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A Collection of Undergraduate Projects + Competitions

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http://archinect.com/rpeer http://lnkd.in/-zZaBm http://www.facebook.com/rpeer

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Roy Peer, Resume + Portfolio 2013 works from 2011-2013


Education College of Architecture Fall 2009- Spring 2014

University of Arizona Tucson, AZ Bachelors in Architecture College GPA (3.5) Dean’s List 2012, 2011 Academic Year Academic Distinction Leadership Institute Program: AIA National Convention Speaker Mentorship Program 2012-13: Mentor Certified Laser Technician Awards AIA Design Excellence Student Traveling Exhibition: MOCA, several architectural firms, Development Services office, etc. Manuel A. Pombo Scholarship 2012 AIA Design Excellence Fall 2011 Winner: One of eight chosen in whole studio (60) to present design proposal to actual clients Arizona Excellence Award Fall/Spring 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009

Certificate of Achievement International Youth Sketch Design Competition: Shortlist: Summer 2011

Professional Experience

Project Designer 01/2013-present Sustainable City Project Tucson, AZ

Skills Personal Outlook Autodesk: Revit, Auto CAD, 3Ds Max, I believe that architecture Maya, Ecotect Analysis, Map 3D

Revit Instructor 09/2012-present Treehouse Design Group

Adobe: Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Premiere, Audition, Acrobat

Revit Technician + Graphic Presentation Drawings 08/2012-present Treehouse Design Group

Other: Rhino, Grasshopper, Sketch Up, Kerkythea 2008, Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Adforce, Classforce

Tucson, AZ

Tucson, AZ

Designer 08/2012-present The Daily Wildcat

Miscellaneous AIAS: 2012-2013 Languages: English & Hebrew

Project Designer 05/2012-08/2012 & 05/2011-08/2011 Quality Assurance 05/2010-08/2010 Data Entry for Amoeba Music Project 05/2009-09/2009 Casamba Inc.

References Susannah Dickinson

Tucson, AZ

Los Angeles, CA

Laboratory Manager 08/2010-05/2011 University of Arizona Tucson, AZ

President of Pledge Class 08/2010-01/2011 Beta Theta Pi Tucson, AZ

Studio Professor

srd@email.arizona.edu

should be a reflection of our zeitgeist.

It

should

reflect

today’s status quo in the cultural, social, economic, and political realms.

Our work, our manifestations, should be the artifacts that respond to these realms and seek to solve today’s issues.

Paul Reimer

preimer@email.arizona.edu

Let these issues not be viewed

Cynthia Callahan

as problematic, but as an

cynthiac@email.arizona.edu

Curt Enrich

Treehouse Design Group Principle

curt@treehousedesigngroup.com

(818) 585-5781 royepeer@gmail.com age:21 hometown: LA

Studio Professor

The Daily Wildcat Design Coordinator

RÉSUMÉ

websites: http://archinect.com/rpeer

opportunity for progress and

http://lnkd.in/-zZaBm

innovation.

http://www.facebook.com/rpeer

ROY E PEER

ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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2009-present

Years of Creative Events


A Collection of Undergraduate Projects + Competitions Roy E Peer cell: (818) 585-5781 email: royepeer@gmail.com http://archinect.com/rpeer http://lnkd.in/-zZaBm http://www.facebook.com/rpeer ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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01 ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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INFORMATION + COLLABORATION CENTER ARC 401 2012

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AECOM URBAN SOS SUMMER 2012

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DOWNTOWN MARKET PLACE ARC 302 2012

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THE WAITING ROOM ARC 302 2012

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UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS CAMPUS ARC 301 2011

Site: Tucson, AZ

Site: Manhattan, NY

Site: Tucson, AZ

Site: Catalina Foothills, AZ

Site: Tucson, AZ

Program: Library

Program: City Bridge

Program: Mix Use

Program: Viewport

Program: Sanctuary

Scale: L

Scale: XL

Scale: L

Scale: S

Scale: M

[STARTS ON PAGE 06]

[STARTS ON PAGE 14]

[STARTS ON PAGE 018]

[STARTS ON PAGE 22]

[STARTS ON PAGE 24]


01

INFORMATION + COLLABORATION CENTER ARC 401 2012

With the site located in Tucson, AZ. This information + collaboration center lies in a campus full of a variety + culture. Tucson's is not as mixed + it's climate features harsh rays all year long.

When thinking of the mixture of ideas, talents, + thought I studied the insect, who in the need to collect pollen, cross pollinates the flowers it visits.

The symbolic relationship between pollinator + pollen benefits both parties. In search of creating cross pollination in architecture, I studied the "chance like" city Rem describes in Delirious New York, + Tschumis's cross pollination principles. ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

From these precedents the program

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06

begins to intersect, collect, + even avoid each other in hopes of creating not an organized program but spontaneous events.

This is human entomophily.

2013


ELLER

Undergraduates:

5,476

Public Stair 300X4=1,200 Public Rest rooms 300X2X4=2,400 Cafe Deliveries 200 General Loading Area 200 1 1 200 Mechanical 2,000 1 4 8,000 Janitorial Storage 500 1 4 2,000 Elevators 100 2 4 800 Exit Stairs 300 2 4 2,400 17,200

0101010010001111010110 1010100100011110101101 0101001000111101011010 1010010001111010110101 0100100011110101101010 1001000111101011010101 0010001111010110101010 0100011110101101010100 1000111101011010101001 0001111010110101010010 0011110101101010100100

is a form of pollination whereby pollen or spores are distributed by insects. ENTOMOPHILY IN NATURE

Graduate:

Large Work Room 400 Medium Work Room 250 Large Study Room (8-10) 200X11=2,200 Small Study Room (4-5) 75X16=1,200 Conference Room 200X2=400 Visiting Faculty Office 100X8=800 Audio Visual Lab 100X2=200 Music Rehearsal Room 100X4=400

service

Entomophily:

collaboration

POLLINATORS

POLLEN/INFORMATION

90,193

117

Total:

549

OTHER VEHICULAR

609

Total:

2,875

SOCIAL COMMUNITIES

COMPUTER ENGINEERS

609

URBAN SPACE

HUMAN ENTOMOPHILY (A CROSS POLLINATION OF DISCIPLINES)

awareness

CENTRAL HUB

STUDENT UNION

Total:

Graduate:

2,875

CALA

663

Undergraduates:

432

Total:

Daily Visitors:

Graduate:

117

6,139

SITE

Total:

549

ARTS

18,800

FUNCTIONALITY ARCHITECTURE

ART UNION GOERS

2,266

Graduate:

5,476

public

visibility

FORCE INTEREST

BICYCLISTS

Engineering

Undergraduates:

Undergraduates:

Gallery 1,500 Gallery Private Collections 4,000 Auditorium 6,000 1 Library Collections 7,000 1 Community Meeting Room 300

exterior 5,000 public

Lobby + Reception 3,000 Café 500 Library Reference 1,500

events in space

CALA

2,266

Graduate:

3,560

ELLER

Open Study Area 9,000 1 Study Carrels 70X60=4,200

13,200

432

Graduate:

Engineering Undergraduates:

22,000

Breakout 120 Coffee 200 IT 220 Storage 120 Servers 900 Administration Offices 2,000

admin

82,693

sf TOTAL w EXTERIOR

CALA

Undergraduates:

SITE

Daily Visitors:

BGSF TOTAL based on 30% Multiplier

7,500

6,139

352

Total:

1,946

63,610

ext.

Total:

1,594

Graduate:

STUDENT UNION

5,850

NASF TOTAL Outdoor Café 1,500 Exterior Terrace 6,000

663

ARTS

Undergraduates:

collaboration

22,000

Undergraduates:

1,594

Graduate:

352

Total:

1,946

COLLABORATION CENTER + SITE FORCES

points

lines

planes

solids

changes in sensory experience:

movement and path:

space definers:

program:

entrance

stairs

opaque walls

library

exits

hallways

translucent walls

art gallery

thresholds

walkways

ceilings

auditorium

interactions

elevators

floors

reception

events

areas of rotation

negative space by-product

study rooms

moments

areas for movement

material

bathrooms

points help dictate changes in space

lines are the movement between dif-

Before solids come planes, and ulti-

solids, or pieces of program, can be

along paths or changes in sensory

ferent experiences.

mately

the

negative

designed in the same fashion as lines

solids

and

adjacent

intake. if the user experiences a

space

between

spatially

to

threshold this is considered a point.

when designing with lines and points

if a user is exposed to a new smell

we deconstruct common notions about

or change in air pressure, this is

circulation and begin to integrate it

What

considered a point. Whether or not

more closely to the program.

building and the surrounding site?

people

naturally

travel

between

point. hence the saying, “from point in

experience

there

movement of the user, or of the surroundings perceived.

spaces

between

your

tion you will find a space that defines its overall composition.

building exposed, hidden, or focused?

interesting events occur when whole

tunities and events that can result

Planes can be made of any material

pieces of program begin to build

from line and point design.

but

relationships.

the

importance

is

the

formal

space it creates. library [target] point b

when the standard line is modified the user can be exposed to different points along the path. this gives the architect more control, and allows the user to experience new events in space.

PAGE

With planes one can manipulate the experience by concentrating on how the spaces and points are created

study

gallery

through the movement of lines around

[origin] point a

07

the

must

almost always be movement whether the

PORTFOLIO

within ever line and point configuraare

diagrammed below are different oppor-

a to point b.” but for there to be a change

and points.

points and lines.

What is seen, is it a treat or is your

the change was consciously observed.

ROY PEER

N

space.

[target] point b

user b

library

systems/circulation

study

y

ext. auditorium

information

auditorium

admin

collaboration

er

systems/circulation plan parti

section parti

study parking

program diagram

gallery library

ll

cross of paths: event created

user a

ga

when the paths cross between two different used the opprotunity for an event, or meeting, or change in awareness of the other can occur.

[origin] point a

cafe

gallery

library

study

lobby

parking

parking

N

Interior View of Library, Art Gallery, Study Carrels


A

20

19

A

11

10

B

B

3 15

2

8

15

A

6

15

2

9

5

B

modular components

module in plan

15

1 3

legend 1

lobby

2

study carrel

3

gallery

4 5 6 15

7

15

16

10

19

17

LEVEL 2

18

SCALE 1/16”=1’0”

NORTH:

level 1-2 stair

level 1-2 stair

19

5

auditorium insulation

library libary reference meeting room

8

s study room

9

m study room

10

l study room

11

conference

12

admin

14

exterior steel

15

mullion

16

4

13

servers

15 14

it

15

stair

16

elevator

17

loading area

20

module assembly

15

19

19

19

18

mechanical

19

bathroom

20

storage

21

cafe seating

20

18 2

15

SCALE 1/16”=1’0”

LEVEL 4

19

NORTH:

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

modules in elevation

level 5

level 4

15

6

15

1

cafe 5 2

8

gallery

gallery

15

15

16

rendering view point

library 16

exterior auditorium 19

13 12

18 14

LEVEL 1

point + line principles applied

SCALE 1/16”=1’0”

higher speed circulation

15

15

SCALE 1/16”=1’0”

NORTH:

cross programming principles applied 15

15

LEVEL 3

NORTH:

15

ROY PEER

15

19

19

19

PORTFOLIO

modules in response to site

20

19

PAGE

08

21

15

15

19

15

19

19

7

19

15

15

6

5

6

6

21

4

1

5

5

2

3

15

4

9 1

2

2

2

5

8

15

8

21

8

3

4

16

2 15 16

1

15

15

15

15

16

16

16

16

10 20

1 lobby 19

19

13

13

14

14

2 study carrel

19

3 study room 12

4 library

12

5 art gallery 6 cafe

ON PARKING 1 18RAMP ONLY 18

18

7 exterior auditiorium

N

8 auditiorium LEVEL 1 LEVEL 1

S-N SECTION

SCALESCALE 1/16”=1’0” 1/16”=1’0”

SCALE 1/16”=1’0”

15

15

NORTH: NORTH:

NORTH:

LEVEL LEVEL 3 LEVEL 3 -1/2

SCALE 1/16”=1’0” SCALE SCALE 1/16”=1’0” 1/16”=1’0”

NORTH: NORTH: NORTH:

LEVEL 5

SCALE 1/16”=1’0”

9 admin NORTH: 10 parking

PERSPECTIVE LOOKING SOUTH

15

Skin System

15

20

20

Exterior View


7

8

5

6

5

4

9

4

3

ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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2 1

10

1 lobby 2 study carrel 3 study room 4 library 5 art gallery 6 cafe 7 exterior auditiorium 8 auditiorium 9 admin 10 parking


ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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Circulation space leading to the library. Note, the systems are visible below ones feet, allowing one to learn and visually see how and where they lead. Low opacity is vital in creating awareness. When you see the pieces of program and the activity that happens within them, curiosity is bound to emerge.


ROOF SYSTEM/MODULE

glazing

solar panels

solar panels

N

glazing

floor structure

structure structure

water proofing water proofing

floor glazing

cable track

hot/cold water supply

hvac

concrete

steel panels insulation

structural glass

truss mullion

supply fans

ROY PEER

cable track

PORTFOLIO

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hot/cold water supply

floor glazing

floor structure

concrete

Exploded Bay

FIRST FLOOR STAIR LOOKING NORTH


ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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1/16” Structural Model

1/4” Section Model


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1/16� Model with Site

Site Model Completed by members of Brad Lang Studio Fall 2012


02

AECOM URBAN SOS COMPETITION SUMMER 2012

Let's cross a frontier; one that has been unsuccessfully attempted, and not widely applied. Bridge cities. Living on a bridge brings great value to many fields related and adjacent to architecture. Architecturally living over a river is a first pass to a new kind of excitement. From a developer's point of view, you have the height of a high-rise, and you are exposed to the water. But how come this idea has not been exploited all over the globe? The biggest issue with this scale is the lack of urban outdoor green space. And after analyzing the past, it can help better design the future. The answer to creating a better city ROY PEER

bridge is the combination of commercial,

PORTFOLIO

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14

residential, and urban space all within a functional infrastructure. Instead of creating more conventional bridges, we can use the structure of the bridge to facilitate a city. In a city that already so dense, the transition from bridge to city can be seamless, bringing the rest of NYC and the NJ area closer.

2013


Site

Precedent

The Ponte Vecchio

Where: Florence, Italy When: 996-1345 Who: Taddeo Gaddi

Many of the precedents that have been executed lack a great urban space. The Pointe Vecchio in Florence creates a great

London Bridge

human condition along the bridge. Some may even forget they are traveling

Where: London, England When: 1176-1209

across a bridge due to the markets and street life that exists on the bridge. But the scale is not appropriate for span of the Hudson. The Skyscraper Bridge by

Chateau Chenonceau

Raymond Hood was never brought to fruition. The

Where: Loire Valley, France When: 1515-1521 Who: Thomas Bohier

biggest issue with this scale is the lack of urban outdoor green space. After analyzing the past, it can help better design the future.

Pulteney Bridge

Where: Bath, England When: 1773

The site lies over the Hudson River between Upper West Side Manhattan, NY, and North Bergen, NJ. These cites both have existing parks and have a relationship that, although

Skyscraper Bridges

physically divided by the Hudson, is extremely strong, not only with view but with hu-

Who: Raymond Hood

man activity. Everyday millions of people travel to Manhattan for work and pleasure. Many different types of transportation are currently being used, such as ferries, subways, trains, automobile, buses, and certain types of aircraft.

Bridge of Houses

A connection between these two cities will break the frontier that the Hudson has

Where: New York City When: 1981 Who: Steven Holl

physically created and bring the communities closer together. Images: The Bay Line Case Study Submission #: P1140 http://sf.streetsblog.org/wp-content/upload1/TheBayLineWPA2.O.PDF

Concept

Program Instead of creating more

1

conventional bridges, we can use the structure of the bridge to facilitate a city. In a city that is already so dense, the transition from bridge to city can be

2

seamless, bringing the rest of NYC and the NJ area closer. 3

4

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5

6

7

New York City is one of the most expensive dollars/sqft2 areas in the United States. Everyday millions of people travel through and to the Manhattan area. And as we escalate up from the street level the price of real estate increases. The same can be said as we get closer to the waterfront. Theoretically the highest floor on the waterfront holds the most value.

$$ $$$$ $ $$$ $ $ $$ $ $

Why build only on the available land? Why not build on the water? Why not connect the millions of people who travel from and to Manhattan and create a beautiful place to live. The proposal is briefly explored, and the numbers are staggering. Let’s create a new urban area, while bringing the Manhattan area, and the burros and states around it closer. Bridge cities in the past have created an inhabitable connection of two different areas of interest. Let’s take a look at how it has been done before.

$ $$ $$ $ $$ $$ Existing Building Conditions

Dollar/Square Foot

$$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$ $$

Building Diagram for most desired real estate

$ $$ $$ $ $$$$

What if you building on the water?

LEGEND 1

Urban Park

2

Residential Units

3

Commercial/Civil Units

4

Bridge Highway

5

Bridge Structure

6

Elevators to/from Beaches

7

Public Beaches


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Residential Units & Park


ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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Beach Landing


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DOWNTOWN MARKET PLACE ARC 302 2012

The third year studio was asked to design a mixed use market place with a site that existed on the border of a dense downtown, and a quiet neighborhood. The initial response was in hope of creating balance, and creating a place where the synergy of the two opposite neighborhoods could merge in harmony.

From Broadway

The north, downtown edge, featured heavy traffic (public transportation, automobiles, bicycles, and pedestrians) in which the design proposed a public orchard. If one was to walk from this public orchard which functioned as a park as well, they would progressively make their way into the market, or the center of the sites differences. Once continuing past the market one would find themselves in a green scape that encourages community based activities (soccer fields, storytelling areas, and places of private relaxation.

Lower Market

When one travels vertically you pass the more public areas on the ground floor and make your way to the private dwellings above; arranged in response to the solar conditions of the harsh Tucson sun.

ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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The market itself served two primary purposes; a day-to-day interior market and a weekly exterior farmers market in which the neighborhood could engage in. To achieve a more synthesized relationship between the permanent market spaces and the weekly farmers the faรงade of the markets were operable. When raised there was no longer a distinction between interior or exterior, or, permanent or temporary. The marketplace could be one.

2nd Floor Cafe

Site Plan

2013


7 6

6

1

3

1

1

3

4

8

1

4

5 6

7

6

1

Market

2 Cafe 3 Condo 4 Suite

6

5 Bike Parking 6 Parking 7 Greenscape 8 Offices

ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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Public Park

Neighborhood Greenscape

ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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20

Outdoor Market Area


Shaded Public Space

Circulation to 2nd Floor

ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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Residential Units


04

THE WAITING ROOM ARC 302 2012

The city of Tucson lies in a vast valley surrounded by beautiful mountains. Naturally the city's fabric is constructed within the valley but begins to fade away as the topography becomes less forgiving. Only the wealthy live in the private homes, although even those diminish after one enters the mountain's canyon. The Waiting Room, a small-scale rest space amongst the mountain trail is designed to create awareness. Siting on the edge of the mountain it waits to be understood. The chosen site reveals three different types of human inhabitance, almost a gradient change from human to natural habitat. The waiting room consists of a central room with three openings. The central room shares no relationship ROY PEER

with the sun or views, leaving the

PORTFOLIO

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22

inhabitant disoriented. Only through double shelled roofing and angles walls can light enter. Each opening points the user to a different condition of the city: the valley, the mountain side, the canyon. Will the waiting room ever create awareness by a passing hiker? Will this inspire thoughts of our inhabit-

“Building transcends physical and functional requirements by fusing with a place, by gathering the meaning of a situation. Architecture does not so much intrude on a landscape as it serves to explain it.� (Steven Holl, Anchoring)

ance in cities? Should we live in a manmade valley or amongst dense nature and can a room help to explain this?

2013


LOCATION ON TRAIL

SITE PHOTOS

SITE PANORAMA

ENTRANCE/EXIT

CANYON/CITY/MOUNTAIN

Visual views through room exits.

REARRANGED

HUMAN INHABITANT GRADIENT

ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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23

ROOM DISORIENTATION

A panorama that places the room’s location into perspective.

The user centered within the waiting room. Visual allowance is represented through shading opacity.


05

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS CAMPUS ARC 301 2011

The Unitarian Universalists have an unique goal within their religious endeavours. They are open to all kinds of religious practice. In an architectural sense the response must accommodate all types of religious rituals. The campus called for a sanctuary, a chapel, a school, an administration office, and a social gathering place. When designing the sanctuary the objective was not set a hierarchy between religions but to break all hierarchy in order to respect all UU goes. The floor plan is made of alternating slabs, all at different heights but easily walkable, just like any stair. Each block left room for a number of activities including: preachable area, choir space, praying plinths, processions, audience seating, etc. This allowed the space to never be defined by form, but defined by its inhabitants. The rest of the campus held close to a system of roof structure. One for the land, which was designed to allow the earth to cover the program below. One for humans, which allowed teachers to have a bird's eye view of the students playing below, or turning a outdoor space into an outdoor auditorium. The last is for spiritual experience, designed in such a way that when the south sun struck its reflective metal it would bounce onto a opaque lightly colored panel which was offset to allow ambient light to enter the spaces, instead of the harsh direct rays of the sun. Through these systems the campus seeks to acknowledge the user and land we intrude on.

ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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The path leading to the UU sanctuary entrance.

2013


UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST

TAKEN GIVEN TAKEN GIVEN TAKEN GIVEN GIVEN

ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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TAKEN

CAMPUS CONCEPT

GIVEN

The site features programs such as a multifunctional parking lot, a school, administration building, social hall, exterior coffee room, a chapel, and the sanctuary. Hierarchically the sanctuary holds the most value to the clients; respecting this the other pieces of program are assembled to reveal and hide the sanctuary [or treat.] Before one makes their way to the sanctuary they must pass through the other pieces of program. Each space before controls the visibility of the treat, some whose relationship focuses and others whose deny view according to program necessity. Subsequently each “given� moment reveals different levels or details and perspective of the sanctuary. Essentially this began as an investigation of the use of planes and controlling user experience and later developed into the forms shown in the animation frames above.


Exterior Block Space

Storage WC

Conditional Block Space

Coffee Area Exterior Sitting

Kitchen

Chapel

Exterior Sitting

WC Coffee Area

Exterior Sitting

Kitchen

Exterior Sitting

WC Activity Area

Exterior Sitting

Kitchen

Exterior Sitting

WC

Play Area Sandbox

Teachers Lounge

Confrence

Classroom

Offices

Information Center & Waiting Area

Classroom Classroom

Classroom

Parking Lot / Market Area / Wedding Space

Parking Lot / Market Area / Wedding Space

ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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This section perspective displays the activity around and within the different building systems. The interior serves the many rituals of the UU, the stair roof serves as an auditorium for the arts and lectures, and the double skin system (to the left) creates an area to admire the nature that surrounds the site.


Building Systems

To Distort Hierarchy The module varies in height giving the floor plan a distorted hierarchy. Due to the multiple religions with different rituals the floor plan serves all religions by not serving one specifically. ROY PEER PORTFOLIO

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27

The space between the floor slab and the seated area houses the mechanical systems and lighting, creating the affect of lightness in the space.

To Control Light This double skin system filters the harsh sun and allows a minimal amount of light to enter the space. Light is important in most religious spaces, and the skin aims to create moments where light can penetrate through, and others where the light hold ambient qualities. The reflectivity of the concrete and the mirror (which exists on the other side) reflects whatever light that isn’t absorbed by the concrete to enter the space in an ambient fashion.

Light Studies Module Detailed Section

To Accommodate Us This system has bifunctional attributes as a roof and as auditorium seating. The risers of the steps function as a series of windows and allows another opportunity for ambient light to enter the space. The variance of three different stair sets allows for the void spaces that they create to change the openness of the space below.

Light Studies


Roy Peer, Resume + Portfolio

2013


Roy Peer Undergraduate Portfolio 2013