympathe6c   approach  to  instruc6on  and  study,  ICHK  inspires   and  challenges  its  students  to  realize  their  full   academic  and  personal  poten6al. As  a  learning  community,  we  expect  each   individual  to  be  principled,  to  be  caring,  to   appreciate  and  cri6cally  examine  different   viewpoints  and  to  act  in  support  of  each  other’s   learning  and  development.

ICHK Year 7 to 9 Curriculum

Living  the  ICHK  Vision “They  spent  their  lunch  hour  helping   a  new  student  to  understand  simile   and  metaphor.” ICHK  community  members  help  and   support  others. _____ “She  handed  me  the  story  and  a[er   reading  it,  I  congratulated  her.  She   said,  ‘No,  it’s  not  mine.  It’s  hers.  Isn’t   it  fabulous?’  ”  ICHK  community  members  take   pride  in  the  accomplishments  of   others  and  offer  praise  and   encouragement. _____ “She  stood  up  and  said,  ‘You’re  not   being  principled.  That  isn’t  the  way   we  should  treat  other  people.’  ” ICHK  community  members  are   principled  and  take  acHon  when   individuals  are  not  being  respecIul,   courteous  or  supporHve.

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Profile  of  an  ICHK  Student PROFILE  OF  AN  ICHK  STUDENT To  achieve  the  mission  and  vision  for  ICHK,  we  ensure  that  every  student: Benefits  from  an  internaXonal  educaXon  by: • Gaining  historic  and  contemporary  knowledge  of  the  world • Acquiring  interna6onal  understanding  through  interac6on  with  others,  and  by   studying  and  experiencing  other  cultures  and  belief  systems • Developing  personal  values  while  respec6ng  those  of  others • Valuing  their  language  and  culture • Maintaining  the  fluency  of  their  mother  tongue  and  valuing  the  acquisi6on  of  other   languages • Understanding  global  issues  and  problem  resolu6on • Knowing  they  can  make  a  difference  to  global  issues • Engaging  in  offsite  ac6vi6es  to  enhance  personal,  social  and  physical  development,   and  to  appreciate  the  beauty  of  our  environment Is  principled,  criXcally  examines  viewpoints  and  acts  in  support  of  others  by: • Sharing,  coopera6ng  and  contribu6ng  responsibly • Thinking  and  ac6ng  cri6cally,  crea6vely,  and  independently • Understanding  the  rela6onship  between  rights  and  responsibili6es • Prac6cing  tolerance • Taking  ac6on  to  protect  our  environment Strives  to  realise  their  potenXal  as  learners  by: • Learning  how  they  learn  best • Discovering  the  joy  of  learning • ATaining  depth  and  breadth  of  knowledge  and  understanding • Acquiring  the  skills  that  support  intellectual  and  academic  success • Understanding  and  developing  their  Human  Technologies • Preparing  themselves  for  the  demands  of  higher  educa6on Strives  to  realise  their  potenXal  as  leaders  by: • Developing  skills  and  knowledge  that  support  leadership • Solving  problems  independently  and  with  others • Encouraging  and  suppor6ng  others • Reflec6ng  on  their  contribu6on  and  sedng  targets  for  improvement • Displaying  sound  decision-­‐making  skills • Building  understanding  and  trust

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The  IB  Learner  Profile THE  IB  LEARNER  PROFILE ICHK  is  well  on  its  way  towards  becoming  an  authorized  IB  school.  We  have  chosen  the   IB  as  we  believe  in  developing  interna6onally  minded  people  who  help  to  create  a   beTer  and  more  peaceful  world.  In  keeping  with  this  vision  for  educa6on,  and  our   commitment  to  the  IB,  we  will  aim  to  ensure  that  ICHK  students  strive  to  be:     Inquirers

They  develop  their  natural  curiosity.  They  acquire  the  skills  necessary  to   conduct  inquiry  and  research  and  show  independence  in  learning.  They   ac9vely  enjoy  learning  and  this  love  of  learning  will  be  sustained   throughout  their  lives.  

Knowledgeable   They  explore  concepts,  ideas  and  issues  that  have  local  and  global   significance.  In  so  doing,  they  acquire  in-­‐depth  knowledge  and  develop   understanding  across  a  broad  and  balanced  range  of  disciplines.   Thinkers

They  exercise  ini9a9ve  in  applying  thinking  skills  cri9cally  and  crea9vely   to  recognize  and  approach  complex  problems,  and  make  reasoned,   ethical  decisions.  

Communicators   They  understand  and  express  ideas  and  informa9on  confidently  and   crea9vely  in  more  than  one  language  and  in  a  variety  of  modes  of   communica9on.  They  work  effec9vely  and  willingly  in  collabora9on  with   others.   Principled  

They  act  with  integrity  and  honesty,  with  a  strong  sense  of  fairness,   jus9ce  and  respect  for  the  dignity  of  the  individual,  groups  and   communi9es.  They  take  responsibility  for  their  own  ac9ons  and  the   consequences  that  accompany  them.

Open-­‐minded  

They  understand  and  appreciate  their  own  cultures  and  personal   histories,  and  are  open  to  the  perspec9ves,  values  and  tradi9ons  of   others.  They  are  accustomed  to  seeking  and  evalua9ng  a  range  of  points   of  view,  and  are  willing  to  grow  from  the  experience.  

Caring  

They  show  empathy,  compassion  and  respect  towards  the  needs  and   feelings  of  others.  They  have  a  personal  commitment  to  service,  and  act   to  make  a  posi9ve  difference  to  the  lives  of  others  and  to  the   environment.  

Risk-­‐takers  

They  approach  unfamiliar  situa9ons  with  courage  and  forethought,  and   have  the  independence  of  spirit  to  explore  new  roles,  ideas  and   strategies.  They  are  brave  and  ar9culate  in  defending  their  beliefs.

Balanced

They  understand  the  importance  of  intellectual,  physical  and  emo9onal   balance  to  achieve  personal  well-­‐being  for  themselves  and  others.  

ReflecXve

They  give  thoughZul  considera9on  to  their  own  learning  and  experience.   They  are  able  to  assess  and  understand  their  strengths  and  limita9ons  in   order  to  support  their  learning  and  personal  development.

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The  CIB   Learner   rofilesizes     Our   ampus   &  CPlass   OUR  CAMPUS  &  LOCATION ICHK’s  spacious,  green  and  low-­‐rise  campus  is  set  in  an  area  of  outstanding  natural   beauty  in  the  northern  New  Territories.   Surrounded  by  country  parks,  our  school  offers  the  ideal  loca6on  for  students  to   develop  a  deeper  apprecia6on  for  Hong  Kong’s  geography,  weather  paTerns  and   wildlife,  and  for  their  own  role  in  protec6ng  the  natural  environment.

LEARNING  FOCUS,  CURRICULUM  &  CLASS  SIZES Our  commitment  to  small  class  sizes  allows  for  a  higher  degree  of  interac6on   between  teacher  and  student,  and  between  student  and  student. Through  inquiry,  we  encourage  crea6ve  thinking  and  innova6on,  and  strive  to   develop  technologically-­‐minded  ci6zens  with  the  knowledge  and  skills  to  appreciate   and  act  on  issues  of  local,  regional  and  global  importance. As  well  as  suppor6ng  the  vision  of  our  school,  the  Year  7  to  9  Curriculum  reflects   our  belief  that  students  benefit  from  breadth,  balance,  progression  and  con6nuity   in  their  educa6on. We  achieve  this  breadth  and  balance  by  offering  a  diverse  range  of  subjects  and  a   broad  selec6on  of  extra-­‐curricular  ac6vi6es. We  ensure  progression  and  conHnuity  by  u6lizing,  where  appropriate,  the  same   inquiry-­‐based  approach  to  teaching  and  learning  that  students  will  have   encountered  in  their  primary  schools,  and  by  preparing  students  for  the  demands   of  the  GCSE  and  Interna6onal  Baccalaureate  Diploma  Programme  (IBDP)  offered  in   the  senior  school.

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2010-2012

Teaching  &  Learning TEACHING  AND  LEARNING:  GENERAL  CHARACTERISTICS   It  is  our  commitment  to  ensure  that  all  students  will  con6nue  to  find  enjoyment  in   their  learning  and  develop  as  independent  learners  and  cri6cal  thinkers.     In  honouring  this  commitment,  ICHK  offers  an  approach  to  teaching  and  learning  with   several  key  characteris6cs. Structured  Inquiry One  of  the  key  aspects  of  our  approach  is  to  provide  students  with  opportuni6es  to   formulate  their  own  ques6ons  related  to  significant  content  in  real-­‐world  contexts.   They  are  required  to  assess  the  various  means  they  have  available  to  answer  these   ques6ons,  and  to  proceed  with  research,  experimenta6on,  observa6on  and  analysis   that  will  help  them  establish  their  own  responses  to  issues.   As  in  the  students’  primary  schools,  this  process  of  inquiry  is  supported  and  structured   by  the  teacher.    The  star6ng  point  is  the  student’s  current  understanding.  The  goal  is   the  ac6ve  construc6on  of  meaning  by  building  connec6ons  between  that  ini6al   understanding  and  the  new  informa6on  and  experience  derived  through  the  process.   Not  all  learning  takes  place  using  this  method  -­‐  however,  when  it  is  used,    an  inquiry-­‐ based  approach  provides  students  with  the  opportunity  to  take  ownership  of  their   own  learning  and  to  be  mo6vated  to  look  deeply  into  key  issues.   Assessment  for  Learning Students  learn  best  when:  they  understand  clearly  what  they  are  to  learn  and  what  is   expected;  they  are  given  feedback  and  advice  which  explains  what  they  can  do  to   make  their  work  beTer;  and  they  are  fully  involved  in  deciding  what  they  need  to  do   next.  While  assessment  at  ICHK  will  take  many  forms,  our  primary  focus  is  to  enable   students  to  improve  and  thus  our  approach  will  reflect  these  principles.   Some  ICHK  teachers  will  make  use  of  rubrics  as  a  means  for  students  to  understand  the   criteria  by  which  they  will  be  assessed  and  so  as  to  show  them  what  they  will  need  to   do  to  realize  a  higher  level  of  achievement.     With  our  smaller  class  sizes,  all  students  can  expect  to  receive  more  frequent   feedback. SMART  Targets In  order  to  maximize  the  assessment  for  learning  strategies  discussed  above,  students   are  given  6me  to  reflect  on  their  progress  and  set  new  targets.    This  occurs  at  the  end   of  a  unit  of  work,  term,  or  the  school  year.   At  the  end  of  each  term  students  will  assess  their  progress;    parents  and  teachers  can   examine  these  reflec6ons  and  schedule  6mes  to  meet  if  required.       The  student  organizer  also  provides  students  with  the  means  to  record  and  review   agreed  SMART  targets.    

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2010-2012

Teaching  &  Learning School-­‐based  problem-­‐solving In  keeping  with  our  aim  to  ensure  that  students  become  cri6cal  and  crea6ve  thinkers   and  problem  solvers,  ICHK  students  begin  to  learn  and  prac6ce  how  to  use  problem   solving  strategies  both  in  Human  Technologies  and  in  our  Personal,  Social    and  Health   Educa6on  Course.  School  issues  are  used,  wherever  possible,  to  provide  a  meaningful   and  real-­‐world  context  for  inves6ga6ons.  The  skills  generated  in  the  early  years  are   further  explored  and  developed  in  the  senior  school.   Independent  Learning As  students  mature  and  gain  in  confidence,  subject  teachers  ensure  that  they   experience  opportuni6es  to  work  independently  (or  with  less  direc6on  from  the   teacher).  In  addi6on,  a  central  strand  of  the  Human  Technologies  course  is  designed  to   provide  opportuni6es  for  students  to  develop  their  communica6on  and  ICT  skills,  and   provide  more  occasions  for  them  to  work  with  greater  independence.  An  independent   project  forms  another  component  of  the  course.  It  is  hoped  that  by  working  on  a  self-­‐ directed  project,  and  by  receiving  regular  feedback  from  their  teachers,  students  will   begin  to  develop  greater  independence,  6me  management  skills  and  be  able  to  seek   answers  to  their  own  ques6ons.   Sources:   • InternaHonal  Baccalaureate  (2008)  ‘Middle  Years  Programme:  From  Principles  into  PracHce’,  Cardiff,   U.K. • Youth  Learn  (2010)    ‘Intro  to  Inquiry  Learning’,  EducaHon  Development  Centre,  Newton,  MA          www.youthlearn.org/learning/general-­‐info/our-­‐approach/intro-­‐inquiry-­‐learning/intro-­‐inquiry-­‐learning • Department  for  EducaHon  (2010)  ‘Assessing  Pupil’s  Progress’          h^p://naHonalstrategies.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/secondary/assessment/assessingstudentsprogressapp

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Student  Well-­‐being  and  Achievement  Team The  Student  Well-­‐Being  and  Achievement  Team  at  ICHK  helps  students  to  be  and  to   want  to  be  the  best  they  can.     By  providing  Personal,  Social,  Emo6onal  and  Academic  guidance,  the  team,  along  with   form  tutors  and  teachers,  provides  a  secure  and  caring  environment  for  students  to   develop  as  learners  and  become  happy  and  fulfilled  individuals.  To  enable  this,  tutors   facilitate  a  Personal,  Social,  Health  and  Educa6on  programme  (PSHE),  which  explores   many  of  the  topics  that  students  are  interested  in  and  o[en  concerned  about.  Our   primary  aim  is  to  equip  them  with  the  skills  necessary  to  deal  with  these  issues,  as  and   when  they  arise,  and  to  boost  our  students’  confidence  in  feeling  equal  to  the   challenges  of  their  rapidly  evolving  lives.   For  those  students  who  need  personal,  social  and/or  emo6onal  support,  our  team   includes  an  educa6onal  psychologist  and  a  counselor,  both  of  whom  have  considerable   experience  dealing  with  young  people  in  an  educa6onal  sedng.  Where  needs  are   more  academically  inclined,  the  team  includes  specialist  teachers  with  exper6se  in   developing  Individual  Educa6on  Plans  (IEP)  that  provides  teaching  strategies  and   targets  for  each  individual.  IEPs  are  a  powerful  weapon  in  helping  students  who  would   otherwise  struggle  to  realize,  let  alone  exceed,  their  poten6al.    We  fundamentally   believe  that  students  grow  and  progress  best  when  involved  in  the  learning  process,   and  we  therefore  take  great  care  in  listening  to  each  individual,  valuing  and  respec6ng   their  opinion  when  pudng  support  provision  in  place.     Our  open  door  policy  means  that  parents  have  a  direct  route  through  which  to  gain   advice  and  support  should  they  require  it.  With  everyone  working  together,  in  a   sympathe6c  and  responsive  environment,  we  aim  to  develop  mentally  and  physically   healthy  individuals  who  are  able  to  take  the  best  possible  benefit  from  their  school   experience.     Teacher  Responsible  :  Ms  Ann  St.  John,  Deputy  Head  of  Lower  School      

10


2010-2012

Assessment  &  ReporXng ASSESSMENT  &  REPORTING The  school  makes  use  of  Assessment  for  Learning  Strategies  and  has  students  set   SMART  targets  to  help  understand  and  work  towards  ways  to  improve.  The  ra6onale,   process  and  dates  for  repor6ng  to  parents  is  shown  below.  Please  note  that  tutors  and   teachers  can  also  be  contacted  outside  of  these  6mes.  Furthermore,  the  student   organizer  provides  a  way  to  communicate  issues  related  to  student  progress. WriTen  Reports Parents  receives  one  full  report  each  year.    These  wriTen  reports  provide  a  summary   of  student  aiainment,  using  the  ICHK  grading  system,  and  an  approach  to  learning     grade.  As  these  full  reports  may  be  shown  to  other  schools  or  universi6es,  teachers   generally  focus  on  the  posi6ve  aspects  of  a  student’s  efforts  and  achievements,  while   sedng  at  least  one  area  for  improvement.    At  the  end  of  the  school  year  they  will  also   receive  a  transcript  summarizing  their  child’s  grades. Grades • Within  the  UK  Na6onal  Curriculum,  students  are  awarded  a  ‘Level‘  for  aTainment,   with  levels  ranging  from  1  to  8  in  Years  7  to  9.   • In  Years  10  and  11,  the  UK  examina6on  boards  award  students  a  grade  from  A*  to  G. • For  Year  12  and  13,  the  IB  awards  points  ranging  from  1  to  7  (with  7  being  the   highest).   These  different  approaches  can  be  confusing  for  parents.  So,  to  simplify  repor6ng  and   to  show  the  correla6on  between  the  different  systems,  we  always  report  on  a  scale   from  1  to  7,  a[er  conver6ng  the  levels  or  grades  as  appropriate.       A  detailed  descripHon  of  how  each  subject  is  assessed,  and  what  students   need  to  do  to  achieve  higher  grades,  is  included  in  our   online  Appendix  to  this  Curriculum  Brochure.

Parent/Teacher  Mee6ngs The  main  purpose  of  assessment  is  to  ensure  that  students  know  where  they  are  and   how  they  can  improve.  We  believe  that  face-­‐to-­‐face  mee6ngs  are  the  best  way  for   students,  parents  and  teachers  to  exchange  views  and  come  to  an  understanding  on   how  to  support  the  student’s  academic  improvement. Parent-­‐teacher  mee6ngs  also  allow  parents  to  meet  with  the  student’s  subject  teacher.   These  mee6ngs  provide  an  opportunity  to  have  more  holis6c  discussions  about  the   learning  and  the  progress  of  a  student.  Your  child’s  tutor  can  offer  details  about  a   student’s  development,  their  progress  in  rela6on  to  standardized  test  scores,   involvement  in  ac6vi6es,  and  any  areas  of  concern. In  any  academic  year,  there  will  be  one  mee6ng  with  the  form  tutor  in  the  first  term,   followed  by  two  subject  teacher  consulta6ons  spread  throughout  the  year.  These   sessions  provide  an  opportunity  to  delve  deeper  into  issues  and  set  challenging  targets   so  the  student  can  make  progress.  

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SeZng  &  Textbooks SETTING In  order  to  ensure  that  students  are  able  to  realise  their  academic  poten6al  they  must   be  suitably  challenged,  mo6vated  and  supported.  In  order  to  accomplish  this,  students   are  placed  into  ability  groups  (or  sets)  based  on  their  knowledge  and  performance  in   Mathema6cs  and  Chinese.  These  sets  enable  the  students  to  learn  at  the  appropriate   pace  using  the  most  appropriate  teaching  resources.  Class  sizes  may  be  smaller  for   those  students  requiring  any  addi6onal  support  and  guidance.   It  is  vital  that  students  have  the  opportunity  to  move  between  sets,  so  subject  teachers   meet  regularly  to  discuss  student  performance.  At  the  beginning  of  Year  7,  teachers   will  wait  for  a  few  weeks  before  placing  students  into  the  appropriate  sets.  They  will   use  the  following  data  to  inform  their  decision:  primary  school  reports,  informa6on   from  conversa6ons  with  primary  teachers,  Cogni6ve  Ability  Test  scores  and  their  own   assessments.   If  a  change  is  to  be  made  during  the  year,  the  subject  coordinator  will  inform  parents   and  discuss  such  changes  with  the  student  concerned.

TEXTBOOKS The  school  has  selected  publishers  who  offer  differen6ated  textbooks  for  each  year.   The  Mathema6cs  textbooks  (and  science  textbooks)  look  iden6cal  and  cover   essen6ally  the  same  concepts  but  ques6ons  can  be  more  (or  less)  challenging   depending  on  the  text.   The  Mathema6cs  books  are  differen6ated  as  follows:  Plus,  Core,  Star  with  the  7+  book   having  more  difficult  ques6ons  that  the  7*  books.  In  terms  of  the  assessment  levels   described  in  the  appendix  available  from  our  school  website,    the  books  cover  the   levels  as  follows:  7+  (4  to  7),  7  (4  to  6)  and  7*  (2  to  4).  This  is  similar  for  year  8  and  9. The  Science  books  :  7  Blue  (Levels  4  to  7)  or  7  Green/Elements  (levels  3  to  6).         The  Chinese  books  for  1st  language  students  are  all  wriTen  in  Chinese,  while  those  for   the  non-­‐na6ve  speakers  of  the  language  are  wriTen  with  English  Instruc6ons.   N.B.  Maths,  Science  &  Language  Textbooks:  in  order  to  reduce  the  weight  of  student   textbooks  each  student  is  given  a  workbook  to  take  home  rather  than  the  text.  This   workbook  summarises  the  concepts/methods  along  with  providing  suitable  ques6ons.  

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Compulsory  subjects  &  acXviXes YEAR  7  TO  9  SUBJECTS The  Year  7  to  9  curriculum  comprises  the  subjects  below.  These  subjects  ensure  that   breadth  and  balance  is  maintained  and  that  students  will  have  the  requisite  knowledge   and  experience  for  the  IGCSE/IB  programmes  in  the  senior  school.   Compulsory  Subjects/AcXviXes   1. English     2. Mathema6cs     3. Science     4. Language  (Chinese  or  Spanish  or  Japanese)   5. Human  Technologies   6. Art 7. Drama 8. Movement 9. Humani6es  (Geography  and  History)   10.  ICT  and  Media  Studies 11.  Physical  Educa6on   12.  Extra-­‐Curricular  Ac6vi6es   13.  Personal,  Social  and  Health  Educa6on  (PSHE)   Timetable:   E

M

S

L

HT

A

D

M

Hum ICT

PE

Act

Tot

7

3

3

3

3

2

1

1

1

3

1

2

1

24

8

3

3

3

3

2

1

1

1

3

1

2

1

24

9

3

3

3

3

2

1

1

1

3

1

2

1

24

N.B.  Students  can  take  extra-­‐curricular  ac6vi6es  outside  the  6metable.  Students  also   have  a  1  hour  PSHE  lesson  each  week.  

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English   ENGLISH In  English,  we  aim  to  teach  our  students  to  be  competent  in  being  clear,  coherent  and   accurate  in  both  spoken  and  wriTen  communica6on  as  well  as  reading  and   understanding  a  range  of  texts  and  responding  appropriately.    Focusing  and  building  on   the  areas  of  reading,  wri6ng  and  speaking  and  listening  enables  pupils  to  be  successful   and  to  engage  with  the  world  beyond  the  classroom.  They  are  able  to  communicate   effec6vely  and  to  func6on  in  a  wide  range  of  situa6ons  and  contexts.  In  being  able  to   speak  or  write  correctly,  read  or  listen  reliably  and  accurately  they  are  able  to  adapt  to   the  demands  of  work  or  study  and  be  successful.  Through  the  study  of  English  we   encourage  students  to  not  only  demonstrate  secure  understanding  of  the  conven6ons   of  wriTen  language,  including  grammar,  spelling  and  punctua6on,  but  to  focus  on   crea6vity,  cultural  understanding  and  cri6cal  understanding.   Through  the  study  of  literature,  we  explore  how  ideas,  experiences  and  values  are   portrayed  differently  in  texts  from  a  range  of  cultures  and  tradi6ons,  whilst  at  the   same  6me  gaining  a  sense  of  the  English  literary  heritage.  Students  thus  gain  a  sense   of  culture  of  their  society,  the  groups  in  which  they  par6cipate  and  ques6ons  of  local   and  na6onal  iden6ty.  Addi6onally,  developing  cri6cal  skills  allows  pupils  to  challenge   ideas,  interpreta6ons  and  assump6ons  on  the  grounds  of  logic,  evidence  or  argument,   and  is  essen6al  if  students  are  to  form  and  express  their  own  views  independently.   The  curriculum  provides  opportuniXes  for  students  to: a)  Speaking  and  Listening

• Present  informa6on  and  points  of  view  clearly  and  appropriately  in  different   • • • • • • • • • • •

contexts,  adap6ng  talk  for  a  range  of  purposes  and  audiences,  including  the   more  formal   Use  a  range  of  ways  to  structure  and  organise  their  speech  to  support  their   purposes  and  guide  the  listener   Vary  vocabulary,  structures  and  grammar  to  convey  meaning,  including  speaking   standard  English  fluently   Engage  an  audience,  using  a  range  of  techniques  to  explore,  enrich  and  explain   their  ideas   Listen  and  respond  construc6vely  to  others,  taking  different  views  into  account   and  modifying  their  own  views  in  the  light  of  what  others  say   Understand  explicit  and  implicit  meanings   Make  different  kinds  of  relevant  contribu6ons  in  groups,  responding   appropriately  to  others,  proposing  ideas  and  asking  ques6ons   Take  different  roles  in  organising,  planning  and  sustaining  talk  in  groups   Si[,  summarise  and  use  the  most  important  points   Use  different  drama6c  approaches  to  explore  ideas,  texts  and  issues   Use  different  drama6c  techniques  to  convey  ac6on,  character,  atmosphere  and   tension   Explore  the  ways  that  words,  ac6ons,  sound  and  staging  combine  to  create   drama6c  moments.  

b)  Reading • Extract  and  interpret  informa6on,  events,  main  points  and  ideas  from  texts   • Infer  and  deduce  meanings,  recognising  the  writers’  inten6ons  

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English   • Understand  how  meaning  is  constructed  within  sentences  and  across  texts  as  a   whole  

• Select  and  compare  informa6on  from  different  texts   • Assess  the  usefulness  of  texts,  si[  the  relevant  from  the  irrelevant  and   dis6nguish  between  fact  and  opinion  

• Recognise  and  discuss  different  interpreta6ons  of  texts,  jus6fying  their  own   views  on  what  they  read  and  see,  and  suppor6ng  them  with  evidence  

• Understand  how  audiences  and  readers  choose  and  respond  to  texts   • Understand  how  the  nature  and  purpose  of  texts  influences  the  selec6on  of   content  and  its  meanings  

• Understand  how  meaning  is  created  through  the  combina6on  of  words,  images   and  sounds  in  mul6modal  texts.  

• How  texts  are  cra[ed  to  shape  meaning  and  produce  par6cular  effects   • How  writers  structure  and  organise  different  texts,  including  non-­‐linear  and   mul6modal  

• How  writers’  uses  of  language  and  rhetorical,  gramma6cal  and  literary  features   influence  the  reader  

• How  writers  present  ideas  and  issues  to  have  an  impact  on  the  reader   • How  form,  layout  and  presenta6on  contribute  to  effect  how  themes  are   explored  in  different  texts  

• How  texts  relate  to  the  social,  historical  and  cultural  context  in  which  they  were   wriTen.  

c)  WriXng

• Write  clearly  and  coherently,  including  an  appropriate  level  of  detail   • Write  imagina6vely,  crea6vely  and  thoughyully,  producing  texts  that  interest   and  engage  the  reader  

• Generate  and  harness  new  ideas  and  develop  them  in  their  wri6ng   • Adapt  style  and  language  appropriately  for  a  range  of  forms,  purposes  and   readers  

• Maintain  consistent  points  of  view  in  fic6on  and  non-­‐fic6on  wri6ng   • Use  imagina6ve  vocabulary  and  varied  linguis6c  and  literary  techniques  to   • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

achieve  par6cular  effects   Structure  their  wri6ng  to  support  the  purpose  of  the  task  and  guide  the  reader   Use  clearly  demarcated  paragraphs  to  organise  meaning   Use  complex  sentences  to  extend,  link  and  develop  ideas   Vary  sentence  structure  for  interest,  effect  and  subtle6es  of  meaning   Consider  what  the  reader  needs  to  know  and  include  relevant  details   Use  formal  and  impersonal  language  and  concise  expression   Develop  logical  arguments  and  cite  evidence   Use  persuasive  techniques  and  rhetorical  devices   Form  their  own  view,  taking  into  account  a  range  of  evidence  and  opinions   Present  material  clearly,  using  appropriate  layout,  illustra6ons  and  organisa6on   Use  planning,  dra[ing,  edi6ng,  proofreading  and  self-­‐evalua6on  to  shape  and   cra[  their  wri6ng  for  maximum  effect   Summarise  and  take  notes   Write  legibly,  with  fluency  and,  when  required,  speed   Use  the  conven6ons  of  standard  English  effec6vely   Use  grammar  accurately  in  a  variety  of  sentence  types,  including  subject–verb  

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English   agreement  and  correct  and  consistent  use  of  tense  

• Signal  sentence  structure  by  the  effec6ve  use  of  the  full  range  of  punctua6on   marks  to  clarify  meaning  

• Spell  correctly,  increasing  their  knowledge  of  regular  paTerns  of  spelling,  word    

families,  roots  of  words  and  deriva6ons,  including  prefixes,  suffixes  and   inflec6ons.    

Teacher  Responsible:  Ms.  Elaine  Long

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MathemaXcs MATHEMATICS Mathema6cal  thinking  is  important  for  all  members  of  a  modern  society  as  a  habit  of   mind  for  its  use  in  the  workplace,  business  and  finance;  and  for  personal  decision-­‐ making.    Mathema6cs  is  fundamental  to  na6onal  prosperity  in  providing  tools  for   understanding  science,  engineering,  technology  and  economics.  It  is  essen6al  in  public   decision-­‐making  and  for  par6cipa6on  in  the  knowledge  economy. Mathema6cs  equips  students  with  uniquely  powerful  ways  to  describe,  analyse  and   change  the  world.  It  can  s6mulate  moments  of  pleasure  and  wonder  for  all  students   when  they  solve  a  problem  for  the  first  6me,  discover  a  more  elegant  solu6on,  or   no6ce  hidden  connec6ons.  Students  who  are  func6onal  in  mathema6cs  and  financially   capable  are  able  to  think  independently  in  applied  and  abstract  ways,  and  can  reason,   solve  problems  and  assess  risk.   Mathema6cs  is  a  crea6ve  discipline.  The  language  of  mathema6cs  is  interna6onal.  The   subject  transcends  cultural  boundaries  and  its  importance  is  universally  recognised.   Mathema6cs  has  developed  over  6me  as  a  means  of  solving  problems  and  also  for  its   own  sake. The  curriculum  provides  opportuniXes  for  students  to:

• develop  confidence  in  an  increasing  range  of  methods  and  techniques • work  on  sequences  of  tasks  that  involve  using  the  same  mathema6cs  in   • • • • •

increasingly  difficult  or  unfamiliar  contexts,  or  increasingly  demanding   mathema6cs  in  similar  contexts work  on  open  and  closed  tasks  in  a  variety  of  real  and  abstract  contexts  that   allow  them  to  select  the  mathema6cs  to  use work  on  problems  that  arise  in  other  subjects  and  in  contexts  beyond  the   school work  on  tasks  that  bring  together  different  aspects  of  concepts,  processes  and   mathema6cal  content work  collabora6vely  as  well  as  independently  in  a  range  of  contexts become  familiar  with  a  range  of  resources,  including  ICT,  so  that  they  can  select   appropriately.

Teacher  Responsible:  Mr  David  Pulger-­‐Frame

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The  Sciences SCIENCE The  study  of  science  fires  students’  curiosity  about  phenomena  in  the  world  around   them  and  offers  opportuni6es  to  find  explana6ons.  It  engages  learners  at  many  levels,   linking  direct  prac6cal  experience  with  scien6fic  ideas.  Experimenta6on  and  modelling   are  used  to  develop  and  evaluate  explana6ons,  encouraging  cri6cal  and  crea6ve   thought.  Students  learn  how  knowledge  and  understanding  in  science  are  rooted  in   evidence.  They  discover  how  scien6fic  ideas  contribute  to  technological  change  –   affec6ng  industry,  business  and  medicine  and  improving  quality  of  life.  They  trace  the   development  of  science  worldwide  and  recognise  its  cultural  significance.  They  learn   to  ques6on  and  discuss  issues  that  may  affect  their  own  lives,  the  direc6ons  of   socie6es  and  the  future  of  the  world. The  curriculum  provides  opportuniXes  for  students  to:

• • • • • • • • • • •

research,  experiment,  discuss  and  develop  arguments pursue  an  independent  enquiry  into  an  aspect  of  science  of  personal  interest use  real-­‐life  examples  as  a  basis  for  finding  out  about  science study  science  in  local,  na6onal  and  global  contexts,  and  appreciate  the   connec6ons  between  these experience  science  outside  the  school  environment,  including  in  the  workplace,   where  possible use  crea6vity  and  innova6on  in  science,  and  appreciate  their  importance  in   enterprise recognise  the  importance  of  sustainability  in  scien6fic  and  technological   developments explore  contemporary  and  historical  scien6fic  developments  and  how  they   have  been  communicated prepare  to  specialise  in  a  range  of  science  subjects  at  Key  Stage  4  and  consider   career  opportuni6es  both  within  science  and  in  other  areas  that  are  provided   by  science  qualifica6ons consider  how  knowledge  and  understanding  of  science  informs  personal  and   collec6ve  decisions,  including  those  on  substance  abuse  and  sexual  health make  links  between  science  and  other  subjects  and  areas  of  the  curriculum

Teacher  Responsible:  Mr  Malcolm  Drew

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Languages LANGUAGES Languages  are  part  of  the  cultural  richness  of  our  society   and  the  world   in  which   we  live  and  work.   Learning   languages  contributes  to  mutual   understanding,   a  sense   of   global  ci9zenship   and   personal  fulfillment.   The   ability   to  understand   and  communicate  in  different   languages  is  a   lifelong  skill  for  educa9on,  employment  and  leisure.   Language   courses  at   ICHK   challenge  students  to  view  the  world  from   different   perspec9ves   and   to   see   how   language   is   crucial   in   communica9ng  our  understanding.  We  aim  at  nurturing  an  interna9onal   outlook,  thus  apprecia9ng  the  richness  and  diversity  of  other  cultures  as   well  as  recognising  that  there  are  different  ways  of  seeing  the  world.  We   ins9ll  crea9ve  thinking  in  our   ability   to  manipulate  and   use  language  to   convey   our  understanding  and   in   the  act   of   persuasion.   We  encourage   cri9cal  thinking  in   a  classroom,   which  is  founded   on   an  inquiry-­‐based   approach. I.  FIRST  LANGUAGE  (Chinese  or  Japanese) The  study   of  first   language  (Chinese  or  Japanese)  focuses  on  the  development   of   language   skills,   learning   strategies,   and   processes   that   are   essen9al   for   promo9ng   pupils’   progress   in   speaking   and   listening,   reading   and  wri9ng   in   their  na9ve  tongue. The  curriculum  provides  opportuniXes  for  students  to  develop: Competence a. Being   clear,   coherent   and   accurate   in   spoken   and   wriaen   communica9on. b. Reading   and   understanding   a   range   of   texts,   and   responding   appropriately. c. Demonstra9ng   a  secure   understanding   of   the   conven9ons  of   wriaen   language,   including   grammar,   wri9ng   systems  of   the   target   language   (Tradi9onal/Simplified   characters   in   Chinese;   Hiragana,   Katakana   and   Kanji,  in  the  case  of  Japanese)  as  well  as  punctua9on  conven9ons. d. The   ability   to   adapt   to   a   widening   range   of   familiar   and   unfamiliar   contexts  within  the  classroom  and  beyond. e. Making  informed  choices  about  effec9ve  ways  to  communicate  formally   and  informally. 2.     CreaXvity a. Making  fresh  connec9ons  between  ideas,  experiences,   texts  and  words,   drawing  on  a  rich  experience  of  language  and  literature. b. Using   inven9ve   approaches   to   making   meaning,   taking   risks,   playing   with  language  and  using  it  to  create  new  effects. c. Using   imagina9on   to   convey   themes,   ideas   and   arguments,   solve   problems,  and  create  sefngs,  moods  and  characters. 1.    

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Languages d. Using   crea9ve   approaches   to   answering   ques9ons,   solving   problems   and  developing  ideas. 3.     Cultural  understanding a. Gaining  a  sense  of  the  target  language’s  literary   heritage   and  engaging   with  important  texts  in  it. b. Understanding  how  the  target  language   varies  locally   and   globally,  and   how  these  varia9ons  relate  to  iden9ty  and  cultural  diversity. 4.     CriXcal  understanding a. Engaging   with   ideas   and   texts,   understanding   and   responding   to   the   main  issues. b. Assessing   the  validity   and  significance   of   informa9on  and   ideas  from   different  sources. c. Exploring  others’  ideas  and  developing  their  own. d. Analysing   and   evalua9ng   spoken   and   wriaen   language  to   appreciate   how  meaning  is  shaped. CHINESE  AS  A  FIRST  LANGUAGE There   are   two   streams  of   Chinese   First   Language  classes.   The   first   group   is   designed   for   students   whose   mother   tongue   is   Chinese   and   have   a   strong   formal  founda9on   of  the  grammar   as  well  as   a   good  repertoire  of  characters   (tradi9onal   or   simplified).   The   aim   is   to   develop   students’   ability   to   communicate  clearly,  accurately   and  effec9vely  at  the  level  of   a  na9ve  speaker.   Students   taking   this   course   should   qualify   to   take   Chinese   Language   A:   language  and  literature  in  the  IB  Diploma  programme  during  Years  12  and  13. The  second  group  is  designed  for   students  with  nearly-­‐na9ve  communica9ve   competence  in  Chinese,  who  have  been  studying  the  language  formally  and  aim   at   improving   their   linguis9c   proficiency,   both  orally   and  in   wri9ng.   They   may   choose  to   study   Chinese   in   Year   12   and  13,   either   as   a  first   or   as   a  second   language  (Language  A  or  Language  B,  at  either  Higher  or  Standard  Level).   Teacher  Responsible:  Ms.  Leah  Tsao JAPANESE  AS  A  FIRST  LANGUAGE Japanese  is   a  key   language  in  Asia,  and  ICHK   has  introduced  its   study   as  First   Language   in   academic   year   2011-­‐12.     This   course   is   designed   for   students   whose  mother  tongue  is  Japanese  and  have  studied  for   a  number  of   years.     It   follows  the  Japanese  na9onal  curriculum,  though,  as  in  other  language  courses,   evalua9on  is  based  on  ICHK  assessment  criteria. Students  taking   this  course  should   qualify   to   take  Japanese  Language  A   (and   op9onally  its  literature)  in  the  IB  Diploma  programme  during  Years  12  and  13. Teacher  Responsible:  Ms.  Kyoko  Moriyama

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Languages

II.  SECOND  LANGUAGE  (Chinese  or  Spanish) The  development   of  communica9on  skills,   together  with   understanding   of  the   structure  of   languages,  lay  the  founda9ons  for   future  study  of   other  languages   and   support   the   development   of   literacy   skills   in   a   pupil’s   own   language.   Second   language  courses  (students  can   choose  between  two  op9ons:  Chinese   or   Spanish)   focus  on   the   development   of   language  skills,   learning   strategies,   and  processes  that  are  essen9al  for  promo9ng  pupils’  progress  in  speaking  and   listening,  reading  and  wri9ng  in  the  target  language,  following  the  UK  Key  Stage   3  Na9onal  Curriculum  for  Modern  Foreign  Languages.   Year   7   students   are  immersed   in  an  introductory   linguis9c   experience   which   builds  the  founda9on  for   the  learning   of   the  new  language.   Grammar   is   fully   integrated  into  the  teaching  sequence  though  as  needed  it  will  be  isolated  and   studied  with  explana9ons  and  further   prac9ce.  Thus,  basic  skills  are  taught  and   revisited   through   a   variety   of   age-­‐appropriate  and  challenging   exercises  and   fun-­‐oriented  tasks  (games,  songs,  etc.).   Year   8   builds  upon  these  founda9ons  and  encourages  students   to  dig  deeper   and  to  employ  a  higher  degree  of  sophis9ca9on  and  maturity  in  their  approach   to   grammar,   and   culture.   Assessment   tasks   require   a   greater   degree   of   proficiency  of  skills  as  well  as  more  communica9ve-­‐oriented  exercises. Year  9  further   builds  upon   this  but   also  prepares  students  for   the   rigor   of  the   GCSE  courses  and  external  examina9ons  in  Years  10  and  11. Students   joining   2nd   Language   class   (Chinese   or   Spanish)   in   Year   8   and   9   without   previous   knowledge   are   expected   to   catch   up   following   an   individualised  plan  designed  according  to  the  stage  of  the  course  as  well  as  the   profile  of  the  language  learner  ajer   an  overall  linguis9c  ap9tude  assessment.   The  measures  include  support  from  the  teacher   during  the  breaks  and  the  work   with  a  student-­‐mentor.  Further   external   assistance  might  be  recommended  in   some  cases.

21


Languages The  curriculum  provides  opportuniXes  for  students  to: 1.

2.

3.

4.

Develop  their  linguisXc  competence a. Developing  the   skills  of  listening,   speaking,  reading  and  wri9ng   in  a  range  of  situa9ons  and  contexts. b. Applying   linguis9c   knowledge   and   skills   to   understand   and   communicate  effec9vely. Extend  their  knowledge  about  the  language a. Understanding  how  a  language  works  and  how  to  manipulate  it. b. Recognizing   that   languages   differ   but   may   share   common   gramma9cal,  morpho-­‐syntac9cal  or  lexical  features. SXmulate  their  creaXvity a. Using  familiar  language  for  new  purposes  and  in  new  contexts. b. Using   imagina9on   to   express  thoughts,   ideas,   experiences  and   feelings. Increase  their  intercultural  understanding a. Apprecia9ng  the  richness  and  diversity  of  other  cultures. b. Recognizing  that  there  are  different  ways  of  seeing  the  world.

CHINESE  AS  A  SECOND  LANGUAGE There  are  two  streams  of  Chinese   Second  Language  classes.   The  first   group  is   for  second  language  speakers  who  have  studied  some  Chinese  before,   and  they   are  working   within  or  above  the  level  expected.   The  second  group   is  designed   for  Chinese  “ab  ini9o”   students,  that  is,   for  students  with  no  prior   knowledge  of   Chinese.   Students   taking   Chinese   as   a   second   language   and   aaaining   sa9sfactory   results   should   qualify   to   take   Chinese   Language   B   (Higher   or   Standard  level)  in  the  IB  Diploma  during  Years  12  and  13. Teacher  Responsible:  Ms.  Amanda  Luk SPANISH  AS  A  SECOND  LANGUAGE Year  7  students  who  choose  Spanish  language  courses  will  learn  “ab  ini9o”,   that   is,   no  prior   knowledge  of   Spanish   is  required.   Students  will  study   one  of  the   three  most  spoken  languages   in  the  world.  Spanish   is  the  first  language  in  21   countries  in  America,   Europe,  Africa,   and  has  an  important  presence   in  many   other   countries   around   the   world.   Students   taking   Spanish   as   a   second   language   and   aaaining   sa9sfactory   results   should   qualify   to   take   Spanish   Language  B  (Higher  or  Standard  level)  in  the  IB  Diploma  during  Years  12  and  13. Teacher  Responsible:  Mr.  Nicolás  Arriaga

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Human  Technologies Human  Technologies  is  a  course  of  our  own  design  -­‐  it  introduces  students  to  a   perspec9ve  on  human  intelligence,  rela9onships  and  ac9ons  that  seeks  to   make  more  sense  of  the  curriculum,  the  process  of  schooling  and  their  lives  in   general.  Our  aim  has  been  to  create  a  course  that: -­‐

-­‐ -­‐ -­‐ -­‐

draws  on  mental,  social,  physical  and  spiritual  tools  and  techniques  to  provide   opportuni6es  and  experiences  that  encourage  the  development  of  skills  for   learning  and  living  (including  self  management;  collabora6on;  leadership;   cri6cal  thinking;  enquiry  and  ICT  skills) encourages  self  awareness  and  reflec6on explores  age-­‐appropriate  social  and  cultural  issues employs  a  pedagogy  that  is  ac6ve  and  engaging,  and  which  enables  students   to  express  and  share  their  thoughts  and  ideas encourages  an  empathe6c  and  mindful  approach  to  the  diverse  personali6es,   values  and  perspec6ves  of  others

Human  Technologies  adopts  a  central  metaphor  of  tool  acquisi9on  and  tool  use   to  build  a  more  connected  and  meaningful  narra9ve  than  is  typical  of  many   tradi9onal  school  curricula.  We  have  developed  a  learning  journey  that   encourages  students  to  draw  and  explore  connec9ons  between  their  broader   experience  as  individuals  and  learners,  within  and  beyond  school.   The  course  revolves  around  the  interconnec9vity  of  four  forms  of  technology   whose  development  has  accompanied  and  characterised  the  progress  of   humankind  down  the  ages.  The  meaning  of  technology  is  understood  as:  the   prac9cal  applica9on  of  knowledge  especially  in  a  par9cular  area;  a  capability   given  by  the  prac9cal  applica9on  of  knowledge;  a  manner  of  accomplishing  a   task  especially  using  processes,  methods  or  knowledge;  and  the  specialized   aspects  of  a  par9cular  field  of  endeavour.

                                                 

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Human  Technologies

Following  Vygotsky  and  others,  a  governing  insight  of  the  course  is  that  much  of   what  we  call  intelligence  resides  not  within  the  individual  mind  but  in  how  that   mind  relates  to,  and  takes  advantage  of,  the  shared  and  social  world  around  it   and  of  which  it  is  a  part.   The  course  seeks  opportuni9es  to  engage  students  mindfully  and  reflec9vely  in   individual,  group  and  team  work,  skillfully  using  old  and  new  technologies,  to   achieve  ends  that,  without  the  thoughZul  employment  of  human  tools,  would   not  otherwise  be  possible. Teacher  Responsible:  Mr.  Toby  Newton

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Art  &  Design ART  &  DESIGN In  art,  cra[  and  design,  students  explore  visual,  tac6le  and  other  sensory  experiences   to  communicate  ideas  and  meanings.  They  work  with  tradi6onal  and  new  media,   developing  confidence,  competence,  imagina6on  and  crea6vity.  They  learn  to   appreciate  and  value  images  and  artefacts  across  6mes  and  cultures,  and  to   understand  the  contexts  in  which  they  were  made.  In  art,  cra[  and  design,  students   reflect  cri6cally  on  their  own  and  other  people’s  work,  judging  quality,  value  and   meaning.  They  learn  to  think  and  act  as  ar6sts,  cra[speople  and  designers,  working   crea6vely  and  intelligently.  They  develop  an  apprecia6on  of  art,  cra[  and  design,  and   its  role  in  the  crea6ve  and  cultural  industries  that  enrich  their  lives. The  curriculum  should  provide  opportuniXes  for  students  to: • Work  in,  and  across,  the  areas  of  fine  art,  cra[  and  design,  including  both  applied   and  fine  art  prac6ces                                                                                                                                                             • Explore  different  media,  processes  and  techniques  in  2D,  3D  and  new  technologies • Study  a  range  of  ar6facts  from  contemporary,  historical,  personal  and  cultural   contexts • Understand  art,  cra[  and  design  processes,  associated  equipment  and  safe  working   prac6ces Teacher  Responsible:  Ms  Chris  Cook

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Drama  &  Movement DRAMA Drama  is  an  exci6ng,  experimental  and  inspira6onal  subject  and  every  student  is   exposed  to  the  innova6ve  and  dynamic  world  drama  creates  in  their  lessons. The  lessons  are  skills  based  and  provide  the  students  with: • • •

The  opportunity  to  adopt  the  roles  of  theatre  prac66oners  including  actors,   directors  and  designers.   The  opportunity  to  develop  and  demonstrate  competence  in  a  range  of   performance  skills The  opportunity  to  learn  about  the  history  of  Drama  and  u6lise  this   knowledge  within  their  performance  work.

• The  lessons,  in  addi6on  are  focused  on  the  communicaXve  skills  that  they  help  the   students  to  develop  as  a  basis  for  their  future  role  as  ac6ve  ci6zens  in  employment  and   society.  These  quali6es  are  suppor6ve  of  the  ICHK  school  mission  and  vision,  including: • • • • •

Encouraging  co-­‐opera6on  and  team  working  abili6es Increasing  social  awareness Building  self  confidence Developing  self  expression  and  sparking  crea6vity   Enhancing  the  skills  of  analysis,  reflec6on,  reasoning,  enquiry  and  evalua6on.

In  each  lesson  the  students: Make  drama The  students  formulate  ideas  through  effec6ve  communica6ve  skills  as  discussed   above.  In  their  assessment  they  are  marked  on  their  making  skills. Perform  drama The  students  use  a  range  of  different  drama  skills  to  structure  themes,  issues  and  ideas   in  their  drama  as  discussed  above.  These  skills  include:  s6ll  image,  thought  tracking,   narra6on,  exaggera6on,  mime,  hot  sea6ng,  slow  mo6on,  marking  the  moment,   synchronised  movement,  flashbacks,  flash-­‐forwards,  cross  cudng  and  choral  speaking. Assessments Progression  concerns  the  development  of  each  individual  student.  Progression  implies   that  the  ac6vi6es  that  the  students  have  taken  part  in  has  resulted  in  a  development  in   their  understanding  and  demonstra6on  of  the  knowledge  in  group  discussion,  prac6cal   performance  and  wriTen  tasks.    The  department  is  commiTed  to  spiraling  work  to   ensure  that  students  are  constantly  reusing  prior  understanding  to  develop  more   advance  learning. Each  week  the  teacher  can  monitor  the  progress  of  the  individual  student  through:

Their  response  levels  in  the  group  discussions

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Drama  &  Movement • • •

Their  own  individual/pair/group  work  as  they  make  their  drama Their  performance  work   Their  evaluaXve  comments

Teacher  Responsible:  Ms  Jennifer  Goldthorpe MOVEMENT “a  crea&ve   and  ar&s&c  medium  in  which  students   can  use  movement   and   dance   to   explore,   express   and   communicate   ideas   and   issues,   and   their   own   feelings   and   moods,  thoughts  and  emo&ons.”                                                                                                                        -­‐  Qualifica9on  and  Curriculum  Development  Agency,  UK At   ICHK   we   use   movement   in   our   arts   curriculum   to   develop   students’   personal,   learning   and   thinking   skills.   Students   think   about   how   to   express  and   communicate   ideas,   emo6ons   and   concepts   through   experien6al   and   inquiry   based   teaching   and   learning  strategies.  This  unique  approach  allows  students  to   use  their  bodies  as  a  tool   for   expression   along   with   giving   them   the   opportunity   to   work   as   an   ar6st,   a   performer,  a  choreographer  and  cri6c. Arts   Council   England  (DfES,  2006)   believes   movement  and   dance  makes  a  significant   contribu6on  to  the  lives  of  young  people  and  we  believe  that  too.  Educa6on  is  the  only   way  to  ensure  all  young  people  have  access  to   relevant,  high-­‐quality  performing   arts   experiences  and  to  learning  in,  through  and  about  performing  arts. The  curriculum  should  provide  opportuniXes  for  students  to: • Use  movement  as  a  means  of  communica6on  within  a  variety  of  cultural,  aesthe6c   and  ar6s6c  contexts Use   t he   body  as  a  medium  for  personal  expression • • Extend  their  individual  range  of  movement  vocabulary • Improve  physical  competence  in  performance • Make  individual  and  collabora6ve  responses  to  a  variety  of  sources  and  to  employ   different  approaches  to  choreographing  and  presen6ng  work • Develop  and  use  personal,  learning  and  thinking  skills • Develop  crea6ve,  imagina6ve,  emo6onal  and  intellectual  abili6es • Learn  to  be  open-­‐minded,  to  ques6on,  to  challenge,  to  take  risks,  to  develop  as             independent  thinkers • To  work  collabora6vely  with  other  individuals Assessments Progression  concerns  the  development  of  each  individual  student.  Progression  implies   that  the  ac6vi6es  that  the  students  have  taken  part  in  has  resulted  in  a  development  in   their  understanding  and  demonstra6on  of  the  knowledge  in  group  discussion,  prac6cal   performance  and  wriTen  tasks.    The  visual  and  performing  arts  department  is  

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Drama  &  Movement commiTed  to  spiraling  work  to  ensure  that  students  are  constantly  reusing  prior   understanding  to  develop  more  advance  learning. Each  week  the  teacher  can  monitor  the  progress  of  the  individual  student  through:

• • • • •

Their  response  levels  in  the  group  discussions Their  own  individual  and  collabora6ve  work  as  they  choreograph  and  learn   movement Their  performance  work   Their  evalua6ve  comments Their  wriTen  homework  in  their  movement  development  log

The  teacher  is  looking  for  a  development  in  their  understanding  of  the  key  skills  within   skills  development,  choreography,  performing  and  evalua6on  work.   At  the  end  of  each  scheme  of  work  (two  per  term)  the  students  are  assessed  by  their   teacher  using  the  following  three-­‐stage  process: • • •

Teacher  assessment:  Movement  progression  chart   Peer  assessment:  Peer  evalua6on  sheet Self  assessment  and  reflecXon  sheet

Units  include:  Exploring  movement,  Prac66oner  focuses  (Merce  Cunningham,  Martha   Graham,  Pina  Bausch),  exploring  s6mulus,  physical  theatre,  mask  and  mime,  media   and  movement  and  exploring  choreography                                                                                                        

Teacher  Responsible:  Mr  Liam  Greenall

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HumaniXes   HUMANITIES  (Geography,  History) At  ICHK  we  take  an  integrated  approach  to  humani6es,  in  which  topics  are  examined   using  the  filters  of  Geography,  History  and  Religious  Studies.  Examining  issues  in  this   way  allows  students  to  develop  the  language  and  skills  within  each  separate  discipline,   but  also  ensures  a  more  complex  understanding  of  the  issues  evolves.  That  said,  each   subject  also  has  its  own  importance  in  expanding  human  knowledge. Geography The  study  of  geography  s6mulates  an  interest  in  and  a  sense  of  wonder  about  places.   It  helps  young  people  make  sense  of  a  complex  and  dynamically  changing  world.  It   explains  where  places  are,  how  places  and  landscapes  are  formed,  how  people  and   their  environment  interact,  and  how  a  diverse  range  of  economies,  socie6es  and   environments  are  interconnected.  It  builds  on  pupils’  own  experiences  to  inves6gate   places  at  all  scales,  from  the  personal  to  the  global. Geographical  enquiry  encourages  ques6oning,  inves6ga6on  and  cri6cal  thinking  about   issues  affec6ng  the  world  and  people’s  lives,  now  and  in  the  future.  Fieldwork  is  an   essen6al  element  of  this.  Pupils  learn  to  think  spa6ally  and  use  maps,  visual  images   and  new  technologies,  including  geographical  informa6on  systems  (GIS),  to  obtain,   present  and  analyse  informa6on.  Geography  inspires  pupils  to  become  global  ci6zens   by  exploring  their  own  place  in  the  world,  their  values  and  their  responsibili6es  to   other  people,  to  the  environment  and  to  the  sustainability  of  the  planet. The  curriculum  provides  opportuniXes  for  pupils  to: • • • • • • • • •

Build  on  and  expand  their  personal  experience  of  geography   Explore  real  and  relevant  contemporary  contexts   Use  a  range  of  approaches  to  inquiries   Use  varied  resources,  including  maps,  visual  media  and  geographical  informa6on   systems   Undertake  fieldwork  inves6ga6ons  in  different  loca6ons  outside  the  classroom,   individually  and  as  part  of  a  team     Par6cipate  in  informed  responsible  ac6on  in  rela6on  to  geographical  issues  that   affect  them  and  those  around  them Examine  geographical  issues  in  the  news Inves6gate  issues  of  relevance  to  HK  and  globally  using  a  range  of  skills,  including  ICT Make  links  between  geography  and  other  subjects,  including  ci6zenship  and  ICT,  and   areas  of  the  curriculum  including  sustainability  and  global  dimension.  

History History  fires  pupils'  curiosity  and  imagina6on,  moving  and  inspiring  them  with  the   dilemmas,  choices  and  beliefs  of  people  in  the  past.  It  helps  pupils  develop  their  own   iden66es  through  an  understanding  of  history  at  personal,  local,  na6onal  and   interna6onal  levels.  It  helps  them  to  ask  and  answer  ques6ons  of  the  present  by   engaging  with  the  past.  Pupils  find  out  about  the  history  of  their  communi6es  and  the   world.  They  develop  a  chronological  overview  that  enables  them  to  make  connec6ons   within  and  across  different  periods  and  socie6es.

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HumaniXes   The  curriculum  provides  opportuniXes  for  students  to: • Explore  the  ways  in  which  the  past  has  helped  shape  iden66es,  shared  cultures,   values  and  adtudes  today • Inves6gate  aspects  of  personal,  family  or  local  history  and  how  they  relate  to  a   broader  historical  context • Appreciate  and  evaluate,  through  visits  where  possible,  the  role  of  museums,   galleries,  archives  and  historic  sites  in  preserving,  presen6ng  and  influencing   people’s  adtudes  towards  the  past • Use  ICT  to  research  informa6on  about  the  past,  process  historical  data,  and  select,   categorise,  organise  and  present  their  findings • Make  links  between  history  and  other  subjects  and  areas  of  the  curriculum,   including  ci6zenship.

Teacher  Responsible:  Mr  MarXn  Clarke

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ICT  &  Media  Studies   ICT  AND  MEDIA  STUDIES The  increasing  use  of  technology  in  all  aspects  of  society  makes  confident,  crea6ve,   produc6ve  and  informed  use  of  ICT  an  essen6al  skill  for  life.  ICT  capability   encompasses  not  only  the  mastery  of  technical  skills  and  techniques,  but  also  the   understanding  to  apply  these  skills  purposefully,  safely  and  responsibly  in  learning,   everyday  life  and  employment.  This  ICT  capability  is  fundamental  to  par6cipa6on  and   engagement  in  modern  society.   ICT  can  be  used  to  find,  develop,  analyse  and  present  informa6on,  as  well  as  to  model   situa6ons  and  solve  problems.  ICT  enables  rapid  access  to  ideas  and  experiences  from   a  wide  range  of  people,  communi6es  and  cultures,  and  allows  pupils  to  collaborate   and  exchange  informa6on  on  a  wide  scale.  ICT  acts  as  a  powerful  force  for  change  in   society  and  ci6zens  should  have  an  understanding  of  the  social,  ethical,  legal  and   economic  implica6ons  of  its  use,  including  how  to  use  ICT  safely  and  responsibly.   Increased  capability  in  the  use  of  ICT  supports  ini6a6ve  and  independent  learning,  as   pupils  are  able  to  make  informed  judgements  about  when  and  where  to  use  ICT  to   enhance  their  learning  and  the  quality  of  their  work. The  curriculum  should  provide  opportuniXes  for  pupils  to: • Make  choices  about  when  and  where  it  is  appropriate  to  exploit  technology  to   support  them  in  their  learning  and  everyday  life • Work  crea6vely  and  collabora6vely • Be  independent,  discrimina6ng  and  reflec6ve  in  choosing  when  to  use  technology • Apply  ICT  to  real-­‐world  situa6ons  when  solving  problems  and  carrying  out  a  range  of   tasks  and  enquiries • Share  their  views  and  experiences  of  ICT,  considering  the  range  of  its  uses  and  its   significance  to  individuals,  communi6es  and  society • Use  ICT  in  other  subjects  and  areas  of  learning  with  contexts  that  are  relevant  and   interes6ng  to  them • Use  their  ICT  skills  to  learn  about,  empathise  with  and  help  others  who  are  less   fortunate  than  themselves. Teacher  Responsible:  Mr  Ross  Parker

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Physical  EducaXon  (PE) PHYSICAL  EDUCATION  (PE) PE  develops  pupils’  competence  and  confidence  to  take  part  in  a  range  of  physical   ac6vi6es  that  become  a  central  part  of  their  lives,  both  in  and  out  of  school. A  high-­‐quality  PE  curriculum  enables  all  pupils  to  enjoy  and  succeed  in  many  kinds  of   physical  ac6vity.  They  develop  a  wide  range  of  skills  and  the  ability  to  use  tac6cs,   strategies  and  composi6onal  ideas  to  perform  successfully.  When  they  are  performing,   they  think  about  what  they  are  doing,  analyse  the  situa6on  and  make  decisions.  They   also  reflect  on  their  own  and  others’  performances  and  find  ways  to  improve  them.  As   a  result,  they  develop  the  confidence  to  take  part  in  different  physical  ac6vi6es  and   learn  about  the  value  of  healthy,  ac6ve  lifestyles.  Discovering  what  they  like  to  do,   what  their  ap6tudes  are  at  school,  and  how  and  where  to  get  involved  in  physical   ac6vity  helps  them  make  informed  choices  about  lifelong  physical  ac6vity. PE  helps  pupils  develop  personally  and  socially.  They  work  as  individuals,  in  groups  and   in  teams,  developing  concepts  of  fairness  and  of  personal  and  social  responsibility.   They  take  on  different  roles  and  responsibili6es,  including  leadership,  coaching  and   officia6ng.  Through  the  range  of  experiences  that  PE  offers,  they  learn  how  to  be   effec6ve  in  compe66ve,  crea6ve  and  challenging  situa6ons. The  curriculum  provides  opportuniXes  for  pupils  to: • Get  involved  in  a  broad  range  of  different  ac6vi6es  that,  in  combina6on,  develop  the   whole  body • Experience  a  range  of  roles  within  a  physical  ac6vity • specialise  in  specific  ac6vi6es  and  roles • Follow  pathways  to  other  ac6vi6es  in  and  beyond  school • Perform  as  an  individual,  in  a  group  or  as  part  of  a  team  in  formal  compe66ons  or   performances  to  audiences  beyond  the  class • Use  ICT  as  an  aid  to  improving  performance  and  tracking  progress • Make  links  between  PE  and  other  subjects  and  areas  of  the  curriculum. Teacher  Responsible:  Mr  Raymond  Chan

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Extra  Curricular  AcXviXes EXTRA  CURRICULAR  ACTIVITIES Extra-­‐curricular  ac6vi6es  are  a  cri6cal  aspect  of  the  social,  emo6onal  and  physical   development  that  students  require  to  mature  into  successful  and  well-­‐rounded  young   adults. Given  our  rural  loca6on  and  spacious  campus,  many  of  our  ac6vi6es  focus  on  outdoor   educa6on  and  apprecia6on  of  the  environment. AcXvity  Sessions: Ac6vity  sessions  take  place  twice  a  week  (one  compulsory,  one  op6onal)  and  range   from  spor6ng  and  physical  to  cultural  and  reflec6ve. Examples  of  ac6vi6es  we  offer  include:

Hockey

Basketball

School  News  Broadcas9ng

Dance

Tennis

Murals

Environmental  Ac9on

Sailing

Model  United  Na9ons  www.hkmunc.org.hk

Drama

Rugby

Judo

Journalism  Club

Yoga

Swimming

Badminton

We  also  offer  various  ac6vi6es  that  run  during  school  break  Xmes.  These  may  include   Badminton,  Table  Tennis,  Girls  Football,  and  Cross  Country.

Teachers  Responsible:  Mr  Raymond  Chan  

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Creativity,  Action,  Service  +  Environment   CAS+E  WEEK CreaHvity,  AcHon,  Service  +  Environment CAS+E  allows  students  to: Develop  as  leaders  and  team  members. Develop  their  knowledge  of  camping,  hiking  and  orienteering. Demonstrate  teamwork  through  physical  ac6vi6es  and  challenges.   Develop  their  understanding  and  apprecia6on  for  the  Chinese  Culture  and   Language   • Develop  independence  and  their  organiza6on  skills.   • • • •

Once  a  year,  all  Year  7,  8  and  9  students  take  part  in  an  off-­‐site  CAS+E  Week.  The  focus   for  each  year  group  is  as  follows:  

Year  7  students  (Camping/Team  Building/Outdoor  Ac6vi6es) In  Year  7  the  key  focus  is  for  the  students  to  begin  to  develop  an  iden6ty  as  a  form   and  with  their  tutor.  This  period  of  6me  is  quite  an  important  one  for  students  to   begin  developing  their  house  spirit  and  building  the  leadership  capacity  of  our   students. Teacher  Responsible:  Mr.  Ben  Blaine Year  8  students  (Chinese  Immersion  Programme  in  Mainland  China) Community  service  and  outdoor  ac6vi6es  feature  heavily  within  this  CAS  trip.  The   other  main  area  of  focus  is  language  development  with  all  students  studying  and   developing  their  knowledge  of  Chinese  language  and  culture  (even  if  taking   Spanish  in  school).   Teacher  Responsible:  Ms  Elaine  Long Year  9  students  (Outdoor  Adventure  Programme) The  aim  of  this  experience  is  for  students  to  develop  their  knowledge  of  first-­‐aid   and  establish  the  skills  they  will  need  to  begin  working  toward  the  Hong  Kong   Award  for  Young  People  (HKAYP).   Teacher  Responsible:  Mr  Andrew  McLeod

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Looking  Ahead  ... LOOKING  AHEAD:  GCSE  &  IGCSE  EXAMINATIONS  (YEAR  10/11) During  Years  10  and  11,  students  work  towards  their  GCSE  and  IGCSE  examina6ons   (Interna6onal  General  Cer6ficate  of  Educa6on).  Most  examina6ons  are  taken  at  the   end  of  Year  11.   The  grades  available  range  from  A*  to  G.  Normally  a  grade  C  or  above  is  recommended   for  a  student  to  con6nue  studying  a  par6cular  subject  in  Year  12  (with  a  ‘B’  normally   recommended  for  a  Higher  Level  Subject).

LOOKING  AHEAD:  IB  DIPLOMA  PROGRAMME  (IBDP) ICHK  offers  the  IB  Diploma  Programme.  The  IB  Diploma  Programme  (IBDP)  is  a  leading,   interna6onally  recognised  pre-­‐university  qualifica6on,  and  is  a  symbol  of  academic   excellence  worldwide.  Students  who  undertake  the  IBDP  demonstrate  a  strong   commitment  to  learning,  both  in  terms  of  the  mastery  of  subject  content  and  in  the   development  of  wide-­‐ranging  skills.     The  aims  of  the  IB  Diploma  Programme  are  to:     • Provide  an  interna6onally  accepted  qualifica6on  for  entry  into  higher  educa6on. • Promote  interna6onal  understanding.   • Educate  the  whole  person,  emphasizing  intellectual,  personal,  emo6onal  and  social   growth.   • Develop  inquiry  and  thinking  skills,  and  the  capacity  to  reflect  upon  and  to  evaluate   ac6ons  cri6cally The  IB  Diploma  Programme  ensures  a  balanced  curriculum  through  the  hexagon.     Students  select  one  subject  from  each  group  (see  diagram  below).  In  addi6on,   students  must  also  study  the  compulsory  core,  made  up  of  the  Extended  Essay,  Theory   of  Knowledge  (TOK)  and  a  CAS  programme.

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7 9 curriculum brochure edit aug 2013 final