Page 1

A  word  from  founder  and  CEO   of  the  Toppers  Pizza  franchise Page  6

Theater  debuts  ‘The  Drowsy  Chaperone,’   ÂżUVWPXVLFDORIVHPHVWHU Page  8

February  27,  2013

www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

Men’s hoops claim WIAC tournament, set sights on NCAA

Professor  wins  minority  grant

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“A  lot   of   students   come   from   school   districts   where   they   don’t   have   as   strong   of   a   science   cur-­ riculum,â€?   McGregory   said,   “so   they   have   some   gaps.   [Biology   %RRW&DPS@KHOSVWKHPÂżOOLQVRPH By Grace Catrambone gaps.â€? Staff  Writer While   Woods   focuses   on   the   Brett   Woods,   assistant   biol-­ science   aspects   of   the   camp,   Mc-­ ogy   professor,   has   received   the   Gregory  handles  the  administration   Wisconsin   Alliance   for   Minority   and  retention  aspects.  McGregory  is   Participation   grant   in   January.   All   in   charge   of   callings,   mailings   and   of  the  money  from  the  grant  will  go   anything   else   that   helps   make   stu-­ toward  Biology  Boot  Camp,  a  pro-­ dents  aware  of  this  opportunity.   gram  to  help  students  be  successful   Biology  Boot  Camp  focuses  on   in  science,  technology,  engineering   study   skills   and   and  math  (STEM)   the   transition   into   ÂżHOGV a  new  institution.   Biology   Boot   During   the   Camp  is  designed   camp,   professors   to  give  students  a   are  invited  to  give   better   transition   mock   lectures.   LQWR WKHLU ÂżUVW VH Students   attend   mester  of  biology   McGregory Woods these   lectures,   DQGWKHLUÂżUVW\HDU take  notes  and  are   on  the  UW-­Whitewater  campus. given  an  exam  in  which  they  are  al-­ “I   have   an   interest   in   helping   lowed  to  use  these  notes.   students,   espe-­ “What   a   cially  minority  stu-­ lot   of   students   GHQWV LQ D ÂżHOG LQ  have  an  interest  in   ÂżQG LV WKDW HYHQ which  there  are  not   when   they   have   a   lot   of   minority   helping  students,  espe-­ their  notes  avail-­ students,â€?   Woods   FLDOO\VWXGHQWVLQDÂżHOG able  to  them  they   said.   “This   is   a   in  which  there  are  not  a   can’t   answer   the   funding  source  that   questions,   be-­ allows   me   to   pro-­ lot  of  minority  students. cause  their  notes   vide   assistance   for   Brett  Woods, are   not   done   in   underrepresented   assistant  biology  professor a   way   that   actu-­ minorities   in   the   ally  helps  them,â€?   STEM  majors.â€? Woods  said.     Richard   Mc-­ Biology   Boot   Camp   provides   Gregory,  assistant  vice  chancellor  of   class   discussions   on   note   taking.   Multicultural  Affairs,  participated  in   These   classes   teach   students   how   a  similar  program  at  Beloit  College   to  take  notes  that  will  actually  help   where  he  met  Woods.   them  do  well  on  the  exam.  

Brett  Woods  plans  to  use   grant  to  prepare  Biology   majors  for  college

“

  I

Jenny DuPuis photo/'X3XLV-&#XZZHGX

Alex Merg, left, passes to a teammate during Saturday’s WIAC Championship. The Warhawks won 66-55 to claim the WIAC tournament title. See Page 10 for story.

  Established  1901

2WKHUEHQHÂżWVRIWKHERRWFDPS LQFOXGH WRXUV RI WKH FDPSXV ÂżHOG trips  to  the  library  and  fun  activities   such  as  movie  nights  and  bowling.   The  main  advantage  of  the  camp   is   students   get   comfortable   with   their  surroundings  by  meeting  pro-­ fessors  and  other  students  while  be-­ coming  familiar  with  campus  before   the  school  year  begins.   Along   with   giving   students   ex-­ posure  to  the  material,  Biology  Boot   Camp   raises   student   awareness   of   expectations  within  the  STEM  ma-­ jors.  Students  will  learn  what  level   of   work,   effort   and   performance   is   needed  to  be  successful.   In   order   to   be   eligible   to   par-­ ticipate  in  the  boot  camp,  a  student   must   be   enrolled   at   UW-­Whitewa-­ ter,  meet  the  requirements  in  terms   of  an  underrepresented  minority  and   have  an  intended  major  in  a  STEM   ÂżHOG Biology   Boot   Camp   will   take   place  in  August  2013.  The  tentative   dates  are  Aug.  12  to  23. Through  this  program,  McGreg-­ ory   hopes   to   see   more   underrepre-­ sented   students   stay   in   STEM   ma-­ jors  and  graduate  from  the  majors.   Woods  said  there  are  good  jobs   in  the  STEM  areas.  This  boot  camp   will   help   direct   students   toward   successful   completion   of   their   ma-­ jors  and  into  employment  in  STEM   ÂżHOGV “They   stay   here,   stay   in   the   majors,   graduate   from   the   major   and   get   connected   to   those   STEM   opportunities   professionally,â€?   Mc-­ Gregory   said.   “It’s   a   win-­win   for   everybody.â€? CatramboGH16@uww.edu

Students  travel  to  Yellowstone By Claire Armetta Staff  Writer

The  Yellowstone   National   Park   trip   has   become   increasing-­ ly   popular   for   students   at   UW   –   Whitewater.    It  is  almost  guaran-­ teed  that  a  student  will  cross  wolf   tracks,   see   Old   Faithful   explode   and   experience   the   expansive,   snow-­capped  mountains  while  on   the  trip. “I   started   this   trip   in   1995   at   Whitewater,�  said  George  Clokey     Ph.D,   the   coordinating   faculty   member.     “It   hasn’t   been   every   year.  We  had  a  rough  start,  but  we   had   15   to   20   students   each   year   for  the  past  10  years  or  so.� The   trip   has   progressed   and  

is  now  running  in  the  winter  and   August.     This   year,   the   trip   will   take   place   on   July   15   to   28   for   those  who  want  to  complete  their   four   General   Lab   credits   and   Aug.   5   to   24   for   those   who   want   to   complete   a   WKUHHFUHGLW ÂżHOG course. “I   hope   that   Clokey the   four   cred-­ it   general   lab   course   will   become   known,â€?   Clokey   said.   “You   knock   your   science  requirement  off  by  going   to  Yellowstone.    What  more  could   you  ask  for?â€?

Clokey  highly   recommends   the   trip   for   science   majors.     Whether   it   is   biology,   ecology,   geology   or   geography,   Clokey   VDLG LW LV EHQHÂż cial.   “This   is   one   RI WKH ÂżHOG VWXG ies   everyone   talks  about,â€?  said   Daryl   Johnson,   a   junior   major-­ Johnson ing  in  geography   who  experienced   the  trip. Johnson   expressed   a   positive   reaction  about  the  trip.

See  Yellowstone  Page  2

Photo submitted

Members of the Yellowstone trip gathered for a photo at Firehole Falls after [V\YPUNWHY[ZVM@LSSV^Z[VUL;OL`[YH]LSLK[V>`VTPUNMVYHĂ„LSKZ[\K`JV\YZL

Student-­Run  Weekly  Newspaper  at  the  University  of  Wisconsin-­Whitewater


Dateline Page 2 Here Royal Purple

News

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com February 27, 2013

Enrollment  at  UW-­�Whitewater  reaches  a  record  high UW-­Whitewater   enrollment   has   been  consistently  rising.  Chancel-­ News  Editor lor   Richard   Telfer   said   the   expo-­ UW-­Whitewater  has  hit  record   nential  growth  is  due  to  a  Univer-­ enrollment   this   school   year   with   sity  of  Wisconsin  System  initiative   12,031  students. called  the  Growth  Agenda. Since  the  2006-­07  school  year,   “Part   of   what   the   Growth   By Samantha Jacquest

Agenda  suggested   was   that   the   state   of   Wisconsin   needs   to   have   more   people   who   are   prepared   with  college  degrees,�  Telfer  said.   “This   can   include   associates   and   technical  degrees,  but  our  focus  is   bachelor  degrees.�

Sydney Michuda graphic/0LFKXGD6.#XZZHGX

One  of  the  goals  of  the  Growth   Agenda   is   to   have   over   260,000   undergraduate   degrees   by   2025.     Telfer   said   the   idea   behind   the   Growth   Agenda   and   increasing   enrollment   is   to   make   Wisconsin   more  successful.    The  agenda  has   a  plan  for  the  UW  System  until  the   2025-­26  school  year. Because  of  the  high  enrollment   in   the   past   six   school   years,   UW-­ Whitewater   has   had   to   accommo-­ date  for  additional  students  living   in   residence   halls.   The   university   has  done  this  by  renting  two  apart-­ ment   buildings   from   D.L.K.   En-­ terprises.   There   also   are   plans   to   renovate   resi-­ dence  halls  in  or-­ der  to  allow  more   bed  space. Telfer Senior  Stacey   Leonard  has  worked  at  D.L.K.  En-­ terprises  for  two  years  and  has  no-­ ticed  changes  in  the  student  rental   process.   “Especially   this   year,   a   lot   of   our   two-­bedrooms   have   been   go-­ ing   a   lot   faster,�   Leonard   said.   “And   because   the   university   bought   out   Cambridge   and   Fox   Meadows  [Apartments],  there  has   been   less   housing   available   for   students.�

Yellowstone “I  learned   everything,â€?   John-­ son   said.   “Clokey   is   really   great   and  knows  a  lot  about  Yellowston,   go   anywhere   and   ask   him   any   question,   and   he’ll   have   an   an-­ swer  for  you.â€? The  trip  is  offered  to  a  variety   of   students,   and   as   of   2010,   it   is   now   a   wheel-­ chair   accessible   trip.     Megan   Lynch,   a   junior   majoring   in   bi-­ ology   pre   med,   was   one   of   the   ÂżUVW WR WDNH DG Lynch vantage   of   this   opportunity. Âł,KDG&ORNH\IRUP\ÂżUVW%L ology   class,   and   he   talked   about   the   trip   all   the   time,â€?   Lynch   said   “and  I  asked  him  if  it  was  acces-­ sible   and   if   I   could   go.     He   said   no,  but  said  we  could  work  on  it.â€? They   worked   on   making   the   trip   accessible   throughout   the   VFKRRO\HDUDQGÂżQDOO\WKDWVXP mer,  Lynch  went  on  the  trip. “I   learned   legitimately   every-­ thing  that  has  to  do  with  wildlife,   and   a   lot   about   science,â€?   Lynch   said.     “I   also   learned   more   about   pushing   myself.    The   three   of   us   in   wheelchairs   pushed   ourselves   so  hard  to  do  all  of  the  same  things   that  everyone  else  was  doing.â€?     Each   student   had   a   different   personal  experience  from  the  trip.    

Leonard  said   D.L.K.   will   rent   out   apartments   almost   a   full   year   in  advance,  starting  in  September. “Compared   to   last   year,   we   have  less  housing  available  at  this   time,�  Leonard  said. Telfer   said   the   university   has   needed  to  accommodate  the  rise  in   students  as  problems  were  brought   to   their   attention.   Parking   is   one   example   where   UW-­Whitewater   had  to  make  changes  to  accommo-­ date  everyone.   The   university   also   needed   to   add   sections   to   certain   courses   to   allow  room  for  additional  students.   Telfer  said  the  number  of  students   in  a  classroom  may  have  gone  up,   but  not  dramatically. While  increasing  enrollment  is   a   priority   for   UW-­Whitewater   to   participate  in  the  Growth  Agenda,   Telfer   said   increasing   retention   rates   and   accepting   transfer   stu-­ dents   is   a   large   part   of   the   UW   System  plan. “We  try  to  have  an  inviting  and   challenging  place  for  people  to  be   and  a  place  where  they’re  encour-­ aged  to  develop  themselves,�  Telf-­ er   said.   “We   want   to   make   UW-­ Whitewater   an   attractive   place,   both  physically  and  programmati-­ cally  attractive.� JacquestSL01@uww.edu

Continued  from  page  1 Lynch   said   her   favorite   part   was   Beartooth   Mountain   in   Montana,   and   Johnson   enjoyed   digging   up   dinosaur  fossils. “Just   seeing   mountains   were   amazing;Íž   you   don’t   see   any   of   that  in  this  area,â€?  Lynch  said.  “As   you   go   further   west,   it   gets   pret-­ tier  and  prettier.â€? Besides   the   incredible   sights   and   wildlife,   the   students   said   their   was   also   a   lot   of   substance   that  came  out  of  their  trip. “The   purpose   of   the   trip   is   to   show   students   the   geology   and   ecology   of   Yellowstone   and   to   JHW WKHP RXW WKHUH LQ WKH ÂżHOG´ Clokey   said.   “Students   take   data   and  learn  techniques  in  a  way  that   will  give  them  a  leg  up  in  the  fu-­ ture.â€? Clokey   said   one   of   the   most   interesting   aspects   of   the   trip   is   the   learning   that   takes   place   in   a   whole  new  setting. “When   you’re   picking   up   a   rock   and   looking   at   a   fossil,   you’re   going   to   remember   that.     It’s   not   like   sitting   in   a   class-­ room,â€?  Clokey  said. Photos  from  the  trip  will  be  on   display   in   Roberta’s   Art   Gallery   in  the  University  Center  with  a  re-­ ception  Wednesday  Feb.  27  from   3:30  to  5  p.m.  The  photos  will  re-­ main  on  display  until  March  13. ArmettaCL31@uww.edu

Downtown Student Housing 2 and 3 Bedroom Apartments Locations available:

t 176 West Main Street t 175 West Main Street Parking Included Call Jim at 414-881-4774 or Nick at 262-370-2884


News

Dateline Here February 27, 2013 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

Police Report Allen,  Kyle  J.,  19   3RVVHVVLRQ RI 0DULMXDQD 3RV-­ VHVVLRQRI'UXJ3DUDSKHUQDOLD 01/23/2013

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Students’  peace  essays   compete  for  $1,000 By Samantha Jacquest

Baber,  Eric  B.,  21 Operating   a   Motor   Vehicle   :LWKRXW 9DOLG 'ULYHU /LFHQVH )DLOXUHWR1RWLI\3ROLFHRI$F-­ cident     02/21/2013 Cottrell,  Caylee  J.,  20   6SHHG([FHHGLQJ3RVWHG/LPLWV 02/18/2013

Paul,  Sarah  S.,  24   ,QDWWHQWLYH'ULYLQJ 02/20/2013 Reiels,  Christopher  J.,  20   'LVRUGHUO\ &RQGXFW ¹ /RLWHU-­ LQJ8QGHUDJH&RQVXPSWLRQ 02/22/2013 Volz,  Brandon  T.,  20   0DULMXDQD3RVVHVVLRQ 02/20/2013

Filipiak,  Tyler  J.,  20 6SHHG([FHHGLQJ3RVWHG/LPLWV 02/24/2013 The  Royal  Purple  RQO\SXEOLVKHVSROLFHUHSRUWVZKLFKIHDWXUH8::KLWHZD-­ ter  students,  faculty  and  staff.  These  reports  are  public  record  and  are  avail-­ DEOHWKURXJKWKH&LW\RI:KLWHZDWHUZHEVLWHXQGHUWKH'DLO\3UHVV5HOHDVHV tab.  No  omissions,  exceptions  or  requests  will  be  considered.  

News  Editor

Students  who   are   interested   in   peace  and  justice  around  the  world   have  the  opportunity  to  win  $1,000   by  stating  their  hopes  for  society. 7KH 5H¿RU 3HDFH 3UL]H DF-­ cepts   essays   about   world   peace   and   movements   for   social   justice   from  students  in  good  standing.  The   deadline  is  March  1. (YHUHWW5H¿RULVDIRUPHU8: :KLWHZDWHU (FRQRPLFV 'HSDUW-­ ment  professor  and  chair.  He  started   WKH5H¿RU3HDFH3UL]HZKHQKHUH-­ WLUHGIURP8::KLWHZDWHUDQGKLV widow  continued  to  fund  the  essay   ever  since  he  died. 'DYLG 5HLQKDUW 3K' D OHF-­ WXUHULQWKH3KLORVRSK\ 5HOLJLRXV 6WXGLHV 'HSDUWPHQW LV SDUW RI D committee   that   has   created   a   new  

Social workers are heroes. The Loyola MSW program at Carthage can show you how to put your intellect and compassion to work, protecting the world from the ravages of unemployment, addiction, disability and abuse. It’s a big job and the Loyola MSW is the credential that helps you get the job and succeed. Traditional Program

(26 months)

Royal Purple Page33

INFORMATION SESSIONS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR R.S.V.P. at LoyolaMSW.com

Advanced Standing

(14 months)

Application Deadline May 1, 2013 All Classes held at Carthage College in Kenosha, WI

www.loyolamsw.com t 800-551-5343 t Classes start July 2013

minor  on   campus   with   a   similar   focus   as   the   essay   contest.   Rein-­ KDUW 3URIHVVRU +ROO\ 'HQQLQJ DQG =RKUHK*KDYDPVKDKLGL3K'ZLOO review   the   essays   and   choose   the   winner. Reinhart  said  one  of  the  focuses   RIWKHQHZ3HDFHDQG6RFLDO-XVWLFH minor,   and   a   possible   topic   for   an   essay,  is  a  different  outlook  on  his-­ tory   than   students   may   be   accus-­ tomed  to. “The  study  of  peace  tries  to  take   a   broader   perspective   on   the   study   RI KLVWRU\´ 5HLQKDUW VDLG Âł:KDW happened   in   wars   is   important   to   know,  but  what  were  the  dynamics   that  led  to  the  war  and  what  are  the   dynamics   and   structures   important   for  sustaining  peace  after  a  war?â€? 'HQQLQJVDLGKHEHOLHYHVRWKHU topics   students   may   write   about   should   somehow   discuss   “ways   to   achieve   world   peace   from   interna-­ tional   and   collaborative   projects.   This  includes  questions  of  ecology   and  resources  in  relation  to  power,   peace,  theoretical  and  philosophical   issues,  religion  and  peace  and  uto-­ pias  and  justice  initiatives.â€? Essays   must   be   at   least   2,000   words  and  double  spaced.  Submis-­ sions  can  be  sent  to  Reinhart  at  re-­ inhard@uww.edu.   Reinhart   said   if   a  student  needs  more  time  to  com-­ plete  the  essay,  contact  him  before   the  deadline  of  March  1  to  discuss  a   possible  extension. -DFTXHVW6/#XZZHGX


“Opportunity  is  missed  by  most  people   because  it  is  dressed  in  overalls  and   looks  like  work.�  -­Thomas  Edison

WEDNESDAY February  27,  2012

Business  Editor: Carrie  Wojcik

PAGE Â 4

Entrepreneurial Energy Student  receives   $10,000  grant  for small  business

By Michael Riley Assistant  News  Editor

 “When  I  was  younger,  snow  days  were  my   favorite,  not  because  I  got  a  day  off,  but  be-­ cause  there  was  the  opportunity  to  shovel  off   people’s   driveways   and   make   money,â€?   UW-­ Whitewater  senior  Andrew  Hoeft  said.       Hoeft  has  continued  his  passion  for  solv-­ ing  problems  through  young  adulthood,  which   has  led  him  to  create  his  own  small  business,   Date  Check  Pro.       Date   Check   Pro   provides   expiration   date   management   software   that   tracks   the   expira-­ tion  dates  on  a  per  product  basis.       Gov.  Scott  Walker  recognized  Hoeft’s  ac-­ complishments  last  week  in  a  presentation  to   :KLWHZDWHUUHVLGHQWVDQGRIÂżFLDOV   Walker   announced   on   Feb.   5   at   White-­ water’s   University   Technology   Park   that   the   Wisconsin   Economic   Development   Corp.     and  the  Whitewater  Community  Development   Authority  would  form  a  partnership  to  provide   support  to  local  entrepreneurs  with  capital  in   the  start  up  stages  of  development.       WEDC   is   providing   a   $150,000   Capital   Catalyst  matching  grant  to  the  CDA  that  will   be  used  to  provide  start  up  money  to  new  com-­ panies.       In  addition  to  the  partnership,    $10,000  in   Whitewater  Capital  Catalyst  Fund  grants  were   awarded  to  Hoeft  and  Joe  Neuman  in  support   of  their  companies  based  in  Whitewater.  Neu-­ man  is  the  founder  of  Got  Apps,  Inc.,  a  com-­ pany  that  helps  design  and  build  apps  built  for   mobile  devices  and  tablets.   1HXPDQ DQG +RHIW VKDUH DQ RIÂżFH DW  Whitewater  Street.     Whitewater  CDA  coordinator  Patrick  Can-­ non  said  the  grants  help  small  companies  save   money  upfront,  so  they  do  not  have  to  use  their   own  savings  to  get  started.       “The  nice  part  about  the   two   grants   we   awarded   is   both   companies   are   using   them  for  rent,  which  is  nice   because   they   can   focus   on   growing  their  business  rather   than  trying  to  keep  their  op-­ Cannon erating  costs  in  check,â€?  Can-­ non  said.     The  beginning  of  an  idea   Before  Hoeft  had  to  worry  about  the  op-­ erating   costs   of   his   own   business,   he   was   more   worried   about   working   more   hours   for   his  summer  job  at  Festival  Foods  in  summer   2010.   He  had  been  working  as  a  Festival  Foods   cashier  and  bagger  since  2007,  and  upon  ask-­ ing  if  he  could  work  more  hours,  they  offered   him  a  job  nobody  wanted  to  do,  date  checking.     Hoeft   was   not   sure,   but   his   boss   said   he   could  maintain  his  own  hours,  so  he  jumped   at  the  opportunity.    His  job  was  to  check  every   product  in  the  store  and  make  sure  they  were   still  fresh.       “It  was  actually  day  one  when  I  realized  I   KDGWRÂż[LWDQGFRPHXSZLWKDEHWWHULGHD´ +RHIW VDLG Âł2Q GD\ WKUHH , ÂżJXUHG RXW P\ idea  and  began  to  try  to  implement  it.â€?       It  started  as  an  excel  document,  typing  in   every  product  and  the  next  expiration  date  into  

Dan Pomykalski photo/3RP\NDOVNL'-#XZZHGX

Andrew Hoeft, a senior at UW-Whitewater, created his own business from an idea while working at his local grocer. Now the CEO of Date Check Pro, a >OP[L^H[LYIHZLKJVTWHU`[OH[OLSWZNYVJLYZJOLJRHUK[YHJRL_WPYH[PVUKH[LZVMZWLJPĂ„JWYVK\J[Z[OH[LSPTPUH[LZ[OLULLKMVYYV[H[PVUHUKZWV[JOLJR ing. Hoeft and fellow entrepreneur Joe Neuman recently received a $10,000 Whitewater Capital Catalyst Fund grant for business expenses.

his  laptop.      This  was  no  simple  task,  and  when   summer  was  ending,  it  still  wasn’t  done.    Af-­ ter  hundreds  of  hours  of  work  and  help  from  a   team  Hoeft’s  boss  gave  him,  the  Excel  docu-­ ment  was  going  well,  but  it  had  its  problems.       “The   most   simple   limitation   was   you   could  only  order  a  spreadsheet  by  location  or   expiration   date,â€?   Hoeft   said.     “So   either   you   order  by  location  and  you  would  have  to  dig   through  pages,  or  you  could  organize  by  date   and  walk  through  the  store  ten  times  trying  to   ÂżQGWKHH[SLUHGSURGXFW,WZDVMXVWDKDVVOH´        Concept  becomes  reality   Hoeft  returned  to  school  for  the  fall  semes-­ ter  with  his  idea  still  in  the  back  of  his  head.     He   joined   the   Collegiate   Entrepreneurs’   Organization   with   friends   Dan   Fink   and   Chris   Nwakalo.   Fink   is   a   former  CEO  president.   As   a   part   of   this   organiza-­ tion,  Hoeft  was  able  to  share   his  ideas,  get  encouragement   Fink from   his   peers   and   network   with  people  on  campus.       CEO  held  a  business  model  canvas  com-­ SHWLWLRQDWZKLFK/DEVDQLQFXEDWRURXWRI Milwaukee,  was  present.   “Andrew  wasn’t  even  part  of  the  competi-­ tion,   but   Chris   nudged   him   to   share   his   idea   to  the  room,â€?  Fink  said.  “He  was  hesitant  to   share,  but  18  months  later,  his  company  is  val-­ ued  at  2  million.â€?     The  company  he  shared  his  idea  with,  now   Genera8or,  gave  Hoeft  the  capital  to  transform   his  idea  and  turn  his  Excel  document  into  an   actual  product  in  June  2011.  It  was  an  $18,000   investment   for   10   percent   of   the   company.     7KH\ SURYLGHG DQ RIÂżFH LQ 0DGLVRQ EXW WR Hoeft,  the  biggest  value  was  the  mentorship.     “(Mentors)   sit   down   with   you   twice   a   week   and   go   through   what   you   are   working   on,  issues  you  are  having  and  any  hurdles  you   encounter,â€?  Hoeft  said.       When   discussing   the   biggest   goal   of   the   ÂżUVW WKUHH PRQWKV RI KLV VWDUW XS EXVLQHVV Hoeft   said   the   most   important   part   is   creat-­

Sam Jacquest photo/-DFTXHVW6/#XZZHGX

On Feb. 5, Gov. Scott Walker announced the partnership of the state-level and local economic development corporations, which provide support to local entrepreneurs with start up captial. Senior Andrew Hoeft and Joe Neuman were recipients of a $10,000 Whitewater Capital Catalyst Fund grant, presented to them by the governor. Above, Hoeft and Walker speak after the partnership announcement and award ceremony at Whitewater’s University Technology Park.

ing  your  minimal  viable  product  so  you  have   something  to  present  when  you  pitch  it  to  in-­ vestors  to  show  and  display  your  ideas.       “I  was  fortunate  enough  that  the  developer   we  had  for  the  company  was  all  about  getting   WKH ÂżUVW YHUVLRQ RI \RXU SURGXFW RXW´ +RHIW said.     “Because   of   my   developers   talent,   we   KDGWKHÂżUVWYHUVLRQRIRXUSURGXFWLQDPRQWK Come  launch  day,  we  not  only  had  built  it,  but   we   had   been   testing   it.     Festival   Foods   had   been  using  it  for  a  month.    We  had  seen  very   positive  results  and  even  had  been  having  dis-­ cussing  with  other  grocers  like  Roundy’s.â€?     Since  the  initial  testing  stages,  Hoeft  said   Date  Check  Pro  has  had  early  adopters  of  the   software   and   are   now   focused   on   selling   the   product  to  the  mass  market,  or  more  simply,  as   many  grocers  as  possible. An  entrepreneurial  atmosphere   With  business  like  Hoeft’s  growing  and  re-­ ceiving  grants,  the  entrepreneurial  atmosphere  

in  Whitewater  is  at  an  all-­time  high.    The  op-­ portunities  for  students  to  create  a  small  start   up   business   from   their   ideas   are   now   more   readily  available  than  ever.       “It   is   not   just   hype.   Things   are   happen-­ ing  here,â€?  Hoeft  said.      “There  are  numerous   stages  to  it.    CEO  has  done  a  very  good  job   in  creating  an  environment  where  students  can   feel   safe   in   sharing   their   ideas   and   work   on   building  upon  them.       “The  university  has  created  the  next  step   ZLWK WKLQJV OLNH /DXQFK 3DG DQG PHQWRUVKLS in  order  to  focus  their  ideas.    The  city  and  state   has  taken  the  third  step,  which  is  taking  those   ideas   and   creating   something   and   now,   with   funding,  it  offers  that  opportunity.â€?  $V+RHIWÂżQLVKHVKLVODVWVHPHVWHUDW8: Whitewater,  he  plans  to  continue  working  with   the  university  and  the  city  of  Whitewater  in  the   development  and  expansion  of  his  company. RileyMP30@uww.edu


“The  only  disability  in  life  is  a  bad   attitude.�

WEDNESDAY February  27,  2013

Opinion  Editor: Abbie  Reetz

 -­Scott  Hamilton

PAGE Â 5

Proactive  approach  needed  for  accessibility Royal Purple Editorial  Staff  Opinion

UW-­Whitewater  has  long  been  known  as   one  of  the  most  accessible  campuses  in  Wis-­ consin.  It  is  known  for  taking  strides  to  accom-­ modate  all  students,  regardless  of  impairments. While  our  university  prides  itself  on  being   particularly  accessible  to  students  with  various   impairments,  there  are  many  areas  in  which  it   could  improve.   By   being   proactive   and   addressing   pos-­ sible  problems  before  they  arise,  UW-­White-­ ZDWHUFDQWUXO\EHFRPHDÀDJVKLSVFKRROIRU accessibility. With   the   help   of   junior   Rachel   Nepper,   who  is  familiar  with  accessibility  issues  from   her   own   wheelchair   use,   we   have   assembled   a   list   of   areas   of   improvement   the   university   should  consider  in  regard  to  accessibility. Snow  removal In   the   Wisconsin   winter   season,   classes   aren’t  canceled  on  account  of  a  few  inches  of   snow.   For   students   who   use   wheelchairs   and   scooters  to  travel  across  campus,  poorly  shov-­ eled  walkways  can  be  especially  dangerous. By  ensuring  that  the  various  paths  across   campus   are   shoveled   or   plowed   before   stu-­ dents  have  to  start  their  trek  to  class,  our  uni-­ versity  would  make  it  safer  and  easier  for  all   students  to  get  where  they  need  to  be. Nepper  also  suggested  creating  a  program   where   volunteers   would   be   available   to   help   students   with   wheelchairs   or   scooters   shovel  

out  their  cars  on  snowy  days  or  to  help  if  they   get  stuck  in  the  snow. Classrooms  and  residence  halls Many   classrooms   don’t   have   wheelchair-­ friendly  desks.  Sometimes  the  arrangement  of   FODVVURRPIXUQLWXUHFDQPDNHLWGLI¿FXOWIRUD student  with  mobility  or  vision  impairment  to   navigate  around  the  room. One  way  to  solve  classroom-­related  acces-­ sibility  issues  would  be  to  develop  a  checklist   of   issues   and   solutions   and   apply   it   to   every   classroom  on  campus.   In  the  residence  halls,  a  way  to  improve  ac-­ cessibility  would  be  to  install  adjustable  shelv-­ ing  so  students  can  adjust  things  to  the  height   that  works  best  for  them.   Currently,   Fischer   Hall   residents   can   re-­ quest  for  shelving  to  be  lowered.  These  types   of  options  should  be  available  and  advertised   to  students  in  all  residence  halls. Buildings To  make  each  building  the  most  accessible   it  can  be,  each  one  should  have  more  than  one   wheelchair-­friendly  entrance.   All   bathrooms   and   doorways   should   also   be  accessible  to  those  who  use  wheelchairs.   &XUUHQWO\WKHPDLQÀRRURIWKHOLEUDU\KDV no   wheelchair   accessible   bathrooms.   There   is  no  reason  why  the  bathrooms  in  one  of  the   most-­used   buildings   on   campus   shouldn’t   be   able  to  accommodate  anyone  who  might  need   to  use  them. Finally,  ramps  or  back  up  plans  should  be   instituted  in  buildings  with  elevators  and  stu-­

dents  should  be  educated  about  what  to  do  in   HYHQWRID¿UHRURWKHUHPHUJHQF\ZKHUHHOHYD tor  use  may  not  be  safe. Other  areas Addressing   issues   facing   students   with   mobility  or  vision  impairments  isn’t  the  only   way  our  campus  could  improve  its  overall  ac-­ cessibility. By  requiring  all  movies  shown  on  campus   to  be  captioned,  our  university  could  improve   accessibility   for   deaf   or   hard   of   hearing   stu-­ dents. Additionally,   offering   sign   language   as   a   language   credit   could   help   all   students   un-­ derstand  what  it  is  like  for  those  who  are  deaf   or   hard   of   hearing   and   teach   communication   skills  that  many  companies  look  for  in  poten-­ tial  employees. Although  there  are  areas  that  could  be  im-­ proved,  UW-­Whitewater    (especially  through   the  Center  for  Students  with  Disabilities)  does   a   good   job   of   accommodating   students   with   various  impairments.   Our  campus  offers  a  number  of  things  other   campuses   don’t,   including   disability   parking,   disability  athletics  and  classes  about  disability. A  willingness  to  help  is  perhaps  the  most   important  thing  our  university  offers  students.   Various  departments  assist  students  with  aca-­ GHPLFVDQGKHOSWKHP¿QGMREVDIWHUFROOHJH While  our  campus  does  well  in  many  areas   of  accessibility,  there  is  obvious  room  for  im-­ provement.  We  hope  to  see  the  same  positive   changes   that   occured   after   the   publication   of  

Abbie Reetz photo/5HHW]$0#XZZHGX

Junior Rachel Nepper navigates the snowy sidewalk in front of the Roseman Building on campus.

former  Royal  Purple  staff  member  Katherine   Watson’s  article  about  the  need  for  braille  la-­ bels  in  Starin  Hall.  Watson,  who  has  been  blind   her  entire  life,  addressed  a  much  needed  issue   involving  accessibility,  to  which  the  university   responded.  Let  the  voices  of  those  most  affect-­ ed  by  university  accessibility  be  heard. rp@uww.edu

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EDITOR  IN  CHIEF...................................................................Andrea  Behling MANAGING  EDITOR...............................................................Carley  Rymkus NEWS  EDITOR.....................................................................Samantha  Jacquest ASSISTANT  NEWS  EDITOR.....................................................Michael  Riley OPINION  EDITOR.........................................................................Abbie  Reetz BUSINESS  EDITOR.....................................................................Carrie  Wojcik LIFESTYLE  EDITOR.................................................................Abbey  Bowen ARTS  &  REC  EDITOR.............................................................Ben  Holzhueter SPORTS  EDITOR.............................................................................Zach  Hicks ASSISTANT  SPORTS  EDITOR.........................................Kevin  Cunningham COPY  EDITOR...........................................................................Jonathan  Block COPY  EDITOR.........................................................................Chris  Johannsen PHOTO  EDITOR.....................................................................Dan  Pomykalski GRAPHICS  EDITOR..............................................................Sydney  Michuda FACULTY  ADVISER....................................................................Peter  Janecky

BUSINESS  AND ADVERTISING  STAFF 262-­472-­5100 RPADS@UWW.EDU ADVERTISING  MANAGER.........................................................Lynn  Marolt BUSINESS  MANAGER...............................................................Heena  Ahmed MARKETING  COORDINATOR.............................................Kelsey  Krueger SALES  REPRESENTATIVE.........................................................Joel  Paschen SALES  REPRESENTATIVE........................................................Rachel  Smith CLASSIFIEDS  COORDINATOR..............................................Brad  Gundrum GRAPHIC  DESIGNER................................................................Emily  Lorenz DISTRIBUTION  COORDINATOR................................................Alex  Cizek

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What are some changes you’d like to see on our campus? “Heide  Hall  is  literally   the  oldest  and  jankiest   building  on  campus  and  I   think  it  really  needs  to  be   improved.� -­Tia  Dowding, junior

“I  would  like  Heide  Hall   to  be  renovated.� -­Matt  Rudig, sophomore

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:ULWHUVPXVWLQFOXGHIXOO¿UVWDQG last  name,  address,  year  in  school  or   position   at   the   university   (if   appli-­ cable)  and  a  phone  number.  Contact   information  will  not  be  published  in   the   Royal   Purple.   Unsigned   letters   are  automatically  rejected.          Opinions  expressed  in  letters,  col-­ umns  or  commentaries  are  solely  the   opinion  of  the  author  and  not  neces-­ sarily  the  opinion  of  the  staff  of  the   Royal  Purple  or  UW-­Whitewater. Please  bring  letters  to  the  Royal  Pur-­ ple RI¿FH  8QLYHUVLW\ &HQWHU RU e-­mail  them  to  RP@uww.edu.

“They’ve  done  kind  of  a   half  job  salting  the  ice,   and  it’s  kind  of  a  hazard   for  everybody.� -­Nicole  Marshall, freshman

“Since  I  play  a  lot  of  pool,   one  of  the  things  I’d  prob-­ ably  like  changed  is  that   some  of  the  rails  on  the   pool  tables  are  dead.� -­Tom  Adair, freshman

“I  would  like  hot  showers   in  Wells.�

“It  would  be  pretty  cool   if  Drumlin  opened  before   the  end  of  the  semester.�

-­Zach  Mahlberg, sophomore

-­Allison  Otley, freshman

AN  AWARD-­WINNING  PUBLICATION 2011  ACP  BEST  OF  THE  MIDWEST  CONTEST FOURTH  PLACE “BEST  OF  SHOW�

2010  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST SECOND  PLACE “GENERAL  EXCELLENCE�

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2010  ACP  BEST  OF  THE  MIDWEST  CONTEST THIRD  PLACE “FEATURE  WRITING�

2010  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST FIRST  PLACE “GRAPHICS�

2009  ACP  BEST  OF  THE  MIDWEST  CONTEST FIRST  PLACE “SPORTS  REPORTING�

2010  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST FIRST  PLACE “BEST  EDITORIAL�


WEDNESDAY February  27,  2013

“Ideas  are  like  pizza  dough,  made  to  be   tossed  around.�   -­Anna  Quindlen

Lifestyle  Editor: Abbey  Bowen

PAGE Â 6

The  power  of  pizza     ‘’’‡”•†‡Ž‹˜‡”•ÂŒÂ‘„•ǥ„‡Â?‡Ď?‹–•Ž‘…ƒŽ…Šƒ”‹–‹‡• By Abbey Bowen Lifestyle  Editor

 “We   keep   the   good   people   of   Whitewater   fed   with   good,   cheesy  food,â€?  Founder  and  CEO   of   Toppers   Pizza,   Scott   Gittrich,   said   of   his   business’   role   in   the   community.   Gittrich  was  introduced  to  the   pizza   business   in   1984   when   he   started   delivering   for   Domino’s   Pizza.     He   said   when   he   began   to   pursue  starting  his  own  company,   one   of   his   friends   suggested   he   RSHQKLVÂżUVWVWRUHLQ:KLWHZDWHU  :KHQ WKH ÂżUVW UHVWDXUDQW opened,   Gittrich   mainly   made   breadsticks   that   were   covered   in   a   thin   layer   of   cheese.   After   awhile,  these  breadsticks  became   more   popular,   and   costumers   made  it  known  they  wanted  more   cheese.  This  is  how  “Topperstixâ€?   were  born.     Not   only   is   the   oldest   store   located   here,   Toppers   Pizza   is  

Photo submitted

UW-Whitewater alumnus Scott Gittrich is the founder and CEO of Toppers Pizza. The company’s oldest store and headquarters are in the city of Whitewater.

also  currently   headquartered   in   Whitewater.     “We   aren’t   only   a   Wisconsin   company,   we’re   a   Whitewater   company,�  Gittrich  said.     The   company   is   vital   to   Whitewater’s   economy   because   it   “spring[s]   ‘Whitewater   recog-­

nition’  on  the  map,�  Gittrich  said.     Toppers   Pizza   employs   around  50  to  55  people  in  the  city   of   Whitewater,   many   of   whom   are  students.   The  company  is  also  involved   in   several   charitable   organiza-­ WLRQV LQFOXGLQJ %HWKHO +RXVH

and  the  Whitewater  pantry.     “We   never   say   no   to   philan-­ thropy  groups,�  Gittrich  said.    %HLQJ DQ DOXPQXV RI 8: Whitewater,   Gittrich   said   he   is   always  looking  to  employ  fellow   Warhawks.   In   fact,   over   half   a   dozen   of   Toppers   Pizza   franchi-­ sees  are  UW-­Whitewater  alumni.     The   year   2012   was   a   monu-­ mental   year   for   Toppers   Pizza.   The   company   opened   16   stores   and  was  named  one  of  the  fastest   growing  companies  in  the  restau-­ rant  business.  The  50th  store  has   also  recently  been  built.     To  celebrate  this  success,  the   company   has   launched   a   social   media   contest   titled   “Show   Us   Your  Toppers  Face.�     Manager   of   Marketing   and   6RFLDO 0HGLD %ULGJHW .HHOHU said   participants   are   encouraged   to  upload  a  photo  of  them  doing   their  best  “Toppers  face�  to  Top-­ pers  Pizza’s  Facebook  page.     “The  photos  will  be  put  into  a   ‘March   Madness’   style   bracket,�  

.HHOHU VDLG Âł,I \RXÂśUH FKRVHQ you  win   a   $1,000   Toppers   gift   card.â€?     The  cover  photo  of  the  Face-­ book  page  will  also  change  to  the   winner’s  picture.     Submissions  need  to  be  made   by  March  17.  The  winner  will  be   announced  on  April  9.     “I’m   hoping   someone   from   :KLWHZDWHUZLQV´.HHOHUVDLG %RZHQ$.#XZZHGX

Submissions  for  “Show   Us  Your  Toppers  Face�   can  be  made  here:  

  International  Education  Week  celebrates  ‘common  ground’  By Cassandra Schenck Staff  Writer

Students  who   are   interested   in   studying   abroad  or  want  to  celebrate  international   diversity  can  partake  in  International  Ed-­ ucation  Week  from  Feb.   25  to  March  1.     The   Center   for   Global   Education   is   hosting  the  week  in  or-­ der   to   raise   awareness   about   the   international   opportunities   on   cam-­ Cuevas pus.   “This   year,   we   are   bringing  out  awareness  of  all  the  interna-­ tional  students  and  faculty  on  campus  and   looking   for   ways   to   create   cross-­cultural   dialogue,â€?   Outreach   Coordinator   Erika   Cuevas  said.     Students   who   are   interested   in   learn-­ ing   about   international   opportunities   or   experiencing   new   cultures   can   expect   to   learn  a  lot  this  week,  Cuevas  said.   An   opening   ceremony   took   place   on   Feb.   25.   Chancellor   Richard   Telfer   gave   the   opening   remarks   and   Siempre   Fla-­ menco,   a   dance   company   from   Milwau-­ kee,  performed.     Other  events  include  a  showing  of  the   ÂżOPÂł&URVVLQJ%RUGHUV´JDPHVRILQWHU national   trivia,   a   global   experience   fair,   D ÂżQDQFLDO DLG ZRUNVKRS DQG DQ LQWHUQD tional  dinner.

 “This  week  is  for  U.S.  students  and  in-­ ternational  students  to  come  together  and   ÂżQGFRPPRQJURXQGLQVWHDGRIORRNLQJDW differences,â€?  Cuevas  said.   Cuevas   works   with   international   fac-­ ulty   and   visiting   scholars   who   are   doing   collaborative   research   with   UW-­Whitewater   professors.   She   said   that   her   experience   studying   abroad   in   school   helped   KHUWRJHWLQWKHZRUNÂżHOG she  is  in  today.        Administrative  Special-­ Auerbach ist  for  the  Center  for  Glob-­ al  Education,  Mikaela  Au-­ erbach,   said   she   is   also   excited   to   help   with   International   Education   Week   for   students   who   want   to   learn   about   study-­ ing  abroad.     “Students   who   study   abroad   get   to   immerse  themselves  in  a  new  country  and   get  to  see  things  in  a  new  way,â€?  Auerbach   said.  “It  makes  you  grow  personally  and   helps   you   to   become   more   independent   and   adaptable,   which   is   something   that   future   employers   really   like   to   see   as   well.â€?        Students  who  are  interested  in  study-­ ing  abroad  have  many  different  places  to   choose  from,  depending  on  how  long  they   want  to  go  or  what  they  want  to  study.   UW-­Whitewater   offers   a   semester   or   yearly   study   abroad   trip,   international   short-­term   faculty   led   programs,   or   stu-­

dent  teaching   abroad   for   education   ma-­ jors.   Per   year,   approximately   300   UW-­ Whitewater   students   study   abroad   through  one  of  these  programs.       One   student   who   had   the   opportunity   to   experience   studying   DEURDG ZDV VHQLRU %ULWW Asbach.             She   traveled   the   en-­ tire   coast   of   Ireland   in   2012  for  over  two  weeks   and    had  the  opportunity   to   stay   longer   and   back-­ Asbach pack  around  Europe  with   a   few   friends.   She   trav-­ eled  to  London,  Rome  and  Paris.     “I   wanted   to   study   abroad,   because   my   parents   had   always   stressed   the   im-­ portance   of   international   travel   as   I   was   growing  up,�  Asbach  said.         Asbach’s   mother   graduated   from   UW-­Whitewater  and  traveled  to  Switzer-­ land   to   work   for   a   few   years   before   re-­ turning  back  to  America.             “My   childhood   is   full   of   memories   of  meeting  and  hosting  foreign  exchange   students  at  my  home,  and  I  really  wanted   the  opportunity  to  cultivate  my  own  life-­ long  relationships  abroad,�  Asbach  said.     She   said   the   best   part   of   studying   abroad  was  getting  to  visit  beautiful  plac-­ es   and   seeing   the   mountains   and   seaside   landscape.     “Ireland   was   a   piece   of   heaven   for  

me,�  Asbach  said.  “I  also  loved  being  im-­ mersed   in   the   hustle   and   bustle   of   Dub-­ lin  city,  but  I  also  admired  the  quiet  little   towns  that  we  would  pass  through.�     If   she   could   give   encouragement   to   other   students   who   are   thinking   about   studying   abroad,  Asbach   said   it   was   one   of   the   biggest   highlights   of   her   college   career,   and   that   there   is   an   amazing   op-­ portunity   to   learn   and   appreciate   people   that  are  different  from  what  we  know.   6FKHQFN&-#XZZHGX

For  more  information  about   International  Education  Week  or the  Center  for  Global  Education:  

Sydney Michuda graphic/0LFKXGD6.#XZZHGX


Lifestyle

Dateline Page 7 Here Royal Purple

Management Analyst: The City of Whitewater is seeking an organized, positive and energetic individual to serve as the Management Analyst for the City Manager’s Office. Position will support the work of the City Manager and the City’s Management Team under the direction of the City Manager. Qualified candidates will have a minimum of 3 years of office/clerical experience. Additional education with an emphasis in business management, public/city management, HR management, or a related field may be substituted for work experience. Experience with Microsoft Office software and strong organizational and communication skills are a must. Duties include administrative support functions in maintaining the operations of the City Manager’s Office. This includes general clerical duties, project management, policy research and analysis, website content administration, human resources, and more. Approximately 20 hours per week year round. Salary: $10.00 - $12.00 per hour DOE. Applications are available online at www.whitewater-wi.gov. If you would like to be a part of a dynamic work team in a University town setting please submit a completed job application, resume with cover letter, and three or more references by Friday, March 15. Send application to: City Hall Attn: Nancy Stanford 312 West Whitewater Street Whitewater, WI 53190 -ornstanford@whitewater-wi.gov The City of Whitewater is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

It’s Not a Big Deal: Courageous Conversations about Race and Racism Monday, March 4th at 5pm UC Old Main Ballroom 275A Students will learn about White privilege and microaggressions, which are more common, subtle forms of racism. All efforts to curb racism must begin with a discussion, so this event takes that first step.

HOROSCOPES Capricorn, 12/22-­1/19 It’s  time  to  buckle   down  and  focus  on  your   studies  this  week.   Midterms  are  just   around  the  corner.  

Cancer, 6/22-­7/22 Who  says  you  can’t   have  your  cake  and  eat  it   too?  You’ve  been   working  really  hard  this   week,  it’s  time  you   EHQH¿WIURP\RXU success.  

Aquarius, 1/20-­2/18 Try  to  cut  down  on  all   the  junk  food  you’ve   come  accustomed  to   eating  while  you  study.   Carrots  and  avocados   promote  brain  activity.

Leo, 7/23-­8/22 You  have  always  been  a   “giver,”  especially  when   it  comes  to  your   VLJQL¿FDQWRWKHU0DNH sure  you  are  truly  getting   back  all  you  give  this   week.  

Pisces, 2/19-­3/20 Your  true  heart’s  desires   will  never  lie.  If  you   have  a  gut  feeling  about   something,  you  need  to   go  after  it.  

Virgo, 8/23-­9/22 You’ve  been  trying   really  hard  to  be  the   best  at  everything  this   week.  Take  a  break  and   focus  on  being  yourself   instead.  

Aries, 3/21-­4/19 Perfection  comes  with   a  heavy  price.  Save   some  theoretical  money   this  week,  and  don’t  be   afraid  to  make  some   mistakes.  

Libra, 9/23-­10/22 Remember,  life  is  what   happens  while  you’re   waiting  for  something   “amazing”  to  happen.  

Taurus, 4/20-­5/20 Don’t  let  anyone  tell   you  your  dreams  are   out  of  reach.  Only  you   can  build  the  ladder   that  will  ultimately  lead   to  your  success.  

Scorpio, 10/23-­11/21 Make  sure  you  take   the  time  to  appreciate   everyone  in  your  life  this   week.  They  deserve  to   know  how  much  they   mean  to  you.  

If You Really Knew Me Tuesday, March 5th at 5pm Warhawk Connection Center Students will learn about respectful exchange or interaction between members of different cultural backgrounds or worldviews. Students will develop understanding of diverse perspectives and how to connect with individuals of different backgrounds.

The Wall of Prejudice

Closing Ceremony

March 5th- March 8th Outside the Fiskum Art Gallery in the UC

Friday, March 8th from 12 to 3pm Warhawk Connection Center

This will be a place for students to write names that they have been called. It will represent words used everyday to discriminate against others. The purpose is to create conversation about prejudice that exists in our community. The wall will be broken down at the closing ceremony on Friday.

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com February 27, 2013

This event will wrap up the week’s activities. There will be free food, speakers, debriefing through discussions, and the Wall of Prejudice will be torn down.

Gemini, 5/21-­6/21 It’s  time  to  stop  being   so  absent-­minded.  Try   really  hard  to  pay  all  of   your  bills  on  time  this   month.  

Sagittarius, 11/22-­12/21 What’s  life  if  you  live   every  day  picking  a   SDUW\RXUÀDZV"6WDUW appreciating  your   imperfections  this  week,   they  are  what  makes  you   beautiful.  

Co-ed YMCA summer camp *Hiring college students

30 minutes south of Whitewater *Work with youth in beautiful camp setting *Salary, room, board provided

Counselor & Office Positions, Lifeguards preferred. June 19 - August 27. Great chance to gain experience

Contact: Don, YMCA Camp MacLean, Burlington , WI 847-410-5340 or denger@ymcachicago.org


WEDNESDAY “I  think  there  is  no  world  without   theatre.�  -­Edward  Bond

February  27,  2013

Arts  &  Rec  Editor: Ben  Holzhueter

PAGE Â 8

uw-w's new musical showcases senior By Jake Magee Staff  Writer

UW-­Whitewater  student   Jacob   Lesh   KDV GUHDPHG RI KDYLQJ D UROH LQ Âł7KH 'URZV\ &KDSHURQH´ VLQFH KH ÂżUVW VDZ LW DV D IUHVKPDQ LQ KLJK VFKRRO 1RZ DV D college   senior   preparing   to   graduate,   his   dream   has   become   a   reality,   as   he   will   star  as  the  lead  role  in  this  unique  musical   FRPHG\ Âł7KLV LV P\ IDYRULWH PXVLFDO RI DOO WLPH´ /HVK VDLG Âł,ÂśYH DOZD\V ZDQWHG WR GRWKLV´ “The  Drowsy  Chaperoneâ€?  will  be  per-­ IRUPHG DW  SP HYHU\ QLJKW WKURXJK 0DUFKLQWKH%DUQHWW7KHDWUH7LFNHWVDUH $12  for  general  admission,  $10  for  seniors   ROGHU WKDQ   IRU FKLOGUHQ DQG  IRU8::KLWHZDWHUVWXGHQWVZLWKDQ,'

Dan Pomykalski photo/3RP\NDOVNL'-#XZZHGX

Senior Jake Lesh stars as Man in Chair. Lesh said this was his, “favorite musical of all time.�

“Eighty  Days:   Nellie   Bly   and   Elizabeth  Bisland’s  History-­Making   Race   Around   the   Worldâ€?   by   Mat-­ thew   Goodman   is   one   of   the   best   QRQÂżFWLRQERRNV,ÂśYHHYHUUHDG 'R\RXOLNHDFWLRQ",VLQWHUQD WLRQDO WUDYHO RQH RI \RXU IDYRULWH topics?  Are  you  a  big  fan  of  history,   journalism  or  women’s  rights?   ,I \RX DQVZHUHG \HV WR DQ\ RI those  questions,  then  “Eighty  Days:   Nellie   Bly   and   Elizabeth   Bisland’s   History-­Making   Race   Around   the   Worldâ€?   by   Matthew   Goodman   is   GHÂżQLWHO\DERRN\RXVKRXOGFKHFN RXW This   book   is   a   masterpiece   of   QRQÂżFWLRQ GHWDLOLQJ WKH UDFH EH tween  Nellie  Bly  and  Elizabeth  Bis-­ ODQGWZRRI$PHULFDÂśVÂżUVWIDPRXV female  journalists,  to  see  who  could   WUDYHODOOWKHZD\DURXQGWKHZRUOG ÂżUVW ,Q D WLPH ZKHUH LW ZDV XQFRP PRQHQRXJKIRUZRPHQWROHDYHWKH

The  musical   tells   the   story   of   Man   in   Chair,   played   by   Lesh,   who   has   a   1920s   PXVLFDO FRPH WR OLIH LQ KLV DSDUWPHQW )HDWXULQJ XSEHDW PXVLF H[WUDYDJDQW FRV tumes   and   crazy   dance   numbers,   “The   'URZV\ &KDSHURQH´ SURYLGHV DQ H\H LQWR the  world  of  musicals  in  the  Roaring  ’20s   ZLWKDFRPLFDOWZLVW Âł, WKLQN RQH RI WKH PRVW LQWHUHVWLQJ things  about  this  show  is  that  it’s  a  musical   WKDW SDURGLHV PXVLFDOV´ /HVK VDLG Âł7KH musical   pieces   rise   in   ridiculousness   and   RYHUWKHWRSKLODULW\LQDQLJKWWKHDWHUJR HUVDUHVXUHWRQHYHUIRUJHW´ 'LUHFWRU &KDUOHV *URYHU VDLG KH EH OLHYHVWKHSURGXFWLRQLVPRUHHQWHUWDLQLQJ WKDQLWLVDQ\WKLQJHOVH Âł,WÂśV JRW D YHU\ WRQJXHLQFKHHN DWWL tude   about   it,   which   makes   it   engaging,â€?   *URYHU VDLG Âł,WÂśV D GHOLJKW WR JR WR UH KHDUVDOHYHU\QLJKW´ Last  year,  Lesh  played  the  lead  role  in   “The  Edwin  Booth  Company  Presentsâ€?  an   original   production   written   and   directed   E\ DFWLQJ SURIHVVRU $QJHOD ,DQQRQH WKDW made  its  world  premiere  at  UW-­Whitewa-­ WHU7KHSURGXFWLRQWROGDVWRU\UHYROYLQJ around  tragic  actor  Edwin  Booth  who  was   RYHUVKDGRZHG LQ KLVWRU\ because   of   his   brother   -RKQ:LONHV%RRWK Lesh  and  the  rest  of  the   cast   had   the   opportunity   to  perform  a  stage  reading   of   the   play   in   New   York   in   Edwin   Booth’s   actual   Lesh KRPH +RZHYHU UHKHDUV als   began   for   “The   Drowsy   Chaperoneâ€?   while  Lesh  was  still  out  east,  putting  him  a   few  days  behind  the  rest  of  the  cast  by  the   WLPHKHJRWEDFN Âł,WZDVDQRWKHUFKDOOHQJHWKDW,KDGWR

house  without  a  chaperone,  Bly  and   %LVODQGERWKWUDYHOHGWKHHQWLUHGLV tance   around   the   globe   alone,   Bly   ZDVWUDYHOLQJDVDQHZVSDSHUUHSRUW er   for   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;New   York   World,â&#x20AC;?   and   %LVODQG ZDV WUDYHOLQJ RQ EHKDOI RI â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cosmopolitanâ&#x20AC;?   magazine,   a   com-­ pletely   different   publication   from   how   we   know   it   today,   competing   to  see  who  would   make   it   back   to   1HZ<RUNÂżUVW , GRQÂśW RIWHQ Commentary by UHDG QRQÂżFWLRQ Abbie Reetz Opinion Editor ERRNV DV ,ÂśP D much   bigger   fan   RI QRYHOV EXW , UHDOO\ ORYHG WKLV ERRN Goodman   included   a   lot   of   ac-­ tual   dialogue   and   interesting   infor-­ mation  that  made  it  read  like  a  work   RIÂżFWLRQ$VDMRXUQDOLVPQHUGDQG ORYHURIKLVWRU\WKHWRSLFVZHUHULJKW

Dan Pomykalski photo/3RP\NDOVNL'-#XZZHGX

Student performers rehearse a scene from â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Droswy Chaperone.â&#x20AC;? The musical provides an eye into the world of musicals in the Roaring â&#x20AC;&#x2122;20s. It will run nightly at 7:30 p.m. until March 2 in the Barnett Theatre.

RYHUFRPH´/HVKVDLGÂł,KDGWRJLYHLWP\ DOOWREHRQWKHVDPHSDJHWKDWHYHU\ERG\ LVQRZ´ /HVK DWWULEXWHV KLV ORYH RI DFWLQJ WR WKHH[SHULHQFHVKHKDGJRLQJWRWKHPRY LHV HYHU\ ZHHNHQG ZLWK his  father   when   he   was   \RXQJ/HVKVDLGWKHVXS SRUW DQG ORYH KH UHFHLYHV IURPKLVIDPLO\JLYHVKLP that  extra  boost  to  pursue   KLVSDVVLRQ Âł$V DQ LQGLYLGXDO , Grover KDYHEHHQVREOHVVHGZLWK family  and  friends  and  supporters  who  just   VD\Âľ,WKLQNWKLVLVIRU\RXDQG\RXÂśUHUH ally   going   in   the   right   direction,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   Lesh   VDLG Âł,WÂśV EHHQ D UHDOO\ DZHVRPH RSSRU WXQLW\ WR KDYH DOO WKHVH SHRSOH ZKR WUXO\

XSP\DOOH\ 7KHUHLVSOHQW\RIDFWLRQ,ZDV RQ WKH HGJH RI P\ VHDW DV , UHDG about  harrowing  train  rides,  charac-­ ters   rushing   to   catch   ships   on   time   DQGDOORIWKHRWKHUWULDOVWKDWWUDYHO EULQJV7KHGHVFULSWLRQVRIWKHSODF HV %O\ DQG %LVODQG WUDYHOHG WR DUH enough  to  make  anyone  come  down   ZLWKDEDGFDVHRIZDQGHUOXVW The  details  about  the  characters   DQGWKHSODFHVWKH\WUDYHODUHFRORU IXODQGH[FLWLQJ<RXUHDOO\IHHOOLNH you   get   to   know   Bly,   Bisland   and   PDQ\RWKHUKLVWRULFDO¿JXUHV $QRWKHUWKLQJ,WKRXJKWZDVH[ tremely  interesting  was  the  intimate   look  at  what  life  was  like  for  women   LQWKHODWHV One   of   the   main   comments   Goodman   says   newspapers   of   the   WLPHPDGHDERXW%O\DVVKHWUDYHOHG was  that  it  was  amazing  she  was  able   WRWUDYHODURXQGWKHZRUOGZLWKRQO\ one  bag  instead  of  the  ten  trunks  an-­ RWKHU ZRPDQ ZRXOG KDYH W\SLFDOO\ XVHG

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WEDNESDAY â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  there  is  no  world  without   theatre.â&#x20AC;?  -­Edward  Bond

February  27,  2013

Arts  &  Rec  Editor: Ben  Holzhueter

PAGE Â 8

uw-w's new musical showcases senior By Jake Magee Staff  Writer

UW-­Whitewater  student   Jacob   Lesh   KDV GUHDPHG RI KDYLQJ D UROH LQ Âł7KH 'URZV\ &KDSHURQH´ VLQFH KH ÂżUVW VDZ LW DV D IUHVKPDQ LQ KLJK VFKRRO 1RZ DV D college   senior   preparing   to   graduate,   his   dream   has   become   a   reality,   as   he   will   star  as  the  lead  role  in  this  unique  musical   FRPHG\ Âł7KLV LV P\ IDYRULWH PXVLFDO RI DOO WLPH´ /HVK VDLG Âł,ÂśYH DOZD\V ZDQWHG WR GRWKLV´ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Drowsy  Chaperoneâ&#x20AC;?  will  be  per-­ IRUPHG DW  SP HYHU\ QLJKW WKURXJK 0DUFKLQWKH%DUQHWW7KHDWUH7LFNHWVDUH $12  for  general  admission,  $10  for  seniors   ROGHU WKDQ   IRU FKLOGUHQ DQG  IRU8::KLWHZDWHUVWXGHQWVZLWKDQ,'

Dan Pomykalski photo/3RP\NDOVNL'-#XZZHGX

Senior Jake Lesh stars as Man in Chair. Lesh said this was his, â&#x20AC;&#x153;favorite musical of all time.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eighty  Days:   Nellie   Bly   and   Elizabeth  Bislandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  History-­Making   Race   Around   the   Worldâ&#x20AC;?   by   Mat-­ thew   Goodman   is   one   of   the   best   QRQÂżFWLRQERRNV,ÂśYHHYHUUHDG 'R\RXOLNHDFWLRQ",VLQWHUQD WLRQDO WUDYHO RQH RI \RXU IDYRULWH topics?  Are  you  a  big  fan  of  history,   journalism  or  womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  rights?   ,I \RX DQVZHUHG \HV WR DQ\ RI those  questions,  then  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eighty  Days:   Nellie   Bly   and   Elizabeth   Bislandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   History-­Making   Race   Around   the   Worldâ&#x20AC;?   by   Matthew   Goodman   is   GHÂżQLWHO\DERRN\RXVKRXOGFKHFN RXW This   book   is   a   masterpiece   of   QRQÂżFWLRQ GHWDLOLQJ WKH UDFH EH tween  Nellie  Bly  and  Elizabeth  Bis-­ ODQGWZRRI$PHULFDÂśVÂżUVWIDPRXV female  journalists,  to  see  who  could   WUDYHODOOWKHZD\DURXQGWKHZRUOG ÂżUVW ,Q D WLPH ZKHUH LW ZDV XQFRP PRQHQRXJKIRUZRPHQWROHDYHWKH

The  musical   tells   the   story   of   Man   in   Chair,   played   by   Lesh,   who   has   a   1920s   PXVLFDO FRPH WR OLIH LQ KLV DSDUWPHQW )HDWXULQJ XSEHDW PXVLF H[WUDYDJDQW FRV tumes   and   crazy   dance   numbers,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   'URZV\ &KDSHURQH´ SURYLGHV DQ H\H LQWR the  world  of  musicals  in  the  Roaring  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;20s   ZLWKDFRPLFDOWZLVW Âł, WKLQN RQH RI WKH PRVW LQWHUHVWLQJ things  about  this  show  is  that  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  musical   WKDW SDURGLHV PXVLFDOV´ /HVK VDLG Âł7KH musical   pieces   rise   in   ridiculousness   and   RYHUWKHWRSKLODULW\LQDQLJKWWKHDWHUJR HUVDUHVXUHWRQHYHUIRUJHW´ 'LUHFWRU &KDUOHV *URYHU VDLG KH EH OLHYHVWKHSURGXFWLRQLVPRUHHQWHUWDLQLQJ WKDQLWLVDQ\WKLQJHOVH Âł,WÂśV JRW D YHU\ WRQJXHLQFKHHN DWWL tude   about   it,   which   makes   it   engaging,â&#x20AC;?   *URYHU VDLG Âł,WÂśV D GHOLJKW WR JR WR UH KHDUVDOHYHU\QLJKW´ Last  year,  Lesh  played  the  lead  role  in   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Edwin  Booth  Company  Presentsâ&#x20AC;?  an   original   production   written   and   directed   E\ DFWLQJ SURIHVVRU $QJHOD ,DQQRQH WKDW made  its  world  premiere  at  UW-­Whitewa-­ WHU7KHSURGXFWLRQWROGDVWRU\UHYROYLQJ around  tragic  actor  Edwin  Booth  who  was   RYHUVKDGRZHG LQ KLVWRU\ because   of   his   brother   -RKQ:LONHV%RRWK Lesh  and  the  rest  of  the   cast   had   the   opportunity   to  perform  a  stage  reading   of   the   play   in   New   York   in   Edwin   Boothâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   actual   Lesh KRPH +RZHYHU UHKHDUV als   began   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Drowsy   Chaperoneâ&#x20AC;?   while  Lesh  was  still  out  east,  putting  him  a   few  days  behind  the  rest  of  the  cast  by  the   WLPHKHJRWEDFN Âł,WZDVDQRWKHUFKDOOHQJHWKDW,KDGWR

house  without  a  chaperone,  Bly  and   %LVODQGERWKWUDYHOHGWKHHQWLUHGLV tance   around   the   globe   alone,   Bly   ZDVWUDYHOLQJDVDQHZVSDSHUUHSRUW er   for   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;New   York   World,â&#x20AC;?   and   %LVODQG ZDV WUDYHOLQJ RQ EHKDOI RI â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cosmopolitanâ&#x20AC;?   magazine,   a   com-­ pletely   different   publication   from   how   we   know   it   today,   competing   to  see  who  would   make   it   back   to   1HZ<RUNÂżUVW , GRQÂśW RIWHQ Commentary by UHDG QRQÂżFWLRQ Abbie Reetz Opinion Editor ERRNV DV ,ÂśP D much   bigger   fan   RI QRYHOV EXW , UHDOO\ ORYHG WKLV ERRN Goodman   included   a   lot   of   ac-­ tual   dialogue   and   interesting   infor-­ mation  that  made  it  read  like  a  work   RIÂżFWLRQ$VDMRXUQDOLVPQHUGDQG ORYHURIKLVWRU\WKHWRSLFVZHUHULJKW

Dan Pomykalski photo/3RP\NDOVNL'-#XZZHGX

Student performers rehearse a scene from â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Droswy Chaperone.â&#x20AC;? The musical provides an eye into the world of musicals in the Roaring â&#x20AC;&#x2122;20s. It will run nightly at 7:30 p.m. until March 2 in the Barnett Theatre.

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WEDNESDAY “Some are  born  great,  some  achieve   greatness,  and  some  have  greatness   thrust  upon  them.”

February 27,  2013

:LOOLDP6KDNHVSHDUH

Kevin Cunningham

Sports Editor: Zach  Hicks

Assistant Editor: PAGE  10

Pilon ascends  to  new  heights

Amanda Ong photo/2QJ$#XZZHGX

Melanie Pilon begins to sprint down the runway at practice. A former football player, Pilon is expected to be an All-American this season.

Feature By Erik Lewis 6WDII:ULWHU

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Men win WIAC, look to NCAA Tournament Men’s Hoops By Jenny Dupuis 6WDII:ULWHU

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Sports

Dateline Page 11Here Royal Purple

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com Februaryy 27, 2013

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks fall short in overtime to UW-­SP Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hoops By Andrea Sidlauskas Staff  Writer

Jenny DuPuis photo/'X3XLV-&#XZZHGX

Mary Merg, right, looks to make a move past a UW-Stevens Point defender during Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s WIAC Championship game. 4LYNZHURHWVPU[LY^P[OSLZZ[OHUĂ&#x201E;]LZLJVUKZSLM[[VZLUK[OLNHTLPU[VV]LY[PTL;OLÂş/H^RZMLSSPUV]LY[PTL

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The  nine-­game  winning  streak   held  by  the  UW-­Whitewater  wom-­ enâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   basketball   team   was   snapped   Sunday   in   the   WIAC   tournament   championship   game   against   UW-­ Stevens  Point,  76-­71. After   defeating   UW-­Superior   RQ )ULGD\ LQ WKH :,$& VHPLÂżQDO game,   the   Warhawks,   ranked   No.   22  in  the  latest  D3hoops.com  top-­ 25   poll,   used   their   momentum   to   propel  them  into  Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  champi-­ onship   game,   where   they   took   an   early   10-­0   lead   against   UW-­Ste-­ vens   Point,   ranked   No.   18   in   the   latest  D3hoops.com  top-­25  poll.   The   Pointers   were   not   willing   WR JR GRZQ ZLWKRXW D ÂżJKW KRZ ever,  and  captured  the  lead  by  half-­ time.   7KHÂś+DZNVFRQWLQXHGWRÂżJKW back,   and   a   3-­pointer   by   Mary   0HUJZLWKÂżYHVHFRQGVUHPDLQLQJ sent  the  game  into  overtime.   Despite  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  effort,  they   were  never  able  to  take  the  lead  in   overtime.  The  Pointers  were  victo-­ rious  and  the  win  guaranteed  a  bid   in   the   upcoming   NCAA   tourna-­ ment  for  the  seventh  straight  year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   felt   like   we   really   com-­ peted  and  gave  it  our  best  effort,â&#x20AC;?   head   coach   Keri   Carollo   said   of   Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   game.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   have   no   ques-­ tion   that   we   gave   it   everything   we  could,  and  we  did  the  best  we  

could  under  the  circumstances.â&#x20AC;? Carollo,  in  her  11th  season  with   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks,   became   the   eighth   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   basketball   coach   in   WIAC   history   to   win   200   games.   She  has  led  the  team  to  three  titles   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  in  2008,  2010  and  2013.   The   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   are   coming   off   of  an  exceptional  season,  winning   their   conference   with   a   record   of   21-­6  overall.  They  will  try  to  con-­ tinue   as   far   as   possible   into   the   NCAA   tournament,   using   their   most   recent   loss   as   fuel   to   over-­ come  their  next  opponent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   just   going   to   work   harder   at   everything   that   needs   to   be   improved,â&#x20AC;?   junior   guard   Kait-­ lyn  Thill  said. Thill  ranks  third  in  school  his-­ tory   for   most   steals   with   197   and   has   been   an   essential   component   to   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   success   thus   far.   Meanwhile,   senior   center   Cortney   Kumerow   was   named   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Basketball   Athlete   of   the   Week   Feb.  11.   Kumerowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   19-­19   free   throw   shooting  is  ranked  No.  2  in  WIAC   KLVWRU\DQGVKHÂżQLVKHGWKHVHDVRQ as  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  leading  scorer  and   rebounder.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cortneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   always   a   force   through   the   paint,   even   if   she   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   scoring   a   lot,â&#x20AC;?   Carollo   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   both   [Kumerow   and   Thill]   done   an   outstanding   job   really   carrying   the   team   all   year   long.â&#x20AC;?   SidlauskAM06@uww.edu

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Dateline Here February 27, 2013 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

Sports

3 Royal Purple Page 12

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks  look  to  rebound  after   disappointing  loss  to  UW-­â&#x20AC;?SP

Tennis  team  1-­1  on  weekend

Commentary

Sumitted photo

Freshman Jake Humphreys, above, won all three of his matches on Saturday, Feb. 23 in Greencastle, Ind. The Warhawks lost six to three to Case Wesern Reserve and defeated DePauw University eight to one.

While  fans  watch  the  rest  of  the   Division  I  college  basketball  season   DQG ORRN WR ÂżQG RXW ZKDW VHHG WKH Wisconsin   Badgers   will   receive   on   6HOHFWLRQ6XQGD\ March   Madness   FRPHV HDUO\ IRU Division  III  wom-­ enâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  basketball. The   War-­ hawks   won   the   :,$& UHJXODU By Kevin VHDVRQ WLWOH VR Cunningham the   team   hosted   Assistant Sports Editor WKH :,$& WRXU nament   this   past   ZHHNHQG EXW FRXOG QRW SXOO RXW the   postseason   title.   The   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   IHOO VKRUW 6XQGD\ )HE  WR 8: Stevens  Point  76-­71  in  an  overtime   thriller.  The  team  did  not  receive  an   DXWRPDWLFELGLQWRWKH1&$$7RXU QDPHQWVRWKHÂś+DZNVKDGWRZLVK IRU DQ DWODUJH ELG LQWR WKH ÂżHOG RI  7KH WHDPÂśV ZLVK FDPH WUXH DQG RQ 0RQGD\ )HE  8: :KLWHZDWHUZLOOKRVW:LVFRQVLQ/X WKHUDQ&ROOHJHLQWKHÂżUVWURXQGRI WKH 1&$$ 7RXUQDPHQW RQ )ULGD\ 0DUFK  LQ .DFKHO *\PQDVLXP 7KH:DUULRUVFRPHLQWRWKHWRXUQD PHQW ZLWK D  UHFRUG DQG KDYH won   their   last   17   games.  The  War-­ ULRUV DUH WKH SURWRW\SLFDO WHDP WKDW LVÂłRQÂżUH´HQWHULQJSRVWVHDVRQSOD\ KDYLQJZRQWKHLUODVWQLQHJDPHVE\ GRXEOHGLJLWV 7KH\ IHDWXUH VHQLRU JXDUG 6KD YRQ 'LOORQ ZKR DYHUDJHV  SRLQWV  UHERXQGV DQG  DVVLVWV SHU JDPH 7KH Âś+DZNV ZLOO OLNHO\ FRXQWHU 'LOORQ ZLWK WKUHHWLPH:, $&$OO 'HIHQVLYH WHDP PHPEHU .DLWO\Q7KLOO7KLOOOHDGV8::LQ FDUHHUVWHDOVZLWK One   of   the   aspects   that   makes   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   a   legitimate   national   FRQWHQGHU LV WKHLU SUHVVXULQJ GH IHQVH :LWK  JLUOV RQ WKH URVWHU head   coach   Keri   Carollo   likes   to   XWLOL]HKHUGHSWKE\PDNLQJKHUWHDP SOD\DQXSWHPSRVW\OHXVLQJDORWRI VXEVWLWXWLRQVWKURXJKRXWWKHJDPH 7KH Âś+DZNV DOVR IHDWXUH &RUW QH\ .XPHURZ D IRRWLQFK VH

QLRUFHQWHUZKRLVRQHRIWZRSOD\HUV LQ :DUKDZN KLVWRU\ WR VFRUH  FDUHHU SRLQWV JUDE  UHERXQGV DQGUHFRUGEORFNV7KH6SDUWDQV KDYH.ULVWLQ6FKXO]DIRRWLQFK sophomore  who  will  be  able  to  give   .XPHURZ D ORRN GHIHQVLYHO\ WKDW she  has  not  seen  often  this  season. ,I WKH :,$& UHJXODU VHDVRQ champions   can   keep   their   defen-­ VLYH SUHVVXUH WR D PD[LPXP ZKLOH XWLOL]LQJ .XPHURZ GRZQ ORZ WKH Âś+DZNV VKRXOG PRYH RQWR WKH VHF RQG URXQG ,I WKH WHDP FDQ JHW WR WKHVHFRQGURXQGWKH\ZLOOKRVWWKH winner   of   Thomas   More   College    DQG&DUWKDJH&ROOHJH   RQ6DWXUGD\0DUFK Thomas   More   has   been   ranked   LQWKHWRSRIWKHGKRRSVFRPWRS  SROO WKURXJKRXW WKH VHDVRQ DQG are  the  favorite  moving  onto  the  sec-­ RQGURXQG7KH6DLQWVIHDWXUHWKUHH SOD\HUV RQ WKHLU $OO&RQIHUHQFH WHDP DQG KDYH ORVW MXVW RQH JDPH DOOVHDVRQWRWKH1RUDQNHG&DO vin   College   Saints.  The   Saints   also   FRPH LQWR WKH WRXUQDPHQW ZLQQLQJ WKHLUODVWJDPHV 2QHZD\WKHÂś+DZNVPD\KDYH DQHGJHRYHUWKH1RUDQNHGWHDP RQ 6DWXUGD\ LI WKH PDWFKXS GRHV RFFXU LV WKH WUDYHO IDFWRU 7KRPDV 0RUHLVIURP&UHVWYLHZ+LOOV.\ VR D SRVVLEOH MHW ODJ HIIHFW FRXOG take   place.   Looking   ahead   past   the   ÂżUVWZHHNHQGRIJDPHVWKHÂś+DZNV GUHZDUHJLRQWKDWGRHVQÂśWVXLWWKHP H[WUHPHO\IDYRUDEO\ (DFK UHJLRQ IHDWXUHV  WHDPV ZLWK  WHDPV PDNLQJ WKH HQWLUH WRXUQDPHQW 7KH ÂżQDO WHDP IURP HDFK UHJLRQ PDNHV WKH )LQDO )RXU ZKHUHWKHODVWIRXUUHPDLQLQJWHDPV ZLOO EDWWOH IRU WKH ',,, 1DWLRQDO &KDPSLRQVKLSLQ+ROODQG0,7KH other   top   teams   in   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   re-­ JLRQ DUH 1R  +RSH &ROOHJH 1R  &DOYLQ &ROOHJH DQG 1R  2KLR 1RUWKHUQ 8QLYHUVLW\ 7KHVH WKUHH MXJJHUQDXWVKDYHORVWDWRWDORIÂżYH JDPHV FRPELQHG WKURXJKRXW WKH UHJXODUVHDVRQ The  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  road  to  the  cham-­ SLRQVKLS ZRQÂśW EH HDV\ +RZHYHU ZLWKSOD\HUVOLNH7KLOODQG.XPHURZ RQWKHLUVLGHDQ\WKLQJLVSRVVLEOH,W PLJKWMXVWEHWKHLU\HDU &XQQLQJK.7#XZZHGX

Bramblett Chamber Series Presents

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Tuesday, March 5 - 7:30 pm Sound Bites 6:30 pm main lobby Tickets Gen pub. $22 UW-W Students $9.25

Tickets 262-472-2222 www.uww.edu/youngauditorium

February 27, 2013 Issue  
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