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UW-­W  instructor  recalls  his  reaction   to  9/11  when  in  Kosovo,  Serbia Page  10

September  11,  2013

Evolution of  campus focus of  lecture

Men’s  soccer  looks  to  reclaim   WIAC  championship  title Page  16

www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

 

   Established  1901

’Hawks hurdle Bears

By Katie Kane Staff  Writer

Fairhaven   Retirement   Com-­ munity  in  Whitewater  held  a  lec-­ ture  open  to  the  public  that  high-­ lighted  critical  events  and  people   at  UW-­Whitewater.   Chancellor   Richard   Telfer   presented   the   lecture.     He   spoke   mostly  about  the  evolution  of  our   campus   from   1983   to   2013.     He   touched  on  new  and  old  buildings   and   how   our   campus   is   working   to   be   more   sustainable.   He   also   spoke   on   technology   and   how   it   has   become   such   a   huge   part   of   student  life  since  1983. Kari   Boren,   outreach   pro-­ gram   manager   at   UW-­Whitewa-­ ter,  works  with  Fairhaven  to  pro-­ vide   these   free   lectures   that   are   available  to  the  public. ”This   is   an   opportunity   for   us   to   extend   our   reach   beyond   campus   and   really   to   increase   our   outreach   efforts   to   the   com-­ munity   and   letting   our   faculty   and   staff   share   their   expertise   in   some   of   their   research   areas,”   Boren  said. Fairhaven  has  a  lecture  each   Monday   during   the   semester,   each  highlighting  a  different  top-­ ic  with  different  guest  speakers. Resident   Gerrie   Carney   rec-­ ommends  them  to  all  students “These   lectures   are   well   worth   attending,”   Carney   said.     “It’s  great  to  learn  about  different   things  going  on.”   Many   residents   wish   to   see   more   students   and   community   members   at   the   lectures   to   bring   in  more  ideas  and  a  different  in-­ sight. Gloria   Madsen,   director   of   leisure   services   at   Fairhaven,   is   excited   about   the   advances   in   technology  and  being  able  to  re-­ ally   give   people   an   insight   into   where  UW-­Whitewater  is  headed. “This   is   a   form   of   continu-­ ing  education,  and  we  are  able  to   look  at  what  actually  is  going  on   at  the  university,”  Madsen  said. Eric   Brown,   assistant   pro-­ fessor   of   biological   studies,   will   speak  next  Monday  about  Nano-­ technology’s  impact  on  our  lives   during  the  last  30  years.     KaneKL16@uww.edu

Dan Pomykalski photo/3RP\NDOVNL'-#XZZHGX

Junior starting running back Ryan Givens, right, led the Warhawks with 51 yards on eight carries on the ground through three quarters before sophomore running back Dennis Moore took over in the fourth quarter. Givens and Moore helped the ’Hawks score 17 unanswered points to start the 2013 season 1-0 with a 17-7 win.

New advising report up and running New  features  focus  on   better  interface  for  users By Lucas Wimmer Assistant  News  Editor

Students  are  now  able  to  en-­ joy  a  newly  remodeled  academic   advising   report   after   the   Reg-­ LVWUDU¶V 2I¿FH LPSOHPHQWHG WKH streamlined  version  of  the  report   in  mid-­July. The   new   AAR   focuses   on   ease   for   the   user.   The   require-­ ments   have   become   collapsible,   completed   requirements   have   a   green   check   mark   next   to   them,   and  there  is  an  option  to  print  as   D3')¿OH R e s p o n s e   from   the   student   body   has   been   generally   posi-­ tive. During   the   last   school   year,   concerns   were   Kopper raised  to  Provost   Beverly   Kopper   about   both   the   readability   and   the   usability   of   the  advising  report.   Junior   Amy   Rubo   said   the   new   design   is   better   because   it  

lets  her  do  what  she  needs  to  do   faster  than  the  old  advising  report   allowed  her  to. “You   can   get   to   what   you   need   faster   in-­ stead   of   having   to   look   for   it,”   she  said. Junior   Cor-­ rinne   Valleskey   likes   the   new   way   the   report   Valleskey is   designed   be-­ cause   things   are   more   organized   and   easier   to   ¿QG ³,W LV GH¿QLWHO\ PRUH RUJD nized,”  Valleskey  said.    “It’s  eas-­ ier   to   see   what   you   have   com-­ pleted.” Junior   Cay-­ la   Lee   prefers   the   new   advis-­ ing   report   to   the   old   advising   re-­ Rubo port   because   it   is  easier  to  read,  which  makes  it   easier  to  prepare  for  advising  ap-­ pointments. “It’s   easier   to   read,   because   what  you  have  completed  is  col-­

lapsed,”  Lee  said. make   it   user-­friendly,”   Prather   All  three  students  agreed  the   said.   “We   have   been   working   new  report  will  make  it  easier  to   with  it  since  June  or  July.” be  prepared  for  their  advising  ap-­ During   the   summer,   there   pointments   by   were   training   sessions   on   how   allowing   them   to   use   the   new   AAR   for   stu-­ to  be  more  orga-­ dents  and  staff,  academic  advisor   nized   and   more   Jacque  Pittz  said. prepared.   Registrar   Jodi   Hare   said   The   new   more   of   these   training   sessions   AAR   has   cre-­ will   be   available   during   the   se-­ ated   an   ease   on   mester,   but   they   will   be   targeted   Lee the  advisors  and   more   toward   staff,   advisors   and   the  students.   support  staff. Some   of   the   academic   ad-­ During   the   summer,   train-­ visors   had   the   ing   sessions   opportunity   to   were   available   work   with   the   at   least   once   a   t’s  easier  to  read,   week.   During   Registrar’s   Of-­ ¿FH WR PDNH because  what  you  have   some   weeks,   sure   the   goals   were  avail-­ completed  is  collapsed. they   were   met.   One   able   multiple   of   those   advi-­ days. Cayla  Lee, sors   was   Benja-­ H o w e v e r,   junior the  training  ses-­ min  Prather. Prather  said   sions   will   be   working   with   held  to  once  per   the   Registrar’s   week  during  the   RI¿FHKHOSHGPDNHWKH$$5HDV semester,   and   they   will   only   be   ier  to  use  for  students. held  until  advising  appointments   “We   had   some   input   with   See  Advising  Page  3 WKH 5HJLVWUDU¶V 2I¿FH RQ KRZ WR

   I

Student-­Run  Weekly  Newspaper  at  the  University  of  Wisconsin-­Whitewater


News

Dateline Page 2 Here Royal Purple

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com September 11, 2013

Campus Briefs Fraternity  Information   Night The   Interfraternity   Council   will   hold   an   information   night   from  8  to  10  p.m.  Wednesday,   Sept.  11  in  the  Old  Main  Ball-­ room.  There  will  be  short  pre-­ sentations   from   each   chapter   followed  by  a  question  and  an-­ swer  session.   University  Holds  Global   Experience  Fair The   University   will   hold   a   Global   Experience   Fair   from   10   a.m.   to   3   p.m.   Thursday,   Sept.   12   in   the   mall   between   Hyland  Hall  and  the  University   Center.  More  than  600  interna-­ tional   education   opportunities   in  more  than  50  countries  will   be  covered.  In  the  case  of  rain,   the   fair   will   be   moved   to   the   Hamilton  Room  in  the  Univer-­ sity  Center. Scholarship  Workshop   Planned  for  Study  Abroad   Students The  College  of  Letters  and   Sciences   will   run   a   workshop   for  students  applying  for  schol-­ arships   for   study   abroad   pro-­ grams   from   4   to   5   p.m.   Mon-­ day,   Sept.   6   in   Hyland   Hall   Room   1001.   Students   must   be   attending  a  travel  study  at  least   four   weeks   long   and   currently   be  receiving  a  Pell  Grant.

University  Honors  Pro-­ gram  Hosts  Open  House The  University  Honors  Pro-­ gram   will   host   an   open   house   from   4   to   5:30   p.m.   Tuesday,   Sept.  17  in  the  Hamilton  Room   at  the  University  Center.    Peo-­ ple   in   attendance   will   learn   about  the  honors  program  from   students   and   staff   currently   participating. Career  and  Leadership   Development  Offers  Resume   Doctor The   Career   and   Leader-­ VKLS 'HYHORSPHQW 2I¿FH ZLOO offer   services   through   the   Re-­ sume  Doctor  from  1  to  4  p.m.   Tuesday,   Sept.   17   at  Andersen   Library.   The   service   provides   students   with   an   opportunity   to   get   advice   on   how   to   make   their   resume   recruiter   ready.   No  appointment  is  necessary. Warhawk  Alley  Hosts   Madden  Tournament A   Madden   25   tournament   will  be  held  at  7  p.m.  Tuesday,   Sept.   17   in   Warhawk  Alley   in   the  University  Center.  The  cost   of   entry   is   $5,   and   the   winner   will   receive   4,000   Microsoft   points.   The   tournament   is   sin-­ gle  elimination,  and  the  top  two   ¿QLVKHUVZLOOUHFHLYHSUL]HV

Dan Pomykalski photo/3RP\NDOVNL'-#XZZHGX

Construction equipment sits outside the Andersen Library while workers are on break. The drive behind the building will be a one-way circle drive when the project is completed in November 2013.

Campus  project  underway By Michael Riley News  Editor

Access   to   the   Andersen   Li-­ brary  will  be  limited  due  to  a  con-­ struction   project   that   has   broken   ground   on   the   north   side   of   the   Andersen   Library   that   will   limit   the  access  to  several  entrances  to   students  and  faculty.   Door  3,  where  students  have   traditionally   entered   the   library   from  Parking  Lot  12,  will  not  be   available. If   students   do   try   to   enter   from   Lot   12,   they   are   advised   to   enter   Door   7,   walk   past   the  

UWW-­TV   station   and   take   the   next  right.    Exit  Door  12.   The   pedestrian   courtyard   and  Door  12  will  remain  open  as   usual.     Director   of   Facilities   Plan-­ ning   and   Man-­ agement   Greg   Swanson   said   the   project   is   meant  to  accom-­ plish   a   number   Swanson of  different  goals   focusing  on  improving  safety.     ³7KH¿UVWJRDOLVWKHVHUYLFH for   the   disabled   was   dangerous   EHFDXVHRIWKDWGULYHZD\FRQ¿J uration.   This   change   is   going   to   improve  service  to  the  disabled,”   Swanson  said.  “The  second  thing   was  safety,  related  to  the  disabled   and  student  pedestrians.” The   problem   with   the   old   design   was   it   was   all   two-­way   WUDI¿F XS WKH GULYH DQG ZLWK WKH

changes,  it  will  now  be  a  one  way   circle  drive. “Visibility   will   be   greatly   enhanced,  and  therefore  it  will  be   much  safer  for  students  who  walk   up   from   Cottage   Street,   along   Main  Street  and  from  the  eastside   of  the  library,”  Swanson  said.           Another   advantage   of   the   new   project   includes   a   parking   space  for  service  deliveries.     “What   they   were   doing   be-­ fore   was   service,   or   more   im-­ portantly   delivery   trucks   would   come   and   block   the   area   while   they   were   doing   deliveries,”   Swanson   said.     “Now   we   will   have  a  designated  spot  for  them,   so  they  won’t  encroach,  or  essen-­ WLDOO\ FDXVH REVWDFOHV IRU WUDI¿F in  and  out  of  that  area.”     The  project  is  supposed  to  be   completed   sometime   in   Novem-­ ber.       RileyMP30@uww.edu


Dateline Here11, 2013 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com September

Police Report Arn,  Cody  A., Underage   Alcohol   Consump-­ tion 09/01/2013

Hansen,  Robert  C., Underage   Alcohol   Consump-­ tion 08/29/2013  

Bauer,  Jordann  M.,   Inattentive  Driving   09/05/2013

Hytry,  Kallie  A., Underage   Alcohol   Consump-­ tion 09/05/2013

Benz,  Anthony  J.,     Exceeding  Speed  Zones   08/30/2013

Elegreet,  Brittany  J., Liquor/Beer  In  Public  Place 08/29/2013  

Figarino,  Samuel  A., Damage  to  Private  Property 09/08/2013 Ford,  Joseph  J., Underage   Alcohol   Consump-­ tion,   Failure   To   Obey   Police   2I¿FHU 09/06/2013

Garhart,  Jacob  T., Liquor/Beer  In  Public  Place 08/30/2013   Garski,  Trenton  J., Exceeding  Speed  Zones 09/02/2013

Jones,  Marcus  A., Operating   Motor   Vehicle   Without  Insurance,  Inattentive   Driving,  Hit  &  Run-­  Involving   Injury,  Hit  &  Run-­  Unattended   Vehicle 08/29/2013  

Matute,  April  J., Disorderly  Conduct-­  Fighting 09/01/2013

Meyers,  Kevin  R.,   Underage   Alcohol   Consump-­ tion   09/07/2013

Pilon,  Brittany  R., Theft-­  Petty 08/31/2013

Ralston,  Amber  R., Underage   Alcohol   Consump-­ tion,  Public  Intoxication 08/31/2013

The  Royal  Purple  only  publishes  police  reports  which  feature UW-­Whitewater  students,  faculty  and  staff.  These  reports  are  public   record  and  are  available  through  the  City  of  Whitewater  website  under   the  Daily  Press  Releases  tab.  No  omissions,  exceptions or  requests  will  be  considered.  

Help Wanted at Rock Bottom!

Join our fun, friendly atmosphere as the newest member of Vinnie’s staff! You just need to be energetic, honest, and reliable! Experience helps, but is NOT a prerequisite. Please respond via email to 1966vinnie@charter.net or come by in person at 123 W. Milwaukee Street, Jefferson 53549

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Advising

Royal Purple Page33 Continued  from  page  1

begin   to   be   heavily   scheduled,   we  needed  to.  That  part  went  re-­ Hare  said. ally  well.” Pittz  said  she  is  pleased  with   Hare   said   there   were   some   how  the  AAR  turned  out  because   issues   in   the   Quantitative   and   it  is  easier  for  the  students  to  use.   Technical   Reasoning   section   of   “It   is   very   user-­friendly   for   the   University   Requirements   on   students   in   re-­ the   AAR   during   gards   to   being   ¿UVWODXQFK able   to   print   To   resolve   off   a   version   this,   the   Reg-­ of   their   AAR,”   LVWUDU¶V 2I¿FH Pittz   said.   “It   worked   with   was   challenging   the   College   of   to   do   that   in   the   Letters   and   Sci-­ Prather Pittz past.” ences   to   rewrite   She   said   the   new   printing   those   areas   of   the  AAR.  Almost   feature   helps   the   students   print   all   the   issues   have   been   cleared   without   losing   information   from   up,  Hare  said. their  AAR   that   they   were   trying   “If   someone   brings   an   is-­ to  copy  and  paste.   sue  to  us,  it  is  usually  addressed   Prather   also   was   happy   with   within  24  hours,”  Hare  said.  “We   the   new   design,   and   he   said   the   try   our   hardest   AAR  is  better  organized  now  be-­ to   get   a   resolu-­ cause   it   makes   it   easier   for   stu-­ tion   that   works   dents. well   for   all   stu-­ “It   makes   more   sense   when   dents,   not   just   you   look   at   it,”   Prather   said.   necessarily   one   “The   old   advising   report   needed   student.” Hare a  manual,  or  at  least  a  freshmen-­ The   print   level  course  on  just  using  the  lan-­ option   is   the   guage.” most   helpful   for   students   com-­ +DUHVDLGWKHQHZ$$5RI¿ SDUHG WR KRZ GLI¿FXOW LW ZDV RQ cially  was  implemented  the  week   the   last   AAR.     A   close   second   of  July  17.  Implementation  went   is   the   collapsible   group   require-­ relatively  smoothly,  Hare  said.   ments,  Hare  said. A   major-­ The   Reg-­ ity   of   the   work   LVWUDU¶V 2I¿FH that   was   done   hopes   to   keep   to   the   AAR   was   breaking   new   t  is  very  user-­ to   clear   up   data   ground   with   friendly  for  students ¿HOG FRQÀLFWV helpful   updates   that   were   mak-­ in  regards  to  being   in   the   near   fu-­ ing   the   report   able  to  print  off ture.   GLI¿FXOW WR UHDG One   up-­ This   required   a  version  of  their  AAR. date   they   hope   going   through   Jacque  Pittz, to   achieve   is   every   course   academic  advisor to   reduce   the   and   making   sure   length   of   the   there   were   no   College   of   FRQÀLFWV Business  AAR  by  a  few  pages  to   “We  expected  there  to  be  is-­ help  the  AAR  become  more  read-­ sues  no  matter  what,”  Hare  said.   able  for  students,  Hare  said. “We  just  took  the  issues  in  stride   “We  are  really  trying  to  focus   and  looked  at  making  changes  as   on   making   it   simple   and   clear,”  

   I

Hare   said.   “We   tend   to   be   really   repetitive   with   the   AAR,   and   I   think  that  is  one  of  the  things  we   have  really  been  working  hard  on   and   have   been   pretty   successful   in,  is  trying  to  get  rid  of  some  of   the  redundancies.” WimmerLA28@uww.edu


Dateline Page 4 Here Royal Purple

News

4 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com September 11, 2013

Law   l ets   s tudents’   voices   b e   h eard Whitewater Student Government

By Lucas Wimmer $VVLVWDQW1HZV(GLWRU

By Michael Riley 1HZV(GLWRU

Wants You Senator Seats Available:

2 Esker Seats 3 Drumlin Seats

9 Off-Campus seats For more information contact Johanna Klay: WSGSpeaker@uww.edu

7KH¿UVWSDUWRIWKH:LVFRQVLQ /HJLVODWLRQ  VWDWHV³7KH VWXGHQWVRIHDFKLQVWLWXWLRQRU FDPSXVVXEMHFWWRWKHUHVSRQVLELOL WLHVDQGSRZHUVRIWKHERDUGWKH SUHVLGHQWWKHFKDQFHOORUDQGWKH IDFXOW\VKDOOEHDFWLYHSDUWLFLSDQWV LQWKHLPPHGLDWHJRYHUQDQFHRI DQGSROLF\GHYHORSPHQWIRUVXFK LQVWLWXWLRQV$VVXFKVWXGHQWVVKDOO KDYHSULPDU\UHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUWKH IRUPXODWLRQDQGUHYLHZRISROLFLHV FRQFHUQLQJVWXGHQWOLIHVHUYLFHV DQGLQWHUHVWV´ 7KLVPLJKWEHWKHPRVWHP SRZHULQJSLHFHRIOHJLVODWLRQIRU 8:VWXGHQWVEHFDXVHE\ODZDG PLQLVWUDWRUVPXVW VHHNRXWVWXGHQWV¶ RSLQLRQVEHIRUH DQ\GHFLVLRQLV PDGHLQYROYLQJ WKHVWXGHQWERG\ The  Royal  Purple   KDVWDONHGWR Murphy PXOWLSOHVRXUFHV WRJHWWKHLUWKRXJKWVRQWKHVXEMHFW Royal  Purple:  What  does  the   36.09(5)  mean  to  you  and  students?   Justin   Murphy,   Whitewater   Student   Government   president:   ³:H DUH WKH VWXGHQWV ZKR JR KHUH DQGDUHRQWKHJURXQGOHYHO:HVHH WKH DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ IURP D GLIIHUHQW YLHZ WKDQ WKH\ VHH WKHPVHOYHV VR RXU LQSXW RQ WKH ZD\ WKLQJV ZRUN DURXQG RXU FDPSXV DQG DURXQG RXU VWDWH LVLQYDOXDEOH´ Wagner Rob   Em-­ mett,   Residence   Hall  Association   president:  ³,WJLYHVVWXGHQWOHDGHU VKLSDZD\WRFRQQHFWZLWKDGPLQ LVWUDWLRQDVIDUDVWKLQJVZHZDQWWR VHHGRQHDQGRXULQSXWRQZKDWHYHU KDSSHQV RQ FDPSXV  ,Q JHQHUDO WKH\KDYHVRPXFKWRGRLWLVYHU\ HDV\WRIRUJHWWKDWVWXGHQWVKDYHDQ LQSXW DQG WKHLU GHFLVLRQV DIIHFW XV 6R  UHDOO\SXWVRXUYRLFHLQ WKHUHDQGKHOSVXVDGYDQFHDORQJWKH SURFHVV´ Peter   Wagner,   Political   Sci-­ ence   professor: , DOZD\V WHOO P\ VWXGHQWV LW LV WKHLU HGXFDWLRQ DQG ZKDWHYHUWKH\GRLQRUGHUWRIXUWKHU LWLVWLPHDQGHQHUJ\ZHOOVSHQW,Q WKDW VHQVH VWXGHQWV VKRXOG EH LQ YROYHGDORWPRUHLQZKDWLVKDSSHQ LQJDW8::KLWHZDWHU7KHLGHDRI VWXGHQW LQYROYHPHQW LV LQ SULQFLSOH D JRRG RQH 6WXGHQWV VKRXOG NQRZ KRZ WKH XQLYHUVLW\ ZRUNV LQ LW¶V SULQFLSOH IXQFWLRQV  7KH\ VKRXOG KDYH D VHQVH RI ZKHUH IDFXOW\ DQG DGPLQLVWUDWLRQFRPHVLQDQGWKDW¶V RI FRXUVH VRPHWKLQJ WKDW SHRSOH KDYHWRGRRQWKHLURZQ´ Tommy   Ziolkowski,   Segre-­ gated   University   Fee   Allocation   Committee:   ³)URP D 68)$& SHU VSHFWLYH ZH GHDO ZLWK 68) IHHV ZKLFK DUH VHJUHJDWHG XQLYHUVLW\ IHHV7KHVHIHHVFRPHGLUHFWO\IURP WKHVWXGHQWVRWKH\VKRXOGKDYHWKH VD\RIZKHUHWKHLUPRQH\LVJRLQJ DQGWKDW¶VZKDW68)$&LVDOODERXW /DVW \HDU ZH DOORFDWHG  PLOOLRQ

GROODUV WR VWXGHQW RUJDQL]DWLRQV ZKLFK LV VXSHU FRRO EHFDXVH ZH KDYH WKH VD\ DV VWXGHQWV ZKHUH WKH PRQH\LVJRLQJ:HQHHGWRJHWWKH VWXGHQWV SHUVSHFWLYH RI ZKDW QHHGV WREHFKDQJHGZKDWQHHGVWREHDO WHUHGZKDWQHHGVWREHFKDQJHGDQG ZKDW¶V JRLQJ JRRG 2EYLRXVO\ WKH DGPLQLVWUDWLRQ NQRZV ZKDW¶V JR LQJJRRGEXWGRHVLWWLHRYHUWRWKH VWXGHQWV" :LWKRXW RXU YRLFH KRZ GRWKH\NQRZLIHYHU\WKLQJ¶VJRLQJ ZHOO"´ RP:   How   can   students   better   represent   themeselves,   and   have   their  voices  heard? Murphy:  ³6WXGHQWVFDQEHWWHU OHWWKHLUYRLFHEHKHDUGE\WKHGLIIHU HQWJRYHUQLQJERGLHVWKDWDUHDOUHDG\ LQSODFHLQDQ\RUJDQL]DWLRQWKDW\RX DUHDSDUWRI$W:KLWHZDWHULI\RX ZDQW\RXUYRLFHKHDUG\RXFDQDO ZD\V DVVHPEOH \RXUVHOYHV RU \RX FDQ YRLFH \RXU RSLQLRQ WR \RXU VHQDWH WKDW UHSUH VHQW WKH VWXGHQW ERG\´ E m m e t t :   ³6WXGHQWVKDYHWR SD\ DWWHQWLRQ WR Emmett ZKDW LV JRLQJ RQ FDPSXV6WXGHQWJURXSVHVSHFLDOO\ VWXGHQW JRYHUQPHQW DQG 5+$ UH DOO\GRWKHUHEHVWWRSXEOLFL]HZKDW WKH\ DUH GRLQJ  ,W UHDOO\ LV RQ WKH LQGLYLGXDO VWXGHQW¶V UHVSRQVLELOLW\ WRVKRZXSWRPHHWLQJVHOHFWUHSUH VHQWDWLYHVRUVHHNHOHFWLRQDQGEHD UHSUHVHQWDWLYHWKHPVHOYHV´ Wagner:   ³, WKLQN 8::KLWH ZDWHUGRHVDJRRG MRE DV DQ RUJDQL ]DWLRQ DQG D XQL YHUVLW\WRDFWXDOO\ WU\ WR LQWHJUDWH VWXGHQWV LQWR WKH EURDGHU XQLYHU VLW\OLIH$JDLQLW Ziolkowski LV XS WR VWXGHQWV.     , WKLQN WKH SRLQW LV WKDW WKLV LV QRW KLJK VFKRRO 7KH FOHDU GLIIHUHQFH EHWZHHQ KLJK VFKRRO DQG FROOHJH LV WKDW \RX ZHUH GUDJJHG WKURXJK KLJKVFKRROEHFDXVHHVVHQWLDOO\LW¶V DUHTXLUHPHQW$WWHQGLQJFROOHJHLV DEVROXWHO\WRWDOO\YROXQWDU\7KDWRI FRXUVH PHDQV \RX DUH DEOH WR WDNH DGYDQWDJH RI RI¿FH KRXUV \RX DUH DEOH WR VLW GRZQ DQG WDON WR IRONV <RXDUHDEOHWRDUWLFXODWHLVVXHV\RX PLJKW KDYH EXW DJDLQ LWV QRW KLJK VFKRROZKHUHWKHUHLVVRUWRIVWLOOWKLV W\SH RI WRWDO DEVROXWH VXSHUYLVLRQ IRUFHIHHGLQJRILQIRUPDWLRQ Ziolkowski:     ³-XVW JHWWLQJ LQ YROYHG LV HYHU\WKLQJ ZKHWKHU LW LV JHWWLQJ LQYROYHG LQ FODVV VSHDNLQJ WR \RXU WHDFKHU DERXW ZKDW WKH\ FDQ EH GRLQJ WR EHWWHU WKHPVHOYHV MRLQLQJDQRUJDQL]DWLRQOLNHVWXGHQW JRYHUQPHQW ZKLFK JLYHV \RX D KXJHVD\RIZKDWJRHVRQRQFDP SXV -XVW JHWWLQJ LQYROYHG RQ FDP SXV LV WKH ELJJHVW KXUGH  6R \RX NQRZZKDW¶VJRLQJRQDQGWKHQ\RX FDQWDONWRDGPLQLVWUDWLRQLI\RXGR KDYHDSUREOHPRU\RXZDQWVRPH WKLQJFKDQJHG$GPLQLVWUDWLRQKHUH LQ :KLWHZDWHU LV JUHDW EHFDXVH RI DQGMXVWEHFDXVHRIWKHZD\ WKHXQLYHUVLW\LVVWUXFWXUHG:HDUH ORRNLQJWRPDNHWKHFDPSXVEHWWHU VRWKH\ZLOOOLVWHQ´ :LPPHU/$#XZZHGX 5LOH\03#XZZHGX


â&#x20AC;&#x153;Change  will  not  come  if  we  wait  for   some  other  person  or  some  other  time.     We  are  the  ones  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  waiting  for.     We  are  the  change  that  we  seek,â&#x20AC;? -­Barack  Obama

WEDNESDAY

September  11,  2013

Business  Editor: Carrie  Wojcik

PAGE  5

UW-­W could see Doctorate program Program  could   be  offered next  fall By Carrie Wojcik Business  Editor

UW-­Whitewater   could   have   WKH SRWHQWLDO WR VWDUW LWV ÂżUVW 'RF torate   program   starting   in   Fall   2014.    The  College  of  Business  and   (FRQRPLFV $VVRFLDWH 'HDQ -RKQ Chenoweth   said   if   approved   by   the   Higher   Learning   Commission,   UW-­Whitewater   could   admit   20   students   into   a   new   doctoral   pro-­ gram  next  fall.         The  Inspiration UW-­Whitewater   has   contin-­ ued   successfully   with   a   Masters   of   Business   Administration   and   Masters   of   Professional   Accoun-­ tancy   programs.   Chenoweth   said   the  long-­standing  MBA  program  at   Whitewater  and  the  success  of  the   CoBE  made  the  idea  of  a  doctorate   program  possible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   feel   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   reach   for   us   to   be   able   to   offer   this,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   C h e n o w e t h   said   faculty   on-­ campus   at   UW-­ Whitewater   have   Chenoweth been   involved   in   doctoral   programs   for   other   cam-­ puses  or  elsewhere.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  had  faculty  that  have   been  involved  in  doctoral  programs   elsewhere,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  had   faculty   who   have   come   from   and   taught   at   institutions   that   offered   'RFWRUDWHVHLWKHU3K'VRU'%$V´ The  Higher  Learning  Commis-­ sion   is   responsible   for   accrediting   universities  so  they  are  able  to  offer   ÂżQDQFLDODLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every  university  or  college  in   this  region  of  the  US  would  be  ac-­ credited  by  this  group,â&#x20AC;?  Chenoweth   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;UW-­Whitewater   is   already   accredited  by  this  group,  but  this  is   DVLJQLÂżFDQWFKDQJHIRUFDPSXV´ He   said   the   Higher   Learning   Commission  will  be  coming  in  Oc-­ tober  or  September  to  approve  the   FROOHJHIRUD'RFWRUDWHSURJUDP

The  Process  for  Approval ,Q WKH VXPPHU WKH '%$ ZDV approved  by  the  Board  of  Regents.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;All  new  degree  programs  that   are  offered  on  a  UW  campus  have   to  be  approved  by  the  Board  of  Re-­ gents,â&#x20AC;?  Chenoweth  said.     The   program   also   is   approved   by   curriculum   committees   on-­ campus,  the  graduate  studies  com-­ mittee,   and   other   committees   and   the   chancellor   before   going   to   the   Board  of  Regents.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once  we  have  done  all  the  ap-­ provals  on-­campus,  then  assuming   that  the  provost  and  the  chancellor   support  it,  then  it  gets  sent  onto  the   Board   of   Regents,â&#x20AC;?   Chenoweth   said.     Once  approved  by  the  Board  of   Regents.   the   institution   is   able   to   begin   offering   the   program;Íž   how-­ ever,   Chenoweth   said   because   the   '%$LVDGRFWRUDWHSURJUDPZKLFK is  a  program  not  offered  by  White-­ water,   currently   there   is   an   extra   step.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Higher   Learning   Com-­ mission   is   making   sure   we   are   UHDG\ WR GHOLYHU D 'RFWRUDWH SUR gram  on  this  campus,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.     Current  Programs Currently   UW-­Whitewater   has   two   graduate   programs   the   MBA   and  MPA.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  [MBA]  is  typically  designed   for  someone  who  is  kind  of  early  in   their   business   career,â&#x20AC;?   Chenoweth   said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;That  is  a  36-­credit  program,   and   students   take   that   right   out   of   an  undergraduate  degree.â&#x20AC;?     Chenoweth  said  students  usual-­ ly  pursue  their  MBA  right  after  re-­ ceiving  their  undergraduate  degree.     The   MPA   program   is   for   stu-­ dents   who   have   completed   their   undergraduate   accounting   degree.     Chenoweth  said  that  students  must   have   150   credits   to   sit   for   their   &3$ZKLFKFHUWLÂżHVWKHPDVDSXE lic  accountant.     The   MPA   is   a   30-­credit   pro-­ gram,   and   the   undergraduate   ac-­ counting   degree   is   a   120   credits.     Chenoweth  said  CoBE  is  constant-­ ly  seeking  to  meet  the  needs  of  the   region. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   constantly   looking   at   what   we   need   to   be   offering,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.     :KRÂżWVZLWKD'%$

Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  thoughts   on  CoBE  offering a  Doctorate of  Business   Administration   Program

Who  is  it  for?       Students  who  have  aquired   an  undergraduate  degree  of  any   discipline.

Who  is  it  for?       Students  who  have  aquired   an  undergraduate  degree  in   Accounting.

How  does  it  work?     Č&#x2C6; 26-­â&#x20AC;?credit  program   Usually  taken  right  after   receiving  an  undergraduate  degree

How  does  it  work?     Č&#x2C6; 30-­â&#x20AC;?credit  program Č&#x2C6; Gives   potential   accountants   the  credits  they  need  to  qualify   for  their  CPA.

Who  is  it  for?     Students  who  have    aquired  a   masters   degree   and   are   cur-­â&#x20AC;? rently  working.    This  degree  is   meant   to   accommodate   those   in  the  workforce.

Č&#x2C6; Č&#x2C6; Č&#x2C6; Č&#x2C6;

How  does  it  work?    

3-­â&#x20AC;?year  program One  weekend  a  month Year  round 60  credits

  This   is   an   interdisplinary   business  degree.

The   program   is   designed   for   need  to  have  work  experience.     students   who   have   achieved   their   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  students  entering  the  pro-­ masters  and  are  currently  working   gram   will   need   to   have   a   masters   LQ WKHLU ÂżHOG DQG DUH VHHNLQJ DG degree   in   a   business   discipline,â&#x20AC;?   ditional  skill  sets  or  to  move  up  in   he   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   program   is   really   WKHLUÂżHOG designed   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   inten-­ someone   who   tion   is   that   this   has   completed   is   an   applied   the   masters   de-­ program   that   is   gree   and   is   in   giving   them   the   more  of  a  senior   skills   they   need   position.â&#x20AC;?     for   the   jobs   they   7KH '%$ LV are   in,â&#x20AC;?   Che-­ a   60-­credit   pro-­ John  Chenoweth, noweth  said. gram   that   will   associate  dean 7KH '%$ be   three   years   is   designed   for   and   one   week-­ students   who   end   a   month   DUH ZRUNLQJ LQ WKHLU ÂżHOG ORRNLQJ year  round  for  classes. to   move   up.     Chenoweth   said   the   Âł7KH ÂżUVW WZR \HDUV ZLOO EH students  entering  the  program  will   classes,   and   the   third   year   would  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

   We  are  

constantly  looking   at  what  we  need to  be  offering,

Karlee  Mann, senior  

Elizabeth  Porter,   junior

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  good  idea,  because   a  lot  of  people  want   to   move   further   with   their   educa-­ tion.     Everyone   looks  at  your  educa-­ tion  level.    I  think  it   is   important   in   any   Mann job   to   have   some-­ what  of  furthering  your  education   and  a  Doctorate  would  be  great.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Its   nice   because   you   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   to   worry   about   applying   to   other   schools,   and   you   know   how   the   busi-­ ness   school   works   here  and  certain  pro-­ fessors.     It   would   be   Porter more   comfortable   then  switching  schools  or  cities.â&#x20AC;?  

be   their   dissertation,â&#x20AC;?   Chenoweth   VDLG  Âł7KH '%$ LV PRVW RI DOO D GRFWRUDO SURJUDP WKDW KDV VLJQLÂż cant  research  components  to  it.â&#x20AC;? Chenoweth   described   the   pro-­ gram   as   an   â&#x20AC;&#x153;applied   program,â&#x20AC;?   meaning   research   is   critical   to   the   program.    He  said  the  research  will   be   much   more   applicable   to   real   life   situations   and   not   so   much   to   theorizing  and  hypothesizing.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  a  lot  of  our  alumnus   who   are   interested   in   this   type   of   program   because   of   the   quality   of   education   they   got   in   their   under-­ graduate   and   masters   programs,â&#x20AC;?   Chenoweth  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  would  like   to  be  going  somewhere  where  they   know   they   will   receive   a   quality   education.â&#x20AC;?       WojcikCA02@uww.edu

Michael  Korman, junior â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  gives  us  an  opportunity  to  get   a  Doctorate  here,   so  we  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  to   change  schools.    I   think  it  will  help   bring  some  students   in  who  are  look-­ ing  for  a  doctorate   Korman VSHFLÂżFDOO\´


â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  enjoy  the  interaction  on  the Internet,  and  the  feeling  of  belonging to  a  group  that  does something  interesting.â&#x20AC;?  -­Linus  Torvalds

WEDNESDAY

September  11,  2013

Opinion  Editor: Josh  Hafemeister

PAGE  6

Online gamingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;more than just a game Royal Purple Editorial  Staff  Opinion

To  your  right  stands  a  tall  human  in  bulky   plate   armor   played   by   a   young   woman   from   Quebec,  Canada,  who  is  going  to  college  for   advertising.  To  your  left  stands  an  elf  wielding   magic  in  his  hands  played  by  a  non-­traditional   student  attending  college  in  Germany  for  a  de-­ gree  in  media  arts.  Before  you  stands  one  of   the  ugliest  monsters  you  have  ever  seen.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   okay,   though,   because   the   friends   you   have   made  playing  this  online  game  are  supporting   you.  Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got  this. Online   gaming   has   proven   to   be   a   new   means   of   socialization   in   the   modern   world.   Students   might   have   heard   of   some   of   these   games,  though  they  may  not  know  what  they   are.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;World   of  Warcraft,â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Second   Lifeâ&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Star  Wars:  The  Old  Republicâ&#x20AC;?  are  a  few  of  the   many   MMORPGs,   or   massively   multiplayer   online   role   playing   games,   that   are   popular   today.   The  concept  behind  these  types  of  games   is  players  must  work  in  a  team  to  accomplish   JRDOV7KHVHJRDOVLQFOXGHÂżJKWLQJJLDQWPRQ VWHUV ÂżJKWLQJ RWKHU WHDPV RI SOD\HUV RU VLP ply  socializing  and  meeting  new  people  while   playing  the  game. Online  gaming  in  MMORPGs  offers  play-­ ers  the  ability  to  be  in  complete  control  of  what   other  people  see  about  them.  Mainstream  me-­ dia  forces  expectations  upon  its  viewers,  such   as  the  expectation  to  be  skinny,  tan,  muscular  

Alyssa Miles graphic/0LOHV$/#XZZHGX

or   well-­dressed.   These   types   of   expectations   lead   to   social   anxiety   for   people   who   do   not   meet   them.  Within   the   world   of   online   gam-­ ing,   players   can   create   their   own   avatar   to   represent  themselves.  No  longer  can  someone   be  deemed  too  fat  or  judged  for  being  dressed   inappropriately.  In  the  video  game  world,  other   gamers  only  see  what  the  player  allows  them   to  see.   Online   gaming   offers   people   a   means   to   escape  the  expectations  of  mainstream  media,   PXFKOLNHRIĂ&#x20AC;LQHJDPHVVXFKDVÂł6N\ULP´RU Âł0DVV (IIHFW´ GR +RZHYHU XQOLNH RIĂ&#x20AC;LQH games,   online   games   such   as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Second   Lifeâ&#x20AC;?   or   â&#x20AC;&#x153;World   of  Warcraftâ&#x20AC;?   offer   players   the   op-­

portunity  to  socialize  with  thousands  of  others   who  are  playing  online.  Players  are  not  shut-­ ting   themselves   off   from   the   world;Íž   they   are   circumventing  the  expectations  of  mainstream   media  while  still  socializing  with  other  people.   Yet   there   are   still   stereotypes   for   gamers   who   play   MMORPGs.   The   stereotype   that   all  people  who  play  games  such  as  â&#x20AC;&#x153;World  of   Warcraftâ&#x20AC;?  live  in  their  parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  basement,  are   overweight,  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  shave  and  are  socially  awk-­ ward  and  immature  is  inaccurate. $UH WKHUH SHRSOH ZKR ÂżW WKLV VWHUHRW\SH" Sure.   However,   millions   of   people   play   on-­ line   games,   and   there   are   many   players   who   are  college  students  looking  to  play  an  online  

game  with  friends. Research   has   shown   that   online   gaming   has  no  serious  health  effects  on  players.  In  fact,   online  gaming  is  a  healthy  substitute  for  social-­ izing  when  physically  going  out  and  meeting   people  face  to  face  is  not  an  option.  It  is  the   time   spent   playing,   their   diet   and   exercising   habits  that  effect  playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  health.  Just  like  any   other  video  game,  moderation  is  key.   There  are  players  online  twenty-­four  hours   a  day,  every  day  of  the  week.  This  means  no   matter   what   time   you   turn   on   the   game   and   play,   there   will   be   someone   else   with   whom   you  can  play  the  game.  A  student  who  spends   much  of  his  or  her  time  studying  and  working   DQGFDQQRWÂżQGIUHHWLPHXQWLODIWHUPLGQLJKW can  still  meet  people  while  gaming. A  person  who  works  third  shift  and  sleeps   all   day   can   still   socialize   online.  An   interna-­ tional  student  or  a  student  who  came  to  UW-­ Whitewater  from  another  state  can  log  onto  an   online  game  and  play  with  his  or  her  friends   and  family  back  home. Online   games   offer   a   new   means   of   so-­ cialization  for  people  of  all  demographics,  in-­ cluding  students  here  at  UW-­Whitewater.  For   students,  time  is  a  commodity  that  is  in  short   supply,   and   going   out   to   meet   new   people   might   not   always   be   easy.   Human   contact   is   essential  for  a  personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  health  but  online  gam-­ ing  provides  a  new  and  healthy  way  to  meet   other  people. rp@uww.edu

Established  1901 66  UNIVERSITY  CENTER 800  W.  MAIN  ST. WHITEWATER,  WI  53190

EDITORIAL  STAFF 262-­472-­1426 RP@UWW.EDU

EDITOR  IN  CHIEF...................................................................Andrea  Behling MANAGING  EDITOR...................................................................Abbie  Reetz NEWS  EDITOR............................................................................Michael  Riley ASSISTANT  NEWS  EDITOR...................................................Lucas  Wimmer OPINION  EDITOR.................................................................Josh  Hafemeister BUSINESS  EDITOR.....................................................................Carrie  Wojcik LIFESTYLE  EDITOR..........................................................Samantha  Jacquest ARTS  &  REC  EDITOR.............................................................Ben  Holzhueter SPORTS  EDITOR................................................................Kevin  Cunningham ASSISTANT  SPORTS  EDITOR...........................................Andrea  Sidlauskas COPY  EDITOR.........................................................................Chris  Johannsen PHOTO  EDITOR......................................................................Dan  Pomykalski GRAPHICS  EDITOR..............................................................Sydney  Michuda FACULTY  ADVISER..................................................Carol  Terricina-­Hartman

BUSINESS  AND ADVERTISING  STAFF 262-­472-­5100 RPADS@UWW.EDU ADVERTISING  MANAGER..........................ACCEPTING  APPLICATIONS BUSINESS  MANAGER.............................................................Jake  Bergstrom SALES  REPRESENTATIVE...................................................Janelle  Hineman SALES  REPRESENTATIVE..........................ACCEPTING  APPLICATIONS CLASSIFIEDS  COORDINATOR..............................................Josh  Kasombo DISTRIBUTION  COORDINATOR.........................................Ben  Holzhueter DISTRIBUTION  COORDINATOR...........................................Michael  Riley

EDITORIAL  POLICIES          The  Royal  Purple  is  an  independent  student-­run  weekly  newspa-­ per  published  at  the  University  of  Wisconsin-­Whitewater  and  is  writ-­ ten  and  edited  by  students.  The  editorial  staff  is  solely  responsible  for   content  and  editorial  policy.           The   Royal   Purple   is   printed   by   Community   Shoppers,   Inc.   in   Delavan,   WI,   weekly   during   the   school   year   with   a   circulation   of   7,000  copies.  Postage  is  paid  at  Whitewater,  WI  53190-­1790.  Single   copies  are  available  on  campus  and  in  the  community  for  free.  Ad-­ ditional  copies  are  available  for  $1  each  at  the  Royal  PurpleRI¿FH Subscriptions  ($20/semester)  are  available.          Advertising  Deadlines:  All  ad  sizes  are  due  no  later  than  4  p.m.  the   Thursday  prior  to  Wednesday  publication.  The  actual  ad  hard  copy   DQGFODVVL¿HGVDUHGXHQRODWHUWKDQQRRQWKH)ULGD\SULRUWR:HGQHV day  publication. 2013  ROYAL  PURPLE

Do you think online gaming is a healthy substitute for face-to-face interaction? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  really  healthy.   It  can  cut  you Â��off  from  the   real  world  and  possibly   reality.  â&#x20AC;? -­Audrey  Hatlen sophomore

â&#x20AC;&#x153;No.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  the  same  as   having  that  type  of   traditional  contact.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;No,  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  so.   Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  really  con-­ necting  with  other  people.   Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  learning  a  game.â&#x20AC;?

-­Marissa  Shroeder, freshman

-­Kenneth  Penzkover, junior

â&#x20AC;&#x153;As  long  as  you  limit   your  time  online  and  keep   yourself  in  check,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   VXUHLWZLOOEHÂżQH´ -­Niki  Anderson, junior

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  as  good   because  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not   physically  with  them.â&#x20AC;?

Letters  to  the  Editor  Policy      The  Royal  Purple  welcomes  letters   to   the   editor.   Timely,   well-­written   opinions   on   topics   of   interest   by   UW-­Whitewater  students  and  faculty   PHPEHUV DUH JLYHQ ¿UVW SULRULW\ IRU publication.          The  editor  reserves  the  right  to  re-­ ject  letters  or  edit  for  clarity,  brevity,   good  taste,  accuracy  and  libel.  Due  to   space  limitations,  we  cannot  print  ev-­ ery  letter  we  receive.  All  submissions   become  property  of  the  Royal  Purple   and  cannot  be  returned.  Please  limit   submissions   to   500   words.   Submis-­ sions  are  due  each  week  by  Sunday   at  5  p.m.

:ULWHUVPXVWLQFOXGHIXOO¿UVWDQG last  name,  address,  year  in  school  or   position   at   the   university   (if   appli-­ cable)  and  a  phone  number.  Contact   information  will  not  be  published  in   the   Royal   Purple.   Unsigned   letters   are  automatically  rejected.          Opinions  expressed  in  letters,  col-­ umns  or  commentaries  are  solely  the   opinion  of  the  author  and  not  neces-­ sarily  the  opinion  of  the  staff  of  the   Royal  Purple  or  UW-­Whitewater. Please  bring  letters  to  the  Royal  Pur-­ ple RI¿FH  8QLYHUVLW\ &HQWHU RU e-­mail  them  to  RP@uww.edu.

-­Amber  Ebert, freshman

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Face  to  face  is  important.   You  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  hide  from  oth-­ ers.  You  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  hide  behind   a  computer  and  pretend  to   be  someone  else.â&#x20AC;? -­Chad  Pharris, junior

AN  AWARD-­WINNING  PUBLICATION 2011  ACP  BEST  OF  THE  MIDWEST  CONTEST FOURTH  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;BEST  OF  SHOWâ&#x20AC;?

2013  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST SECOND  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;FEATURE  WRITINGâ&#x20AC;?

2010  ACP  BEST  OF  THE  MIDWEST  CONTEST FIRST  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;BEST  OF  SHOWâ&#x20AC;?

2013  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST SECOND  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;PHOTOGRAPHYâ&#x20AC;?

2010  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST SECOND  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;GENERAL  EXCELLENCEâ&#x20AC;?

2013  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST THIRD  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;COLUMN  WRITINGâ&#x20AC;?

2013  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST FIRST  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;GENERAL  REPORTINGâ&#x20AC;?

2013  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST HONORABLE  MENTION â&#x20AC;&#x153;GENERAL  REPORTINGâ&#x20AC;?


Dateline Here11, 2013 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com September

Opinion

The reason I write

Why  do  I  write? 7KH DQVZHU WR WKLV IRXUZRUG question  is,  well,  hard  to  put  down  in   writing.  Joan  Didion  did  it  in  a  piece   ÂżUVW SXEOLVKHG LQ  ZLWK D FRQ IHVVHGO\VWROHQWLWOHIURP*HRUJH2U well,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why  I  Write.â&#x20AC;?  In  about  2,600   words,  Didion  bares  the  bones  of  the   ZULWHUKROGLQJWKHSHQZKLFKSURE DEO\WDNHVWKHVDPHDPRXQWRIFRXU age  as  choosing  to  pursue  a  career  in   ZULWLQJLQWKHÂżUVWSODFH For   me,   in   all  of  my  amateur   writing  glory,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been  a  moth  to  the   Ă&#x20AC;DPH IRU DOPRVW seven   years.   This   is  a  bold  statement   for  a  21  year  old,  I   Andrea Behling am  acutely  aware,   Editor in Chief but   with   every   â&#x20AC;&#x153;ahahâ&#x20AC;?   moment   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   lucky   to   have   in   my   journalistic   career,   my   feelings   have   only   been   reinforced   and  my  ambitions  spurred. My   most   recent   moment   of   FODULW\ FDPH DIWHU UHDGLQJ WKH ÂżUVW person  story  of  a  journalist  and  two   high  school  wrestlers  who  let  her  into   WKHLU OLYHV LQ  DQG LW HQGHG XS changing  hers.  It  started  as  an  ESPN  

feature  so  touching  it  almost  required   WHDUV %XW LW LV WKH IROORZXS VWRU\ published  this  July  that  pulls  on  the   VWULQJVRIP\KHDUWLQWKHPRVWSHU sonal  way. Lisa  Fenn  had  been  working  as   DQ(631SURGXFHUVLQFHGHDO LQJZLWKVSRUWVUHODWHGKXPDQLQWHU est   stories.   One   such   story   brought   KHUWR&OHYHODQG2KLRWRPHHW'DU tanyon   Crockett   and   Leroy   Sutton.   :KHQ/LVDÂżUVWVDZWKHWZRVKHVDLG she  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  take  her  eyes  off  them.   She   watched   Dartanyon,   who   was   born   with   Leberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   disease   leaving   him   legally   blind,   sling   his   friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   arms  over  his  back  and  pick  him  up   off  the  ground.  The  reason  he  carried   Leroy  this  way  was  because  he  is  a   double  amputee,  the  result  of  having   been  run  over  by  a  train  at  11  years   old.   These  physical  limitations  only   scratch  the  surface  of  explaining  the   unfortunate   hands   these   two   were   dealt.   Bouts   of   homelessness   and   hunger   plagued   the   friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   young   lives,  constantly  surrounded  by  drug   use  and  poverty.  Yet  the  two  met  their   GLIÂżFXOWLHV ZLWK D VPLOH WRJHWKHU Both   members   of   the   high   school   ZUHVWOLQJ WHDP 'DUWDQ\RQ DQG /H

roy  were  a  package  deal.   Lisa   found   herself   emotionally   invested  in  the  story  and  lives  of  the   two   who   were   hesitant   to   lend   out   their  trust  to  her  in  the  beginning.  But   unable   and   unwilling   to   be   another   SHUVRQWRZDONLQDQGRXWRI'DUWDQ yon  and  Leroysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  lives  once  the  story   was   told,   Lisa   never   left.   National   attention  was  drawn  to  the  story  and   an   outpouring   of   support   followed,   which  led  to  the  creation  of  a  college   tuition   fund.   Lisa   personally   helped   the  two  apply  for  college  and  paid  for   other  necessities  after  high  school. The  bond  was  real,  and  Lisa  had   made   room   in   her   heart   for   both   of   them.  And   in   the   process   of   telling   their  story  to  the  world,  Lisa  changed   the  course  of  their  lives  for  the  better.   Leroy  went  on  to  study  video  game   design   in   college   and   will   become   WKH ÂżUVW LQ KLV IDPLO\ WR UHFHLYH D high   school   diploma   and   a   college   degree.  Dartanyon  received  an  offer   WROLYHDWWKH2O\PSLF7UDLQLQJ&HQ ter  in  Colorado  Springs  to  compete  in   the  Paralympics,  which  he  later  won   the  bronze  medal  in  judo.  Both  keep   in  close  touch  with  the  woman  who   cared,  Lisa. Usually  you  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  hear  this  side  

of  the  storyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the  side  that  exposes  the   passion   and   emotion   that   goes   into   telling  a  meaningful  story.  A  reporter   is  taught  early  on  to  be  a  shadow  on   WKHJURXQGDFWLQJDVDQLQYLVLEOHQDU rator.  But  every  journalist  knows  that   these  stories  become  a  part  of  us  in   some  way.  It  might  just  be  a  footnote,   EXWVRPHWLPHVLWEHFRPHVDGHÂżQLQJ moment  that  changes  everything. 7KLVLVZK\,ZULWH,WKDQNMRXU nalists  like  Lisa  Fenn  who  remind  me   how  powerful  storytelling  can  be.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   stories  like  this  that  help  me  see  how   incredibly   rewarding   this   tough   job   FDQ EH ZKLOH DOVR FRQÂżUPLQJ KRZ important  it  is  in  evoking  change,  big   or  small.   The  stories  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  told  in  my  life   are  easy  to  recall,  because  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  placed   them   close   to   my   heart.  The   stories   RI D FKLOG VXUYLYLQJ D KHDUW WUDQV SODQWDQDUWLVWÂżQGLQJKLPVHOIDPDQ dedicating   his   precious   free   time   to   philanthropyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;they  are  all  still  with   PH&RQVWDQWUHPLQGHUVRIWKHFRXU age  it  takes  for  a  person  to  open  up  to   DYLUWXDOVWUDQJHUDQGWKHIXOÂżOOPHQW WKDWFRPHVZLWKWKHSULYLOHJHRISXW ting  it  into  words. Behlingam28@uww.edu

Letters to the Editor UW-­W Police crack down on drunken driving

In  memory  of  Paula  Poorman

I  write  a  letter  every  year   at  this  time  in  remembrance  of   Paula  Poorman.  You  see  I  took   Paulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  life  while  driving  under   WKHLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHRIGUXJVDQGDOFR Dear  Editor: hol  on  June  27th  2007. We  all  face  life  choices,   We  know  them,  we  see  them,   good  or  bad,  and  if  you  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   and  perhaps  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  even  been  one   make  the  right  decisions  along   of  them.  Drunken  drivers  come   WKHZD\WUDJLFWKLQJVFDQKDS from  all  walks  of  life,  but  they   pen  to  you  and  innocent  people   do  have  one  thing  in  common.   around  you.  Events  like  this  one   7KH\ÂśYHPDGHRQHWKHPRVWGDQ have  changed  everyone  involved   JHURXVDQGLUUHVSRQVLEOHGHFL lives  forever  more.  When  I  was   sions  an  operator  of  a  potentially   in  my  teens,  I  made  the  choice  to   lethal  weapon  can  make.   get  involved  with  drugs,  alcohol,   Last  year,  223  people  died   DQGXQKHDOWK\SHRSOH,XQIRUWX and  nearly  3,000  were  injured   nately  continued  on  that  path  of   LQDOFRKROUHODWHGFUDVKHVLQ destruction  until  that  June  day.   Wisconsin.  Many  of  them  were   $IWHUWKDWOLIHFKDQJLQJHYHQWIRU innocent  victims  who  were  killed   so  many  people,  I  have  devoted   or  injured  by  a  drunken  driver. To  help  combat  drunken   GULYLQJ8::KLWHZDWHU3ROLFH RIÂżFHUVZHUHRXWLQIRUFHIURP $XJWR6HSWZKLFKLQ As  the  current  student   cluded  the  Labor  Day  weekend,   leader  of  UWW  Tobacco  Free   for  the  national  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drive  Sober  or   Campus  Coalition,  one  of  our   Get  Pulled  Overâ&#x20AC;?  campaign.       objectives  is  to  educate  the   Drunken  driving  is  entirely   campus  community  about  other   preventable.    So  we  urge  you  to   tobacco  products,  also  known   XVHDGHVLJQDWHGGULYHURUÂżQG as  OTPs.  These  are  smokeless   another  way  home  if  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   tobacco  products  that  tobacco   impaired.  The  Zero  In  Wisconsin   companies  made  just  for  us  and   WUDIÂżFVDIHW\LQLWLDWLYHDOVRRIIHUV because  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  so  new,  they   a  free  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drive  Soberâ&#x20AC;?  mobile  app   think  college  students  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   WKDWFDQEHGRZQORDGHGE\YLVLW know  the  risks.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  where  we   ing  zeroinwisconsin.  gov. come  in. During  this  crackdown  on   Big  tobacco  companies   drunken  drivers  and  throughout   spend  about  $1.5  billion  a  year   the  year,  we  are  serious  when  we   WRZDUGPDUNHWLQJWKHLUVPRNH say,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drive  Sober  or  Get  Pulled   OHVVWREDFFRSURGXFWVWR Over.â&#x20AC;? year  olds.1  These  new  OTPs   have  become  increasingly  more   Matthew  Kiederlen popular  because  of  the  new   8::KLWHZDWHU VPRNHIUHHSROLFLHVJRLQJLQWR Chief  of  Police effect  on  college  campuses,  the  

all  my  time  and  energy  trying  to   better  myself  so  I  can  help  others   learn  from  my  mistakes. Throughout  the  years  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   heard  so  much  about  Paula,  and   KRZLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQWLDOVKHZDVZLWK her    family,  community  and   everyone  she  knew.  Even  though   Paulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  with  us  anymore  she   KDVLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHGPHWREHDPRUH caring  and  loving  person.  She  is   one  of  my  strongest  mentors  and   I  know  she  would  have  wanted   me  to  get  involved  with  school,   work,  and  volunteer  time  to  my   community,  so  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   doing  with  my  life.   I  owe  a  lot  of  gratitude  to   P\IDPLO\IULHQGVWHDFKHUVLQ structors,  and  others  around  me   EHFDXVHWKH\FRQWLQXRXVO\LQĂ&#x20AC;X

ence  me  to  do  positive  healthy   things  for  myself  so  I  can  be   there  for  others.  I  appreciate   and  love  them  for  helping  me   through  these  very  hard  years.  I   hope  and  pray  Paulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  family  has   found  the  same  support  groups   in  their  lives.    It  breaks  my  heart   to  know  that  my  choices  caused   an  extraordinary  person  to  be   taken  from  her  family  and  loving   community. Moving  forward  I  will  focus   on  the  positives  and  stay  on  the   right  path  and  never  forget  my   past  actions  for  the  rest  of  my   life.  I  will  carry  Paulaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  memory   with  me  forever. Samantha  Young

Campus  group  promotes  smokeless  tobacco perfect  target.  They  have  new   products  that  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  require  any   spitting  and  some  that  dissolve,   they  are  extremely  easy  to  use   and  by  the  looks  of  them  they   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  seem  that  harmless,  but   looks  can  be  deceiving.     OTPs  still  contain  the   cancer  causing  agents  we  have   learned  about  all  throughout   our  adolescent  years.  Even   though  they  eliminate  second   hand  smoke  risk,  they  still  cause   KDUPWRWKHXVHUÂśVERG\$FFRUG ing  to  National  Cancer  Institute,   there  are  28  cancer  causing   chemicals  that  could  lead  to   oral  cancer,  esophageal  cancer,   and  pancreatic  cancer.2  These   may  not  be  immediate  results   of  using  OTPs,  but  they  will   harm  a  personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  body  every  time  

theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  used.   College  students  may   FKRRVHWRHQJDJHLQULVN\EH haviors,  but  tobacco  shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be  one  of  them.    Choose  to  take   control  of  your  health  today  and   ÂżJKWWKHDGGLFWLRQZLWKD tobacco  free  campus.    Picture   itâ&#x20AC;Śan  environment  where  you   learn,  live,  work  and  play  that   supports  your  healthy  lifestyle.     :LVFRQVLQ&OHDULQJ house  for  Prevention  Resources,   UHWULHYHGRQIURPKWWS ZZZWREZLVRUJ (2)   National  Cancer   ,QVWLWXWHUHWULHYHGRQ IURPKWWSZZZFDQFHUJRY FDQFHUWRSLFVIDFWVKHHW7REDFFR smokeless#r1 Michelle  Bertucci

Royal Purple Page27

What do you want to be when you grow up? For   one   of   my   very   first   homework   assignments   of   the   semester,   I   had   to   write   a   one   and   a   half   page   paper   on   my   ideal   job.   Sounds   easy   enough,   right?   You   just   jot   down   a   few   quick  paragraphs  about  what  job   you   want   and   why   you   want   it,   and   bam!   A   page   and   a   half   is   written   in   no   time. Not  so  easy,   in   my   case.   My   Abbie Reetz SURIHVVRU H[ Managing Editor plicitly   stated   we   were   not   to   talk  about  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;why.â&#x20AC;?  Instead,  we   had  to  focus  on  the  many  aspects   we   want   in   a   job   and   had   to   let   them  speak  for  themselves.   7KLV DVVLJQPHQW ZDV SDU ticularly  difficult  for  me  because   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   never   given   much   thought   to  the  tiny  details  I  expect  when   I  get  hired  somewhere.  With  my   'HFHPEHUJUDGXDWLRQGDWHGUDZ LQJ FORVHU E\ WKH GD\ LW WHUUL fied   me   when   I   began   to   tackle   my  assignment  of  describing  my   ideal  job  and  I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  what   I  wanted. Of   course,   I   knew   the   big   picture.   I   want   to   review   books   or   write   about   books   or   read   books   and   get   paid   for   it.   But   I   knew  nothing  about  what  kind  of   benefits   I   wanted.   I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   even   know  what  standard  benefits  are.   , GLGQÂśW NQRZ ZKDW DQ H[SHFW ed   salary   could   be,   and   I   never   thought   twice   about   whether   a   future   job   would   include   free   employee  parking  or  not. 7KLV DVVLJQPHQW DQ H[HU cise   in   formatting   and   concise   writing,   was   a   rude   awakening   for   me.   Suddenly   the   question,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;What   do   you   want   to   be   when   you   grow   up?â&#x20AC;?   held   a   lot   more   weight.   It   began   morphing   into,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;What   do   you   deserve   to   earn   when   you   grow   up?â&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Will   \RXEHDOORZHGWRH[SUHVV\RXU self  freely  when  you  grow  up?â&#x20AC;? Most   of   us   at   this   point   know   what   we   want   to   be   or   do   DIWHUZHJUDGXDWH%XWKRZSUH SDUHGDUHZHIRUDOORIWKHPLQX tia   that   comes   with   a   new   job?   In  my  case,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  really  glad  I  got   WKLVZDNHXSFDOOZKHQ,GLG I   learned   that   applying   for   a   job   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   just   finding   a   career   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   be   okay   with   doing.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   big   step   in   setting   you   up   for   how   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   live   the   rest   of   your   life. When   I   begin   to   apply   for   SRVWFROOHJH MREV QRZ , NQRZ that  I  really  need  to  pay  attention   WR WKLQJV OLNH KHDOWK DQG LQVXU ance  benefits  or  employee  stock   options   that   I   may   have   just   glanced   over   before.   If   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   as   lost   as   I   was   when   I   started   my   homework   assignment,   you   should  look  into  it,  too. ReetzAM12@uww.edu


WEDNESDAY

September  11,  2013

â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  can  be  sure  that  the  American   spirit  will  prevail  over  this  tragedyâ&#x20AC;?  -­Colin  Powell

Lifestyle  Editor: Samantha  Jacquest

PAGE  8

   Snoozing         and  losing

Photo illustration by Royal Purple staff

By Bethe Croy Staff  Writer

In  college,  students  have  to  make   time  for  many  things  such  as  class,   homework,   projects,   student   orga-­ nizations,  work  and  socializing  with   friends.   With   such   a   busy   lifestyle,   PDQ\SHRSOHHQGXSVDFULÂżFLQJEDVLF needs   to   make   time   for   everything   else.   Countless   students   are   guilty   of   making   one   of   the   most   common   VDFULÂżFHVVOHHS Nearly   ev-­ eryone   has   been   a   victim   of   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;eight-­hours-­of-­ sleep-­each-­nightâ&#x20AC;?   lecture,   but   many   do   not   understand   Niemeier the   true   impor-­ tance  of  getting  sleep  and  the  conse-­ quences  of  lacking  proper  rest.   Not   getting   enough   sleep   can   affect   everything,   from   someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   mood  to  the  way  they  eat  throughout   the  day.   Brandi   Niemeier,   assistant   pro-­ fessor  in  health  promotion,  said  lack  

of  sleep  can  effect  many  aspects  of   a   personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   life,   from   becoming   ir-­ ritable   and   impatient   to   causing   in-­ creased  hunger  and  more.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lack   of   sleep   also   creates   a   problem   with   concentration,â&#x20AC;?   Nie-­ meier   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   in   class,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   harder   to   follow   the   materials   that   the   instructor   is   presenting   to   you.   That   lack   of   ability   to   really   have  sharp  thinking  certainly  affects   the  performance  in  the  classroom.â&#x20AC;? Many  students   believe   a   success-­ ful  way  to  combat   this   sleepy   be-­ havior   is   to   over-­ caffeinate   them-­ selves  to  get  more   energy.   However,   Henley Whitney   Henley,   University   Health   and   Counseling   Services  health  and  wellness  coordi-­ nator,  said  caffeine  sometimes  gives   a   quick   boost   of   energy,   but   it   can   interfere  with  sleep.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some  students  have  a  problem   because   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   use   caffeine   to   stay   up   to   cram,   and   then   the   next   day  

theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   just   zombies,â&#x20AC;?   Henley   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  really  hard  to  take  a  test  if  you   havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   slept   well   the   night   before,   so  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  better  to  just  study,  cut  your-­ self  off,  go  to  bed  and  then  wake  up   refreshed.â&#x20AC;? Besides  interfering  with  the  abil-­ ity   to   concentrate   and   increasing   irritability,   a   lack   of   sleep   also   can   have   a   strong   effect   on   someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   emotional  state.  Matt  Mallin,  an  as-­ sociate   counselor   with   UHCS,   said   a   good   sleep   schedule   should   be   a   priority  for  college  students  because   sleep  plays  an  important  part  in  both   the  physical  and  emotional  well-­be-­ ing  of  a  student. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  everybody  can  relate  to   the   very   basic   notion   of   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;how   you   sleep  impacts  how  you  feel,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  Mal-­ lin  said.   Niemeier   strongly   emphasized   getting  into  a  regular  sleeping  sched-­ ule.   She   said   every   person   is   dif-­ ferent,   so   testing   different   sleeping   WLPHVLVLPSRUWDQWWRÂżJXUHRXWZKDW works  best  for  an  individual. Âł7KH ÂżUVW WKLQJ WR GR WR HVWDE lish   a   good,   healthy   sleep   pattern  

is   to   make   sure   that   your   body   is   rested,   and   once   your   body   is   rest-­ HGGRVRPHWULDODQGHUURUWRÂżJXUH out  how  much  sleep  you  need  each   night,â&#x20AC;?  Niemeier  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most  people   do  need  eight  hours  of  sleep,.Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   pretty   typical.   Some   people   need   more   like   nine   hours   of   sleep,   and   some  people  can  go  with  six  hours   of  sleep.â&#x20AC;? It   is   important   to   get   up   at   the   same  time  each  day  and  go  to  bed  at   the  same  time  each  night.   A  good  sleep  schedule  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  just   about   getting   to   bed   on   time.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   also   about   sleeping   uninterrupted,   Niemeier  said  which  means  cutting   down   on   distractions   right   before   bed   and   making   sure   the   room   is   dark,  cool  and  quiet.   Alarm   clock   â&#x20AC;&#x153;snoozingâ&#x20AC;?   also   should   be   avoided   because   it   inter-­ rupts  the  sleep  cycle  over  and  over   again;Íž  Niemeier  said  a  person  would   be   better   off   to   wake   up   with   only   one   alarm.   The   longer   a   person   sleeps  without  interruption,  the  bet-­ ter  the  quality  of  the  sleep.

Fast  facts   about  napping It  boosts  alertness. A   NASA   study   found   that   a   40-­â&#x20AC;?minute   nap   allows   for   higher  levels  of  alterness. Napping   improves   learning   and  memories. MRI   scans   show   that   brain   Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ć&#x;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ç&#x2021; Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĹľÄ&#x201A;Ĺ?ĹśĆ? Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152; Ä&#x201A;ĹŻĹŻ day  for  hour-­â&#x20AC;?long  nappers. /Ć&#x161;Í&#x203A;Ć?Ć?ŽžÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x;ĹľÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä?Ä&#x17E;ĆŠÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152; Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ?ŽčÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Studies  have  shown  that  af-­â&#x20AC;? ternoon  naps  are  the   perfect   way   to   re-­â&#x20AC;?ener-­â&#x20AC;? gize   and   retain   informa-­â&#x20AC;? Ć&#x;ŽŜÍ&#x2022; Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152; Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ĺś Ć&#x152;ƾŜŜĹ?ĹśĹ? on   empty   and   shoving   too   žƾÄ?Ĺ&#x161; Ĺ?ŜĨŽĆ&#x152;ĹľÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜ Ĺ?ĹśĆ&#x161;Ĺ˝ an  exhausted  brain. /ŜĨŽĆ&#x152;ĹľÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜĹ?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;ĨĆ&#x152;Žž dĹ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;,ƾĸ ĹśĹ?Ć&#x161;ŽŜWĹ˝Ć?Ć&#x161;

CroyEK18@uww.edu

UW-­â&#x20AC;?W  alumnus  hits  six  gallon  mark  for  blood  donated By Andrea Behling Editor  In  Chief

Photo submitted

Mike Doyle is seen holding a plaque awarded to him after hitting the four gallon mark of blood donated.

Mike  Doyle  remembers  vividly   WKHÂżUVWWLPHKHGRQDWHGEORRGDVD student   at   UW-­Whitewater   in   the   late  1960s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   never   forget   it,â&#x20AC;?   Doyle   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whenever  I  give  blood  or  see   someone   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   always   tell  the  story  on  how  I  started  giving   blood.â&#x20AC;? Doyle  was  excited  to  hear  about   the  free  lunch  being  given  out  at  the   Whitewater  Armory  for  people  who   donated  blood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  a  college  student,   free   lunch   is   an   easy   decision,â&#x20AC;?   Doyle  said.

It   was   an   even   easier   decision   for   Doyle,   whose   father   had   re-­ cently   died   and   money   was   tight   as   a   sophomore   in   college.   So   he   walked  down  to  the  armory  where   he  stood  in  a  long  line.  After  giving   blood   painlessly,   he   was   escorted   to  a  waiting  area  where  they  sat  at   tables,  waiting  to  be  served  a  deli-­ cious  sandwich.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   little   old   ladies   would   come  out  with  these  trays  of  sand-­ wichesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one  side  was  white  bread   and  one  side  was  wheat  bread  and   they  were  ham  salad.â&#x20AC;? The   home-­cooked   meal   meant   more   to   Doyle   than   the   little   old   ladies   probably   knew.   When   they  

asked  him  if  he  wanted  another,  he   gladly  obliged. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What   a   no   brainer.   I   mean,   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  doing  something  really  nice   and   then   you   get   a   free   lunch,â&#x20AC;?   Doyle  said. Doyle  went  on  to  donate  at  ev-­ ery   drive   held   at   UW-­Whitewater   until   he   graduated.   It   was   this   ex-­ perience  that  marked  the  beginning   of  Doyleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  longterm  commitment  to   blood   donation.   Today,   Doyle   has   donated  nearly  six  gallons  of  blood. Having   an   O   negative   blood   type,   his   blood   is   universally   ac-­ cepted   by   all   blood   types,   making   him  the  perfect  donor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  like  him  are  really  im-­

portant   to   us   because   every   single   person  can  get  his  blood,â&#x20AC;?  said  Hei-­ di  Ognibene,  director  of  operations   at   the   Rock   River   Valley   Blood   Center   in   Rockford,   Ill.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   very   common.   His   blood   is   often   used   in   premature   infants   because   there   is   no   typing   on   it,   so   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   re-­ ally   easy   for   newbornsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   immune   systems  to  handle  it.â&#x20AC;? When   Doyle   graduated   from   UW-­Whitewater   in   1970,   he   was   drafted   into   the   army   toward   the   end  of  the  Vietnam  war.  They  made   him   a   medic,   and   he   soon   learned   how  to  draw  blood  himself.

See  Blood  Page  10


Lifestyle

Dateline Here 11, 2013 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com September

Royal Purple Page29

Should you keep a high school relationship in college? Heading   off   to   college   is   a   huge  step  in  life,  but  it’s  no  reason   to  end  an  otherwise  functional  and   happy  relationship.  You  might  be   DIUDLGWKDW\RXRU\RXUVLJQL¿FDQW other  are  going  to  change  a  lot  at   college   or   that   you’ll   be   physi-­ cally  too  far  away  at  different  col-­ leges  to  keep  a  relationship  going.   The   truth   of   the   matter   is   if   you’re   happy   and   you   love   and   trust  your  boyfriend  or  girlfriend,  

you  can  make  things  work. ,I \RX DQG \RXU VLJQL¿FDQW other   are   going   to   the   same   col-­ lege,   staying   together   can   help   you  make  tons  of  new  friends  and   help  you  gain  new  experiences.   Look  at  it  like  this:  If  you  and   your  boyfriend  or  girlfriend  are  at   the   same   school   but   involved   in   different   clubs   or   taking   differ-­ ent  classes,  you’ll  both  be  making   new  friends  separately.  

At   some   point,   you’re   bound   WR PHHW \RXU VLJQL¿FDQW RWKHU¶V friends   and   introduce   him   or   her   to   yours.     You’ll   get   to   meet   a   whole  set  of  new  people  who  you   may  not  have  otherwise  gotten  to   know!   You’ll   also   have   someone   right  on  campus  who  you  love  and   trust   to   share   your   new   experi-­ ences  with. ,I \RX DQG \RXU VLJQL¿FDQW other   are   going   to   colleges   that  

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Education Center for Global Updates

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are  far  away  from  each  other,  just   remember  that  long  distance  is  not   a  death  sentence  for  your  relation-­ ship.  Video  chatting,  calling,  tex-­ ting  and  online  gaming  are  just  a   few   of   the   ways   you   can   keep   in   touch   and   spend   time   together   even   though   you’re  far  apart.   Not   having   your   boyfriend   Commentary or   girlfriend   by Abbie Reetz Managing at   your   school   Editor gives   you   room   to   grow   on   your   own   while   still   maintaining   a   relationship   with   someone   you  

love.  It  takes  a  lot  of  trust  to  make   things   work,   but   planning   week-­ end  visits  and  keeping  each  other   up  to  date  on  what’s  happening  at   your  separate  campuses  will  help   keep  things  going. A  loving  relationship  is  a  lov-­ ing  relationship  whether  it  begins   in   high   school   or   at   a   university.   ,I \RX UHDOO\ ORYH \RXU VLJQL¿ cant   other   and   are   happy   in   your   relationship,  don’t  end  things  just   because  you’re  heading  off  to  col-­ lege.   Instead,   give   your   relation-­ ship   a   fair   chance   to   grow   and   change.   It   might   get   even   better   with  time.  

Breakups  are  never  easy,  but  be-­ ing  in  a  long-­distance  relationship  in   college  has  the  potential  to  be  even   PRUHGLI¿FXOW :KHQ \RX DQG \RXU VLJQL¿FDQW other   graduate   from   high   school   with  the  intention  of  attending  differ-­ ent  universities,  you  have  an  impor-­ tant   decision   to   make.   Do   you   stay   together   and   try   to  make  it  work,   or   do   you   move   on   and   remove   an   additional   distraction   from   your   future   life   in  college? During   my   Commentary by Chris freshman   year,   Johnannsen I   made   several   Copy Editor new  friends,  and   many   of   them   remained  in  relationships  with  their   high  school  sweethearts. I   was   a   single   guy,   so   I   didn’t   know  what  they  were  dealing  with.   But   I   admired   their   dedication   to   their  relationships.  Ultimately,  how-­ ever,   each   and   every   one   of   them   eventually  broke  up  with  their  signif-­ icant  others  back  home.  Naturally,  I   was  the  shoulder  for  them  to  lean  on.   ,¶YH VHHQ ¿UVWKDQG ZKDW ORQJ distance   relationships   can   do   to   someone   if   they   don’t   work   out   in   college.   I’m   by   no   means   saying   you   shouldn’t  give  it  a  shot  if  you  truly   care   about   the   person   you’re   with.   That  being  said,  don’t  deprive  your-­

self   of   the   great   opportunities   col-­ lege   presents   because   you’re   in   a   relationship.  It’s  a  once  in  a  lifetime   experience  that  shouldn’t  go  under-­ appreciated.   Whitewater   has   a   reputation   of   being  a  “suitcase  college,”  and  a  big   part  of  that  is  because  many  students   return  home  on  weekends  to  be  with   their   boyfriends   and   girlfriends.   Don’t  be  one  of  the  people  who  puts   your  relationship  before  growing  as   a  person  and  making  new  friends. <RX DQG \RXU VLJQL¿FDQW RWKHU will   obviously   be   exposed   to   new   people  and  adventures,  and  the  only   way  for  you  to  share  them  with  each   other  will  be  over  the  phone,  through   texting,   or   Skype.   It   won’t   be   the   same  as  being  with  them. Trust  is  a  major  factor  in  any  re-­ lationship.  If  you  can’t  deal  with  the   fact  that  your  boyfriend  or  girlfriend   is  meeting  new  people  and  living  it   up  at  college,  you  might  need  to  take   a  step  back  and  consider  the  future  of   your   relationship.   There’s   no   place   for  jealousy  in  any  relationship,  es-­ pecially  one  that  is  long  distance. Try  to  make  it  work  if  you  truly   believe  you  can,  but  if  you’re  having   any   doubts   about   your   relationship,   it  might  be  best  to  let  it  go  while  you   still  can.  Don’t  miss  out  on  the  col-­ lege  experience,  because  you’ll  most   likely   end   up   regretting   that   more   than  ending  a  relationship  that  may   not  last  anyway.

ReetzAM12@uww.edu

JohannseCR12@uww.edu


Lifestyle

Dateline Page 10Here Royal Purple

3 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com September 11, 2013

A  day  to          remember

By Samantha Jacquest Lifestyle  Editor

Photo submitted

Mike Doyleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dress army uniform shows the Expert Field Medical Badge, on the right. Doyle learned how to draw blood while a medic during his enlistment in the 1970s.

Blood

Continued  from  page  8

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   never   afraid   of   needles   or  taking  blood  because  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what   I   mostly   did   in   Germany,â&#x20AC;?   Doyle   said. After  his  enlistment,  Doyle  con-­ tinued   donating   blood   regularly.   A   Belvidere,   Ill.   resident,   Doyle   worked   many   years   for   the   Rock-­ ford   Register   Star   and   is   currently   a   high   school   geography   and   jour-­ nalism   teacher   at   Belvidere   North   High  School.  Doyle  said  he  likes  to   show   his   students   his   Rock   River   Valley   Blood   Center   four   gallon   plaque  he  received  a  few  years  ago   to  get  them  excited  about  donating   as  well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   show   them   my   plaque   and   they   say   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Four   gallons?   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   lot!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   Doyle   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;And   we   [our   school]  has  a  tremendous  response   [to  blood  drives],  and  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  great   thing.â&#x20AC;? Blood   drives   visit   the   high   school   twice   a   year,   which   Doyle   often  serves  as  a  volunteer  as  well   as   a   donor.   Ognibene   said   high   school   blood   drives   and   college  

campus   blood   drives   are   huge   for   blood  centers  in  terms  of  the  num-­ ber  of  donors  that  show  up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   a   really   strong   high   school   program,   and   the   college   visits   are   also   big   events   for   us,â&#x20AC;?   Ognibene  said. A   Red   Cross   blood   drive   will   be   held   in   Whitewater   this   Friday   from   noon   to   6   p.m.   at   the  White-­ water  Armory   at   146  W.   North   St.   Other  upcoming  blood  drives  in  the   area   include   two   in   Fort  Atkinson   on  Sept.  18  at  the  American  Legion,   201   S.   Water   St.   and   on   Nov.   13   at   the   Fort   Atkinson   Armory,   420   Bark  River  Drive. Ognibene   said   the   biggest   in-­ centive   they   can   provide   donors   is   a  guarantee  that  they  can  feel  proud   of  donating  to  someone  in  need. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  depend  on  volunteers,  and   we  really  are  big  proponents  of  your   community   helping   your   hospitals   that   serve   that   community,â&#x20AC;?   Og-­ nibene  said. BehlingAM28@uww.edu

HOROSCOPES Capricorn,  12/22-­1/19 You  have  been  strug-­ gling  with  moral  delim-­ mas  lately.  Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  do  it.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  wrong.

Cancer,  6/22-­7/22 :DWFK\RXU¿QDQFHV extra  close  this  week.   Those  meals  out  add  up   quickly.

Aquarius,  1/20-­2/18 Who  died  and  made   you  boss?  Take  a  step   back  and  let  other   peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ideas  take   form.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  always   your  responsibility  to   take  charge.

Leo,  7/23-­8/22 Remember  that  person   who  you  thought   checked  you  out  last   week?  They  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t,  get   over  it.

Pisces,  2/19-­3/20 Look  out  for  that   special  someone,  and  if   you  already  have  one,   do  something  extra   special  this  week.  Up   all  night  to  get  lucky.

Virgo,  8/23-­9/22 If  you  have  had  the   urge  to  get  out  and  try   something  new,  now  is   the  time  to  do  it  before   FODVVHVJHWGLI¿FXOW

Aries,  3/21-­4/19 Take  your  failures   with  a  grain  of  salt.  It   will  only  give  you  the   experience  you  need  to   become  successful  in   the  future.

Libra,  9/23-­10/22 Be  careful  with  germs   this  week,  Libraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  will   be  extra  sensitive  to  the   effects.

Taurus,  4/20-­5/20 Quit  dwelling  on   that  exam  you  failed   last  semester  and  the   relationship  that  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   work  out  and  look  to   the  future.

Scorpio,  10/23-­11/21 Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  getting  behind   with  school  work  and   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  only  the  second   week  of  classes!  Get   your  stuff  together.

Gemini,  5/21-­6/21 You  should  probably   double  check  your   locks  this  week.

Sagittarius,  11/22-­ 12/21 Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be  extra  curious   this  week.  But  make   sure  curiousity  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   turn  into  being  nosey.

September  11,  2001. A  piece  of  history  that  we  are  still  living   through.  Twelve  years  later  we  are  still  expe-­ riencing  the  aftermath.   While  most  students  at  UW-­Whitewater   were   still   in   elementary   school   when   the   World  Trade  Center  and  Pentagon  were  at-­ tacked,  many  faculty  and  staff  members  re-­ member  it  with  perfect  clarity. Michael  Nyenhuis,  senior  military  science   instructor,  remembers  exactly  where  he  was   ZKHQKHÂżUVWKHDUGWKHQHZV+HDOVRUHPHP EHUVKLVÂżUVWUHDFWLRQLQGLIIHUHQFH Nyenhuis   was   in   Kosovo,   Serbia,   on   a   peace-­keeping   mission   with   the   Army   Re-­ serve.  It  was  3  p.m.  local  time,  and  a  team-­ PDWHFDPHLQWRWKHRIÂżFHWRWHOOKLPDEXLOG ing  in  New  York  was  hit  by   a  plane. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  anything   of  it,  because  once  or  twice   in  the  past  small  planes  have   hit  the  towers  on  accident,â&#x20AC;?   Nyenhuis  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then  about   another   20   minutes   later,   Nyenhuis someone   else   came   in   the   RIÂżFHWRVD\WKHVDPHWKLQJ except  this  time  it  was  plural,  two  planes.â&#x20AC;? Nyenhuis  made  it  to  the  only  television  in   WKHEXLOGLQJLQWLPHWRZDWFKWKHÂżUVWWRZHU fall. Outrage,   confusion,   heartbreak   and   ev-­ erything   in   between   is   how   Nyenhuis   de-­ scribed  a  packed  room  of  over  100  people. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  was  just  stunned  silence,â&#x20AC;?  Nyen-­ huis   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Immediately,   everyone   knew   we   were  attacked.â&#x20AC;? Nyenhuis  said  he  immediately  wondered   who  was  responsible  for  the  attack  and  how   to   respond.   Then,   his   thoughts   went   to   the   thousands   of   soldiers   in   Kosovo   with   him,   wondering   how   they   were   feeling   and   what   WKHLUQH[WVWHSVZHUH$WÂżUVW1\HQKXLVVDLG no  one,  not  even  their  leaders,  knew  what  to   do. Eventually,   the   soldiers   were   ordered   WR LQFUHDVH VHFXULW\ ZHDSRQV ZHUH ORDGHG full  battle  gear  was  put  on  and  all  the  civil-­ ians   were   ordered   out   of   the   military   base.   7KH VROGLHUV ZHUH ÂżQDOO\ WROG WR JR RQ ZLWK the  mission  as  planned  but  with  heightened  

security.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   necessarily   concern   we   were   going   to   be   a   target,   but   there   was   a   sense   that   we   had   to   get   somebody;Íž   some-­ body  had  to  be  responsible,â&#x20AC;?  Nyenhuis  said. On   top   of   the   confusion   and   anger   was   anxiety  over  the  lack  of  communication  with   loved   ones   in   the   states.   Nyenhuis   was   not   able   to   reassure   his   wife   that   everything   by   him  was  safe  until  two  days  after  the  attack.   Some   people   waited   almost   a   week   without   any   word   from   their   family   and   friends   in   New  York  because  of  the  jam  in  communica-­ tion  outlets. Finally,   Nyenhuis   went   home   at   the   end   RIKLVPLVVLRQLQ2FWREHU+HFDPHKRPHWRD much  different  home  than  he  left. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For   one   thing,   the   airports   were   emp-­ ty,â&#x20AC;?   Nyenhuis   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then,   everywhere   you   ORRNHG \RX VDZ $PHULFDQ Ă&#x20AC;DJV RQ DOPRVW every  home,  business,  and  bumper  sticker.  It   was  amazing  how  much  patriotism  that  event   EURXJKWWRWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRUKRZSHRSOHUHDOL]HGKRZ much  this  country  meant  to  them.â&#x20AC;? 1\HQKXLVH[SHULHQFHGWKHSDWULRWLVPÂżUVW hand. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everywhere   I   went   in   uniform,   people   would   thank   me,   I   had   dinners   bought   for   me  by  people  I  will  never  meet,  and  that  kind   of  stuff  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  happen  before  9/11,â&#x20AC;?  Nyenhuis   said. Life  kept  changing  in  the  following  years.   Before  9/11,  people  joined  the  Army  Reserve   and  National  Guard  with  the  expectation  that   they  would  never  go  to  battle.  As  the  War  on   Terror  progressed,  military  efforts  increased.   By  2003,  members  of  the  Army  Reserve  and   National  Guard  could  expect  to  be  mobilized   every  three  years. September  11,  2001  changed  Americanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   history,  and  things  will  never  go  back  to  the   way  they  were  before  that  tragic  day.  Wheth-­ er  that  is  a  good  or  bad  thing  is  not  always   easy  to  tell. Âł7KHUHZDVVXFKDORVVRIOLIHFLYLO ians   died,   the   largest   attack   on   civilians   we   have   ever   had,â&#x20AC;?   Nyenhuis   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;For   that   reason  alone,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  to  remember  this   day.  We  were  attacked  for  our  ideals  and  by   someone  who  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  share  our  same  ideals   for  freedom  that  we  have  in  this  country.  And   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  to  remember  how  we  came  to-­ gether  as  a  country  in  the  aftermath.â&#x20AC;? JacquestSL01@uww.edu


WEDNESDAY â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  is  a  thin  line  that  separates   laughter  and  pain,  comedy  and   tragedy,  humor  and  hurt.â&#x20AC;?  -­Erma  Bombeck

September  11,  2013

Arts  &  Rec  Editor: Ben  Holzhueter

PAGE  11

Comedian  returns  to  familiar  stage By Ben Holzhueter Comedian   Eric   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   performed   at   UW-­Whitewater   since  2007,  but  he  still  fondly  re-­ calls  his  last  time  here. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   students   were   very   sharp,â&#x20AC;?  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  remember   the  fun,  I  remember  the  looseness,   and  I  remember  how  they  got  ev-­ erything.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   very   much   looking   forward  to  being  here  again.â&#x20AC;? Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   will   take   the   stage   at   8   p.m.   Sept.   12   in   the   UC-­Down   Under. Even   though   he   enjoyed   his   last  time  performing  here,  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   said   he   knows   the   college   crowd   has   changed   greatly   in   just   six   years,  and  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  have  to  make  sure   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  at  the  top  of  his  game.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   have   to   be   sharper   than   ever,â&#x20AC;?   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back   then,   for  whatever  reason,  it  was  a  sim-­ pler  time.  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  mean  to  make  it   sound   like   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   80   years   old,   but   it  was.â&#x20AC;? It   has   been   almost   20   years   VLQFH 2Âś6KHD ÂżUVW VWDUWLQJ GRLQJ stand-­up  at  Marquette  University.   He  had  planned  to  major  in  sports   broadcasting,   but   his   senior   year   he   discovered   his   love   of   putting   on  a  show.   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   said   he   decided   to   go   to  an  open  mic  night,  got  hooked   and  never  looked  back.  He  started   out  in  Milwaukee  and  did  anything   it   took   to   do   comedy,   including   sleeping   in   his   car   and   working   for  small  sums  at  bowling  alleys.  

He   eventually   moved   to   New   York   City   and   has   been   there   for   the  last  15  years,  but  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea  said   he  never  misses  a  chance  to  come   back  to  the  Midwest.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  enjoy  New  York  City,  but  I   have   not   forgotten   where   I   start-­ ed,â&#x20AC;?   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   always   fallen   in   love   with   the   Midwest   people.  Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  some  of  the  kind-­ est   and   most   real,   and   they   make   for  great  crowds.â&#x20AC;? Some  of  his  favorite  Midwest   crowds   are   college   audiences,   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea  said,  and  since  1995,  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   averaged   60-­70   college   shows   a   year.   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea,   nominated   six   times   for   national   college   performer   of   the   year,   said   he   is   grateful   and   blessed  for  all  the  support  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  re-­ ceived   from   the   schools   over   the   years,  and  that  the  audiences  do  a   good   job   of   keeping   his   material   fresh.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  energy  is  there;Íž  the  youth   is  there;Íž  the  excitement  is  there,â&#x20AC;?   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   keep   you   honest.  You  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   do   cheap   mate-­ rial.â&#x20AC;?   W h e n   2Âś6KHD ZDV ÂżUVW starting   out,   Lee there   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   the   access  to  social  media  like  there  is   now.  With  the  rise  of  sites  such  as   YouTube,   Facebook   and   Twitter,   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   said   he   works   especially   hard  to  stay  relevant  and  sharp.  

I  have  been  listening  to  Franz   Ferdinand   since   I   was   in   high   school,  yet  I  had  no  idea  the  band   was   coming   out   with   its   fourth   album   already.   The   moment   I   found  out  they  had  released  their   new  album,  I  immediately  down-­ loaded  it.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right  Thoughts.  Right   Words.  Right  Actionâ&#x20AC;?  sounds  and   feels   like   the   Franz   Ferdinand   I   started  listening  to  years  ago. Formed   in   2002   at   the   Glasgow  Art  School  in  the  U.K.,   the   Scottish   alternative   rock   band   consists   of   Alex   Kapranos   on   lead   vocals   and   guitar,   Nick   McCarthy  on  rhythm  guitar,  key-­ boards   and   backing   vocals,   Bob   Hardy   on   bass   guitar,   and   Paul   Thomson   on   drums,   percussion   and  backing  vocals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Take   Me   Out,â&#x20AC;?   the   bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   VHFRQGVLQJOHDQGÂżUVWELJVXFFHVV reached   No.   3   in   the   UK   charts.   Since   then,   Franz   Ferdinand   has   released   a   total   of   four   al-­

bums,   titled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Franz   Ferdinand,â&#x20AC;?   their  debut  album,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tonightâ&#x20AC;?  and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   Could   Have   It   So   Much   Better,â&#x20AC;?  a  platinum  selling  album   in   the   U.K.   and   gold   selling   al-­ bum  in  the  U.S. Franz   Ferdinandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   latest   al-­ bum,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right   Thoughts.   Right   Words.   Right   Actionâ&#x20AC;?   was   re-­ leased   on   Aug   26   in   the   U.K.   and   on   the   27   here  in  the  U.S. Commentary by The   deluxe   Josh Hafemeister album   includes   Opinion Editor ten   new   tracks,   as   well   as   13   live   renditions   of   songs   from   this   album   and   pre-­ vious  albums  including  â&#x20AC;&#x153;No  You   Girls,â&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  Stop  Feeling,â&#x20AC;?  and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ulyssesâ&#x20AC;?  from  their  album,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;To-­ night,â&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do   You   Want   Toâ&#x20AC;?   from  the  album  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  Could  Have   It  So  Much  Better.â&#x20AC;?  I  have  mixed  

Arts  &  Rec  Editor

Photo submitted

Eric Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea has averaged 60-70 college shows a year since 1995. Sept. 16 will mark his 20th anniversary performing stand-up comedy. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea said he will be returning to UW-Whitewater for at least the fifth time in his career.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   students   have   seen   it   all,â&#x20AC;?  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got  to   really   prove   yourself.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   really   satisfying   when   someone   says   nice   job   or   they   have   you   back   somewhere,  like  Whitewater.  You   know   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   doing   something   right.â&#x20AC;? SEAL   entertainment   intern   Rachel   Lee   helped   book   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   at   UW-­Whitewater   and   said   she   WKRXJKW KH ZDV D JRRG ÂżW IRU WKH school.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  does  things  that  are  funny   and  will  appeal  to  students  in  col-­ lege,â&#x20AC;?  Lee  said. Lee  said  working  with  him  this   semester   has   gone   really   well   so   far,  and  comedians  usually  draw  a  

big  crowd. The   crowds   are   one   of   the   main   reasons   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   said   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been   doing   this   for   20   years   and   never  once  called  it  â&#x20AC;&#x153;work.â&#x20AC;? Âł,WKLQNWKDWUHDOO\GHÂżQHVKRZ much   I   love   what   I   do,â&#x20AC;?   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Comedy  is  a  relationship.  I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  do  it  without  a  great  crowd.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  nothing  without  them.â&#x20AC;? SEAL   is   expecting   a   packed   house,   and   Lee   said   students   should   try   to   get   there   early   be-­ FDXVH LW ÂżOOV XS IDVW HVSHFLDOO\ with   a   comedian   as   popular   as   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  he  offers  a  wide  range   of   humor   that   a   lot   of   students   are   going   to   enjoy,â&#x20AC;?   Lee   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  

feelings  on  this,  as  I  would  rather   go  to  a  concert  and  hear  the  live   rendition   for   myself   rather   than   on  my  iPod.   The   album   starts   off   right   away   with   a   more   upbeat   tempo   with   the   song   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right   Action.â&#x20AC;?   This  song  and  its  snazzy  tempo  is   reminiscent  of  Franz  Ferdinandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   hit   single   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Take   Me   Out.â&#x20AC;?   The   tempo  continues  with  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evil  Eye,â&#x20AC;?   which  sounds  as  though  it  should   be   played   at   Halloween   parties,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love   Illumination,â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stand   on   WKH +RUL]RQ´ DQG ÂżQDOO\ Âł%XO letâ&#x20AC;?.   Other   songs   on   the   album,   including   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fresh   Strawberriesâ&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brief   Encounters,â&#x20AC;?   have   a   mellower  tempo. I  will  not  say  it  is  Franz  Fer-­ dinandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   best   album.   I   enjoy   it   and   do   not   regret   purchasing   it.   However,   I   still   think   their   best   album   to   date   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tonight.â&#x20AC;?   Re-­ leased   Jan.   24,   2009,   the   band   added  dance  and  electronic  music   to  their  repertoire.  Where  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right  

Thoughts.   Right   Words.   Right   Actionâ&#x20AC;?   might   sound   like   an   al-­ bum   about   break-­ ing   up,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tonightâ&#x20AC;?   sounds   more   like   a   night   on   the   town,  stopping  at  local  pubs  and   meeting   new   people.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tonightâ&#x20AC;?   has   plenty   of   Franz   Ferdinandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   snazzy   beats   that   they   incor-­ porate   in   plenty   of   their   songs.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right   Thoughts.   Right   Words.   Right  Actionâ&#x20AC;?  has  only  a  handful   of   songs   that   really   get   me   tap-­ ping  my  feet. While   the   album   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right   Thoughts.   Right   Words.   Right   Actionâ&#x20AC;?   still   has   that   Franz   Fer-­ dinand   feel,   its   shortage   of   the   upbeat  tempo  that  the  band  typi-­ cally   incorporates   makes   this   RQH D VROLG WKUHH RXW RI ÂżYH ,I you   are   new   to   alternative   rock   bands,   Franz   Ferdinand   is   still   a   great   entry   point   into   the   genre.  

gives   you   something   to   do   on   a   Thursday   night   if   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   had   a   long  week  at  school.  You  can  con-­ nect  with  the  community  and  meet   new  people.   When   asked   to   make   a   pitch   on  why  students  should  come  out   and   see   him,   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   even   hesitate.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going   to   be   a   totally   different  twist  on  what  you  might   think   of   comedy,â&#x20AC;?   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  talking  about  beer  and  pot   and  fraternity  halls.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  talking   about  stuff  you  and  I  do  everyday.   You   get   to   laugh   at   yourself   and   me.â&#x20AC;?   HolzhuetBM04@uww.edu

If   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   already   a   fan   of   Franz   Ferdinand,  you  cannot  go  wrong   with   adding   the   album   to   your   collection.

For  purchasing                   information:  


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WEDNESDAY â&#x20AC;&#x153;A  school  without  football  is  in  danger   of  deteriorating  into  a  medieval study  hall.â&#x20AC;?  -­Vince  Lombardi

September  11,  2013

Sports  Editor: Kevin  Cunningham

Assistant  Editor: Andrea  Sidlauskas PAGE  13

Moore powers â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks to 1-­0 start Football By Kevin Cunningham Sports  Editor

In   front   of   a   crowd   of   4,282   people,  the  UW-­Whitewater  foot-­ ball  team  opened  the  2013  season   at   Perkins   Stadium   on   Saturday,   Sept.  7  with  a  17-­7  win  over  the   Washington   University-­Saint   Louis  Bears. The   10-­point   win   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   as   comfortable   as   the   score   may   indicate   for   the   Warhawks,   but   a   17-­point   fourth   quarter   spoke   volumes   to   head   coach   Lance   Leipold  about  his  team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   overly   pretty,   but   we   had   a   lot   of   guys   out   WKHUH SOD\LQJ WKHLU ÂżUVW JDPHV´ Leipold   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   very   proud   of   this   team.  We   found   a   way   to   make   plays   when   we   needed   to.   I   have   no   question   about   any-­ ERG\ÂśVHIIRUWOHYHOWRGD\´ It   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   take   long   for   the   Âś+DZNV WR ÂżQG WKHPVHOYHV WUDLO LQJLQWKHLUÂżUVWJDPHRIWKHVHD son.   Bears   senior   quarterback   Eric   Daginella   found   wide   re-­ ceiver   Will   Smith   for   a   29-­yard   touchdown   pass   not   even   four   minutes  into  the  game.   From   that   point   on,   neither   team   found   any   offensive   mo-­ PHQWXP DQG WKH ÂżUVW KDOI HQG ed   with   the   Bears   leading   the   Âś+DZNV,WZDVWKHÂżUVWWLPH since  Oct.  20,  2012,  against  UW-­ Oshkosh   that   the   team   was   held   scoreless  in  a  half  at  home. The   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   compiled   a   net   of   33   yards   on   19   carries   in   the   ÂżUVWKDOIEXWMXQLRUUXQQLQJEDFN Ryan  Givens  totaled  51  yards  on   eight  carries. Junior  quarterback  Matt  Beh-­ rendt   threw   for   82   yards   during   WKHÂżUVWKDOIFRPSOHWLQJVHYHQRI 11  passing  attempts  while  getting   sacked  twice.  Junior  wide  receiv-­ er   Jake   Kumerow   said   a   simple   message   was   conveyed   around   the   team   during   halftime   after   a   ODFNOXVWHUÂżUVWKDOISHUIRUPDQFH â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   was   not   much   to   say   other   than,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You   know   what   guys?   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not   taking   this   ORVVϫ.XPHURZVDLG The  third  quarter  proved  to  be   much  of  the  same  for  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks,   as   offensively,   zero   points   were   scored.   Defensively,   the   team   continued  its  dominance,  only  al-­ lowing  21  passing  yards  and  two   ÂżUVWGRZQVLQWKHWKLUGTXDUWHU In  the  fourth  quarter,  the  tide   started  to  change  for  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks.   7KHGHIHQVHVWLĂ&#x20AC;HGWKH%HDUVÂśRI IHQVH DOORZLQJ ]HUR ÂżUVW GRZQV the   entire   quarter.   After   numer-­ ous  opportunities  for  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   offense  to  get  going,  the  running   game   started   to   shine   as   the   of-­ fensive   line   began   opening   up   holes. Despite  only  carrying  the  ball   two  times  last  season,  sophomore  

Jenny DuPuis photo/'X3XLV-&#XZZHGX

Warhawk wide receiver Jake Kumerow, right, led the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks with three catches for 66 yards in the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 17-7 victory over Washington University-Saint Louis. Kumerow had the only receiving touchdown in the game for the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks.

running  back  Dennis  Moore  pro-­ wide   open   in   the   end   zone   on   a   vided   the   spark   for   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   play  action  pass.   offense.   Moore   carried   the   ball   After  the  next  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks  posses-­ 12   times   in   the   fourth   quarter,   sion,  Kindler  was  forced  to  punt,   totaling   80   yards   and   scoring   a   but   a   fumble   forced   by   sopho-­ touchdown.   more   linebacker   Justin   Dischler   Moore  was  happy  to  be  a  big   gave  the  team  the  ball  back  with   part  of  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  victory  but  was   3:20  remaining  in  the  game  and  a   TXLFNWRVKLQHWKHOLJKWRQWKHÂżYH 10-­7  lead. men  blocking  for  him  up  front. Once   again,   the   team   only   Âł,W ZDV D JUHDW H[SHULHQFH´ needed   one   play   to   score.   This   Moore   said.   time,   it   was   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   whole   line   Moore   running   really   stepped   28   yards   for   up,  and  the  holes   WKH ÂżQDO VFRUH were   there.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   of   the   game.   MXVW JODG , JRW His   81   yards   on   the   opportunity.   the   day   totaled   After   a   few   car-­ more   than   the   Moore Leipold ULHV\RXMXVWJHW amount   of   yards   into   a   rhythm.   he  gained  on  the   The   line   was   ground   during   hyped   up   and   the   entire   2012   fter  a  few  carries   we   were   roll-­ season.   LQJ´ Senior   line-­ you  just  get  into  a  rhythm.   With   9:19   backer   Kyle   The  line  was  hyped  up   r e m a i n i n g ,   Wismer,   who   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   and  we  were  rolling.â&#x20AC;? earned   2012   got   within   the   First   Team   All-­ Dennis  Moore, Bearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   30-­yard   :,$& DV D MX running  back OLQHIRUWKHÂżUVW nior,   said   the   time   all   game   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   defense   and   elected   to   played  great. DWWHPSW D \DUG ÂżHOG JRDO RQ Âł:HÂżQLVKHGVWURQJ´:LVPHU fourth-­and-­two.   Senior   kicker   VDLG Âł:H OHW XS WKH ÂżUVW WRXFK Eric   Kindler   made   the   kick,   GRZQRQWKDWÂżUVWGULYHEXWDIWHU which  put  the  team  on  the  score-­ that,   they   had   one   big   play.   We   ERDUGIRUWKHÂżUVWWLPHRIWKHVHD kept   getting   three   and   outs,   and   son. we   kept   our   composure.   We   did   After   a   kick-­catching   inter-­ ZKDWZHZHUHVXSSRVHGWRGR´ ference   penalty   by   the   Bears   Despite   Behrendt   only   com-­ after   their   ensuing   possession,   pleting   14   passes   for   158   yards   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   took   over   at   the   op-­ on   the   day,   Leipold   said   he   was   ponentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   30-­yard   line.   One   play   proud   of   how   his   quarterback   later,   Behrendt   found   Kumerow   stayed  strong  mentally.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

   A

â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   were   probably   a   few   WLPHV>%HKUHQGW@JRWIUXVWUDWHG´ Leipold  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  he  got  through   it.   I   thought   he   handled   things   well   and   really   led   our   offense.   He   may   have   gotten   frustrated,   EXW KH QHYHU JRW Ă&#x20AC;XVWHUHG WR WKH point   where   he   couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   make   good  decisions.  He  made  the  big   WKURZZKHQZHQHHGHGKLPWR´ While  neither  of  the  offenses   thrived,   Behrendtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   158   yards   bested   Daginellaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   147   yards   for   the  Bears.   'DJLQHOODÂżQLVKHGWKHGD\JR ing   nine   for   26   through   the   air,   getting   sacked   once   by   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   senior   defensive   lineman   Mar-­ shall  Rutherford. Zero   receivers   in   the   game   got   past   the   century   mark   in   re-­ ceiving   yards,   and   no   receiver   had  more  than  three  catches. The   leading   receiver   for   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   was   Kumerow,   who   caught   three   balls   for   66   yards   and  scored  a  touchdown.  No  oth-­ er   reveiver   on   the   team   totaled   more  than  23  yards  receiving. On   the   defensive   side   of   the   ball,  Wismer  led  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks  with   VHYHQ WRWDO WDFNOHV DQG MXQLRU cornerback   Brady   Grayvold   had   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   only   interception   in   the  17-­7  victory.   The  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks  have  a  bye  week   Sept.  14,  but  play  again  on  Satur-­ day,  Sept.  21  against  the  Buffalo   State  College  Bengals  in  Buffalo,   N.Y.   The   Bengals   defeated   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   last   year,   7-­6,   in  White-­ water,   which   snapped   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   46-­game  win  streak. CunninghKT25@uww.edu


Sports

Dateline Page 14Here Royal Purple

Sports Briefs Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Soccer The   Warhawk   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   soccer   team   won   their   third   consecutive   game   this   past   Sunday,  shutting  out  St.  Cath-­ erineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   3-­0.   Freshman   Carly   3RWWOH VFRUHG WZR ÂżUVWKDOI JRDOV ZKLOH IUHVKPDQ &DULQD Krausert  secured  the  win  with   KHUÂżUVWJRDORIWKHVHDVRQLQ the   50th   minute.   Jordan   My-­ ers  and  Emily  Haeger  had  two   saves   each,   contributing   to   the  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  shut  out.   The   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   improved   their  record  to  3-­0-­1  and  will   WUDYHOWR0DULDQIRUWKHLUQH[W match  on  Sept.  11.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Golf The   Warhawk   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   JROIWHDPÂżQLVKHGWKLQWKH 18-­team  Olivet  Fall  Invitation   this   past   Saturday   in   Mar-­ shall,   Mich.   Sammie   Lieb-­ ham   and   Claudia   Rhein   both   VKRWVOHDGLQJWKHZD\IRU

WKHÂś+DZNV/LHEKDPWLHGIRU UG LQ WKH JROIHU ÂżHOG DQG5KHLQWLHGIRUWK Bethel,   Olivet,   and   Car-­ thage   Colleges   clinched   the   top   three   spots   in   the   invi-­ tational,   respectively.   The   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   will   head   to   Illinois   6HSWIRUWKH,OOLQRLV:HV leyan  Fall  Fling. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Volleyball The   Warhawk   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   volleyball   team,   ranked   No.   13,   swept   both   North   Cen-­ tral   College   and   Concordia-­ Wisconsin  in  a  triangular  this   past   Friday,   improving   their   record  to  5-­3. Jessica   Sabey   led   all   hit-­ ters  with  10  kills,  Kelsey  No-­ bilio   led   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   in   digs   with   13,   and   Staci   Hasler   had   28   assists   to   propel   the   Âś+DZNV WR YLFWRU\ 1H[W WKH\ will   play   at   home   Sept.   13   against  Millikin  University.  

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com September 11, 2013

Runners eye nationals Cross Country By Justin Woodard 6WDII:ULWHU

7KH VWRULHV RI WKH PHQÂśV DQG womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   cross   country   teams   at   UW-­Whitewater   heading   into   the   VHDVRQDUHTXLWHGLIIHUHQW   While   the   men   return   every-­ ERG\ IURP ODVW VHDVRQ LQFOXGLQJ top  runners  Dawson  Miller,  Kevin   Buntman,   Quinn   Farley   and   Mat-­ thew   Rudquist,   the   women   lose   ÂżYHRIWKHLUWRSHLJKWUXQQHUVIURP last   season,   including   All-­Ameri-­ can  Alyssa  Duncan. +HDG FRDFK -HII 0LOOHU KDV been  pleased  with  the  training  and   conditioning   on   both   the   menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   and  womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  side,  but  he  believes   the  men  might  be  a  little  more  pre-­ pared  to  make  a  run  at  Nationals. Âł:H DUH GHÂżQLWHO\ EHWWHU WKDQ ODVW\HDUEXWLWLVJRLQJWREHGLI ÂżFXOW´ 0LOOHU VDLG Âł:H PLJKW EH PHQWLRQHGLQ1DWLRQDOVWDON´ 0LOOHUVDLGWKHWRSIRXURQWKH menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   side   are   pretty   much   set  

Dan Pomykalski photo/3RP\NDOVNL'-#XZZHGX

The Warhawks hosted their annual Alumni-Intrasquad meet on the campus course here at UW-Whitewater this past Saturday.

DV WKH VDPH IURP ODVW VHDVRQ EXW GHYHORSPHQW´ WKHUH ZLOO EH D EDWWOH IRU WKH ÂżIWK Even   though   the   women   lost   spot  among  many  contenders. RYHUKDOIRIWKHLUWRSUXQQHUVIURP 7KRVHEDWWOLQJIRUWKHÂżIWKVSRW ODVW VHDVRQ PDQ\ IUHVKPHQ IURP LQFOXGH IUHVK last  year  are  back   man   Ryan   Mind-­ as   stronger   soph-­ ham,   sophomore   omores   look-­ Scott   Wolter   and   ing   to   move   into   sophomore   Kent   those  top  spots.   Miehe   among   Returnees   in-­ others.   clude   Mary   Kate   Kahl D. Miller Âł:H ZLOO ÂżQG Bernier,   Jaclyn   out   in   two   weeks   Rowe  and  Amy   when   we   go   to   and  Emily  Kahl   the  Roy  Griak  In-­ among  others. HDUHGHÂżQLWHO\ vitational   where   7KDW ÂżUVW ZHDUHDW´0LOOHU EHWWHUWKDQODVW\HDU run   as   a   col-­ said.   legiate   athlete   EXWLWLVJRLQJWREH Junior   Daw-­ can   be   nerve   son  Miller  is  com-­ GLIÂżFXOW racking   and   LQJ RII DQ $OO Amy   Kahl   -HOO0LOOHU American   season   FURVVFRXQWU\KHDGFRDFK hopes   to   enter   as   a   track   runner,   meets   this   sea-­ and   he   hopes   to   VRQ ZLWK D IHZ improve  as  a  long   OHVVEXWWHUĂ&#x20AC;LHV distance  runner  this  season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   learned   that   being   nervous   Âł,KDYHDOZD\VEHHQPRUHRID RQO\ KXUWV P\ SHUIRUPDQFH VR , track  and  mid-­distance  runner,  but   have   learned   to   control   my   atti-­ GXULQJP\ODVWWZR\HDUVRIFROOH WXGH´.DKOVDLGÂł,QRZORRNIRU giate   running   I   have   showed   my-­ ward   to   races,   and   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   worry   VHOIWKDW,FDQPRYHXSLQGLVWDQFH DERXWZKDWFRXOGJRZURQJ´ DQGVWLOOFRPSHWHDWDKLJKOHYHO´ Coach  Miller  remains  optimis-­ Miller  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  have  worked  on  en-­ WLF IRU ERWK WKH PHQ DQG ZRPHQ durance  training  this  summer  more   this  season. WKDQHYHUEHIRUHVR,KRSHWRLP Âł%\ WKH EHJLQQLQJ RI WKH VHD SURYHHYHQPRUHWKLV\HDU´ VRQ ZH ZLOO KDYH D VROLG ÂżYH The  women  stand  on  the  other   JX\V´FRDFK0LOOHUVDLGÂł,WZRXOG VLGHRIWKHIHQFHZKHQLWFRPHVWR EH D KXJH VWHS IRU WKH ZRPHQ LI competing  with  the  top  schools  in   WKH\FRXOGEHEHWWHUWKDQODVW\HDU´ the  state. 7KH:DUKDZNVœ¿UVWPHHWVWDUWV â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   team   is   prob-­ at  10:45  a.m.  this  Saturday  on  the   ably   not   nationally   ready,   but   we   campus  course  in  Whitewater.   DUHORRNLQJIRUFRQWLQXHGLPSURYH The  Warhawk  Invitational  also   PHQW´ &RDFK 0LOOHU VDLG Âł7KH\ marks   parents   day,   as   well   as   se-­ have  an  unrealistic  chance  because   nior  day. itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   hard   to   upset   stronger   teams.   WoodardJA31@uww.edu We  are  not  thinking  about  that,  just  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

   W


Sports

Dateline Here11, 2013 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com September

3 Royal Purple Page 15

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks look to make it seven straight titles the  2012-­13  season  ranked  in  the   Intercollegiate   Tennis   Associa-­ WLRQ'LYLVLRQ,,,&HQWUDO5HJLRQ By Andrea Sidlauskas 7KH Âś+DZNV RIÂżFLDOO\ EHJDQ $VVLVWDQW6SRUWV(GLWRU SOD\ RQ $XJ  ZLWK WKHLU ÂżUVW 9-­0   sweep   of   the   year,   this   time   If  this  past  weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  match-­ RYHUWDNLQJ(GJHZRRG&ROOHJHLQ es   are   any   indication   of   the   up-­ the  season  home  opener. coming   season   for   the   Warhawk   They   continued   their   quest   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  tennis  team,  the  players   to   conference   supremacy   Aug.   ZLOOGHÂżQLWHO\KDYHVRPHWKLQJWR  UHLJQLQJ RYHU WKH HLJKWWHDP celebrate.   LQYLWDWLRQDO KRVWHG DW :DQJHULQ The   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   hosted   Wheaton   Courts.   College  this  past   â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   the   pre-­ Saturday   and   season   [the   maintained   their   players]   worked   perfect   record,   hard,   and   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   sweeping   the   paid   off   so   far,â&#x20AC;?   Thunder,  9-­0.   head   coach   â&#x20AC;&#x153; T h e y â&#x20AC;&#x2122; r e   Frank   Barnes   a   tough   team.   said. Barnes Bayliss Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   proba-­ F r e s h m a n   bly  the  toughest   Megan   Hum-­ weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   face   this   SKUH\VSURYHGWR fall,â&#x20AC;?  senior  Al-­ be   a   force   to   be   exandra   Bayl-­ reckoned   with,   eâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  won  six   iss  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was   earning   UW-­ years  in  a  row  now,   a   good   start   to   Whitewater   ath-­ our   season.   We   so  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  just  trying  to   lete   of   the   week   showed   great   make  it  seven.â&#x20AC;? IRU KHU DFKLHYH team  effort.â&#x20AC;?   ment   in   singles   Alexandra  Bayliss, competition  dur-­ Bayliss   de-­ senior LQJWKHLQYLWH feated   Sarah   Ray   at   No.   1   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  is  prob-­ singles,  7-­5  and   ably  going  to  be   6-­4,   and   part-­ in  the  lineup  for   nered   with   Jackie   Vitale   to   con-­ HYHU\PDWFKZKLFKLVSUHWW\LP quer   Ray   and   Julie   Buursma   at   SUHVVLYH´%D\OLVVVDLGDERXWKHU No.  1  doubles,  8-­3.   teammate.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   a   freshman,   that   Both  Ray  and  Burrsma  ended   GRHVQÂśWKDSSHQYHU\RIWHQ´

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tennis

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

   W

Liz Seonbuchner photo/6HRQEXFK(-#XZZHGX

Senior Alexandra Bayliss, the Warhawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; No. 1 singles and doubles player, led the team to a 9-0 sweep over Wheaton College this past Saturday.

Bayliss   and   Vitale   were   named   athletes   of   the   week   in   doubles   competition   for   the   sec-­ RQGFRQVHFXWLYHZHHNDIWHUWKHLU stellar   performances   in   both   the   LQYLWDWLRQDO DQG WKH :KHDWRQ matchup.   All  three  players  were  granted   Wisconsin   Intercollegiate   Ath-­ letic   Conference   athletes   of   the   week  honors. While  Barnes  preaches  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;one   week   at   a   timeâ&#x20AC;?   mentality   to   his   SOD\HUV %D\OLVV LV FRQÂżGHQW LQ her   teammates   as   they   head   into   the  season.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   main   goal   is   to   win   conference   again,â&#x20AC;?   Bayliss   said. ��  Âł:HÂśYH ZRQ VL[ \HDUV LQ D URZ now,  so  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  just  trying  to  make   LWVHYHQ´ 7KHÂś+DZNVZLOOWUDYHOWR(DX Claire   on   Friday   as   they   look   to   uphold   their   perfect   record   against   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   undefeated   conference  foe. 7KH %OXJROGV KDYH ZRQ HDFK of   their   matches   this   season   by   scores  of  9-­0,  8-­1  and  9-­0. SidlauskAM06@uww.edu

on the Royal Purple Advertising Staff

Seeking a hardworking, deadline-oriented student with experience in advertising and management through course work or past employment.

Seeking an organized student with excellent time management skills and a desire to gain experience in advertising by working one on one with clients.

For more information, check out a full description of the positions on HawkJobs. Those interested, please email rpads@uww.edu or stop by the Royal Purple office in the UC Down Under, Room 66.


Sports

Dateline Page 16Here Royal Purple

4 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com September 11, 2013

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks  look  to  regain  control  of  WIAC Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soccer By Justin St. Peter Staff  Writer

Last   year   was   the   first   time   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   soccer   team   did   not   win   the   WIAC   confer-­ ence,  with  a  record  of  8-­5-­3  (2-­1-­ 1  in  conference).   It   also   marked   the   first   time   they   lost   a   conference   game   in   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   four-­year   history   in   the  WIAC.   This  all  happened  in  an  over-­ time  game  goal  to  UW-­Platteville   on  Oct.  4  last  year. The  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks  would  like  to  re-­ claim  their  WIAC  Championship   but  are  not  focusing  on  that.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   the   main   focus   this   year   is   taking   one   game   at   a   time,â&#x20AC;?   second   year   head   coach   Tony   Guinn   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think  too  far  in  advance.â&#x20AC;?   Taking   it   one   game   a   time   seems   to   be   working,   as   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks  have  been  rolling  to  start   the  season.   The   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   opened   up   the   season  with  a  3-­0  shutout  against   St.   Norbert   and   followed   it   up   with   a   2-­0   win   against   Edge-­ wood.   In   both   games,   they   did   not  allow  a  shot  on  goal. Junior   midfielder   John   Gottwald   scored   the   first   goal   of   the   year   on   a   direct   free   kick   eight  yards  out  of  the  box  in  the   first  half.  

Junior   midfielder   Sam   Kuchenreuther   has   scored   in   each  contest.   Sophomore   forward   Xander   Lien   and   junior   defender   Kody   Mjelde   also   have   goals   on   the   season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   (the   wins)   were   just   a   big  team  effort,â&#x20AC;?  senior  defender   Bob   Shone   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   you   look   at   the  box  score,  26  players  played   and   26   players   contributed.   We   played  a  really  good  team,  and  it   took  every  player  to  beat  them.â&#x20AC;? The   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   come   into   the   season   having   lost   WIAC   Co-­ Player   of   the   Year,   forward   Lo-­ gan  Fye,  and  three  others.   Fye   led   the   WIAC   with   six   goals  and  14  points  total,  includ-­ ing  two  game-­winning  goals.   Without   Fye   and   the   other   players   that   moved   on   from   the   program,   the   team   will   rely   on   their   deep   talent   pool   and   depth   to  make  their  run.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   big   advantages   for   Whitewater   in   soccer   right   now   is   our   tal-­ ent   pool   and   our   depth,â&#x20AC;?   said   Guinn.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Other   teams   sub   like   4-­5   guys,   while   Guinn we   can   sub   10-­ 14  guys,  and  our   level  of  play  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  drop.â&#x20AC;? Guinn  has  what  he  calls  â&#x20AC;&#x153;un-­ orthodoxâ&#x20AC;?  goals  for  the  team.  

+HU7VT`RHSZRPWOV[V3RP\NDOVNL'-#XZZHGX

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   three   team   goals:   do  your  best,  do  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  right  and   treat   others   the   way   you   want   to   be   treated,â&#x20AC;?   Guinn   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   dwell   on   the   conversa-­ tions  on  winning   and   champion-­ Shone ships.â&#x20AC;? The   team   took   a   trip   to   Ireland   over   the   summer   with   Guinn,   who   grew   up  there,  as  a  team  bonding  ses-­

sion.   They   did   some   sightseeing   and  grew  as  a  team.   All   three   captains,   Gottwald,   Shone   and   senior   defender   Kyle   Sundby,   were   there   to   lead   the   team   in   what   Guinn   called   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;kickoff  party.â&#x20AC;? Even   though   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   in-­ sist  on  fousing  on  one  game  at  a   time,   they   cannot   help   but   look   at  the  revenge  game  against  Plat-­ teville.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   we   had   to   pick   one   game   on   the   schedule   to   kind   of   look   forward   to,   that   is   the   team   we  

are  looking  at,â&#x20AC;?  Shone  said. Sundby   has   even   higher   ex-­ pectations   while   agreeing   they   are   still   taking   it   one   game   a   time.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  we  have  all  the  piec-­ es   together   right   now   to   make   a   solid  run  this  year,â&#x20AC;?  Sundby  said. â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   fans   certainly   hope   they   do   and   can   come   support   them  this  Saturday  against  Wart-­ burg  College  (3-­0-­1)  at  2:00  p.m.   at  Fiskum  Field  in  Whitewater. StPeterJR26@uww.edu





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September 11, 2013 Issue