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March  19,  2014

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Referendum removed from ballot

Smoking  ban  removed,   sustainability  remains By Alexandria Zamecnik Assistant  News  Editor

The  Whitewater   Student   Gov-­ ernment  election  ballot  offers  more   than  just  two  slates  running  against   each  other.   Before   the  WSG   Senate   meet-­ ing  on  March  17,  two  non-­binding   referendums  were  to  be  placed  on   the   ballot.   Non-­binding   referen-­ dums  are  meant  to  serve  as  advisers   to  gauge  public  opinion.

The  referendums   originally   to   be  placed  on  the  ballot  were: 1.  Would  you  be  willing  to  pay   a   separate   segregated   fee   ($5/per   student/semester)  to  support  a  sus-­ tainability/green  fund?   2.   Would   you   support   a   cam-­ pus-­wide  tobacco  ban  for  the  Uni-­ versity  of  Wisconsin-­Whitewater? During   the   senate   meeting   on   March   17,   the   senate   voted   to   re-­ move   the   referendum   asking   stu-­ dents   if   they   supported   a   campus-­ wide  tobacco  ban,  leaving  only  the   sustainability  referendum. Jonathan  Fera,  

intergovernmental  affairs   director,   was   responsible   for   the   tobacco   referendum   that   was   unanimously   approved  on  March  3.  Two  weeks   later  he  asked  the  senate  to  remove   it. “It’s  [Tobacco  Referendum]  re-­ ally  vague,�  Fera  said.  “I  feel  as  if   there  is  more  that  can  be  done.� Fera   said   one   of   his   biggest   concerns   was   that   the   polls   are   anonymous.   The   ballot   would   not   be   able   to   tell   the   difference   be-­ tween  a  freshman  and  senior. “I  feel  like  I  jumped  the  gun,�   Fera  said.  “I  apologize  for  wasting  

[senates’]  time  and  making  [senate]   put  on  the  ballot  unanimously.� vote.�   While   the   tobacco   referendum   After   a   roll   call   vote,   12   was   removed,   the   sustainability   senators  voted  to  remove  the  refer-­ referendum   re-­ endum  from  the  ballot.  Two  sena-­ mained   on   the   tors  voted  against  the  removal. ballot. Parliamentarian   Johanna   Klay     Sustainabil-­ voted   against   the   removal   of   the   ity   Director   of   referendum. WSG,   Alexan-­ “I  believe  that  there  are  students   dra  Labonte,  said   that   could   potentially   voice   their   the   sustainabil-­ Labonte opinion  better  in  a  simple  referen-­ ity   referendum   dum  form  on  the  ballot,�  Klay  said.     might   be   right   “It   would   be   an   injustice   to   those   for  Whitewater,  and  WSG  is  gaug-­ students  if  the  referendum  was  re-­ See  Ballot  Page  3 pealed   unanimously   when   it   was  

Warhawk  basketball  shines  in  NCAA’s  

—”˜‹˜‡•ƒÂ?†ƒ†˜ƒÂ?…‡•–‘Ď?‹Â?ƒŽˆ‘—”

By Kevin Cunningham Sports  Editor

UW-­Whitewater  entered   the   weekend   beginning   March   14   as   the   only   school   featuring   both   its   men’s   and   women’s   basketball   teams   in   the   Division-­III   NCAA   Tournament.   Fast  forward  two  days  and  the   :DUKDZNV ¿QG WKHPVHOYHV LQ WKH Final  Four,  competing  for  national   championships. With  both  the  men’s  and  wom-­ en’s   wheelchair   basketball   teams   winning  titles  in  Arlington,  Texas,   UW-­Whitewater   has   the   opportu-­ nity   to   sweep   all   four   basketball   championships  in  2014.  By  strictly   following  the  D3hoops.com’s  top-­ 25   rankings,   the   Warhawk   men’s   basketball  team  had  an  uphill  bat-­

tle  heading  into  the  weekend.   Ranked   No.   13   entering   the   WRXUQDPHQW WKH œ+DZNV ¿UVW KDG to  get  through  No.  16-­ranked  UT-­ Dallas   before   facing   the   winner   of   Emory   and   No.   1-­ranked   UW-­ Stevens  Point.  Against  UT-­Dallas,   the   ’Hawks   had   to   stop   the   Com-­ ets’   conference   player   of   the   year   in  Kyle  Schleigh.   Schleigh   was   shut   down   pri-­ marily   by   Warhawk   senior   guard   Eric  Bryson.  Bryson  held  Schleigh   to   seven   points   on   1-­8   shooting   IURP WKH ¿HOG DQG WKH œ+DZNV moved   onto   the   Elite   Eight,   win-­ ning  81-­63. UW-­Whitewater  then  faced  the   Emory   Eagles   in   the   Elite   Eight   game   after   the   Eagles   upset   UW-­ Stevens  Point  in  an  overtime  battle  

played  in  Stevens  Point.  The  War-­ hawks   were   up   to   the   challenge   of   taking   down   the   upset-­minded   Eagles,  winning  74-­51.   Next  up  for  the  Men  ’Hawks  in   the  Final  Four  is  Illinois  Wesleyan,   where   the   team   will   try   and   win   their   second   national   champion-­ ship  in  three  years  after  winning  in   2012. On   the   women’s   side,   the   ’Hawks   had   to   take   down   UW-­ Oshkosh  for  a  third  time  this  sea-­ son   in   order   to   move   to   the   Elite   Eight.   Warhawk   head   coach   Keri   Carollo’s   team   was   also   up   to   the   challenge  in  beating  the  same  team   three  times  in  one  season.   $IWHU D EDFNDQGIRUWK ¿UVW half,   the   ’Hawks   built   their   lead   to   double   digits   and   never   looked  

back.  The   Warhawks   moved   on,   winning   69-­57.   The   very   next   night,  the  team  had  to  face  another   familiar  foe  in  DePauw  University,   a  team  that  beat  the  ’Hawks  in  the   national   championship   game   last   season. Carollo   said   the   team   came   out   and   played   with   a   chip   on   WKHLU VKRXOGHU DQG WKH ¿QDO VFRUH showed  it,  as  the  ’Hawks  got  their   revenge,   winning   88-­71.   Next   for   the  Warhawks  is  Whitman  College   in   the   Final   Four,   which   is   set   in   Stevens  Point  on  March  21  and  22. CunninghKT25@uww.edu

See  Page  13 for  the  full  game  recaps

Student-­Run  Weekly  Newspaper  at  the  University  of  Wisconsin-­Whitewater


News

Dateline Page 2 Here Royal Purple

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com March 19, 2014

Pow-­wow: Drums,  dance  and  regalia

By Alexandria Zamecnik Assistant  News  Editor

During  pow-­wows,   Native   Americans  wear  traditional  cloth-­ ing   depending   on   which   tribe   their  ancestors  belonged  to.     San   Carlos  Apache   tribesmen   Ronnie  Preston  wears  bear  claws   in  representation  of  the  spirit  that   he   said   still   dances   with   him   ev-­ ery  day.   Preston,  a  member  of  the  Mil-­ waukee   Native   American   Dance   7URXSH ZKLFK FRQVLVWV RI ÂżYH different   Native   Americans   who   hail   from   three   separate   tribes,   visited  UW-­Whitewater  on  March    WR H[SODLQ WKH VLJQLÂżFDQFH RI pow-­wows.   Pow-­wows   have   tradition-­ DOO\EHHQGHÂżQHGDVJDWKHULQJVRI North  American   natives.   Modern   pow-­wows,   however,   now   serve   as   a   method   of   socialization,   Preston  said.   “Pow-­wows   are   a   way   to   gather,   make   new   friends,   greet   old   friends,   sing   songs,   dance   and   taste   other   Native   American   foods,â€?  Preston  said.   The   troupe’s   colorful   attire,   commonly  known  as  regalia  in  the   Native   American   community,   is   hand-­crafted.  The  regalia  changes   according  to  tribe  location.     Northern   tribes   based   in   the   Midwest   produce   regalia   with   modest   colors   and   thicker   layers   to   represent   the   colder   weather,   while  southern  tribes  create  vivid  

colors  and  shapes  to  represent  the   warmth.     Preston   said   he   was   taught   how   to   dance   and   sing   in   pow-­ wows  at  a  young  age. “We  start  children  out  as  soon   as   they   can   walk,â€?   Preston   said.   “We  get  them  in  regalia  as  soon  as   LWÂżWVDQGWHDFKWKHPKRZWRVLQJ and  dance.â€? The   most   important   part   of   a   pow-­wow   is   the   drum,   Preston   said.   “The  drum  is  called  the  heart-­ beat   of   Mother   Earth,â€?   Preston   said.   “This   is   very   important   to   Native   Americans.   Without   the   drum,   you   can’t   have   a   pow-­ wow.â€? More  than  a  year  ago,  Mai  Yer   Yang,   student   services   coordina-­ tor   at   Career   &   Leadership,   de-­ cided  to  host  the  Native  Pride  lec-­ ture  series  because  she  said  that’s   what  the  students  wanted. “We   wanted   to   do   the   pow-­ wow   because   people   think   of   it   as  a  dance,  but  it  is  actually  more   than   that,â€?   Yang   said.   “I   want   students   to   appreciate   the   native   culture   and   really   understand   the   meaning  of  a  pow-­wow.â€?   The  Milwaukee  Native  Amer-­ ican  Dance  Troupe  displayed  sev-­ eral   different   types   of   dances   for   the   audience.   Each   dance   had   a   different  meaning. The   men   and   women   shared   the  largest  difference. “When   warriors   went   to   bat-­

tle,  the   women   would   dance   for   their   men,â€?   Preston   said.   “They   would   dance   in   the   four   cardinal   directions   waiting   for   the   return   of   the   men.   They   would   dance   XQWLO WKHLU VLJQLÂżFDQW RWKHU FDPH home.â€?   The   men’s   traditional   dances   mimic   the   jobs   they   would   have   had   in   earlier   years.   They   would   imitate  themselves  during  the  act   of   battle,   hunting   or   collecting   ÂżUHZRRG Men  dance  with  sharp  and  on-­ point   moves,   while   the   women   KDYHPRUHIUHHGRPDQGĂ€RZZLWK their  moves.   Some   students   were   asked   to   attend   the   event   for   class   credit.   Others  went  for  a  new  experience.   Marlee  Whiteside,  sophomore   and   Media   Arts   &   Game   Devel-­ opment   major,   said   she   mostly   went   because   of   class,   but   she   didn’t  have  to. “There’s  always  the  option  to   come   in,   sit   down   and   sign   your   name,â€?   Whiteside   said.   “Howev-­ er,  I  think  it’s  important  to  see  dif-­ ferent   diversity   and   how   people   embrace  it.â€? Whiteside   said   she   is   origi-­ nally  from  Idaho  and  has  not  had   the   chance   to   embrace   different   cultures. “I   wanted   to   learn   something   Alexandria Zamecnik photo/=DPHFQLN$(#XZZHGX that   I   didn’t   know,â€?   Whiteside   said.  “It’s  nice  to  see  the  culture.â€? Ronnie Preston (center) of the Apache tribe stands in front of Daniel Preston ZamecnikAE17@uww.edu

(left) and Kim Reyes (right) of the Oneida tribe. Ronnie Preston explains how 5H[P]L(TLYPJHUZJYLH[L[OLPYV^UV\[Ă„[ZI`^OH[PZTVZ[PTWVY[HU[[V[OLT

Sorority house not up to code

Samantha Jacquest photo/-DFTXHVW6/#XZZHGX

By Michael Riley News  Editor

Alexandria Zamecnik photo/=DPHFQLN$(#XZZHGX

7KH 7UL6LJPD KRXVH ZKHUH D ÂżUH RFFXUHG RQ the  morning   of   March   14,   did   not   have   an   opera-­ WLRQDO ÂżUH VSULQNOHU LQ SODFH DFFRUGLQJ WR D QHZV release  from  the  Wisconsin  Chapter  of  the  National   Fire  Sprinkler  Association. Wisconsin  state  law  requires  all  sorority  and  fra-­ ternity  houses  to  have  sprinkler  systems  installed  by   Jan.   1,   2014.     The   house   “did   not   meet   the   (Janu-­ ary)   deadlineâ€?   to   have   the   sprinklers   operational,   according  to  the  report. Approximately  23  students  were  displaced  after   D WZRDODUP ÂżUH FDXVHG DQ HVWLPDWHG  LQ damages. 7KH7UL6LJPDVRURULW\UHOHDVHGDQRIÂżFLDOVWDWH-­ ment   March   17   to   the   Royal   Purple,   “We   appreci-­ ate  the  thoughts,  prayers  and  concerns  we  have  re-­

FHLYHG DIWHU WKH ¿UH WKDW RFFXUUHG DW RXU$OSKD ;, Chapter  house.   Each   of   our   members   are   safe   and   have  been  accounted  for.  While  we  focus  on  ensur-­ ing  our  members  can  move  into  temporary  housing,   we   are   asking   to   respect   the   privacy   of   those   in-­ YROYHGDVWKLVLVDGLI¿FXOWWLPHIRUWKHFKDSWHU$Q\ VSHFL¿FTXHVWLRQVFDQEHGLUHFWHGWRWKH8QLYHUVLW\ or  National  Sorority.� Jan  Bilgen,  associate  director  of  Career  &  Lead-­ ership,  said  the  Greek  community  showed  its  unity   by  providing  emotional  support,  clothing,  blankets,   food  and  creating  a  Tri-­Sigma  relief  fund.   Residence   Life   provided   housing   to   the   dis-­ placed   women   from   March   14   to   16.     Currently,   D.L.K.   Enterprises   has   found   temporary   housing   for  all  students.     RileyMP30@uww.edu


Dateline19, Here March 2014 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

News

Royal Purple Page33

Alyssa Miles graphic/0LOHV$/#XZZHGX

By Vesna Brajkovic Senior  Staff  Writer

Candidates  vying   for   the   posi-­ tions   of   Whitewater   Student   Gov-­ ernment  president  and  vice  president   sat   down   with   the   Royal   Purple   to   answer  questions  about  why  they  are   running. Royal   Purple:   There’s   a   big   population   of   commuters   on   cam-­ pus.   Is   there   anything   you   plan   on   GRLQJ WKDW ZLOO VSHFL¿FDOO\ EHQH¿W this  population?   Nathan  Perry  and  Lucas  Tom-­ achek:  We  plan  to  work  on  a  mar-­ keting   campaign   directed   towards   students   that   commute   so   that   they   are   aware   of   all   of   the   rescources,   opportunities   and   activities   that   are   offered  on  campus. Robert   Emmett   and   Thomas   Ziolkowski:   We   recognize   and   ap-­ preciate  the  unique  blend  of  students   that   we   have   at   UW-­Whitewater.   One  of  the  big  needs  for  commuting   students   is   accessible   parking.   We   understand  that  there  are  certain  me-­ ters,  such  as  the  ones  located  on  Prai-­ rie  Street,  that  really  make  no  sense   and   place   an   additional   burden   on   VWXGHQWVGULYLQJLQDQGWU\LQJWR¿QG a  place  to  park.  On  the  same  note,  we   don’t   want   students   to   have   to   run   out  during  a  class  to  plug  a  meter.  It   just  doesn’t  seem  fair. RP:  :KDWœV\RXU¿UVWSODQRIDF-­ tion  for  presidency  and  the  steps  you   plan  to  take  to  make  it  successful?

Perry/Tomachek: 2XU ¿UVW plan  of   action   is   to   do   a   review   of   the  GenEd  courses,  and  to  solve  any   problems   that   arise   from   review   of   the  courses. Emmett/Ziolkowski: 2XU ¿UVW plan  of  action  is  to  add  the  Connec-­ tion   Student   Council   to   the   list   of   external   committees.   Having   WSG   reliably  at  those  meetings  will  be  a   big   step   in   enhancing   our   relation-­ ship  with  student  organizations.  We   plan   to   be   more   engaging   with   our   senators  and  all  students  in  an  effort   to  have  increased  attendance  at  regu-­ lar  meetings.   RP:  If  any  of  your  goals  start  to   take   longer,   or   require   more   work   than   originally   planned,   how   will   you  deal  with  this? Perry/Tomachek:   We   are   strong  believers  in  working  smarter   not  harder.  We  will  continue  to  pur-­ sue  the  goal  that  is  taking  more  time   than   we   thought.   We   would   make   sure  that  we  hold  all  parties  involved   with  the  goal  responsible.   Emmett/Ziolkowski:   As   we   stand  currently,  we  know  that  some   of  our  goals  are  long  term.  We  real-­ ize   that   large-­scale   change   cannot   happen   overnight.   However,   we   would  continue  to  work  just  as  hard   in  order  to  ensure  enhanced  student   EHQH¿WIRU\HDUVWRFRPH RP:  What  is  something  that  the   previous   presidency   enacted   that   you  hope  to  continue,  build  upon,  or   change?

Ballot: WSG slates take stance on sustainability referendum Continued  from  page  1 ing  the  interest  of  students. “Sustainability   initiatives   that   are  student-­driven  will  not  only  save   money   on   campus   utility   and   pur-­ chasing  bills,  but  also  promote  envi-­ ronmental  stewardship  in  students,â€?   Labonte  said. Labonte   said   although   it   is   dif-­ ÂżFXOWWRUDQN8::KLWHZDWHUFRP-­ pared   to   other   schools   there   is   al-­ ways  room  for  improvement.   The   University   of   Wisconsin-­ LaCrosse   has   green   funds   directly   in   its   tuition.   Each   UW-­LaCrosse   student  pays  $13  a  year  for  sustain-­ ability.   Other   UW   schools   such   as   UW-­Stout   and   UW-­Eau   Claire   in-­ clude  sustainability  in  tuition.   “To  improve,  we  need  continued   growth  of  environmental  awareness   on   campus   and   to   create   environ-­ mental   responsibility   in   our   stu-­ dents,â€?  Labonte  said.  

Nathan  Perry   and   Lucas   Tom-­ achek  are  running  for  presidency  on   the  same  ballot  as  the  referendum. The   Perry/Tomachek   slate   said   they  think  it  is  a  good  idea  to  have   a   fund   for   sustainable   projects   on   campus  as  long  as  the  funds  do  not   get  wasted  or  go  unused. The   other   president   hopefuls,   Robert   Emmett   and   Thomas   Zi-­ olkowski,  said  they  are  in  support  of   a  green  fund  with  a  few  stipulations. “We   are   in   support   of   a   green   fund,   but   we   need   to   ensure   that   controls  are  put  in  place  so  that  the   funds  are  used  in  a  way  that  directly   EHQHÂżWV VWXGHQWV´ WKH (PPHWW=L-­ olkowski  slate  said.  “Using  student   IHHV IRU WKLV SXUSRVH FDQ EH GLIÂż-­ cult.â€? ZamecnikAE17@uww.edu

Perry/Tomachek:  We   think   they   did   a   great   job   with   sustain-­ ability  on  campus,  and  we  hope  [to] further   their   successes   in   making   Whitewater  a  greener  campus. Emmett/Ziolkowski:   We’re   thoroughly   impressed   with   the   cur-­ rent   administration’s   friendliness   when   interacting   both   in   and   out   of   WSG   happenings.   We   are   also   pleased   with   the   vision   that   Presi-­ dent   Murphy   and   vice   president   Waldhuetter  had  by  creating  the  Sus-­ tainability   Specialist   position.   We   plan  to  utilize  and  publicize  the  work   of  this  position  even  more  in  the  next   school  year. RP:  Did  the  run-­in  with  disqual-­ L¿FDWLRQ FKDQJH \RXU SHUFHSWLRQ RI the  WSG? Perry/Tomachek:  The  disquali-­ ¿FDWLRQZDVDKLFFXS,WZDVDQLVVXH we  wish  never  happened,  but  it  was   dealt  with  in  the  best  ways  possible.   We  are  thankful  for  the  opportunity   they  have  given  us.   Emmett/Ziolkowski:  It  did  not   change   our   perception   of   WSG.   However,  we  were  surprised  by  the   decision.   We   have   always   known   WSG  to  be  a  group  that  adheres  to   and  abides  by  their  constitution  and   standing   rules.   We   understand   that   RYHUWXUQLQJ WKH GLVTXDOL¿FDWLRQ KDV the   potential   to   set   a   bad   precedent   that  the  rules  simply  do  not  matter,   DQGZHZLOO¿JKWWKDWSHUFHSWLRQDQG work  to  set  a  better  example  for  the   campus.

RP:  What  is  your  main  goal  for   SUFAC?   Perry/Tomachek:   It   would   be   only  logical  to  anticipate  an  increase   in   segregated   funds.   We   believe   in   the  abilities  of  SUFAC  and  trust  that   ZKDWHYHUWKH\GRLWZLOOEHQH¿WWKH student  population  as  best  as  it  can.   Emmett/Ziolkowski:  Our  main   goal  for  SUFAC  is  to  ensure  that  the   work  of  the  committee  is  to  enhance   VWXGHQW EHQH¿W DQG LQYROYHPHQW through   the   responsible   use   of   stu-­ dent  dollars.  It  would  be  unfair  to  is-­ sue  a  blanket  statement  that  we  wish   to   reduce   spending,   because   each   case  is  different,  and  using  an  insuf-­ ¿FLHQWDPRXQWRIPRQH\RIWHQWLPHV OHDGVWRDGHFUHDVHLQVWXGHQWEHQH¿W BrajkoviVA04@uww.edu


News

Dateline Page 4 Here Royal Purple

4 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com March 19, 2014

Student improves industry Senior  brings  gaming   summit  to  Midwest By Michael Riley News  Editor

Senior  Travis   Garski   had   one   major   concern   on   his   mind   that   lead   to   an   organized   effort   to   bring   together   students   from   across  the  region.     Garski   said   he   was   worried   about   his   future   employment   un-­ certainty  in  the  video  game  indus-­ try. His   conerns   led   to   the   Mid-­ west   Game   Developers   Summit   (MGDS),  which  focuses  on  local   Midwest   developers   coming   to-­ gether   to   share   their   knowledge   and   experiences   with   profession-­ als,   peers   and   aspiring   develop-­ ers.     Currently,   MGDS   has   launched   a   Kickstarter   in   an   at-­ tempt  to  raise  $8,000  to  help  fund   the  weekend.    With  less  than  three   weeks   to   go,   it   is   more   than   half   way   to   its   goal.     People   can   do-­ nate   anywhere   from   $1   to   more   than  $250.   The   more   someone   donates   the   more   perks   they   will   receive   at   the   conference,   ranging   from   VIP  passes  to  MGDS  swag.   Garski   said   he   has   spoken   to   potential   sponsors   in   hopes   to   raise  money  for  the  event.     “We   are   optimistic   that   we   will   reach   and   exceed   our   Kick-­ starter   goal,�   Garski   said.     “If  

the  Kickstarter   should   fail,   we’ll   evaluate   our   options   and   decide   how  to  best  proceed  forward  with   MGDS.â€? Garski   said   game   developers   conferences  are  an  incredible  way   to  network  and  learn  from  profes-­ sionals,  but  the  majority  of  these   were  not  close  to  Wisconsin,  and   the  cost  to  attend  was  not  possible   for  the  average  college  student.     Last   year,   Garski   helped   or-­ ganize   the   Wisconsin   Game   De-­ velopers   Summit   held   at   UW-­ Milwaukee,   where   300   people   attended   with   40   speakers   from   GLIIHUHQWÂżHOGVLQWKHYLGHRJDP-­ ing  industry.     “The  exposure  our  event  gives   students   will   help   them   learn   in-­ dustry  standard  practices,  expand   WKHLU QHWZRUN VLJQLÂżFDQWO\ LQ-­ crease   job   opportunities   and   let   them   bump   elbows   with   some   name  developers,â€?  Garski  said.     Although   this   helped   many   aspiring  video  game  industry  stu-­ dents   in   Wisconsin,   there   was   a   desire  from  the  surrounding  area.     Garski,  along  with  the  help  of   others,   widened   and   re-­branded   the  event  to  the  entire  Midwest.     Garksi   said   he   described   his   work   with   MGDS   as   a   roller-­ coaster.   “In  a  word,  it  has  been  stress-­ ful,â€?  Garksi  said.  “When  it  comes   time  to  actually  hosting  the  event,   though,   it   simply   feels   amaz-­ ing.     Seeing   all   those   aspiring   DQG KLJKSURÂżOH JDPH GHYHORS-­

ers  gathering  together  because  of   what   I   helped   accomplish   is   one   of   the   most   humbling   feelings   ever.     It   drives   me   to   make   the   next  year’s  event  even  bigger  and   better.�   Junior  media  arts  &  game  de-­ velopment  major  (MAGD)  Kath-­ erine   Stull   said   the   MAGD   de-­ partment  has  grown  substantially   since  she  came  to  UW-­Whitewa-­ ter  last  year.    Many  people  want  to   dive  into  the  gaming  industry  and   leave  the  university  with  as  much   experience  as  possible,  Stull  said.   “MGDS   would   give   MAGD   students  a  chance  to  practice  their   journalism  skills  by  covering  the   convention,   as   well   as   gaining   important  leadership  and  industry   tips  that  can  apply  to  their  future   and  also  their  work  at  Gamezom-­ bie.tv.,�  Stull  said.   Other   gaming   conventions   were   held   in   Chicago   and   Mil-­ waukee   where   people   can   show   their   love   for   gaming,   but   not   where   students   can   share   their   skills   and   expand   their   knowl-­ edge.     Stull  said  the  environment    al-­ lows   MAGD   students   to   grow.     Graduates   have   been   hired   at   gaming   companies   like   IGN   and   Joystiq.   It   is   a   chance   to   be   in-­ volved  in  UW-­W  League  of  Leg-­ ends  Club,  GAMED  and  GZ.     Freshman  Alec  Tranel  pledged   his   own   money   to   the   MGDS   Kickstarter.     He   is   a   part   of   the   entrepreneurship   program   called  

Police Report Axtman,  Luke  T., Failure   to   Prevent   Underage   Alcohol  Consumption 03/15/14 Burris,  Luke  R., Underage  Alcohol   Consumption,  Disorderly   Conduct-­  Objectionable   Conduct,  Failure  to  Obey 3ROLFH2I¿FH 03/15/14 Farnsworth,  Layne  L., Public   Intoxication,   Underage   Alcohol  Consumption 03/16/14 Feliciano,  Nicholas  P., Underage  Alcohol   Consumption,  Failure  to   Prevent   Underage   Alcohol   Consumption 03/15/14 Graham,  Audrey  S., Underage  Alcohol   Consumption 03/15/14 Heagney,  Thomas  J., Failure   to   Prevent   Underage   Consumption 03/08/14 Hytry,  Kallie  A., Public   Intoxication,   Underage   Alcohol  Consumption 03/16/14

Johnson,  Jamie  A., Operating  With  Prohibited   Alcohol  Concentration 02/23/14

Sanftleben,  Lindsey  R., Exceeding  Speed  Zones (16-­19  MPH) 03/12/14

Koepke,  Sarah  A., Underage  Alcohol   Consumption 03/15/14

Stevens,  Andrew  U., Disorderly  Conduct-­ Trespassing,  Public   Intoxication 03/15/14

LaMarca,  Nicole  E., Operating  While  Under  the   ,QÀXHQFH2SHUDWH:LWK Prohibited  Alcohol   Concentration 03/16/14 Lindert,  Heidi  B., Inattentive  Driving 03/14/14 McDermott,  Ryan  A., Failure   to   Prevent   Underage   Alcohol  Consumption,   Underage  Alcohol   Consumption 03/15/14 Neumann,  Tamara  K., Underage  Alcohol   Consumption 03/16/14 Pawlak,  Jennifer  J., Inattentive  Driving 03/10/14

Strehlow,  Maxwell  D., Underage  Alcohol Consumption 03/14/14 Tasch,  Jennifer  A., Underage  Alcohol Consumption 03/08/14

Courtesy photo

Keith Fuller was the 2013 keynote speaker at the Wisconsin Game Developers Summit at UW-Milwaukee. He has 13 years of experience in video gaming.

Launch  Pad,  where  he  met  Garski   and  heard  about  the  event.     “Through   Launch   Pad,   I   am   able   to   start   my   own   company   and   surround   myself   with   many   colleagues   like   Travis   [Garski],�   Tranel   said.     “I   was   eager   to   be   apart  of  MGDS  in  any  way.    I  do-­ nated  $20  and  shared  this  oppor-­ tunity  to  through  Facebook  to  all   my  friends.�  

  

RileyMP30@uww.edu

GREAT FOOD

MADE FAST!

Tidmore,  Montrell  L., Underage  Alcohol   Consumption 03/15/14 Vasquez,  Johnny  S., Underage  Alcohol   Consumption 03/16/14 Walton,  Andre  L., Underage  Alcohol   Consumption 03/15/14

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³$Q\VXI¿FLHQWO\DGYDQFHGWHFKQRORJ\LV LQGLVWLQJXLVKDEOHIURPPDJLF´  -­Arthur  C.  Clarke

WEDNESDAY March  19,  2014

Business  Editor: Rumasa  Noor

PAGE Â 5

Former student turns entrepreneur

Alyssa Miles graphic/0LOHV$/#XZZHGX

By Rumasa Noor Business  Editor

Mobile  apps   have   become   more   popular   than   ever.   Accord-­ ing   to   money.cnn.com,   “Mobile   devices   accounted   for   55   percent   of   Internet   usage   in   the   United   States  in  January  [2014].â€? Kyle   Van   Dyn   Hoven,   a   for-­ mer  UW-­Whitewater  student,  has   joined   the   mo-­ bile  app  industry.   He   is   the   CEO   and   founder   of   two  online-­based   companies:   Cre-­ ation   Burst   and   Slick   Lizard   Van Dyn Hoven Games. In   2013,   he   transfered   to   an   online   school   in   New  York. Van  Dyn  Hoven  said  Creation   Burst  Studio  is  a  “mobile  and  web   development  company.â€?   “We   do   anything   from   apps   for   iOS,   apps   for   android,   web   design,   graphic   design,   branding,   video   creation,â€?   Van   Dyn   Hoven   said. Van   Dyn   Hoven   said   people   come   to   Creation   Burst   Studio   with  their  ideas  and  the  company   helps   them   turn   those   ideas   into   reality.     Âł:HKDYHPDGHOLNHÂżYHRUVL[ apps   for   clients   so   far,â€?  Van   Dyn   Hoven  said. Slick  Lizard  Games  is  a  gam-­ ing  company.  One  of  the  apps  they   have  created  is  called  “Flappy  the   Pig,â€?   which   is   derived   from   the   popular  game  “Flappy  Bird.â€?   Van  Dyn  Hoven  said  his  com-­ pany  has  been  working  on  a  new   game  for  seven  months. “We  are  working  on  a  mobile   racing  game;Íž  its  going  to  be  some-­ thing   that’s   going   to   be   available  

on  iOS   devices,   iPads,   iPhones,   work  on  them.  He  started  getting  a   iPods,  and  it  also  will  be  available   sense  of  this  business,  and  he  has   for   android   as   well,�   Van   Dyn   been  working  on  them  for  about  a   Hoven  said. year  now. The   racing   game   is   set   to   be   “I   started   out   with   doing   just   released  by  the  end  of  April.   the   game   for   myself   and   then   I   Van   Dyn   Hoven   has   a   back-­ later   decided   that   I   also   wanted   ground   in   coding.   He   studied   in-­ to   start   doing   stuff   for   clients   as   tegral   science   at   UW-­W,   and   his   well,�  Van  Dyn  Hoven  said. interest  in  making  games  and  apps   Van  Dyn  Hoven  is  hopeful  for   led  him  to  create  these  companies. the  future  of  his  companies.  Right   “It’s   fun   to   now  he  does  not   make   games,   have   a   physical   apps,   it’s   enjoy-­ location   for   his   able  for  me,  and   IRXUUDFLQJJDPH businesses   and   it’s  also  the  kind   everything   is   GRHVZHOOZHZRXOG of   industry   that   based  online. I   want   to   get   OLNHWRRSHQXSD “If   our   rac-­ into,�   Van   Dyn   ZKROHVWXGLR ing   game   does   Hoven  said.  “It’s   well,   we   would   growing   very   .\OH9DQ'\Q+RYHQ like   to   open   up   very   fast.   You   &(2DQGIRXQGHU a   whole   studio,   could   be   very   probably  in  Cal-­ successful  if  you   ifornia,  add  full-­ know   what   you   time   employees   are  doing.� and   I   guess   continue   to   work   on   Although   he   has   interest   in   games   from   here   on   out,�   Van   making  games  and  apps,  Van  Dyn   Dyn  Hoven  said.   Hoven   does   not   design   them.   He   People   who   are   interested   in   works   with   different   people   who   having   their   apps   developed   can   design  apps  and  games  for  him. leave   a   message   at   creationburst. “I  kind  of  do  most  of  the  man-­ com. agement,  I  deal  with  all  the  clients   NoorR16@uww.edu and   make   sure   everyone   is   hap-­ py,�  Van  Dyn  Hoven  said.  “I  kind   of  work  with  people  from  all  over   To  download  “Flappy  the   the  world.  Most  of  my  developers   Pig,�  scan  below: I  work  with  are  actually  from  In-­ dia.�   Van  Dyn  Hoven  has  a  business   partner   based   in   California   and   a   manager  who  works  for  him  from   India.   He   said   he   does   not   have   permanent  employees;͞  most  of  his   employees  work  for  him  on  proj-­ ect  -­to-­project  basis.   Van   Dyn   Hoven   said   before   starting  his  businesses,  he  used  to   buy   apps   from   other   people   and  

“

  I

Business Briefs Increased  Marketability:   Preparing  yourself  for  job   search Student   organizations   Beta   Gamma   Sigma,   Mu   Kappa   Tau,   and   Pi   Sigma   Epsilon   are     teaming   up   to   co-­host   an   event  that  will  help  students  in   UHVHDUFKLQJ WKH ¿UPV WKH\ DUH applying  for. 5HVHDUFKLQJ WKH ¿UPV LV particularly   important   because   it   helps   people   answer   the   job   interview   questions,   helps   ask   intelligent   questions   and   aids   in  making  the  right  decision  to   either  accept  or  decline  the  job.

Dr.  Rob   Boostrom,   faculty   advisor  for  Mu  Kappa  Tau  and   co-­faculty  advisor  for  Pi  Sigma   Epsilon,  said  it  is  not  common   to   see   student   organizations   work  together. At  this  event,  students  will   learn   how   to   properly   use   li-­ brary  and  online  job  resources   to  research  companies. Speaker:  Amanda  Howell When:  5:15  p.m.,  March  19 Where:  Hyland  1309


WEDNESDAY

“In  the  spring,  I  have  counted  136   different  kinds  of  weather  inside   of  24  hours.�

March  19,  2014

Opinion  Editor: Lucas  Wimmer

 -­Mark  Twain PAGE  6

Students  should  use  spring  break  to  learn Royal Purple Editorial  Staff  Opinion

Spring  Break   is   a   time   for   students   to   celebrate  their  week-­long  freedom  from  re-­ sponsibilities.   As   MTV   has   been   showing   us  since  1986,  the  year  they  began  covering   Spring  Break  live,  many  students  head  down   WRZDUPEHDFKHVDQGKDYHWKHLU¿OORIDOFR hol  and  regrettable  decisions. Although   this   may   seem   like   an   attrac-­ tive  idea  for  a  vacation,  there  are  other  op-­ portunities   for   Spring   Break   that   students   should  take  advantage  of.   College   is   a   great   time   to   have   fun   and   go   out   with   your   friends,   as   evidenced   by   Whitewater’s   thriving   bars,   but   it   also   is   a   time   for   students   to   learn   both   inside   and   outside  the  classroom. By   volunteering,   students   can   learn   a   plethora   of   valuable   life   lessons   including   KDUGZRUNHPSDWK\KXPLOLW\VDFUL¿FHDQG compassion.   These  values  can  be  of  great  help  to  stu-­ GHQWVZKRZLOOVRRQ¿QGDFDUHHUDQGHQWHU the  workforce.   UW-­Whitewater   offers   a   few   alterna-­ tive  Spring  Break  opportunities  that  students   would  be  wise  to  utilize. For   example,   UW-­Whitewater   Habitat   for  Humanity  offers  a  Spring  Break  trip  ev-­ ery  year.  This  year,  participants  will  travel  to   Albany,  Ga.  

Alyssa Miles graphic/0LOHV$/#XZZHGX

7KLVPD\QRWVHHPOLNHDYDFDWLRQDWÂżUVW glance,  but  the  agenda  for  the  week  has  non-­ work  activities  planned  as  well,  including  a   day  at  the  beach. This  provides  students  an  opportunity  for   fun  in  the  sun  while  helping  those  in  need.   Grades  can  be  a  source  of  stress  for  stu-­ dents  in  college,  and  volunteering  can  help   with  that  as  well. A   study   by   Amelia   Parnell   of   Florida   State  University  in  2010  titled  “The  relation-­ ship  between  volunteering  and  undergradu-­ ate   academic   achievement   at   Florida   State   University,â€?   found   students   who   volunteer  

during  their   time   at   college   usually   have   a   higher  GPA  than  students  who  do  not. For  students  interested  in  learning  about   United   States   history,   UW-­Whitewater   also   offers  a  unique  travel  study  opportunity  dur-­ ing  Spring  Break.   The  social  justice  travel  study  takes  UW-­ Whitewater   students   to   places   with   strong   civil   rights   histories   such   as   Cincinnati,   Montgomery,   Selma   and   Jackson.   Students   can   take   this   trip   either   for   credit   or   non-­ credit.   Students  will  learn  about  hisitoric  events   in  those  cities  while  also  attending  museums  

and  other  landmarks  along  the  way. This  is  a  great  way  for  students  to  learn   and   enjoy   themselves   in   beautiful   historic   cities  across  the  United  States.   In  addition  to  opportunities  given  by  the   university,  groups  like  the  United  Way  also   provide   alternative   Spring   Break   trips   for   those  looking  to  volunteer.   According  to  their  website,  destinations   include   Washington   D.C.,   the   New   Jersey   shore,  San  Francisco  and  others.   All  of  these  destinations  have  volunteer   opportunities,   including   a   trip   to   Biloxi,   Miss.,   a   community   that   was   ravaged   by   powerful  storms  and  is  still  trying  to  rebuild.   Although  some  of  these  destinations  may   not  blow  your  mind  with  bikinis  and  gallons   of   alcohol,   they   all   provide   unique   oppor-­ tunities  that  allow  students  to  help  those  in   need,  grow  as  a  person  and  can  be  attractive   on  a  résumé.   This   should   be   something   that   is   more   important  to  students  than  emulating  Spring   Break   coverage   on   television   and   getting   EODFNRXW GUXQN IRU WKUHH WR ¿YH GD\V LQ DQ unfamiliar  environment.   Students  interested  in  more  information   on   the   social   justice   travel   study   in   2015   should   contact   Kari   Borne   at   the   Continu-­ LQJ (GXFDWLRQ 2I¿FH DW   RU cetravelstudy@uww.edu. rp@uww.edu

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What are you doing over spring break?

EDITORIAL Â STAFF  RP@UWW.EDU

EDITOR  IN  CHIEF..............................................................Samantha  Jacquest MANAGING  EDITOR..............................................................Ben  Holzhueter NEWS  EDITOR............................................................................Michael  Riley ASSISTANT  NEWS  EDITOR.........................................Alexandria  Zamecnik OPINION  EDITOR.....................................................................Lucas  Wimmer BUSINESS  EDITOR.....................................................................Rumasa  Noor LIFESTYLE  EDITOR........................................................Jacqueline  Schaefer ARTS  &  REC  EDITOR.........................................................Abrielle  Backhaus SPORTS  EDITOR................................................................Kevin  Cunningham ASSISTANT  SPORTS  EDITOR...........................................Andrea  Sidlauskas COPY  EDITOR.........................................................................Chris  Johannsen COPY  EDITOR........................................................................Josh  Hafemeister PHOTO  EDITOR...........................................................................Amanda  Ong MULTIMEDIA  EDITOR..........................................................Andrea  Behling GRAPHICS  EDITOR.....................................................................Alyssa  Miles FACULTY  ADVISER..................................................Carol  Terracina-­Hartman

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“I’m  just  going  home.�  

“I’m  going  to  Ohio  State   to  visit  a  friend.�

“I’ll  be  catching  up  on   homework.�

-­Grace  Devine, freshman

-­Megan  Hack, sophomore

-­DeJuan  Washington, sophomore

“I’m  going  to  cook  for   myself  because  I  don’t   have  time  to  do  it  during   the  week,  and  I’m  going   to  sleep  a  lot.� -­Lisa  Helms, senior

“I’m  going  to  England.  I’ll   be  visiting  some  friends.�

Letters  to  the  Editor  Policy      The  Royal  Purple  welcomes  letters   to   the   editor.   Timely,   well-­written   opinions   on   topics   of   interest   by   UW-­Whitewater  students  and  faculty   PHPEHUV DUH JLYHQ ¿UVW SULRULW\ IRU publication.          The  editor  reserves  the  right  to  re-­ ject  letters  or  edit  for  clarity,  brevity,   good  taste,  accuracy  and  libel.  Due  to   space  limitations,  we  cannot  print  ev-­ ery  letter  we  receive.  All  submissions   become  property  of  the  Royal  Purple   and  cannot  be  returned.  Please  limit   submissions   to   500   words.   Submis-­ sions  are  due  each  week  by  Sunday   at  5  p.m.

:ULWHUVPXVWLQFOXGHIXOO¿UVWDQG last  name,  address,  year  in  school  or   SRVLWLRQ DW WKH XQLYHUVLW\ LI DSSOL FDEOH DQGDSKRQHQXPEHU&RQWDFW information  will  not  be  published  in   the   Royal   Purple.   Unsigned   letters   are  automatically  rejected.          Opinions  expressed  in  letters,  col-­ umns  or  commentaries  are  solely  the   opinion  of  the  author  and  not  neces-­ sarily  the  opinion  of  the  staff  of  the   Royal  Purple  or  UW-­Whitewater. Please  bring  letters  to  the  Royal  Pur-­ ple RI¿FH  8QLYHUVLW\ &HQWHU RU e-­mail  them  to  RP@uww.edu.

-­Rick  Grunewald, junior

“I’m  going  home.  I’m   going  to  spend  some  time   with  family  and  friends,   relax  a  little  bit  and  get   away  from  school.� -­Michael  Heck, sophomore

AN  AWARD-­WINNING  PUBLICATION 2010  ACP  BEST  OF  THE  MIDWEST  CONTEST FIRST  PLACE “BEST  OF  SHOW�

2013  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST SECOND  PLACE “FEATURE  WRITING�

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2013  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST HONORABLE  MENTION “GENERAL  REPORTING�


Opinion

Dateline Page 7 Here Royal Purple

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com March 19, 2014

Letters to the Editor Lecture went beyond ‘liberal-­leaning presentation’ I  am  writing  to  discuss  the  viral  video  I   took   of   a   recent   lecture   in   my   GenEd   130,   in  which  candidate  for  Milwaukee  alderman   Eyon  Biddle  is  featured  speaking  about  Re-­ publican  racism  and  “white  rage.â€? First,  I  want  to  point  out  that  Mr.  Biddle   LV D FDQGLGDWH IRU SXEOLF RIÂżFH DV ZHOO DV D ZHOO NQRZQ SXEOLF ÂżJXUH LQ 0LOZDXNHH His  conduct  in  a  public  setting  is  under  more   scrutiny  than  that  of  an  average  private  citi-­ zen,  because  he  has  chosen  to  make  himself   DSXEOLFÂżJXUH I  did  not  record  my  professor,  as  she  is   a   private   citizen,   nor   did   I   record   any   stu-­ dents.  Once  Eyon  Biddle  began  to  make  his   outrageous   remarks,   it   was   my   duty   to   let   his   constituents   know   what   their   candidate   really  believes.  Since  Mr.  Biddle  wanted  to   have   an   honest   discussion   about   the   issues   he   feels   strongly   about,   he   should   have   no  

objection  to  me  videoing  him  and  posting  it.   Now,   his   lecture   is   receiving   more   discus-­ sion  than  he  could  have  imagined.   Further,   by   allowing   his   views   to   be   heard   by   a   national   audience,   I   have   been   accused  of  not  believing  in  the  First  Amend-­ ment.  To  that  point,  I  say  there  is  not  a  stron-­ ger   believer   in   the   First   Amendment   than   myself,  as  a  strict  constitutionalist.  I  believe   Eyon  Biddle  has  every  right  to  say  anything   he  wants.   My  objection,  and  the  reason  I  chose  to   shoot  the  video,  is  his  lecture  went  beyond   simply   a   liberal-­leaning   presentation.   He   used  his  forum  to  accuse  people  who  don’t   agree   with   him   of   being   racist,   and   to   say   the  problems  of  society  today  are  simply  the   result  of  Republican  racism.  If  this  is  what   0U%LGGOHEHOLHYHVWKDQWKDWLV¿QHIRUKLP to   say;͞   but   in   a   classroom   setting,   a   candi-­

GDWHIRURIÂżFHFDQQRWVD\VRPHWKLQJVRLQDF curate  and  expect  no  repercussion.  Had  the   video  not  been  taped  and  then  gone  national,   a   counter   perspective   would   not   have   been   invited   to   give   a   guest   lecture   to   the   class,   and   Mr.   Biddle’s   lecture   would   have   been   the  last  word  on  the  issue.   Now,  in  credit  to  the  professor,  a  conser-­ vative  speaker  will  come  into  the  class  and   provide  an  alternative  view  to  Mr.  Biddle’s   belief  that  the  Republican  Party  is  fueled  by   “white   rage.â€?   There   is   no   question   in   my   mind   the   classroom   should   be   a   safe   envi-­ URQPHQWKRZHYHUDSXEOLFÂżJXUHDQGFDQGL GDWHIRURIÂżFHVKRXOGQRWH[SHFWKLVZRUGV especially  if  they  are  intolerant  and  untrue,   to  go  undocumented  for  the  public  at  large   to  see.   This   was   not   a   lecture   open   to   the   uni-­ versity  at  large,  but  rather  a  lecture  in  a  re-­

quired  class   with   no   counter   balance,   until   now.   The   community   and   parents   deserve   to   know   what   students   are   being   taught   in   class,   because   their   money   and   the   univer-­ sity’s  credibility  is  on  the  line.   Knowledge   is   power,   and   having   too   much   information   is   never   a   bad   thing.   If   one  is  opposed  to  me  taping  the  lecture,  then   they  obviously  realize  how  radical  it  was,  or   else  they  wouldn’t  mind  the  public  knowing   about  it.   Therefore,  I  support  Mr.  Biddle’s  right  to   speak  his  mind  wholeheartedly,  however  the   public  has  a  right  to  know  what  is  being  said   E\ D FDQGLGDWH IRU RI¿FH WR LPSUHVVLRQDEOH minds   in   a   required   course,   and   decide   for   themselves  if  it  was  appropriate  or  not.  

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          Kyle  Brooks

Biddle  unfairly  criticized

Brooks wrong to record speaker

The  characterization   by   Fox   News   of   the   events   reported   on   in   the   Royal   Purple’s   March   5   article   “From   UW-­W   classroom   to   national  media�  suggests  that  something  inap-­ propriate  happened  in  the  classroom.    In  citing   the  UW  System  policy  on  political  campaign   activities,  the  Royal  Purple  writer  suggests  that   this  policy  may  have  been  violated,  when  that   is  clearly  not  the  case. Eyon   Biddle   was   invited   to   speak   on   a   topic  relevant  to  the  class.    Since  he  is  active  in   Democratic  Party  politics  at  the  county  level,   it   is   reasonable   to   expect   that   he   will   speak   from   that   political   perspective.     Further,   it   is   not  incumbent  upon  any  speaker  to  represent   the  positions  of  other  parties,  including  the  Re-­ publican  Party,  the  Libertarian  Party,  the  Green   Party,  or  the  Socialist  Party. In  some  cases  Biddle  presented  a  Demo-­ cratic  interpretation  of  state  and  national  poli-­ tics   since   2010.     In   other   cases,   such   as   that   about   redistricting,   he   presented   facts   that   Republicans   publicly   embrace   as   strategy.   Unfortunately,   the   Royal   Purple   did   not   ac-­ curately  represent  Biddle’s  statement.    Biddle   explained  that  the  result  of  the  Republican-­led   state  legislature’s  redistricting  in  2010  was  to   create   districts   that   are   either   predominantly   Republican  or  predominantly  Democrat,  elim-­ inating  districts  where  there  was  a  more  even   split  between  the  two  major  parties.    The  stated  

Like  many   others   on   campus,   I   am   trou-­ bled  by  the  incident  involving  former  Milwau-­ kee   county   supervisor   Eyon   Biddle’s   visit   to   Monique  Liston’s  general  education  class,  but   perhaps  for  different  reasons  than  some.  Lis-­ ton  had  asked  Biddle  to  speak  to  the  topic  of   power  and  politics,  and  in  the  course  of  his  re-­ marks  he  attributed  Republican  success  in  the   2010  election  to  “white  rage.�  Biddle’s  analy-­ sis  may  have  been  simplistic,  overgeneralized,   or   wrong,   but   what   disturbs   me   more   about   this   incident   are   the   actions   of   Kyle   Brooks,   the  College  Republican  freshman  who  decided   to  make  this  a  public  affair. Brooks   took   offense   to   Biddle’s   remarks   and  clandestinely  recorded  Biddle  on  his  cell   phone   and   distributed   his   recording   on   the   Internet.   I   am   a   63-­year-­old   man   who   may   be  a  bit  old  fashioned,  but  back  in  the  day  it   would   have   been   considered   rude   to   secretly   photograph  or  videotape  another  without  their   permission.   I   realize   that   today’s   youth   have   grown  up  in  a  “gotcha�  culture  where  this  is   normative,  feeling  entitled  to  share  most  any-­ thing  with  the  rest  of  the  world.  But  it  leaves   me  wondering,  why  can’t  a  student  like  Brooks   simply  speak  up  in  class,  or  talk  to  the  profes-­ sor  afterwards  and  ask  for  time  to  rebut  the  re-­ marks?  Nowadays  students  seem  to  think  they   are  entitled  to  bypass  this  apparently  anachro-­ nistic   element   of   human   communication   and  

goal  of   the   Republican   Party   at   the   national   level  was  to  create  more  districts  that  favor  Re-­ publican   Candidates   (check   out   “Redmap�).     Biddle   cited   other   facts,   such   as   the   shift   in   funding  from  public  schools  to  charter  schools,   and  the  effects  on  campaign  advertising  of  the   Supreme  Court  decision  on  “Citizens  United�   to  show  that  the  political  climate  in  Wisconsin   has  become  polarized  since  the  2010  elections.     In  some  cases  he  presented  a  Democratic  inter-­ pretation  of  events,  which  makes  sense,  given   his  position,  and  in  other  cases,  he  was  just  lay-­ ing  out  the  facts.  He  was  not  out  of  line. The   instructor   encouraged,   expected,   and   required   critical   responses   to   the   speaker’s   presentation,  as  reported  by  the  Royal  Purple.     The  student  who  posted  the  recording  on  social   media  made  an  unfortunate  choice  that  took  on   a  life  of  it’s  own  when  Fox  got  involved.  Just   as  there  is  an  obligation  to  critically  evaluate   statements  by  guest  speakers,  there  is  an  ob-­ ligation  to  critically  evaluate  the  characteriza-­ tion  of  events  as  covered  by  media  outlets  such   as  Fox  News.  

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            Crista  Lebens

Cyberbullying  an  issue  at  UW-­â€?W Âł,IZHWRRNMXVWÂżYHPLQXWHVWRUHFRJ nize   our   beauty   instead   of   attacking   each   other’s  differences...  it’s  not  hard.  It’s  ac-­ tually  an  easier  way  to  live.  And  ultimate-­ ly,  it  saves  lives.â€?  This  inspiring  quote  was   spoken   by   Ellen   Page,   as   she   talks   about   how   harsh   people   and   their   words   are   to   others.   The   bullying   epidemic   has   grown   to  a  new  extreme  within  the  last  few  years   with   about   4,400   kids   committing   sui-­ cide   every   year   because   of   it.   Although   the   majority   of   bullying   usually   occurs   throughout   high   school,   it   still   exists   in   middle   and   elementary   schools,   and   even   colleges.   “When   it   comes   to   bullying   in   college,   according   to   a   Health   Day   News   study   in   2012,   15   percent   of   college   stu-­ dents  reported  being  bullied  and  nearly  22   percent   reported   being   cyberbullied.   The   study   found   that   when   it   comes   to   bul-­ lying   in   college,   38   percent   of   students   knew  someone  who  was  cyberbullied,  and  

about  9   percent   said   they   had   cyberbul-­ lied.�     Of   those   who   said   they’d   been   cyber-­ bullied,   25   percent   said   it   was   through   a   social  networking  site,  21  percent  through   texting,   16   percent   through   email   and   13   percent  through  instant  messages.  We  need   to  be  aware  of  how  are  words  and  actions   affect  others. The   University   of   Wisconsin-­White-­ water’s   confession   page   on   Facebook   is   where  we  can  see  a  large  amount  of  bully-­ ing  on  campus.  Over  half  of  young  adults   have  been  exposed  to  cyber  bullying.  Any-­ one  is  able  to  access  this  page  and  read  the   nasty  remarks  that  people  make.  Although   the  original  posts  are  anonymous,  it  is  still   bullying.  An  example  of  some  of  the  bul-­ lying  taking  place  on  the  confession  page   is   a   comment   that   said,   “If   one   more   Tri   Pig  gets  in  my  way  at  the  gym  in  going  to   call  Old  McDonald  and  tell  him  to  wrangle  

his  hogs  up.�  Some  of  these  posts  are  very   inappropriate   and   shouldn’t   be   repeated,   but   if   you   go   look   for   yourself   you   can   read   some   of   the   nasty   remarks   people   have  to  say.  These  words  that  they  use  to   describe  how  they  are  feeling  is  unjust  and   cruel.  People  need  to  watch  what  they  say   because  they  never  know  what  their  words   can  lead  to.     So   I   ask   you,   Whitewater   students,   what   can   you   do   to   prevent   bullying   on   campus?    

  Nicole  Kohnke  and  Jenna  Blakey

go  directly  to  university  administrators,  politi-­ FDORIÂżFLDOVRUWKHPHGLDZLWKWKHLUFRPSODLQWV One  of  the  Internet  sites  that  Brooks  sent   his  recording  to  is  Campus  Reform,  the  group   that   apparently   offered   him   the   most   public-­ ity   and   led   to   his   appearance   on   the   highly   partisan  Fox  News  channel.  Campus  Reform   claims  to  be  “a  watchdog  to  the  nation’s  higher   education  system,â€?  employing  a  “team  of  pro-­ fessional   journalists   [who]   work   alongside   student  activists  and  student  journalists  to  re-­ port  on  the  conduct  and  misconduct  of  univer-­ sity   administrators,   faculty,   and   students.â€?   In   somewhat  Orwellian  fashion,  it  claims  to  hold   “itself   to   rigorous   journalism   standards,â€?   but   there  is  no  doubt  it  has  a  decidedly  conserva-­ tive  bias,  which  is  revealed  by  the  fact  that  it  is   sponsored  by  the  Leadership  Institute.   Brooks  may  indeed  be  a  rising  star  in  this   movement,  but  his  actions,  when  duplicated  by   others  time  and  time  again  around  the  country,   are  creating  a  chilling  effect  in  college  class-­ rooms.   When   Biddle   walked   into   Liston’s   class,   I   imagine   he   had   no   idea   that   he   was   VWHSSLQJLQWRDSROLWLFDOPLQHÂżHOGZKHUHIUHH dom  of  speech  is  under  attack.    

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      Ronald  Berger

Liston  not   at   fault   in  Brooks  case While   the   events   described   in   the   Royal   Purple  article,  “From  UW-­W  classroom  to  na-­ tional  media,�  raise  a  number  of  concerns  for   me  about  academic  freedom,  I  am  compelled   to   address   here   the   implication   in   the   article   that   the   instructor   in   question,   Monique   Lis-­ ton,  did  something  wrong  and  is  being  “moni-­ tored.�  Monique  Liston  is  a  trusted,  valued  and   talented  member  of  the  Department  of  Wom-­ en’s  and  Gender  Studies.  She  did  not  violate   any   policy.     On   the   contrary,   she   did   exactly   what  we  want  her  to  do—challenge  students  to   consider   and   critically   assess   viewpoints   dif-­ ferent  from  their  own.  As  a  colleague  of  Ms.   Liston’s   who   has   seen   the   carefully   crafted   assignments,  the  engaging  class  activities  and   the   thoughtful   approaches   to   her   work,   I   am   grateful  to  have  her  at  UW-­W.  

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                      Ellie  Schemenauer


WEDNESDAY “Everything  negative  —  pressure,   challenges  —  is  all  an  opportunity   for  me  to  rise.�  -­Kobe  Bryant

March  19,  2014

Lifestyle  Editor: Jacqueline  Schaefer

PAGE Â 8

Role  model  on  and  off  the  court   By Samantha Jacquest Editor  In  Chief

Auditions  can  be  nerve-­wracking  experi-­ ences;Íž  people  are  judging,  watching,  waiting,   scrutinizing  a  performance  for  any  mistake.   Sophomore  Katie  Gruber  was  nervous   when  she  auditioned  for  the  UW-­Whitewater   cheerleading  squad  her  freshman  year.  But   she  says  it  wasn’t  as  stressful  because  she   didn’t  take  it  seriously. “I  just  did  it  for  laughs  at  the  time,â€?   Gruber  said.  “My  friend  Elizabeth  [Fideler]   and  I  got  these  letters  saying  there  were  cheer   tryouts,  and  she  said  we  should  try  out  to  see   if  we  would  actually  make  the  team.â€? Gruber  has  cerebral  palsy,  a  neurologi-­ cal  disorder  that  occurs  during  pregnancy  or   early  infancy  and  affects  body  movement   and  muscle  coordination,  according  to  the   National  Institute  of  Neurological  Disorders   and  Stroke. The  cause  of  Gruber’s  disorder  likely   stems  from  her  mother’s  choice  to  smoke  dur-­ LQJSUHJQDQF\DQGQHJOHFW*UXEHULQKHUÂżUVW few  days  of  life. Now  adopted  into  the  same  family  as   her  half  siblings,  Gruber  lives  with  physical   and  learning  disabilities.  Spasms  contract  her   muscles  painfully,  getting  worse  during  the   winter.  The  right  side  of  her  body  is  more   affected  than  her  left.  She  also  suffers  from   a  mild  form  of  Parkinson’s  Disease,  which   causes  her  to  shake  uncontrollably. “It’s  one  of  those  types  of  disabilities   where  you  reach  a  certain  plateau,â€?  Gruber   said.  “My  plateau  was  pretty  much  my  junior   year  of  high  school,  then  you  start  noticing   new  challenges  with  your  body,  and  I  noticed   that  quite  quickly  right  after  my  plateau  had   reached.â€?

Amanda Ong photo/2QJ$#XZZHGX

Sophomore Katie Gruber joined the cheerleading team last year. She is the first student with a disability to be on the squad for more than a year.

Part  of  the  team Because  of  her  disabilities,  Gruber  did   not  take  Fideler  seriously  when  she  sug-­ gested  they  try  out  for  the  cheerleading  squad   together.  Fideler  has  nystagmus,  which  causes   fuzzy  vision  and  her  eyes  to  move  uncontrol-­ lably. Âł,ÂżJXUHGLWZDVDJRRGWKLQJZHFRXOG do  together  and  we  could  get  the  word  out   about  disabilities  and  that  we  could  do  a  lot   of  things  that  other  people  could  do,â€?  Fideler   said. Fideler  had  been  a  member  of  cheerlead-­ ing  teams  in  the  past.  For  Gruber,  it  was  a   different  story. “At  my  high  school,  I  never  really  was   able  to  get  involved  with  anything,  and  with   VSRUWVGHÂżQLWHO\QRW´*UXEHUVDLGÂł7KH\ called  my  school  inclusive,  but  I  didn’t  think  

Courtesy photo

Gruber and team members cheer on the Warhawks at a men’s basketball game at Kachel Fieldhouse.

so.  I  thought  it  was  more  segregated  and  I  was   Gruber  refuses  to  be  given  a  timeline. bullied  a  lot.â€? “I  try  to  stay  away  from  the  timeline  and   Gruber  decided  to   get  as  little  X-­rays  and  stuff   go  for  it.  She  and  Fideler   as  possible,â€?  Gruber  said.  “I   contacted  the  student   worry  about  it  sometimes,   he’s  happy  with   coaches  and  adviser  of   but  I  don’t  let  it  affect  me   the  squad.  It  took  some   to  the  point  of  where  I  can’t   who  she  is  and  what   time  for  the  student   handle  it.  I  know  that  if  it   she  has  overcome,   coaches  to  learn  what   comes  it’s  just  part  of  life.â€? Gruber  and  Fideler  were   because  she’s  over-­ Sophomore  Coleton   comfortable  with,  but   Hrgich  has  known  Gruber   come  a  lot. after  about  four  months   since  their  summer  transition   of  meetings,  they  were   Coleton  Hrgich, program  going  into  fresh-­ both  part  of  the  team  and   sophomore man  year.  He  said  Gruber  is   cheering  at  the  home   always  in  the  front  row  of   basketball  games. class,  always  has  a  story  to   Fideler  said  she  thinks   tell  and  does  not  let  negative   DWÂżUVWVRPHRIWKHRWKHUFKHHUOHDGHUVZHUHQÂśW LQĂ€XHQFHVID]HKHU sure  how  to  react  about  her  and  Gruber  join-­ “She’s  happy  with  who  she  is  and  what   ing  the  team.  After  a  few  games,  everyone   she  has  because  she’s  overcome  a  lot,â€?  Hrgich   got  used  to  the  idea  and  enjoyed  have  her  and   said.  “That  just  proves  to  me  how  strong  she   Gruber  on  the  squad,  Fideler  said. is.  I  know  some  people  who  would  probably   Fideler  had  to  quit  the  squad  this  year   just  give  up  if  they  had  a  disability.â€? because  of  her  class  schedule,  but  Gruber  is   still  cheering,  and  this  year  she’s  getting  more   Life  as  a  Warhawk involved  with  her  team   Gruber  said  UW-­W  has  made  living  with   members  on  and  off  the   a  disability  less  stressful.  Coming  from  a  high   court. school  that  didn’t  know  how  to  handle  her   “Now  we’re  in  year  two,   disability,  Gruber  said  the  chancellor  and  the   and  now  what  makes  me  do   university  are  very  accommodating  and  open   it  is  the  bond  I  have  with  the   to  suggestions  from  disabled  students. cheerleaders,â€?  Gruber  said.   Something  as  simple  as  a  button  to  help   “I  trust  them  with  a  bunch   open  doors  is  what  Katie  sees  as  a  way  of  the   Michaelsen of  stuff.  I  know  they  will   university  welcoming  her. never  try  to  endanger  me.â€? Sophomore  Haley  Krupp,  another  student   Sophomore  Allysa  Michaelsen,  one  of  the   coach  for  the  cheerleading  squad,  described   squad’s  student  coaches,  and  other  members   *UXEHUDVDSRVLWLYHLQĂ€XHQFHRQFDPSXVDQG of  the  squad  described  Gruber  as  brave  for   on  the  cheerleading  squad. auditioning  for  the  team  and  being  so  visible   “She  keeps  everybody’s  spirits  up,â€?  Krupp   at  basketball  games. said.  “People  might  get  down  on  themselves   “I  don’t  know  if  other  people  would   or  not  so  happy  with  the  team,  but  then  we   have  the  same  attitude  as  she  does  about  it,â€?   see  her  there  and  it  just  reminds  us  that  not   Michaelsen  said.  “I  would  be  absolutely  terri-­ everyone  has  the  privilege  of  doing  this,  and   ÂżHGLI,ZDVLQKHUSRVLWLRQ,ZDVWHUULÂżHGMXVW we  should  really  be  grateful  for  what  we  do   trying  out  as  a  freshman,  just  coming  into  the   have.â€?   squad,  and  she  did  it  with  such  a  wonderful   Gruber  said  she  strives  to  enjoy  every   attitude  and  just  said,  ‘this  is  something  I  want   moment:  whether  it’s  cramming  for  endless   to  do.’â€? exams  or  cheering  on  her  Warhawk  basketball   players. Ignoring  the  timeline “While  I’m  here  I  try  to  live  as  normal  of   Gruber  knew  someone  who  has  given  a   a  life  as  possible,â€?  Gruber  said.  “Even  though   timeline:  he  would  live  until  he  was  28  years   I  know  there’s,  at  this  point,  no  cure,  and   old.  Even  though  he  made  it  until  31,  Gruber   some  of  the  babies  that  are  born  with  it  have   said  he  was  so  depressed  by  knowing  he   to  die,  I’m  one  of  the  lucky  ones  that  hasn’t   would  soon  die,  that  he  had  given  up  years   yet.â€? before. JacquestSL01@uww.edu

“

  S


Lifestyle

Dateline Page 9 Here Royal Purple

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com March 19, 2014

Break  provides  chance  to  relax,  refresh     Spring  semester  can  be  brutal   in  Wisconsin.  Winter  can  drag  all   the  way  into  March,  but  there  is  one   week  most  students  look  forward  to:   Spring  Break.   Whether  trav-­ eling  somewhere   warm  and  tropical   or  staying  local,   Spring  Break  is   a  much-­needed   week  to  rejuve-­ Commentary by Samantha nate  from  the   Phillips college  grind. Staff Writer Traveling  to   Florida  or  Mexico  can  be  pricey  for   a  college  student,  but  sometimes  it   is  exactly  what  students  need.  UW-­ Whitewater  senior  Brandon  Shaw   has  helped  make  Spring  Break   dreams  come  true  by  offering  a   simple  and  inexpensive  trip  to  Pan-­ ama  City  Beach,  Fla.,  for  UW-­W   students.  Shaw  is  the  promotional   manager  at  Ballin’  On  A  Budget,   a  business  that  for  three  years  has   been  offering  trips  to  Panama  City   Beach  for  only  $550.  That  includes   transportation,  hotel  stay  and  club   covers  for  the  whole  week.  

7KHÂżUVWWULSWKURXJKWKHFRP pany  started  in  UW-­Madison.   Âł7KHÂżUVWWULSZDVVRVXFFHVV ful  we  realized  there  was  a  strong   market  for  this  organization,â€?  Shaw   said.  “We  decided  to  organize   something  bigger  and  at  different   universities.â€? Shaw  said  he  is  glad  UW-­W   students  have  responded  well  to  the   group,  but  would  like  to  spread  the   word  even  further  than  Whitewater.   “We  are  trying  to  reach  out  to   the  general  student  population  now   that  we  are  established,â€?  Shaw  said. About  50  Whitewater  students   will  leave  campus  on  Friday,  March   21,  to  head  down  to  Florida.  Shaw   is  already  there  preparing  for  the   students’  arrival.   Not  everybody  has  the  opportu-­ nity  to  travel  during  Spring  Break.  It   also  can  be  a  good  time  to  get  ahead   RIWKHÂżQDQFLDOGHPDQGVRIFROOHJH UW-­Whitewater  senior  Kari  Watt  is   staying  in  town.   “I’ll  be  staying  here  to  work,â€?   Watt  said.  “However,  I  am  going  to   Punta  Cana  with  my  family  a  few   weeks  after,  if  that  counts.â€?

Even  though  Watt  has  to  wait  a   couple  weeks  longer,  she  still  will   get  a  dream  vacation  after  working   during  her  spring  break.   “I’ve  never  been  there  before,�   Watt  said.    “I’m  so  excited  for  some   real  warmth.�   UW-­Whitewater  junior  Molly   Petri  has  been  traveling  more  in  the   last  three  months  than  most  people   have  in  their  life.  Petri  is  currently   studying  abroad  in  the  United  King-­

dom  and  has  a  spring  break  trip   planned  that  most  would  be  grateful   to  take.   “We  are  going  to  Greece  and   staying  in  Santorini,â€?  Petri  said.   Âł%DVLFDOO\ZKHUHWKH\ÂżOPHGÂľ6LV terhood  of  the  Traveling  Pants.’â€?   Petri  could  not  contain  her   excitement  for  the  trip  that  she  and   her  best  friend,  Kailee  Nyman,  will   take. “Last  year  I  was  sitting  in  my  

EHGZDWFKLQJ1HWĂ€L[GXULQJVSULQJ break,â€?  Petri  said.  “This  year’s   doesn’t  compare  at  all.â€?   While  in  Greece,  Petri  said  she   plans  to  tour  the  city,  hike,  relax  by   the  pool  and  jump  off  a  cliff. If  anyone  is  interested  in  getting   involved  in  Ballin’  On  A  Budget’s   Spring  Break  trips,  contact  Shaw  at   bshaw@boabtravel.com. PhilipsSD01@uww.edu

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WEDNESDAY “You can’t  always  get  what  you   want,  but  if  you  try  sometimes,   ZHOO\RXPLJKW¿QG\RXJHWZKDW \RXQHHG´  -­The  Rolling  Stones

March 19,  2014

Arts &  Rec  Editor: Abrielle  Backhaus

PAGE 10

Students can  see  ‘Where  Dreams  Begin’ By Abrielle Backhaus Arts  &  Rec  Editor

By Signe Trewyn Staff Writer

Roberta A.  Fiskum  Art  Gallery’s  new-­ est  exhibit  includes  Black  Student  Union   artifacts  and  black  history  memorabilia.   BSU   President   Connell   Patterson   III   said   the   exhibit   is   a   tribute   to   the   legacy   of  Martin  Luther  King  Jr.  and  designed  to   inform  students  of    UW-­Whitewater’s  Af-­ rican  American  history. The   “Where   Dreams   Begin”   exhibit   will   be   featured   in   the   gallery   from    April  1  to  14.   Patterson   said   45   years   of   BSU   history   will   be   displayed   in   the   exhibit. Patterson “It  [the  display]  pays   homage  to  the  alumni,”  Patterson  said.   The   exhibit   also   will   display   T-­shirts   from  past  alumni,  as  well  as  articles,  pic-­ tures   and   an   original   playwright   script   a   student  wrote.

7KLV LV 3DWWHUVRQ¶V ¿UVW \HDU DV SUHVL dent of  BSU,  and  he  said  part  of  his  job  is   to  attend  meetings  geared  toward  educat-­ ing   the   campus   about   African   American   culture.   “We   also   want   to   raise   awareness   of   the   history   of   the   BSU   student   organiza-­ tion   and   African   Americans,”   Patterson   said. Martin   Luther   King   Jr.   visited   UW-­ Whitewater  in  1961  to  give  a  speech  about   civil  rights  and  equality  for  black  individ-­ uals,  Patterson  said. Patterson   said   visitors   can   see   how   long  the  organization  has  been  going  on,   and  it  is  a  great  way  to  recognize  the  or-­ ganization   and   what   its   members   have   done  throughout  the  years  during  the  Civil   Rights  Movement  and  Jim  Crow  laws.    “I  would  say  my  favorite  part  of  being   involved  with  BSU  is  that  I  am  involved   with   the   history   of   African   Americans,   and  it  impacted  me  as  person  and  a  Afri-­ can-­American  individual,”  Patterson  said.   Assistant   University   Center   Direc-­ tor  Kim  Adams  has  been  supervising  the   art  gallery  since  1995,  and  although  they  

have seven  exhibits  during  each  academic   year,  there  hasn’t  been  one  quite  like  this.   Adams   said   she   was   happy   to   collabo-­ rate   with   BSU   for   the   “Where   Dreams   Begin”   exhibit.   ³7KH VWDII LV VLJQL¿ cantly  involved  with  the   entire   exhibit   and   they   Adams do   much   outreach   to   BSU,”  Adams  said.   Adams   said   this   is   a   different   exhibit   because   she   has   not   had   the   opportunity   to   spread   comprehensive   information   or   highlight   a   student   organization   such   as   BSU  before  on  campus. “I  hope  students  will  be  given  a  broad-­ HUXQGHUVWDQGLQJRIWKHVLJQL¿FDQFHRIWKH BSU  organization  on  campus  and  to  cel-­ ebrate   45   years   of   history   on   campus   as   well   as   understand   Martin   Luther   King,”   Adams  said. BackhausAL10@uww.edu TrewynS10@uww.edu

Photo illustration by Abrielle Backhaus/%DFNKDXV$/#XZZHGX

Biographer shares  stories  of  Rolling  with  the  Stones By Nat Edson Staff  Writer

The “Beggar’s  Banquet”  was  a  “fanzine”   that   catered   to   those   hungry   for   information   about  the  rock    mega-­group  the  Rolling  Stones.   A   fan-­based   magazine   lasting   nearly   two   decades   with   a   worldwide   subscription,   it   covered  topics  other  media  couldn’t,  contain-­ ing  within  its  pages  knowledge  about  the  band     other   sources   never   matched.   It   had   detailed   interviews   and   a   look   at   the   musician’s   per-­ sonal  life.   The  “fanzine”  didn’t  have  a  large  staff  or   even  a  staff  at  all.  It  had  just  one  man  who  did   everything:  from  writing  the  stories,  to  laying   out   the   pages,   printing   it   and   sending   it   out   through  snail  mail.  His  name  was  Bill  German,   and  he  was  16  years  old.   “I  wanted  to  be  a  journalist,  and  I  was  a  big   rock  fan,”  German  said.  “Perfect  way  to  marry   the  two.” German   will   journey   from   his   home   in   New  York   City   to  Whitewater   to   give   a   talk   about   his   time   running   the   fanzine,   and   the   experiences   he   had   with   the   Rolling   Stones.   He  plans  on  sharing  stories  from  his  recently   released   book,   including   how   his   story   got   started. When   German   was   beginning   his   sopho-­ more   year   in   high   school   he   said   he   already   knew  that  he  wanted  to  be  a  journalist.  He  car-­ ried  with  him  a  passion  for  the  Rolling  Stones   as  well,  and  when  he  realized  that  no  real  mag-­ azines  would  hire  him,  he  decided  to  start  his   own  fanzine.   German  lived  and  still  lives  in  New  York   City,   the   same   city   as   the   Rolling   Stones,   so   he  was  in  close  proximity  to  the  group  as  they   went   about   their   daily   lives.   Three   or   four   times  a  week  the  group  would  go  out  and  hop   between   night   clubs,   clubs   German   was   too   young  to  get  into. That   didn’t   stop   German,   though.   The   young  man  waited  outside  or  contacted  people   KHNQHZZKRZHUHROGHQRXJKDQGJRW¿UVW hand  accounts  of  what  was  going  on  with  his  

Courtesy photo

Bill German, a biographer for The Rolling Stones, spent a majority of his teens and twenties following the band and making memories. He will speak on campus at 7 p.m. on April 1 in Heide Hall, Room 101.

favorite rock  group,  making  contacts  and  gath-­ ering  the  seeds  needed  for  his  “fanzine.”   At   night,   German   would   sneak   into   the   mimeograph  room  of  his  high  school,  what  he   called  a  “smelly,  old  fashioned  way  of  print-­ ing.”   There   he   would   secretly   print   out   his   fanzine   and   wrap   it   up   to   be   shipped   to   his   subscribers.   Word   of   mouth   served   to   keep   German   going,  getting  people  from  a  wide  area  inter-­ ested  in  reading  his  fanzine.  Soon  enough  he   had  subscribers  from  other  countries,  sending   three   dollars   to   his   bedroom   for   a   year-­long   subscription.   *HUPDQ ¿QDOO\ PHW WKH PXVLFLDQV DIWHU ¿QGLQJ RXW DERXW D SDUW\ WKH\ ZHUH JRLQJ WR attend.  He  said  he  rushed  straight  to  them  and   handed  them  a  copy  of  the  most  recent  “Beg-­ gar’s  Banquet”  into  their  hands.   “That  was  two  days  after  my  high  school   graduation,”  German  said.  “The  bigger  event   ZDVPHHWLQJWKH6WRQHV'H¿QLWHO\KDGDELJ ger  impact  on  my  life.” For   the   next   17   years,   German   spent   al-­

most every  waking  moment  either  working  on   his   fanzine   or   being   with   the   band.   He   went   to  almost  every  performance,  formal  or  infor-­ mal.  Sometimes  he  would  be  on  the  bus,  or  just   headed   over   to   the   house   to   hang   with   them   and  their  family. Drugs  were  a  fairly  present  thing  as  Ger-­ man   journeyed   with   the   Rolling   Stones,   but   he  never  partook.  He  said  that  as  a  journalist,   he  needed  to  be  sober.  Sometimes  they  would   play  songs  just  for  him,  sometimes  songs  that   hadn’t  been  released  yet,  and  he  needed  to  be   able  to  remember  that  clearly. “I  had  the  occasional  drink,  though,”  Ger-­ man  said.  “Jack  Daniel’s  came  out  of  the  taps   of  their  houses.” This  ability  to  stay  separate  from  the  tar-­ get  of  his  writing  is  one  of  the  reasons  he  was   chosen  to  speak  at  UW-­Whitewater  by  profes-­ sor   Carol   Terracina-­Hartman.   She   petitioned   to   the   Visiting  Artists   and   Speakers   program   to  fund  bringing  him  to  UW-­W,  who  accepted,   because  he  has  a  story  she  said  is  valuable  to   budding  journalists.  

“How do  you  write  objectively  when  you   are   traveling   with   your   sources?”   Terracina-­ Hartman  said.  “How  do  you  ‘party’  with  your   sources,  but  not  really  ‘party  with  them?’” Eventually,   though,   the   ride   came   to   an   end.  After   17   years   the   job   had   changed.   By   the   mid-­nineties   the   Rolling   Stones   hated   each  other,  German  said.  The  only  thing  that   brought  them  back  was  the  money. They  still  loved  the  music,  but  for  the  band   it  became  more  about  the  money.  Ticket  prices   skyrocketed,   and   for   German,   getting   inter-­ views   with   the   musicians   became   a   practice   in  frustration.  Whereas  once  he  merely  had  to   call   them   up   and   jog   over   to   their   house,   he   now  had  to  go  through  layers  of  publicists  and   managers  and  bodyguards. The  technical  aspect  of  the  fanzine  was  be-­ ginning  to  wear  on  German,  too.  He  described   what  an  old  history  teacher  had  told  him  once:   when  you  mix  hobby  and  profession  your  job   might  get  more  fun,  but  your  hobby  will  start   to  feel  like  work. At  the  age  of  33,  17  years  and  102  issues   after   his   start,   German   ended   the   “Beggars   Banquet.”  He  still  journeys  to  Rolling  Stones   concerts  now  and  then,  but  he  said  he  has  be-­ come  slightly  jaded  to  the  whole  experience. The  writer  will  be  making  an  appearance  at   UW-­Whitewater  to  give  a  talk  about  his  book   and  his  experiences.  The  talk  will  take  place  at   7  p.m.  on    April  1  in  Heide  Hall,  Room  101.   “For  anyone  interested  in  music  criticism,   media   history,   and   journalism,”   Terracina-­ Hartman  said.  “[German’s]  lecture  will  be  not   only  valuable,  but  a  lot  of  fun.” German,   now   51,   also   has   published   a   book  chronicling  his  time  with  the  band  titled   “Under  Their  Thumb:  How  a  Nice  Boy  from   Brooklyn   Got   Mixed   Up   with   the   Rolling   Stones  (and  Lived  to  Tell  About  It).”  In  it  he   has  recounted  a  myriad  of  stories  from  his  two   decades  with  the  band,  from  the  highest  highs   to  the  lowest  lows. EdsonNS22@uww.edu


Arts & Rec

Dateline Here March 19, 2014 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

2 Royal Purple Page 11

Spanish composers  featured Professor  performs  with   classic  guitar By Lauren Piek Staff  Writer

Taught at  a  young  age  to  play   music,  George  Lindquist  used  his   early-­learned  talent  to  create  a   career. Lindquist,  a  classical  guitarist   and  professor  at  UW-­Whitewater,   will  perform  a  faculty  recital  at   7:30  p.m.  on  March  20,  at  the  Light   Recital  Hall.  Tickets  are  $3  for   students  and  those   18  and  under,  $4   for  65  and  older,   and  $5  for  the   general  public. Lindquist   started  out  play-­ ing  ukulele  and   Lindquist guitar,  both  taught   to  him  by  his  father.  As  a  teenager,   and  into  his  early  20s,  Lindquist   played  guitar  in  multiple  bands. He  attended  Carthage  College   with  the  hopes  of  earning  a  business   degree.  While  at  Carthage  College,   he  couldn’t  help  but  maintain  his   interest  in  playing  guitar,  Lindquist   said. “I  kept  gravitating  to  the  music   classes,”  Lindquist  said.  “I  was  for-­

tunate because  the  chairman  there  at   the  time  knew  that  I  played  guitar,   and  he  said  I  could  study  guitar   as  long  as  it  was  classical  guitar.  I   didn’t  really  know  much  about  clas-­ sical  guitar  at  the  time.” Lindquist  was  granted  permis-­ sion  to  study  the  art  under  classical   guitarist  James  Yoghourtijan.  He   eventually  earned  a  business  degree   and  classical  guitar  degree  from   Carthage,  Lindquist  said. After  graduating  from  Carthage   College,  Lindquist  earned  his  mas-­ ter’s  degree  in   musicology  from   the  University  of   Wisconsin.  He   began  teaching   at  the  Wisconsin   Conservatory  of   Music  in  Milwau-­ LaMuro kee,  where  he  still   teaches  part-­time,  Lindquist  said.     At  UW-­Whitewater,  he  teaches   classical  guitar,  folk  guitar  classes   and  guitar  ensemble  Lindquist  said.   He  tries  to  perform  at  a  recital  every   year. “Faculty  recitals  allow  students   to  see  their  professors  perform  on   stage  and  see  how  it’s  done,”  As-­ sociate  Director  of  Public  Events,   Leslie  LaMuro  said.

7KH¿UVWKDOIRIWKHUHFLWDOZLOO consist of  solo  performances  from   Lindquist.  He  will  perform  lute   pieces—transcribed  for  classical   guitar—along  with  pieces  by  John   Duarte,  Isaac  Albeniz,  Manuel  de   Falla,  and  Enrique  Granados.   “The  audience  will  be  amazed   E\KRZIDVW*HRUJH¶V¿QJHUVÀ\ across  the  strings,”  LaMuro  said.   “George  picked  pieces  by  some   of  the  greatest  composers  for  this   recital.” In  the  second  half  of  the  recital,   Lindquist  will  be  joined  by  fellow   music  professor  and  cellist  Ben-­ jamin  Whitcomb.  Lindquist  had   accompanied  Whitcomb  during  his   own  faculty  recital. Lindquist  offers  one  piece  of  ad-­ vice  for  students  pursuing  a  career   in  music:  be  versatile. “You  need  to  know  a  lot  of   different  styles  of  guitar,”  Lindquist   said.  “If  you  only  focus  on  one   thing,  like  I  have,  it’s  kind  of  tough.   My  advice  is  to  know  as  much  as   you  can  about  guitar.  Always  try  to   ¿QGVRPHRQHZKRFDQWHDFK\RX something  new.”

Alyssa Miles graphic/0LOHV$/#XZZHGX

PiekLE20@uww.edu

Alyssa Miles graphic/0LOHV$/#XZZHGX

262-472-5562

Classifieds

262-472-5562

Fax: 262-472-5101 Email: rpclassifieds@uww.edu Web Site: www.royalpurplenews.com Cost: Business/Community- $5.00 for first 20 words, 0.25 for each additional word; Students: FREE! Deadline: Fridays at noon New Construction! 5 Bedroom house available for Fall 2014 For Rent No Summer Rent Obligation New 4-Bedroom Apartments Available All New appliances—including high Walking distance to campus efficiency furnace. Water, heat, internet included with Water and Laundry included in rent! washer/dryer in unit Call 262.473.3355 Call 262.473.5523 for more information for more information Newly renovated 5 bedroom house New Construction! 4 Bedroom house available for Fall 2014 available.Walking distance to downtown No Summer Rent Obligation Whitewater and short distance to class. Water, internet, and laundry facilities All New appliances—including high efficiency furnace. included. Call 262.473.5321 for more information Water and Laundry included in rent! Call 262.473.5321 5 Bedroom, 3 Bathroom house available for more information on Tratt Street! House for Rent: 291 Janesville St., VERY close to campus! Water, Internet, and Laundry included in $900/month, 3 bedrooms, washer/ dryer/dishwasher included, big backrent. yard, 1 car garage, pet Call 262.473.5523 for more information

friendly, security/pet deposit required, utilities not included. 1 year lease starting June 1st Call 414-690-7996 for more info.

Are you interested in an exciting life time career opportunity in becoming a Payroll, Bookkeeper, Survey Shopper, Term Shopper, Sales Manager, or Accounts Management? Consider these Help Wanted requirements found requirements below. Seeking individual interested in watchRequirements: ing 5 children during the summer. Ages Applicant should be computer are 13, 10, 5, 3 and under 1 year. Must literate. 24 Hour Access to the have a valid Drivers License, wiling to Internet. Must be efficient and do some light cleaning and preparing of dedicated. meals, as well as drive kids to activities. Honest and Trustworthy. Would prefer someone that is life guard If you are out there and think you certified. Dates would be June 9th meet these requirements, then thru August 22nd. Located in Elkhorn. email your resume to Please e-mail polylawrence2112@gmail.com or ketterhagena@yahoo.com for please contact us at an appointment. 415-226-9199


Dateline Page 12Here Royal Purple

Arts & Rec

3 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com March 19, 2014

Female sublease wanted for Spring Salomones Pizzeria needs servers 4 Bedroom Furnished House For Rent: 2014-2015 year. Close to cam- 2014 semester: 557 South Clark Street, and hostesses. Apply in person. For Rent $1700.00 per semester, pus. Looking for 3 females (nonOpen at 4pm. 1245 Madison Ave. 4 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage, washer/dryer. smokers) to rent newer home; nice 3 other roommates including a cat, 920-563-9217 Close to campus. Call 608-884-3910 or neighborhood. Large bedrooms, 3 utilities not included, personal bedroom, The Black Sheep is hiring cooks 608-931-9372 and 2 baths. Please contact Alex at bathrooms, central air, washer/dryer, & dishwashers/cleaners. Apply at Bielskiam26@uww.edu or free TV and Internet service. Rent 3 BEDROOM HOUSE FOR RENT: http://www.eatatblacksheep.com/ (262)515-2963 2014-2015 year. 330 N. Fremont St. Close includes utilities. Available starting careers summer semester. Call 847.609.1800 to campus. 1 1/2 bath, washer/dryer, Attention: All Students - Mental for details. dishwasher, rent plus utilities. Free parkHealth Staff Needed! Help Wanted ing. Available June 1, 2014, and not DLK Furnished room for rent in country. Very Private. Wausau, Wisconsin rental. 608-279-7064 or Productive Living Systems, Inc. is Bartender/Server in the Ribmountain vicinity. $650/ Sperino’s Pepperoni Pub Sports Bar in zopfis35@yahoo.com known as a leader in month. FOR RENT: Remodeled 6 bedroom 3 full Elkhorn is looking for a high energetic, providing innovative services for Call 262-607-0022 baths, one block from campus, central adults with hard worker to join our team. Send air, free off street parking, garage space APARTMENTS FOR RENT. 2-3 resume to Cory@sperinos.com or call mental illnesses/developmental available, 2 refrigerators, dishwasher, PERSONS. $300 EACH disabilities. PLS wants all in262-723-2222. laundry included, non-smoking, no pets. +UTILITIES. FREE PARKING. terested students to apply. All Great Evironment, Great People $2025/semester/person. Go to 262-473-4351 Jim & Judy’s Food Market in Palmyra majors welcomed. This work exwww.NewStartMgmt.com for more info. Student Housing looking for part time stockers, cashiers, perience forms leadership skills; 3,4,5 bedroom homes avail. for 2014-15 2 & 3 bedroom apartments store closers, and deli workers. Will train an impressive resume feature! No year. Owner Managed 24/7! the right person. Will work days, nights, experience necessary. Paid trainFree Parking Lawn & Snow care provided. and weekend. Please stop in to apply. ing. Job duties include the ability 414.881.4774. Free Parking, Dishwashers, & Laundry in to work with male residents with 262.370.2884 Baymont Inn of Whitewater is a seeking most units. Close to their daily activities of life in a third shift front desk part-time 4 bedroom home at 259 Janesville. Campus & Downtown group home. FT/PT hours on Parking Included. Has fire pit, rec employee. Must be flexible for weekends 2nd and 3rd shifts with limRLA Properties LLC and holidays. Please apply in person. room, and basement. Walking 608-843-0606 ited 1st shifts. Weekends a plus. 1355 West Main Street. distance to campus and downtown! Downtown 1,2,3,4 Bedroom Applicants will have successful Please call Brad at 262-473-6062 Seeking Residential Care Staff—Brotoloc completion of reference checks, Apartments. Lofts, Studios, & Flats. All South, Inc., a leader in (also listed on nomoredorms.com) utilities included. On site laundry. Rec caregiver background check, high providing assistance to adults with Room. Security cameras. Elevator. Triple school diploma or equivalent, mental and physical disabilities is now and must be at least 18 years of J Properties (414) 881-0883. Affordable Living 2014-2015. hiring Residential Care Staff to work in age. Apply at www.plsjobs.com or www.triplejpropertiesllc.com. 1 and 2 bedrooms available. the Whitewater and Delevan areas. Job 806 E. Commercial Ave., Whitetriplejpropertymgmt@yahoo.com Downtown Location. Large quiet country room. Private Bath. duties include assisting and supporting water, WI M-F, 8am-4:30pm, Private Parking. With Utilities. Fully Furnished. Non-smoker. Includes residents in their daily activities of life in (262)47308144. PLS is an Equal Call 262-510-3462 all utilities. $400/month 262-490-5075 a group home setting. Full and part- Opportunity Employer working Available April 1st. 2 Bedroom. HOUSE FOR RENT: 5 Bedroom, 2 bath time hours are available for a variety of under Affirmative Action Goals Downtown Whitewater. 1/2 block from campus. Available August shifts. High School diploma/GED and & Steps. Just remodeled. 2014. Call 262-949-5221 valid driver’s license with an excellent 2, 3 and 4 person units still available for Secure Building with Access Code. driving record required. Paid training COMMERCIAL CLEANING next year! Call 262-470-4208 $750/month plus Utilities. No pets. is provided. For more information visit *Whitewater* P/T nights/ today to schedule a showing! No smoking. 262-903-5500. our website at www.brotolocsouth.com weekends apply online @ www. 2-5 bedroom units available for the 2014petersoncleaning.com to download an application or stop in at 2015 school year. Close to the office at, 209 Taft St., Whitewater, WI Sublease campus, most utilities included, free 8-4:30 p.m., Mon-Fri, Misc. parking, for more information call Chris 1-2 SUBLETS needed! Two bedroom (262) 473-0480. EOE apartment Indian Village. at 1-262-613-3457. PAINTING PARTIES @ Waters Edge Apartments 1, 2, and 3 2014 Summer and/or 2014 Fall and/or Polo Ralph Lauren Factory Store, STUDIO 84. Great for student 2015 Spring. Call: 262-391-7089 Bedrooms for lease. Please call located in Johnson Creek, is now org. activities or just bring your 262-903-8951 to schedule a tour to view Subleases are available for second accepting applications for part time friends! All proceeds help studio semester at the Element. Call your new home. positions with flexible scheduling and 84’s art program for people with Newly remodeled 5 bedroom house, 2 262-753-3146 or email generous employee discounts. We disabilities. www.studio84inc. bathrooms, laundry, central air, dishwash- leasing@elementwhitewater.com for offer flexible shifts of 4-7.5 hours from org email:info@studio84inc.org er, new windows and insulation. 2-car gadetails. 7am – 10pm, Sundays through Saturday REPAIRS/BUYING PHONES rage, free parking, near downtown. $395 Sublease needed for Spring 2014 with a total of 10-25 hours per week. If Replacing cracked screens, butper person plus tilities. 920-723-2387 semester: Duplex on Walworth Ave, interested, contact the store at tons, batteries, buying damaged For Rent: $1275 for semester, 2 other room920-699-2773 or stop in the store and and used devices text 1. 2 bedroom apartment for spring semates, very large bedroom with fill out an application. (262) 372-1234 or mester at 812 Main St. Fully furnished, personal entrance, pet friendly. Please Food & Cocktail Servers www.mrwuthrich.com off street parking, washer/dryer/dish- contact Katie at plummerkm13@uww. No experience necessary. Fun work enviwasher. $500mo. ronment. Looking for a few great people edu for more details. 2. 4 bedroom house for rent. 271 Prairie Sublease needed for Spring 2014 that are high energy and love meeting THERE’S ROOM St. for 2014-15 school year. semester for 288 S. Janesville St. Well new people. Must be available to work Call Bud at 847-207-5070 kept 4 BR 2 BA with 1 BR available nights and weekends. Stop in for an apFOR 3, 4 AND 5 BEDROOM HOUSES AND (Master Suite Attached) and 3 great plication today! APARTMENTS RENTING FOR 2014-15. residing roommates! $1875.00/SeHHFFRRRGGH YOU CALL TODAY! mester OBO $330.00/Month. Contact 731 S Wuthering Hills Drive, Janesville WHITEWATER PROPERTY Michael Merrill (920) 210-6976 or Jamesway A.F.H seeking one part time RIGHT HERE! MANAGEMENT 262-473-7300 merrillmp18@uww.edu care giver on staff for one behaviorally Two 3-4 bedroom units available. Hardchallenged individual. PLACE SUBLEASER TRATT ST. 2 sublets wood. 2014-2015, 1 block from campus. Experience required. Please call Trish needed Spring 2014 semester for 608-558-5460 at 920-723-6355 A spacious 3 bedroom 2 bathroom apartment. Laundry units included in Full time summer help wanted – JNT’S Affordable Living 2014-2015. Parkside Marina-pump gas, sell bait, CLASSIFIED 3 bd & 4 bd. 325 per person per month apartment. Utilities included. $460/ boat rentals, sell food and month/person. Downtown Location. store merchandise. Send resume to TODAY! Current renters willing to cover one Private Parking. With Utilities. wids1960@ameritech.net month’s rent. Email schlichtcn27@ Call 262-510-3462 or call 262-473-5960 for an application. uww.edu for more details.


WEDNESDAY “Talent  is  God  given.  Be  humble.  Fame   is  man-­given.  Be  grateful.  Conceit  is   self-­given.  Be  careful.�  -­John  Wooden

March  19,  2014

Sports  Editor: Kevin  Cunningham

Assistant  Editor: Andrea  Sidlauskas PAGE  13

Roles reversed, down goes DePauw Women’s Hoops By Kevin Cunningham Sports  Editor

History  repeated   itself   in   one   way,   yet   did   not   repeat   itself   in   another   on   March   15   in   the   Elite   Eight   game   against   DePauw   Uni-­ versity,  when  the  UW-­Whitewater   Warhawks  defeated  the  Tigers,  88-­ 71,  for  the  right  to  move  on  to  the   Final  Four. Nearly   one   year   ago,   the   ’Hawks   beat   Hope   College,   65-­ 50,   to   move   on   to   the   program’s   third  Final  Four  in  school  history.   By   getting   the   best   of   DePauw   this  past  weekend,  the  team  made   it   back   to   the   Final   Four   for   the   second  straight  season.  History  re-­ peated  itself. In  last  year’s  national  champi-­ onship   game,   the   Tigers   defeated   the  ’Hawks,  69-­51,  completing  an   undefeated   season.   In   that   sense,   history  did  not  repeat  itself. “We  got  our  sweet  revenge  that   we  wanted  to,�  senior  guard  Mary   Merg  said.  “They  have  an  extraor-­ dinary   home   record,   and   we   had   nothing  to  lose.� On   DePauw’s   home   court   in   Greencastle,   Ind.,   the   Tigers   had   lost   two   games   in   the   previous   eight   seasons   heading   into   Satur-­ day’s  contest.  The  Warhawks’  win   also   broke   the   Tigers’   36-­game   home  court  winning  streak.

Amanda Ong photo/2QJ$#XZZHGX

Warhawk guard Mary Merg pushed the Warhawks through UW-Oshkosh and DePauw University on March 14 and 15. Merg recorded 21 points, nine rebounds and dished out six assists in the ’Hawks’ 88-71 win to propel the team to the Final Four.

UW-­Oshkosh  Recap Before   the   17-­point   victory   to   move   to   the   Final   Four,   the   War-­ hawks  had  to  defeat  a  common  foe   in  the  UW-­Oshkosh  Titans  to  make   it   to   the   Elite   Eight.   The   ’Hawks   and   Titans   met   two   times   dur-­ ing   the   regu-­ lar   season,   and   head   coach   Keri   Carollo   said   she   knows  things  can   get   tricky   when   Carollo playing   a   team   a   third  time. “Both   teams   had   a   hard   time   scoring  [to  start]  because  we’re  so   familiar  with  each  other,�  Carollo   said.   “We   just   wanted   to   stay   the   course  and  play  great  defense.  We  

did  change  things  a  bit  on  offense   just  to  give  them  a  different  look,   but   defensively   we   stuck   to   the   same  game  plan.� ,Q WKH ¿UVW  PLQXWHV RI play,   the   ’Hawks   and   Titans   both   could   not   shoot   north   of   40   per-­ cent.  Merg,  however,  was  the  lone   bright  spot  in  the  half,  scoring  16   RI WKH WHDPœV  SRLQWV +HDGLQJ into  the  second  half,  the  Warhawks   KHOGDOHDGRYHUWKH7LWDQV Carollo’s   team   went   on   a   9-­1   UXQ ZLWK MXVW PRUH WKDQ  PLQ utes   remaining   and   eventually   pushed   the   lead   to   double   digits,   which   proved   to   be   too   much   for   the  Titans.  UW-­Oshkosh  could  not   RYHUFRPH WKHLU  WXUQRYHUV DQG the  ’Hawks  moved  on  to  play  De-­ Pauw  after  a  69-­57  win.

DePauw  Recap 7KH ÂżUVW KDOI RI WKH 'H3DXZ game   went   a   lot   smoother   for   the   Warhawks,   yet   at   the   end   of   WKH ÂżUVW  PLQXWHV RI SOD\ WKH ’Hawks  only  saw  themselves  lead-­ LQJ  7KH ODVW WLPH WKH WZR teams   had   met,   the   Tigers   bested   the   Warhawks   for   the   national   championship   last   season.   Any   questions  regarding  how  the  team   would  come  out  and  respond  were   quickly  answered. “I   saw   our   team   playing   with   DWRQRIFRQÂżGHQFH´&DUROORVDLG “I  was  really  excited  for  them,  and   I  was  looking  forward  to  coaching   that  game  because  we  had  a  group   of   girls   that   were   going   to   give   their  best  effort.â€? $IWHU WKH ÂżUVW PLQXWH RI WKH

second  half,   starting   sophomore   guard   Abbie   Reeves   went   down   with  a  shoulder  injury  that  would   leave   her   sidelined   for   the   rest   of   the  contest.   The   injury   seemed   to   light   a   ÂżUH LQ WKH Âś+DZNVÂś EHOO\ DV WKH\ ZHQW RQ D  UXQ GLUHFWO\ DIWHU and   the   lead   would   never   dip   be-­ low  double  digits  again.   “It’s   an   incredible   feeling   [when  you’re  out  there]  that  words   can’t  describe,â€?  Merg  said. The  88-­71  win  over  the  Tigers   was   fueled   by   the   54   second-­half   points   the   Warhawks   put   up.   In   last   year’s   championship   game,   the   ’Hawks   mustered   only   51   points  in  the  entire  game. This   time   around,   Merg   and   Ruchti   led   the   way,   with   Merg   VFRULQJ  SRLQWV UHFRUGLQJ QLQH rebounds   and   dishing   out   six   as-­ sists.   Ruchti   scored   a   game-­high   SRLQWVDQGFUDVKHGWKHJODVVDV well,  earning  nine  rebounds. Next   up   for   the   Warhawks   in   the   Final   Four   are   the   Whitman   Missionaries  (30-­1). The   ’Hawks   will   have   the   shortest   drive   to   make   the   trip   to   the   Final   Four,   as   it   is   set   in   Ste-­ vens  Point.  The  Warhawks  face  the   Missionaries   at   7   p.m.   on   March    IRU WKH ULJKW WR JR WR WKH QD tional  championship  game,  which   WDNHVSODFHDWSPRQ0DUFK

&XQQLQJK.7#XZZHGX

Warhawks  eye  second  Final  Four  in  three  seasons Men’s Hoops By Paul Bressler Staff  Writer

The  UW-­Whitewater  Warhawks  are  head-­ ing  back  to  Salem  as  their  ticket  to  the  Final   Four  was  punched  with  a  74-­51  victory  over   the   Emory   University   Eagles   in   the   NCAA   Tournament  Saturday  night. “Just   obviously   very   proud   of   this   team   and   happy   to   be   heading   back   to   Salem   [Va.],â€?  head  coach  Pat  Miller  said.  “I  thought   we   played   a   solid   game   tonight.   I   thought   Emory  really  battled.  I  thought  our  quickness   and  maybe  a  little  fatigue  on  their  part  was  the   difference  in  the  game.â€? 7KHÂś+DZNVZLOOPDNHWKHLUÂżIWKDSSHDU ance   in   the   Final   Four.   The   last   three   Final   Four  appearances  resulted  in  the  ’Hawks  win-­ ning  the  whole  thing.   The   ’Hawks   will   face   Illinois   Wesleyan   8QLYHUVLW\   DW  SP RQ 0DUFK  DW the  Salem  Civic  Center  in  Salem,  Va. “It’s   going   to   be   a   battle,â€?   junior   guard   Quardell   Young   said.   “We’re   going   to   be   mentally  and  physically  prepared  to  play  and   bring  the  title  back  home.â€? In   the   Elite   Eight   game,   the   Eagles   an-­ swered   a   solid   start   from   the   Warhawks   by   closing  out  the  half  with  an  8-­0  run  and  led,   DWLQWHUPLVVLRQ Jake  Davis,  the  Eagles’  leading  scorer  at   QHDUO\SRLQWVSHUJDPHZDVSODJXHGZLWK

early  foul  trouble  and  saw  only  nine  minutes   of  action.   The   Eagles,   seemingly   having   the   mo-­ mentum  going  into  halftime,  saw  the  ’Hawks   UHHORIIDQUXQWRRSHQWKHKDOI Two   free   throws   from   senior   forward   Reggie   Hearn   had   the   Warhawks’   lead   bal-­ ORRQWRSRLQWVZLWKOHIWLQWKH game. 7KHÂś+DZNVVKRWDEOLVWHULQJSHUFHQW in   the   second   half.   The   Warhawks   clamped   GRZQRQGHIHQVHDQGOLPLWHGWKH(DJOHVWR SHUFHQWIURPWKHĂ€RRU “In  the  second  half,  they  attacked  us  and   kind  of  got  us  on  our  heels  a  little  bit,â€?  Da-­ YLVVDLGÂł&UHGLWWRWKHP:HQHYHUÂżQLVKHG VWURQJ TXLWH DV ZHOO OLNH ZH GLG LQ WKH ÂżUVW half.â€? (YDQV ZKR KDG  SRLQWV LQ WKH VHFRQG KDOIOHGDOOSOD\HUVZLWKSRLQWVDQGUH bounds. Eagles   head   coach   Jason   Zimmerman   was  gracious  in  defeat. “We   didn’t   play   our   best   basketball   to-­ night,â€?  Zimmerman  said.  “A  lot  of  that  had  to   do  with  Whitewater.  They’re  very  talented.â€? The  ’Hawks  advanced  to  the  Elite  Eight   with   an   81-­63   win   over   the   University   of   7H[DV'DOODV)ULGD\QLJKWLQWKHLUÂżUVWRIWZR weekend  matchups. The   Warhawks   found   themselves   down   early   despite   holding   somewhat   of   a   home   court  advantage.   A  steal  and  fast  break  assist  by  Young  to  

Hearn  for   the   lay   in   gave   the   ’Hawks   their   ÂżUVWOHDGRIWKHJDPH7KHÂś+DZNVOHG ZLWKUHPDLQLQJLQWKHKDOI An  8-­0  run  would  follow,  and  the  ’Hawks’   OHDGLQFUHDVHGWRDIWHUDQ(YDQVÂśMXPS er.   7KHÂś+DZNVFORVHGWKHÂżUVWKDOIRQD UXQDQGWKHLUOHDGVWRRGDW7KH&RP ets  did  not  record  a  single  point  in  the  remain-­ LQJRIWKHKDOI The  Warhawks’  momentum  and  halftime   lead   quickly   dissipated   in   the   face   of   the   Comets’   1-­3-­1   zone   defense   in   the   second   KDOI7KH&RPHWVFXWWKHOHDGWRÂżYH after  a  Kyle  Schleigh  3-­pointer  from  the  left   FRUQHUDWWKHPDUN $KHDG  ZLWK  UHPDLQLQJ WKH ’Hawks  went  on  a  16-­3  run  to  seal  the  deal. The   ’Hawks   shot   59   percent   from   the   Ă€RRUZKLOHKROGLQJWKH&RPHWVWRSHUFHQW A  46-­18  advantage  in  the  paint  told  the  story   on  this  night. (YDQVOHGDOOVFRUHUVZLWKSRLQWVZKLOH Odegaard   scored   a   season-­high   18   on   5-­7   from  beyond  the  arc.   Schleigh  ended  with  seven  points  on  1-­8   VKRRWLQJ 7KH &RPHWV ÂżQLVKHG WKHLU VHDVRQ  With   a   victory   in   the   Final   Four,   the   ’Hawks   would   face   the   winner   of   Amherst   &ROOHJH  YV:LOOLDPV&ROOHJH  DW  SP RQ 0DUFK  LQ WKH 1&$$ ',,, Courtesy photo by Josh Smith national  championship  game.   K.J. Evans led UW-W, scoring 27 points and %UHVVOHU30#XZZHGX

grabbing 11 rebounds in a 74-51 win over Emory.


Sports

Dateline Page 14Here Royal Purple

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com March 19, 2014

:DUKDZNVÀQLVKDVUXQQHUXS 8::IDOOVVKRUW Wartburg  remains  No.  1 Wrestling By Christopher Clapper Staff  Writer

The  UW-­Whitewater   wres-­ tling   team   has   taken   its   game   to   QHZ KHLJKWV LQ UHFHQW \HDUV DQG ODVW ZHHNHQGÂśV 1&$$ QDWLRQDO tournament   provided   the   cherry   on  top.   With   two   individual   runner-­ XSV WKUHH ÂżIWKSODFH ÂżQLVKHUV and   a   second-­place   overall   team   VFRUHWKHWHDPUHFRUGHGWKHEHVW ÂżQLVKLQSURJUDPKLVWRU\ Sophomore  133-­pounder  Jim-­ my   Nehls   completed   his   season   ZLWKDÂżIWKSODFHÂżQLVKDIWHUZLQ QLQJKLVÂżUVWPDWFK “I   think   overall   I   did   SUHWW\ZHOOEXW, GHÂżQLWHO\ ZDQW HG WR ÂżQLVK RQ WRS´1HKOVVDLG “I   had   a   couple   URXJK PDWFKHV Nehls EXW ,ÂśP SUHWW\ happy  with  the  way  it  went  over-­ DOO´ The   Warhawks   had   three  

Amanda Ong photo/2QJ$#XZZHGX

(M[LY[HRPUN[OPYKH[UH[PVUHSZSHZ[`LHY[OL>HYOH^RZYLZWVUKLK[OPZZLHZVU^P[OHWYVNYHTILZ[Ă„UPZO[HRPUNZLJVUK ;OLÂť/H^RZMLSSZOVY[VM>HY[I\YN*VSSLNL^OV^VU[OLPYMV\Y[OZ[YHPNO[UH[PVUHSJOHTWPVUZOPW[V[HSPUNWVPU[Z

ZUHVWOHUV SODFH ¿IWK ZLWK UHWXUQ LQJ QDWLRQDO TXDOL¿HUV &HGULF Gibson  and   Elroy   Perkin   each   claiming   the   title   of   All-­Ameri-­ FDQDORQJZLWK1HKOV %HLQJ RQO\ D VRSKRPRUH Nehls   already   is   looking   toward   QH[WVHDVRQ ³,œP JRLQJ WR WDNH D IHZ weeks   off   and   let   my   body   re-­ coup   a   little   but   get   right   back   at   it   in   about   a   month   with   a   lot   RI RIIVHDVRQ WUDLQLQJ DQG H[WUD ZRUNRXWV´KHVDLG³>,œP@GRLQJ DVPXFKDV,FDQWR¿QLVKRQWRS

QH[W\HDU´ The  two   wrestlers   closest   to   ¿QLVKLQJ RQ WRS WKLV \HDU ZHUH sophomores   Shane   Siefert   and   Matt  Adcock.   %RWKZUHVWOHUVPDGHLWWRWKH ¿QDOV EXW HQGHG XS ORVLQJ FORVH matches  to  end  their  seasons.   %HJLQQLQJ WKH WRXUQDPHQW DV WKH VL[WKVHHGHG ZUHVWOHU $G FRFN KDG WR ¿JKW KLV ZD\ LQWR ¿QDOVZKHUHKHPDWFKHGXSZLWK 0HVVLDK &ROOHJHœV .DOHE /RKW who   had   an   impressive   37-­0   re-­ cord   against   Division-­III   oppo-­

’Hawks  soar  to   another  Final  Four Women’s Basketball Column 7KH :DUKDZNV RYHUFDPH WKHLU GHPRQ 'H3DXZ 8QLYHUVLW\ LQ WKH (OLWH (LJKW JDPH RQ0DUFK-XVWDVHDVRQDJRLQWKHQDWLRQDO FKDPSLRQVKLS WKH 7LJHUV JRWWKHEHVWRIWKHÂś+DZNV  FRPSOHWLQJ WKHLU 34-­0  perfect  season. )DVW IRUZDUG QHDUO\ D \HDU DQG DQ  YLFWRU\ IRUWKHÂś+DZNVFDPHRQWKH 7LJHUVÂś KRPH FRXUW QRQH Commetary WKHOHVV JLYLQJ WKHP WKHLU by Kevin third  home  loss  in  the  previ-­ Cunningham Sports Editor ous  eight  seasons.   ,Q WKH JDPH VHQLRU guard  Mary  Merg  dominated  play  on  the  pe-­ rimeter  while  the  seniors  in  the  post  got  things   GRQH LQ .ULVWHQ 5XFKWL DQG $P\ 0DQGUHOO 0HUJÂżQLVKHGZLWKSRLQWVQLQHUHERXQGV DQGVL[DVVLVWV Âł:KDWÂśVQRWWRORYHDERXW0DUFK´0HUJ VDLGÂł,WÂśVZLQRUJRKRPH%HLQJDVHQLRU,ÂśP just  giving  everything  I  have  to  the  game.  If   ZHÂśUH JRLQJ WR JR GRZQ ZHÂśUH JRLQJ WR JR GRZQZLWKDÂżJKW´ Mandrell  ended  the  game  with  10  points   and   seven   rebounds   in   only   18   minutes   of   SOD\5XFKWLVWDUWLQJDORQJVLGH0DQGUHOOÂżQ ished  with  24  points  and  nine  rebounds  of  her   own. “We  wanted  to  get  post  touches  as  much   DVZHFRXOG´KHDGFRDFK.HUL&DUROORVDLG Âł:HZDQWHGWRJHWLWLQWR.ULVWHQDQG$P\ and   let   them   go   to   work.   We   felt   like   they   FRXOGQÂśWPDWFKXSZLWKXVLQWKHSRVW´ 5XFKWL PDGH KHU ÂżUVW VWDUW RI WKH VHDVRQ against  DePauw  due  to  sophomore  guard  Ab-­ bie  Reeves  getting  injured  early  in  the  second   half   the   night   before   against   UW-­Oshkosh.  

Carollo  said  Reeves  is  seeing  a  doctor  and  it   will  depend  on  how  she  feels  as  far  as  wheth-­ HUVKH¶OOEHDEOHWRSOD\LQWKH)LQDO)RXURQ March  21  and  22. ,QWKH)LQDO)RXUVHWLQ6WHYHQV3RLQWWKH Warhawks  take  on  the  Whitman  Missionaries     :KLWPDQ IURP :DOOD :DOOD :DVK KDYHKDGDKRPHFRXUWDGYDQWDJHLQWKH¿UVW four  games  of  the  NCAA  Tournament.   :LWKWKH)LQDO)RXUEHLQJVHWLQ6WHYHQV 3RLQW 8::KLWHZDWHU ZLOO KDYH WKH VKRUW est  trip  to  make  of  any  of  the  four  remaining   teams. The  Missionaries  made  it  to  this  point  by   GHIHDWLQJSUHYLRXVO\XQGHIHDWHG1RUDQNHG Thomas   More   in   the   Elite   Eight.   Thomas   0RUH IHDWXUHG 6\GQH\ 0RVV ZKR LV IRUPHU 1)/ZLGHUHFHLYHU5DQG\0RVV¶GDXJKWHU Sydney  Moss  transferred  from  the  Univer-­ VLW\RI)ORULGDWKLVSDVW\HDUDIWHUEHLQJQDPHG WRWKH6(&$OO)UHVKPDQWHDPLQ 0HUJZKRWKRXJKWWKHWHDPZRXOGKDYH to  play  Thomas  More  if  they  were  to  advance   SDVW'H3DXZWKRXJKWQRWKLQJRIWKHVRFDOOHG upset  that  Whitman  pulled  off. ³7REHKRQHVWZH¶UHUHDG\IRUZKRPHY HU´ 0HUJ VDLG ³:H WRRN GRZQ 'H3DXZ RQ 'H3DXZ¶V FRXUW DQG ZH IHHO FRQ¿GHQW ULJKW QRZ´ Whitman  Preview :KLWPDQ VXIIHULQJ RQO\ RQH ORVV WKLV VHDVRQ ORVLQJ WR :KLWZRUWK E\ WKUHH SRLQWV revenged   its   loss   in   the   second   round   of   the   NCAA  Tournament  when  they  defeated  Whit-­ ZRUWK  %HIRUH WKH ORVV WR :KLWZRUWK GXULQJ WKH UHJXODU VHDVRQ WKH 0LVVLRQDULHV

See  Women  Page  16

nents  this  season. 7KHÂżQDOVFRUHHQGHGDQG $GFRFN ZRXOG ÂżQLVK KLV VHDVRQ with   a   26-­9   re-­ cord. Âł+H $G cock)   really   has   a  great  path  now;Íž   KH LV GHÂżQLWHO\ someone  to  keep   DQH\HRQ´KHDG Fader FRDFK7LP)DGHU said.  “A  lot  of  the  other  coaches   were   surprised   at   how   tough   he   ZDV DQG KRZ GLIÂżFXOW KH LV WR

VFRUHRQ´ 6HLIHUW RQ WKH RWKHU KDQG went  into   the   tournament   as   the   No.  2  seed  with  the  team  lead  in   pins   as   well   the   most   technical   falls  in  D-­III.   )DFLQJ WKH 1R VHHGHG ZUHVWOHU $OH[ &RROLGJH RI &RU QHOO6LHIHUWEHJDQWKHPDWFKZLWK a   quick   takedown   but   eventually   IHOOLQKHDUWEUHDNLQJIDVKLRQ DQGDVHFRQGSODFH¿QLVK ³+H ZDV OLWHUDOO\  VHF onds  away  from  being  a  national   FKDPSLRQEXWWKDWœVZK\ZHORYH wrestling;͞  you  have  to  wrestle  the   HQWLUHVHYHQPLQXWHV´VDLG)DGHU While   second   place   was   not   what   Siefert   was   hoping   for   go-­ ing  into  the  tournament  individu-­ DOO\ WKH VHFRQGSODFH ¿QLVK E\ the  team  was  the  best  in  program   history.   )LYH RI WKH VL[ WKLV \HDU ZKR TXDOL¿HG FDSWXUHG $OO$PHULFDQ KRQRUV DQG WKH RQO\ RQH WKDW GLGQœW KHDY\ZHLJKW $QWKRQ\ (GJUHQ DOUHDG\ REWDLQHG WKDW distinction  last  year. Wartburg   College   captured   WKH WHDP WLWOH ZLWK  SRLQWV followed   by   UW-­Whitewater   with   67   and   Messiah   College   with  64.   ClapperCJ12@uww.edu

:DUKDZNVZLQ DYRLG6WHYHQV3RLQW Men’s Basketball Column The  NCAA   Division-­III   Tournament   is   supposed  to  be  set  up  in  a  way  that  each  quali-­ I\LQJWHDPSOD\VDJDLQVWDEDODQFHGÂżHOGEXW LQUHDOLW\HDFKWHDPRQO\KDVWREHDWWKHWHDPV put  in  front  of  it.   The   UW-­Whitewater   Warhawks   did   just   that   by   defeating   the   lesser   of   two   teams  Saturday  night.   The   Emory   Eagles   put   XS D ÂżJKW EXW WKH Âś+DZNV took  care  of  business  in  the   second   half   and   ended   up   Commetary ZLQQLQJZLWKDÂżQDO by Paul LQ6WHYHQV3RLQW:LV Bressler Staff Writer The   victory   punched   WKHÂś+DZNVÂśWLFNHWWRWKH)L QDO)RXUDQGKDVWKHWHDPSRVLWLRQHGWREULQJ the  title  back  home.   ,IWKDWÂśVWKHFDVHWKH:DUKDZNVPD\ZDQW WRVHULRXVO\FRQVLGHUVHQGLQJDJLIWEDVNHWDW WKHYHU\OHDVWWRWKH(DJOHVIRUWDNLQJRXWWKH UW-­Stevens  Point  Pointers.   The   Eagles   defeated   the   Pointers   in   dra-­ matic  fashion  behind  the  tremendous  play  of   senior  forward  Jake  Davis.   $IWHU WUDLOLQJ WKH 1R UDQNHG 3RLQWHUV 'DYLVNQRWWHGWKLQJVXSDWDIWHUKLVÂżUVWRI two  clutch  3-­pointers  came  with  only  21  sec-­ onds  left  in  regulation.   'DYLVÂśODVWEDVNHWFDPHLQRYHUWLPHZLWK ÂżYHVHFRQGVVKRZLQJRQWKHFORFN+LVVHFRQG FOXWFKWKUHHSURYHGWREHWKHGLIIHUHQFHDQG an  Elite  Eight  appearance  was  his. The  irony  of  it  all  was  the  Warhawks  did   not   have   to   take   on   the   Pointers   in   Stevens   3RLQWDQGWKH\DOVRJRWWREHDWXSRQDWHDP WKDWFOHDUO\GLGQÂśWKDYHDQ\WKLQJOHIWWKHQH[W night.   $OWKRXJKWKHÂś+DZNVZHUHFRPLQJRIID )ULGD\QLJKWJDPHWKHPVHOYHVWKH:DUKDZNV

coasted  through  the  Sweet  16  against  UT-­Dal-­ las  81-­63. 1RQHRIWKLVZLOOPDWWHULIWKH¶+DZNVZLQ LWDOOLQ6DOHP7KHWURSK\ZRQ¶WKDYHDQDV terisk  on  it  detailing  how  the  team  got  there.   It  will  only  say  the  Warhawks  are  the  2014   ',,,&KDPSLRQVVRPHWKLQJWKDWQRERG\ZLOO ever  be  able  to  take  away  from  them.       Perhaps   a   bit   of   karma   is   coming   into   SOD\IRUWKH:DUKDZNV$IWHUDOOWKHZD\WKH tournament  is  set  up  the  majority  of  the  really   good  teams  are  slotted  in  the  same  region.   This  happens  because  the  good  teams  typ-­ ically  come  from  the  Midwest  and  traveling   H[SHQVHVDUHNHSWWRDPLQLPXP 7KDW EHLQJ VDLG WKLV LGHD IRU D EDODQFHG ¿HOGLVDOPRVWQRQH[LVWHQW7KHEHVWRIWKH best  beat  up  on  each  other  until  one  team  is   OHIW VWDQGLQJ RQ RQH OHJ ZLWK D )LQDO )RXU berth.   7KH:DUKDZNVPDQDJHGWR¿JKWWKHLUZD\ through  the  politics  with  a  bit  of  luck  and  now   VWDQG ¿UPO\ RQ WZR OHJV ZLWK D OHJLWLPDWH chance  to  win  the  whole  thing.   7KH ¶+DZNV ZLOO PDNH WKHLU ¿IWK )LQDO )RXUDSSHDUDQFHDWSP0DUFKDJDLQVW the  No.  6-­ranked  Illinois  Wesleyan  University. ³7KH\¶UH>,:8@UHDOO\JRRG´KHDGFRDFK 3DW0LOOHUVDLG³7KH\ZHUHDWWKH)LQDO)RXU with  us  in  2012.  Ron  Rose  is  a  great  coach.   ,NQRZWKH\¶UHUHDOO\GHHS7KH\KDYHUHDOO\ good  inside  players.  They  shoot  the  ball  well   DQGREYLRXVO\FRPLQJRXWRIWKH&&,:>&RO OHJH &RQIHUHQFH RI ,OOLQRLV DQG :LVFRQVLQ@ WKH\ DUH YHU\ EDWWOH WHVWHG DQG H[SHULHQFHG 7KDWZLOOEHDEDWWOH7KH\¶UHDJUHDWWHDPDQG ZHNQRZWKDW´ 7KH¶+DZNVGHIHDWHGWKH7LWDQVRQ 1RYLQ%ORRPLQJWRQ,OODQGRQFH

See  Avoid  Page  16


Dateline Here March 19, 2014 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

Sports Briefs Men’s  Baseball The   Warhawks   baseball   team  started  their  spring  break   a   week   early,   traveling   to  Au-­ burndale,  Fla.  for  the  RussMatt   Central   Florida   Baseball   Invi-­ tational  beginning  Mar  19.  The   ’Hawks  will  play  against  teams   from   Georgia,   Illinois,   Massa-­ chusetts,   Minnesota   and   New   York.  The  ’Hawks  went  4-­1  at   this  invitational  last  season. 7KH Âś+DZNV ÂżQLVKHG  last  season,  but  lost  to  St.  Scho-­ lastica  in  the  NCAA  regionals.   The  ’Hawks  return  19  members   RIWKHVTXDGIRXUZKRUH ceived  All-­WIAC  honors. Softball Similar   to   the   baseball   team,   the   Warhawks   softball   squad   also   will   spend   their   spring   break   in   Florida.   On   0DU  WKH Âś+DZNV UHWXUQ WR Clermont  as  they  step  onto  the   diamond   against   Plattsburgh   6WDWH LQ WKH ÂżUVW RI  JDPHV RYHU D VL[GD\ VSDQ ,Q  WKHÂś+DZNVZHQWDSHUIHFW IRULQ&OHUPRQW Last   season,   the   ’Hawks   KDG D  UHFRUG EHIRUH IDOO ing   to   UW-­Eau   Claire   in   the   NCAA  regionals.   Men’s  Tennis Last  Friday,  the  men’s  ten-­ QLV WHDP UDQNHG 1R  LQ Division-­III,  defeated  Cardinal  

Stritch  University,   9-­0.   Junior   Ben   Shklyar   won   at   No.1   sin-­ JOHVDQGDOVRZRQ at   No.   1   doubles   with   senior   Byron  Balkin.   Women’s  Tennis The   women’s   team   won   a   pair  of  meets  on  Friday,  defeat-­ ing  Coe  College,  8-­1,  and  Au-­ gustana  College,  9-­0.   Against   Coe,   senior   Alex-­ andra   Bayliss   was   victorious   at  No.  1  singles,  dropping  only   three   games,   6-­3,   6-­0.   Bayliss   teamed   with   senior   Jackie   Vi-­ tale   at   No.   1   doubles   as   well,   winning  8-­1.     In   the   second   meet   versus   Augustana,  the  ’Hawks  got  vic-­ tories  from  Megan  Humphreys   DW 1R  VLQJOHV   DQG sophomore   Erika   Williams   in   a  long  three-­set  match  at  No.  4   singles  5-­7,  7-­5,  10-­5. They   will   join   the   men’s   team  in  Hilton  Head  next  week. Women’s  Golf   The   women’s   golf   team   RSHQVWKHLUVHDVRQ6DWXU day   in   Memphis,  Tenn.,   at   the   Rhodes  Invitational.   Sophomore   Sammie   Leib-­ ham   led   the   ’Hawks   last   fall   with   an   84.5   18-­hole   average.   Other   top   golfers   included   ju-­ nior   Catherine   Hiltenbrand    DQGMXQLRU&ODXGLD5KH LQ  

Sports

3 Royal Purple Page 15

Bowlers eye nationals Bowling Column UW-­Whitewater  will  send  many   representatives  to  this  year’s  USBC   Intercollegiate   Bowling   Champion-­ ships  in  Reno,  Nev.,  after  both  men   and  women  performed  impressively   at  sectionals. The   women’s   bowling   team   was   not   allowed   to   compete   as   a   team   at   sectionals   this   year   due   to   a   mishap   in   paper-­ work   that   caused   Commetary the  team  to  be  in-­ by Ashley McCallum eligible.   Staff Writer But   the   War-­ hawks   decided   they  were  not  going  to  let  that  stop   them  on  their  journey  to  Reno. Out  of  more  than  150  individual   bowlers  in  this  weekend’s  sectional,   only   four   moved   on   to   compete   at   the  national  tournament.   Three  out  of  the  four  qualifying   women  were  Warhawk  bowlers.   Sophomore   Jaymi   Watson,   freshman   Amanda   Van   Duyn   and   senior  Katherine  Kleinmaier  placed   second,  third  and  fourth,  advancing   to  the  national  championship.   All  three  star  singles  for  the  War-­ KDZNV ¿QLVKHG ZLWKLQ  SLQV RI each  other.   Watson   shot   a   six-­game   series   of   1364,   Van   Duyn   shot   1368   and   Kleinmaier   shot   1356,   giving   each   of  them  over  averages  of  more  than   SLQVSHUJDPH

Watson  was  37  pins  away  from   being   the   tournament   champion,   a   title   that   went   to   Jackie   Carbonetto   from  Robert  Morris.     “These   ladies   showed   a   lot   of   discipline   today   and   have   been   working   hard   all   season.   It   was   a   wonderful   experience   to   see   all   of   their  hard  work  pay  off,â€?  head  coach   Leann  Eimermann  said. Another   freshman   from   the   Warhawks,  Taylor  Hoppe,  made  an   LPSUHVVLYHVKRZRXWRIKHUÂżUVWFRO legiate   sectional   appearance,   plac-­ ing  No.  15  overall,  the  next  highest   placed  Warhawk  individual  after  the   WKUHHQDWLRQDOTXDOLÂżHUV +RSSHDYHUDJHGZLWKD series.   On  the  men’s  side,  the  team  com-­ peted  in  Allenstown,  Pa.,  to  qualify   IRU LWV ÂżUVW QDWLRQDO FKDPSLRQVKLS DSSHDUDQFHDVDWHDPVLQFH 7KH Âś+DZNV TXDOLÂżHG IRU VHF tionals   after   winning   the   WCBC   conference   on   Feb.   9.     After   two   days   and   64   games,   the   ’Hawks   placed  second  overall  and  advanced   to  the  national  tournament. 7KHÂś+DZNVKHOGWKHÂżUVWSODFH VSRW DW WKH HQG RI WKH ÂżUVW GD\ RI competition   with   a   comfortable   80   pin  lead  over  Purdue.   Day   two   of   the   tournament   VWDUWHGZLWKDURXJKÂżUVWVHWRIIRXU games  that  included  no  games  over   DQGDQXSVHWWLQJJDPH After  the  third  set  of  the  day,  the   ’Hawks   dropped   to   the   third-­place   VSRWIRUWKHÂżUVWWLPHDOOWRXUQDPHQW 7KHWHDPGURSSHGWRÂżIWKSODFHDIWHU

the  break  after  16  games,  but  trailed   by  only  six  pins. “Not   the   morning   we   had   ex-­ pected  or  hoped  for.  However  we  are   where   we   like   to   be.   Sixteen   game   VSULQWWRWKHÂżQLVK´DUHSUHVHQWDWLYH of   the   team   said   via   the  Warhawks   Bowling  Twitter  account. With  16  games  left  to  crack  the   top   four   and   advance   to   nationals,   WKHÂś+DZNVĂ€HZRXWRIWKHJDWHZLWK two  back-­to-­back  sets  of  910  series   WKDW LQFOXGHG D ELJ  JDPH WKDW made  up  many  pins  lost  that  morn-­ ing.   The   ’Hawks   were   able   to   keep   a  steady  and  successful  momentum   that   allowed   them   to   soar   into   the   second-­place   spot   behind   tourna-­ ment   champion   Webber   Interna-­ tional.   “What   a   total   team   effort   this   afternoon.   Warhawks   are   going   to   Reno,â€?   via   the   Warhawks   Bowling   Twitter  account. The   men   did   not   have   any   sin-­ gles  players  advance  to  nationals.   Sophomore   Cory   Lenz   per-­ formed  best  for  the  Warhawks  in  the   individual  competition,  rounding  out   the  top  10  out  of  roughly  160  indi-­ YLGXDOV ZLWK D  VHULHV IRU VL[ games. As  for  NCAA  news,  the  women   ERZOHUVZLOOGLVFRYHURQ0DUFK if  they  will  be  one  of  the  eight  teams   selected   to   compete   at   NCAA   Na-­ tional   Champions   in   Cleveland,   Ohio. McCallumAN03@uww.edu


Sports

Dateline Page 16Here Royal Purple

:RPHQWDNHÀIWK PHQVL[WKDWQDWLRQDOV :DUKDZNV¿QLVKVWURQJ to end  indoor  season M/W Track/Field By Carson Taylor 6WDII:ULWHU

With numerous   All-­American   honors,   the   UW-­Whitewater   track   DQG¿HOGWHDPVSRVWHGVWURQJSHU formances  at  the  NCAA  Division-­ ,,, ,QGRRU 1DWLRQDO &KDPSLRQ VKLSV )LQLVKLQJ LQ D WLH IRU ¿IWK WKH Warhawk  women  equaled  the  best   VKRZLQJ LQ VFKRRO KLVWRU\ 7KH PHQSODFHGVL[WK 7KH 1DWLRQDO &KDPSLRQVKLSV ZHUHKRVWHGE\1HEUDVND:HVOH\ DQDQGKHOGDWWKH'HYDQH\6SRUWV &HQWHULQ/LQFROQ1HE 7KH :,$& GRPLQDWHG WKH PHHWKROGLQJ¿YHRIWKHWRSHLJKW WHDPVDQGVKRZLQJWKHVWUHQJWKRI WKHFRQIHUHQFH 8:/D&URVVH¿QLVKHGLQ¿UVW on  the  men’s  side,  while  UW-­Osh-­ NRVKZRQWKHWLWOHIRUWKHZRPHQ Men 7KH :DUKDZN PHQ KDYH ¿Q LVKHG DPRQJ WKH WRS  WHDPV LQ four   consecutive   NCAA   Indoor   &KDPSLRQVKLSV Junior   Jared   Denu   led   the   PHQEHFRPLQJWKH¿UVWPDOHDWK OHWH LQ 8::KLWHZDWHU KLVWRU\ WR earn   All-­America   honors   in   three   HYHQWVDWWKHVDPHFKDPSLRQVKLS 7KHKRQRUVDUHDZDUGHGWRWKH WRSHLJKWSHUIRUPHUVLQHDFKHYHQW 2Q )ULGD\ 'HQX ZDV D SDUW RI WKH :DUKDZNV¶ WKLUGSODFH GLV WDQFH PHGOH\ UHOD\ WHDP ZLWK VH nior  Kevin  Buntman  and  fellow  ju-­ QLRUV7RQ\ 8UEDQVNL DQG 'DZVRQ 0LOOHU 2Q 6DWXUGD\ 'HQX SLFNHG XS

 

his second   and   third   All-­Ameri-­ FDQ¿QLVKHVDVDQDQFKRURQ8: :KLWHZDWHU¶V [PHWHU UHOD\ WHDPWKDW¿QLVKHGHLJKWKDQGLQWKH PHWHU GDVK ZKHQ KH ¿QLVKHG VL[WKZLWKDWLPHRI -RLQLQJ 'HQX LQ WKH [ PHWHU UHOD\ WHDP ZDV VRSKRPRUH %U\FH 5XGHEHFN DQG IUHVKPDQ $OH[ 6KDUURFN DQG '4 :\QQ 6PLWK ,Q KLV ¿UVW ,QGRRU 1DWLRQDO &KDPSLRQVKLS VRSKRPRUH &RUH\ %URXVVDUG OHG WKH SRLQWV WRWDO IRU the   Warhawks   with   a   second   SODFH¿QLVKLQWKH PHWHU GDVK W\LQJ KLV VFKRRO UHFRUG ¿QLVKLQJ DW It  was  the  best   Broussard ¿QLVK IRU D PDQ LQWKHVKRUWGDVKLQ8::KLVWRU\ ³, IHOW VDWLV¿HG ZLWK ZKDW , GLG´ %URXVVDUG VDLG ³7R JHW RQ WKH SRGLXP DQG KDYH P\ IDPLO\ DQG P\ WHDP VHH PH UHFHLYH P\ DZDUG , ZDV VWLOO UHDOO\ H[FLWHG DERXWWKHSODFHWKDW,FDPHLQ´ Broussard   also   commented   on   WKHWHDP¶VRYHUDOOSHUIRUPDQFHRQ WKHZHHNHQG ³,KRQHVWO\ZDVQ¶WVDWLV¿HGEH cause  I  know  as  a  team  we  can  do   ZD\ EHWWHU´ %URXVVDUG VDLG ³%XW ZLWKWUDFNWKHUH¶VDORWRIXSVDQG GRZQVVRZHMXVWKDYHWRJRZLWK WKDWDQGPRYHRQWRRXWGRRU´ -XQLRU '\ODQ &UDIWRQ DGGHG to   the   ’Hawks’   All-­American   to-­ WDOZLWKDVL[WKSODFH¿QLVKLQWKH PHWHU GDVK FURVVLQJ WKH OLQH DW ,QWKHORQJMXPSVHQLRU&RUH\ =DHVNHSODFHG¿IWKZLWKDOHDSRI  +HEHFDPHWKH¿UVWWKUHHWLPH $OO$PHULFDQ LQ WKH LQGRRU ORQJ MXPSLQ8::KLWHZDWHUKLVWRU\

Women 7KHZRPHQVKRZHGVWURQJLP SURYHPHQW DW QDWLRQDOV WKLV \HDU E\SODFLQJ¿IWKMXPSLQJVSRWV IURPODVW\HDU¶V¿QLVKRIVW 7KH¶+DZNVDOVR¿QLVKHG¿IWK LQ 7KH\ZHUHOHGE\MXQLRUV6KHO E\ 0DKU DQG /H[LH 6RQGJHURWK HDFKWXUQLQJLQWZR$OO$PHULFDQ SHUIRUPDQFHV 0DKU SODFHG VHFRQG LQ WKH ZHLJKWWKURZDQGVL[WKLQWKHVKRW SXW Her toss   of    LQ WKH ZHLJKW WKURZ broke   the   school   UHFRUG RI  that  she  recorded   HDUOLHUWKLV\HDU 7KH VHFRQG Mahr SODFH ¿QLVK DOVR LV WKH EHVW ¿QLVK IRU D :DUKDZN ZRPDQVLQFH ³0\ JRDO ZDV WR 35 LQ ERWK HYHQWVDQG,ZDVJRQQDEHKDSS\ ZLWK WKH UHVXOW DV ORQJ DV , WKUHZ ZHOO´ 0DKU VDLG ³)LQLVKLQJ LQ VHFRQGZDVMXVWDFKHUU\RQWRSRI DJRRGZHHNHQG´ 6RQGJHURWK ZKR TXDOL¿HG LQ WKUHHHYHQWVHDUQHGWKLUGSODFHLQ WKH ORQJ MXPS ZLWK D OHDS RI   6KH DOVR SODFHG ¿IWK LQ WKH PHWHU GDVK ZLWK D WLPH RI  Junior   Amanda   Brom   round-­ HG RXW WKH WRS SHUIRUPHUV RQ WKH ZRPDQ¶V VLGH ¿QLVKLQJ VL[WK LQ WKHPHWHUGDVK %URP¶VWLPHZDV 7KH :DUKDZNV ZLOO QRZ ORRN ahead  to  the  outdoor  season,  when   WKH\ZLOOKRVWWKH5H[)RVWHU,QYL WDWLRQDOWDNLQJSODFHRQ$SULO &ODSSHU&-#XZZHGX

4 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com March 19, 2014

Women: ’Hawks look ahead to Whitman College Continued from  page  1 VSRUWHG'KRRSVFRP¶V1RUDQN LQJ Whitman   features   three   women   WKDW DYHUDJH GRXEOH ¿JXUHV ZLWK IRXU DYHUDJLQJ RYHU VL[ SRLQWV SHU JDPH -XQLRU JXDUG +HDWKHU -RKQV OHDGV WKH ZD\ DYHUDJLQJ RYHU  SRLQWV DQG VL[ UHERXQGV SHU JDPH :KHQLWFRPHVWRSRVWSOD\WKH0LV VLRQDULHVORRNQHDUO\LGHQWLFDOWRWKH :DUKDZNV &UDVKLQJ WKH JODVV WR PDWFK XS ZLWK WKH ¶+DZNV¶ IRRW 5XFKWL LV WKH 0LVVLRQDULHV¶ IRRW VHQLRU FHQWHU 6DUDK $QGHUHJJ $QGHUHJJ DYHUDJHV RYHU  SRLQWV DQG VHYHQ UHERXQGVSHUFRQWHVW /HDGLQJ WKH ZD\ IRU WKH 0LV sionaries  when  it  comes  to  rebound-­ LQJLVIRRWVHQLRUIRUZDUG0HJKDQ :KLWH ZKR DYHUDJHV RYHU HLJKW SRXQGVDQGUHERXQGVSHUJDPH)RU WKH:DUKDZNVDIRRWVHQLRUFHQWHU FDQEHIRXQGLQ0DQGUHOO :LWK 0DQGUHOO EDWWOLQJ :KLWH ZKLOH 5XFKWL LV OLNHO\ WR PDWFK XS ZLWK $QGHUHJJ WKH JDPH FRXOG FRPHGRZQWRJXDUGSOD\ ,IWKHSUHVVXUHGHIHQVHIURP&DU

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March 19, 2014 Issue  
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