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February  20,  2013

www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

Eating   ’Hawks disorders   growing   in  US     By Kevin Cunningham Asistant  Sports  Editor

By Samantha Jacquest News  Editor

Nearly   20   million   women   and   10  million  men  will  suffer  from  a   ³FOLQLFDOO\ VLJQL¿FDQW´ HDWLQJ GLV order   at   some   point   in   their   lives,   according   to   the   National   Eating   Disorder   Asso-­ ciation.       Forty-­two   percent   of   girls   LQ ¿UVW WR WKLUG grade   want   to   be   thinner.   Forty-­six   percent  of  nine  to   Mallin 11-­year-­old   said   WKH\ ³VRPHWLPHV´ RU ³YHU\ RIWHQ´ diet. University   Health   and   Coun-­ seling   Services   is   preparing   for   National   Eating   Disorder   Aware-­ ness  Week  to  help  bring  awareness   to  this  major  health  concern. 7KLV\HDUœVWKHPHIRU1('$: LV³(YHU\ERG\NQRZVVRPHERG\´ ³:H ZDQW HYHU\ERG\ WR UHDO L]H \RX FDQœW WHOO MXVW E\ ORRNLQJ at  someone  if  they  have  an  eating   disorder,   they   come   in   all   shapes   and  sizes,�  UHCS  Psychiatrist  Jill   0DOOLQVDLG³:HZDQWWRKHOSSHR ple  recognize  signs  and  symptoms  

See  NEDAW  Page  3

)RUPHU:DUKDZN/LVD3DQLFL OHDYHVOHJDF\DW8::KLWHZDWHU Page  13

Coming   into   the   WIAC   tour-­ QDPHQW WKH :DUKDZNV ZRPHQœV basketball  team  is  the  No.  1  seed   and  has  won  eight  straight  games.   After   a   66-­60   win   Saturday   over   8:5LYHU )DOOV WKH œ+DZNV currently   have   the   longest   win-­ ning  streak  in  the  conference  and   are   ranked   No.   20   in   the   latest   D3hoops.com  top-­25  poll. ³:HZRQFRQIHUHQFHVRHYHU\ team   is   going   to   give  us  their  best   game,�   fresh-­ man   forward   Lisa  Palmer  said.   ³:HœYH ZRQ eight   in   a   row   IRU WKH ¿UVW WLPH Carollo in  school  history,   VRWKLVZDVDUHDOO\ELJFRQ¿GHQFH booster   heading   into   the   WIAC   tournament.� Being   the   No.   1   seed   in   the   tournament   means   several   things   IRU WKH œ+DZNV $V ORQJ DV WKH team   wins,   they   will   continue   to   play   games   at   home   through-­ out   the   tournament.   The   WIAC   tournament   is   a   six-­team   playing   ¿HOG VR WKH WRS WZR WHDPV 8: Whitewater   and   UW-­Oshkosh,   UHFHLYH¿UVWURXQGE\HV7KLVVHWV up  matchups  between  No.  3  UW-­ Stevens  Point  against  No.  6  UW-­ Eau  Claire  and  No.  4  UW-­Superi-­ or  against  No.  5  UW-­River  Falls. Being   the   No.   1   seed   in   the  

 

   Established  1901

hungry for more

tournament  also  puts  the  target  on   WKH œ+DZNVœ EDFNV ,WœV HDV\ IRU teams  to  see  how  players  like  Kai-­ tlyn   Thill   and   Cortney   Kumerow   are   dominant   on   the   court.   Op-­ posing   coaches   will   have   plenty   of   opportunities   to   be   the   under-­ dog   when   they   play   the   No.   1   seed  and  look  to  prove  everybody   wrong.  No  matter  what  team  it  is,   there  will  be  no  reason  for  a  team   to   come   to   UW-­Whitewater   and   overlook   the   nationally   ranked   Warhawks.   When   No.   3   UW-­Stevens   Point   hosts   No.   6  UW-­Eau  Claire   on   Wednesday,   expect   to   see   the   home   team   come  out  victori-­ Palmer ous.  The  Pointers   have   played   the   Blugolds   twice   this   season   and   have   won   both   matchups.  The  Pointers  come  into   WKLV PDWFKXS WLHG IRU ¿UVW LQ WKH conference   with   UW-­Whitewater   in   points   per   game,   averaging    /HDGLQJ WKH 3RLQWHUVœ RI fensive  attack  is  senior  guard  Sam   Barber.  Barber  is  the  top  scorer  in   the  WIAC,   averaging   18.7   points   and   7.4   rebounds   per   game.   Ex-­ pect   the   5-­foot-­9-­inch   guard   to   dominate   the   game   both   scoring-­ wise  and  on  the  glass. 7KHRWKHU¿UVWURXQGPDWFKXS pits   No.   4   UW-­Superior   against  

See  ’Hawks  Page  14

Jenny DuPuis photo/'X3XLV-&#XZZHGX

Brittany Gregorich, left, is gaurded by two Warhawk defenders Saturday, Feb. 16. The ’Hawks will look to win the WIAC Tournament as the No.1 seed this weekend.

Final  donations  made  to  ‘Treyton  Kilar’s  Field  of  Dreams’   By Amy Smith Staff  Writer

By Samantha Jacquest News  Editor

Six-­year-­old   Treyton   Kilar   was   killed   by   a   drunk   driver   Sept.   2,   2010  at  the  intersection  of  Highway   20  and  County  N  near  East  Troy.  In   remembrance  of  their  son,  who  was   a   baseball   fanatic,   the   Kilar   family   made  plans  for  the  construction  of  a   EDVHEDOO¿HOGWLWOHG³7UH\WRQ.LODUœV Field  of  Dreams�. 0DU\ .LODU 7UH\WRQœV PRWKHU was   a   two-­time   All-­American   vol-­ leyball   player   during   her   time   as   a   UW-­Whitewater   student.   She   later   became   the   assistant   coach   of   the   Whitewater   High   School   volleyball   team.   She   is   now   principal   of   St.  

John  the  Baptist  in  Jefferson. With  close  ties  to  the  Whitewa-­ ter   community,   the   family   reached   out  for  help  in  their  endeavor  to  con-­ VWUXFWDFRPPXQLW\EDVHEDOO¿HOG After   years   of   fundraising   and   support   from   the   community,   the   IDPLO\ KDV ¿QDOO\ reached  its  goal  of   $475,000   to   build   WKH¿HOG Mary Kilar On   Jan.   17,   2012,   Golden   State   Foods   Foun-­ dation   made   a   $50,000   donation,   ZKLFKSXWWKH.LODU¶VZLWKLQ of  their  goal.   ³0LNH 0DU\ DQG , WDONHG YHU\ candidly  about  the  vision  for  the  fu-­ ture  and  their  big  fear  was  not  allow-­

ing  his  memory  to  ever  diminish  in   our  hearts,â€?  said  Wayne  Luter,  Gen-­ eral  Manager  of  the  GSF  Whitewater   distribution  center,  in  a  January  press   UHOHDVHÂł:HPDGHWKDWSURPLVHWKDW we   would   not   allow   that   to   happen   as  long  as  our  Foundation  was  here,   and  we  were  part  of  the  Whitewater   community.â€? After  Golden  State  Foods  closed   WKH JDS 0DU\ .LODUÂśV DXQW DQG XQ cle,  Cindy  and  Stan  Jaskolski  made   WKHÂżQDOGRQDWLRQRI 7KH GRQDWLRQ ÂłFDPH DV D FRP SOHWHVXUSULVH´0DU\VDLGÂł0\KXV band  and  I  received  a  phone  call  one   night,  and  it  was  very  emotional.  A   lot  of  tears  were  shed.â€?   Mary   said   her   aunt   and   uncle   have  participated  in  many  of  the  fun-­ GUDLVLQJHYHQWVDQGÂłKDYHEHHQYHU\

supportive�  of  their  efforts.   ³,WœV NLQG RI KDUG WR SXW LQWR words,�  Mary  said  of  her  reaction  to   WKH¿QDOGRQDWLRQ Mary  and  her  husband  said  their   greatest   fear   was   that   the   project   would  lose  momentum. ³$VSHRSOHVœOLYHVFRQWLQXHLWLV still  something  very  close  to  my  hus-­ band  and  I,�  she  said.   0DU\ VDLG VKH LV ³KXPEOHG´ by   the   support   the   community   of   Whitewater   has   shown.  The   family   was   especially   touched   by   the   sup-­ port  of  students  at  UW-­Whitewater. ³7KHZD\WKHXQLYHUVLW\VWXGHQWV have   reached   out   is   just   something   special   about   UW-­Whitewater,�   0DU\VDLG³6WXGHQWVQHHGWREHVR proud.  It  really  has  touched  us.�   Mary   said   as   a   college   student  

Student-­Run  Weekly  Newspaper  at  the  University  of  Wisconsin-­Whitewater

she   was   not   nearly   as   aware   of   the   community   around   her,   and   she   wanted  to  say  thank  you  for  the  com-­ passion   UW-­Whitewater   students   have  shown  her  family.   Though   the   initial   goal   of   $475,000   has   been   reached,   Mary   said   they   are   still   fundraising.   That   money   will   pay   for   the   220   to   225   IRRW\RXWKVL]HG¿HOGZLWKDUWL¿FLDO turf,   concrete   dugouts,   fencing   and   construction   stands,   but   they   said   they  would  still  like  to  raise  enough   money  for  lighting  and  a  pavilion.   &RQVWUXFWLRQ RI WKH ¿HOG LV planned   for   this   spring,   weather   permitting.   Mary   said   the   family   would  like  to  hold  a  groundbreaking   ceremony   that   would   be   something  

See  Trey  Page  4


Dateline Page 2 Here Royal Purple

News

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com February 20, 2013


Dateline Here February 20, 2013 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

New position offers behavioral screening UHCS  now  offers   intervention  services  to   students By Lexi Fischer Staff  Writer

University   Health   Center     &   Counseling   Services   will   now   be   offering   behavioral   screening   and   intervention   services   (BSI)   which   helps   reduce   binge   drink-­ ing,  drug  abuse  and  improve  de-­ pression.   UHCS   Health   Service   Direc-­ tor  Ruth  Swisher   said   she   is   con-­ ÂżGHQW LQ WKH HI fectiveness   and   value   this   new   program   will   bring   to   stu-­ dents   on   cam-­ Swisher pus.   Swisher   said   there   is   no   additional   cost   to  students;Íž  it  is  included  in  their   health  service  program. The  University  became  aware   of  this  program  more  than  a  year   ago   and   was   very   impressed   by   the   presenta-­ tion   and   how   it   is  data  driven. “We   are   ex-­ tremely   happy,â€?   Swisher   said.   Boaz “Our   students   will   be   able   to   have   additional   support   in   dealing   with   health   behaviors   that   could   have   nega-­ tive   impacts   on   them   here   on   campus.â€? Swisher  said  UW-­Whitewater   is  very  fortunate  to  have  two  new   Clinical  Health  Educators,  Jenni-­ fer  Boaz  and  Beth  Champion,  to  

assist  students  on  campus  to  bet-­ ter  their  lives.   Boaz   and   Champion   went   through   two-­weeks   of   intensive   training  at  UW-­Madison  through   the   Wisconsin   Initiative   To   Pro-­ mote  Healthy  Lifestyles. Boaz   and   Champion   meet   with   patients   who   screen   posi-­ tive   for   unhealthy   lifestyles   and   execute   further   evaluations   to   deliver  recommendations  of  life-­ VW\OHPRGLÂżFDWLRQ “We’ve   had   really   great   re-­ sponses   from   prior   patients,â€?   Boaz   said.   “For   the   most   part,   everyone   has   been  very  recep-­ tive.â€?     According   to   Champion,   the   sessions  are  very   Champion EULHIDQGÂżWHDV ily   into   college   student’s   sched-­ ules.   “It’s   whatever   you   want   to   get  out  of  this  experience,â€?  Boaz   said. Boaz   and   Champion   act   as   leaders   to   help   students   make   the  changes  they  want  to  make  in   their  lives.  They  said  it  is  a  very   collaborative,   non-­threatening   process   students   should   take   if   they  want  to  make  better,  health-­ ier  choices. “It’s  been  great  seeing  people   walk   out   with   maybe   a   little   bit   more   motivation   to   make   those   healthy   changes,â€?   Champion   said.   For   more   information,   visit   UHCS  in  Ambrose  Health  Center   or  visit  WIPHL.org. FischerAA11@uww.edu

News

Royal Purple Page33

NEDAW

Continued  from  page  1

and  know  what  to  do  if  you  have  a   friend  who  has  an  eating  disorder.â€? NEDAW  will  occur  on  campus   from   Feb.   25   to   March   1.   Events   include   a   documentary   called   “Missrepresentationâ€?   at   7   p.m.   on   Feb.  25  in  Summers  Auditorium,  a   live  Twitter  chat  from  1  to  3  p.m.   on  Feb.  26  and  a  presentation  from   Dietician   Karen   Woodland   at   7   p.m.  on  Feb.  27  in  the  Univsersity   Center  Room  259B. “It’s   a   designated   week   for   people   all   across   the   nation,   re-­ JDUGOHVV RI WKHLU DIÂżOLDWLRQ ZLWK D university,  hospital  or  church,  to  do   anything   that   promotes   awareness   that   eating   disor-­ ders   do   exist   and   that  they  are  very   dangerous,â€?  Mal-­ lin  said. Recent   trends   in   eating   disor-­ ders   have   con-­ Zambrowicz tributed   to   this   year’s   theme.   Mallin   said   eating   GLVRUGHUV KDYH VSUHDG VLJQLÂżFDQW O\ WR HYHU\ UDFH DQG IRU WKH ÂżUVW time  in  history,  the  number  of  men   seeking  treatment  is  growing  faster   than  women. Holli   Zambrowicz,   a   graduate   assistant   working   at   UHCS,   said   media  contributes  to  both  male  and   female   eating   disorders   more   so   than  in  the  past. “The   ideals   of   beauty   have   gotten   stricter,â€?   Zambrowicz   said.   “We  don’t  really  see  a  lot  of  variety   in  the  media,  and  when  you’re  con-­ stantly   seeing   the   same   messages,  

that   becomes   the   norm.   It   can   af-­ fect   how   you   feel   about   yourself   and  what  you  think  you  should  be.â€? Zambrowicz   said   the   goal   of   NEDAW   on   campus   is   to   raise   awareness   for   eating   disorders.     The   event   is   aimed   at   informing   people   who   may   have   an   eating   disorder   and   for   people   who   may   have   a   friend   who   has   an   eating   disorder  and  what  to  do  in  that  situ-­ ation.   “Deep   down   someone   may   know   there’s   a   problem   but   they   don’t   want   to   acknowledge   it,â€?   Zambrowicz   said.   “It   may   take   someone  else  to  say  something  be-­ fore  they  will  actually  admit  it.â€? Mallin  and  other  counselors  at   UHCS   offer   free   counseling   ser-­ vices   to   students.   The   process   of   treating   someone   with   an   eating   disorder  is  for  one  of  the  counsel-­ ors  to  evaluate  a  client,  send  them   to   health   services   to   make   sure   the   disorder   has   not   harmed   them   physically,  then  they  are  sent  to  see   DQXWULWLRQLVWRQFDPSXVDQGÂżQDOO\ they  are  prescribed  any  medication   needed. If   the   medication   is   not   work-­ ing   or   there   have   not   been   any   improvements   with   counseling   services,  a  client  may  be  sent  to  an   off-­campus  facility  for  more  inten-­ sive  care.   “It’s   a   very   gentle   process,â€?   Zambrowicz   said.   “You   can   bring   an  eating  disorder  to  someone’s  at-­ tention,  but  that  doesn’t  mean  they   want  to  do  anything  about  it.â€? -DFTXHVW6/#XZZHGX

Social workers are heroes. The Loyola MSW program at Carthage can show you how to put your intellect and compassion to work, protecting the world from the ravages of unemployment, addiction, disability and abuse. It’s a big job and

Campus Briefs Careers  in  Retail  Expo   From  5  to  8  p.m.  Feb  26,  in   the   University   Center   Hamilton   Room,   Kohl’s   and   Center   &   Leadership  Development  will  be   presenting   an   event   that   shows   there   are   many   jobs   for   all   ma-­ jors  in  the  Retail  business.   Kohl’s  Corporate  Vice  Presi-­ dent  Wes   McDonald   will   speak   about  the  retail  industry  and  ca-­ reer   consultant,   Susan   Caplan,   will  also  speak  about  developing   your  personal  brand.       7KH ÂżUVW  VWXGHQWV ZLOO receive  a  copy  of  Susan  Caplan’s   book,  “Marketing  Yourself  to  the   Real  World.â€?

 The  Role  of  Corn  in Indigenous  Mexican  Cultures )URP  WR  SP RQ Feb.   25,   the   Fairhaven   Retire-­ ment  Community,  435  W.  Strain   Road,  will  host  Bert  Kreitlow   He  will  discuss  how  food  is   substantive,   how   it   brings   cul-­ tures   and   families   together,   and   the  way  food  has  found  its  way   to  be  the  focus  of  many  cultural   traditions.     The  lecture  is  free  and  open   to  the  public.  

Runzheimer International Summer Internship *Mobile Application Development -Majors in IT Infrastructure & Management Computer Systems (prefer Junior or Senior level students) -Sign-up to interview on Hawk Jobs and learn more at www.runzheimer.com -On-Campus Interviews will take place February 28th. Sign-Up closes February 26th.

the Loyola MSW is the credential that helps you get the job and succeed. Traditional Program

(26 months)

INFORMATION SESSIONS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR R.S.V.P. at LoyolaMSW.com

Advanced Standing

(14 months)

Application Deadline May 1, 2013 All Classes held at Carthage College in Kenosha, WI

www.loyolamsw.com t 800-551-5343 t Classes start July 2013


News

Dateline Page 4 Here Royal Purple

4 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com February 20, 2013

Trey special   for   the   community,   the   uni-­ versity  students  and  all  contributors.   “Without   this   community,   we   would   have   been   lost,   devastated   and  alone,â€?  Mary  said  at  a  press  con-­ ference  in  January.  “Because  of  this   donation   and   the   generosity   of   so   PDQ\WKLVÂżHOGZLOOEHEXLOW,WZLOO be  built  in  honor  of  all  those  lost  to   destruction,  it  will  be  built  as  a  gift   to  our  youth  to  continue  to  dream  as   Treyton  did,  and  it  will  be  built  and   represent  this  wonderful  community   ÂżOOHGZLWKRUJDQL]DWLRQVDQGSHRSOH like   you   that   believe   in   creating   a   better  world  and  giving  back  to  peo-­ ple  who  need  you  most.â€?   Even  though  the  Kilar  family  has   reached   their   goal   for   the   baseball   ÂżHOG FRPPXQLW\ PHPEHUV DUH VWLOO donating  toward  the  cause. The  annual  event,  Run  for  Trey,   is   scheduled   for   Oct.   13   and   a   few   other   projects   are   in   the   works   in-­

Continued  from  page  1 cluding,   two   different   fundraising   kickball  tournaments. Senior  Kyle  Wagner  is  an  intern   for  the  City  of  Whitewater  Parks  and   Rec.  Department  and  is  holding  one   of  the  kickball  tournaments  to  raise   PRQH\IRUWKH¿HOG.LFNLWIRU7UH\ will  be  at  10  a.m.  on  April  13  at  Sta-­ rin  Park. Participants  pay  $15,  which  cov-­ ers   entrance   into   the   tournament,   a  T-­shirt   and   lunch.  All   of   the   pro-­ FHHGVZLOOEHQH¿W7UH\WRQœV)LHOGRI Dreams. ³, KDYH FORVH IULHQGV ZKR ZHUH FRXVLQV ZLWK 7UH\ VR , KDYH EHHQ following   the   development   of   the   ¿HOGVLQFHKLVGHDWK´:DJQHUVDLG ³2QFH , KDG WKH RSSRUWXQLW\ WR SXW RQDQHYHQW,ZDQWHGWRGRWKLV´ 7OV[VZ\ITP[[LK

SmithAL15@uww.edu

Mary and Mike Kilar (center) accept a $50,000 donation from Golden State Foods Foundation to “Treyton Kilar’s Field of +YLHTZšHSP[[SLSLHN\LIHZLIHSSĂ„LSKPUTLTVY`VM[OLPYZVU;YL`[VU^OV^HZRPSSLKI`HKY\URKYP]LYPU4HY`2PSHYÂťZ H\U[HUK\UJSLKVUH[LKHUV[OLY ^OPJOW\[[OLMHTPS`H[P[ZNVHSVM [VZ[HY[JVUZ[Y\J[PVUVU[OLĂ„LSK

JacquestSL01@uww.edu

Police Report Adogamhe,  Paul  G.,  63 Operation   of   Motor   Vehicle   with  Suspended  Registration 02/13/2013  

Dawson,  Tequilla  M.,  26 )DLOXUH WR<LHOG:KLOH 0DNLQJ Left  Turn 02/11/2013

Jarrett,  Brianne  A.,  21 Speed  Exceeded  Posted  Limits   02/17/2013

Temte,  Nicholas  A.,  19 Underage  Consumption   02/15/2013

Blanchard,  Exavier  M.,  22 Non-­Registration  of  Motor  Ve-­ hicle   02/13/2013

Hansen,  Erik  H.,  19 Underage  Consumption   02/15/2013

Smith,  Brandon  J.,  18 Underage   Consumption,   Pos-­ session  of  Drug  Paraphernalia 02/15/2013

Ulbrich,  Christopher  W.,  24 Speed  Exceeded  Posted  Limits   02/13/2013

Hilgenburg,  Charissa  H.,  18 Speed  Exceeded  Posted  Limits   02/15/2013

Solofra,  Ryan  J.,  19 Underage  Consumption   02/15/2013

VanCamp,  Trevor  K.,  19   Underage  Consumption   02/15/2013

The  Royal  Purple  only  publishes  police  reports  which  feature  UW-­Whitewater  students,  faculty  and  staff.  These  reports  are  public  record  and  are  available   through  the  City  of  Whitewater  website  under  the  Daily  Press  Releases  tab.  No  omissions,  exceptions  or  requests  will  be  considered.  

Why Teach?

Student WEA Interviews with Exceptional Teachers By Chelsea Spatola

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Find a way to reach them, with all the things pulling them in different directionsâ&#x20AC;Ś itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a delicate balanceâ&#x20AC;? is a major piece of advice that Daniel Shimon offered Student WEA during his interview. Mr. Shimon, a World Literature and Composition teacher at Tremper High School in Kenosha, originally attended college in pursuit of a law enforcement occupation. After working as a police officer and as a Kenosha Deputy Sheriff, Shimon was injured on the job. Mr. Shimon realized then that â&#x20AC;&#x153;when they are calling you [for help], it really is too lateâ&#x20AC;?. He thought that he could help people more effectively as a teacher than as a police officer because, as a teacher, he could reach them before they got to the point where the law had to be involved. With his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assistance, Mr. Shimon realized that he has always had a passion for storytelling and English. He then decided to return to school to become a high school English teacher. Mr. Shimon has been teaching since January, 2002.

Why do you teach? Mr. Shimon teaches because he wants his students to â&#x20AC;&#x153;share experiences, connect those experiences to other human beings, [and gain] insight into what [high school students] can look forward toâ&#x20AC;?. In addition, he fervently desires for his students to realize that â&#x20AC;&#x153;the experiences of people are the same. Everybody is different, but human beings are mostly similar. We are more the same than differentâ&#x20AC;?. His main goal in teaching is for his students to obtain a â&#x20AC;&#x153;global-mindset [which leads to] global-realizationâ&#x20AC;?.

Do you have any advice for future English educators or secondary education? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is imperative to teach [high school English] without compartmented lessons into sectionsâ&#x20AC;? is something that Mr. Shimon stressed when asked this question. He said that â&#x20AC;&#x153;everything is mixed together: grammar, vocabulary, spelling, writing, and literatureâ&#x20AC;?. Mr. Shimon mentioned how a teacher cannot just have a lesson on vocabulary and then another one on literature, but rather it is an â&#x20AC;&#x153;integration of all the language artsâ&#x20AC;?. In addition, teachers should always remember that students are always going through different situations. If something should arise in a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal or academic life, Shimon recommends, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lower standards. Instead, have the students produce a product that demonstrates their knowledge [in a different way]â&#x20AC;?. Moreover, always â&#x20AC;&#x153;remember that everybody has a different situation, and be flexible with their needs and situationsâ&#x20AC;?.

The next Student WEA meeting is February 11th, 2013 at 6 pm in UC 261! See you there! Blog


â&#x20AC;&#x153;What  the  mind  of  a  man  can  conceive   and  believe,  it  can  achieve.â&#x20AC;?  -­Napoleon  Hill

WEDNESDAY February  20,  2013

Business  Editor: Carrie  Wojcik

PAGE  5

National organization to move headquarters to Hyland Hall Campus  wins  tight  bid  to   host  small-­business   DVVRFLDWLRQRI¿FH By Connell Patterson Staff  Writer

UW-­Whitewater   was   recently   chosen   as   the   new   location   for   the   headquarters   of   the   United   States   Association   for   Small   Business   and   Entrepreneurship.     Assistant   professor   of   the   Man-­ agement   Department   from   the   Col-­ lege   of   Business   and   Economics,   Jeff   Vanevenhoven   said   this   move   â&#x20AC;&#x153;changes   the   pro-­ ÂżOH RI WKH XQLYHU sityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   representa-­ tion   in   the   area   of   Vanevenhoven entrepreneurship   and  business  development.â&#x20AC;?   According   to   the   associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   website,  the  Chair  of  the  Site  Select   Committee,   Pat   Dickson,   released   a   statement   regarding   UW-­Whitewa-­ terâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   selection   of   the   new   headquar-­ ters   saying   that   the   USASBE   site   selection   committee   unanimously   recommended   the   University   of   Wisconsin-­Whitewater  to  be  the  host   site  for  the  organization  based  on  the   strong   commitment   that   UW-­W   and   the   whole   community   has   made   to     focus  on  entrepreneurship.   Dickson   also   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although   one  of  a  number  of  strong  proposals   submitted,  UW-­W  rose  to  the  top  be-­ cause  of  the  enthusiasm  and  clear  fo-­ cus   for   creating   the   next   generation   of   entrepreneurs   that   the   committee   saw.â&#x20AC;?   The   national   organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   mis-­ sion  statement  has  a  focus  on  provid-­ ing  a  network  to  advance  knowledge   and   foster   business   development   through   entrepreneurship   education   and  research.   Having   an   organization   like   this   on  campus,  some  of  the  faculty  in  the   School   of   Business   and   Economics   said   they   look   forward   to   the   over-­ Ă&#x20AC;RZ RI LQIRUPDWLRQ WKDW ZLOO EH DF cessible.

  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Entrepreneurship   is   a   trait,â&#x20AC;?   Vanevenhoven  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  trait,  it   can  be  taught,  then  it  can  be  learned,   and  if  we  can  learn  it,  we  can  do  it,â&#x20AC;?     The   headquarters   at   UW-­White-­ water   also   might   allow   for   student   RUJDQL]DWLRQJURZWKVSHFLÂżFDOO\WKH Student  Chamber  of  Commerce.   This   act,   in   which   the   university   was  chosen  in  a  tight  bidding  war  for   the   location,   shows   the   growth   and   rising   potential   in   the   area   of   small   business   and   entrepreneurship   here   on  campus,  Vanevenhoven  said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   was   a   very   competitive   selection   process,   and  we  were  selected   over  a  group  of  insti-­ tutions   that   is   really   recognizable,â&#x20AC;?   said   William   Dougan,   a   professor   of   En-­ trepreneurship   and   Clements Management   from   the  School  of  Business  and  Econom-­ ics.  7KHUH DUH EHQHÂżWV WKDW WKH DVVR ciation  will  bring  to  you,  even  if  one   is  not  a  business  or  entrepreneurship   majors,  Vanevenhoven  said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   can   affect   all   students,â&#x20AC;?   Vanevenhoven  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  larger   student  groups  who  have  the  concept   of  business,  and  this  association  with   USASBE   will   help   students   be   bet-­ ter   informed   on   how   to   have   more   meaningful  businesses.â&#x20AC;?   Vanevenhoven   also   commented   on   the   increased   awareness   of   the   university   at   a   national   level   as   a   result  of  housing  the  USASBE  head-­ quarters.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   association   brings   addi-­ tional   visibility   to   this   campus,   and   the  association  with  UW-­Whitewater   will  help  increase  national  awareness   of   the   strength   of   our   entrepreneur-­ ship   and   business   program,â&#x20AC;?   said   Christine  Clements,  dean  of  the  col-­ lege  of  Business  and  Economics.  7KH DVVRFLDWLRQÂśV RIÂżFH KHDG quarters  will  be  in  the  Center  for  In-­ novation   and   Development,   on   the   ÂżUVWĂ&#x20AC;RRURI+\ODQG+DOO$FFRUGLQJ to   its   website,   the   expected   arrival   date  is  between  April  and  May. PattersoCL08@uww.edu

Archive Photo


â&#x20AC;&#x153;Give  a  man  health  and  a  course  to   steer,  and  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  never  stop  to  trouble   about  whether  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  happy  or  not.â&#x20AC;?  -­George  Bernard  Shaw

WEDNESDAY February  20,  2013

Opinion  Editor: Abbie  Reetz

PAGE  6

Healthy  choices  deserve  support Royal Purple Editorial  Staff  Opinion

According   to   the   American   Heart   As-­ sociation,   149.3   million   Americans   over   the  age  of  20  were  overweight  or  obese  in   2012. With  statistics  like  that,  it  comes  as  no   surprise   that   more   fad   diet   plans   and   ex-­ ercise  programs  have  popped  up  in  recent   years.   People   are   exchanging   carbohydrates   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;super   fruitsâ&#x20AC;?   and   spending   upwards   of  $100  for  DVD  exercise  programs,  hop-­ ing  these  changes  will  help  them  achieve  a   healthy  weight. (YHQ WKRXJK LW PD\ EH GLIÂżFXOW IRU some  to  understand  why  people  subscribe   to  seemingly  crazy  or  over-­the-­top  diet  and   exercise  programs,  students  should  support   each  other  in  healthy  lifestyle  decisions. Exercise  and  a  healthy  diet  are  two  key   players  in  leading  a  healthy  life.  By  work-­ ing  out  and  eating  a  variety  of  fruits,  vege-­ tables,  grains  and  proteins,  someone  could   see   positive   changes   such   as   weight   loss   and  lower  blood  pressure. Diet  and  exercise  programs  are  typical-­ ly  designed  to  combine  a  variety  of  work-­ RXW WHFKQLTXHV ZLWK D YHU\ VSHFLÂżF PHDO plan   to   help   users   lose   weight   and   gain   muscle  in  a  healthy  way. Some   exercise   systems   and   diet   plans   get  a  bad  reputation  of  being  ineffective  or  

a   waste   of   money   even   though   they   may   work  well  for  some  people.   If   followed   correctly,   one   person   may   achieve  great  results  from  a  program  some-­ one  else  deems  useless. Something  people  should  keep  in  mind   before   judging   someone   for   the   diet   or   exercis   regimen   they   follow   is   this:   One   VSHFL¿F SURJUDP GRHVQœW DOZD\V ZRUN IRU everyone.   Each   person   has   different   needs   and   abilities,  so  a  diet  that  works  well  for  one   person  might  not  work  for  someone  else  at   all. Because   of   this,   students   should   not   automatically   jump   to   the   conclusion   that   someone  else  is  following  a  useless  diet  or   exercise  plan.   If   one   person   wants   to   try   the   P90X   ¿WQHVVSURJUDPRUWKH3DOHRGLHWDQGWKH\ are   getting   healthy   results,   the   only   thing   that   should   matter   is   that   they   are   getting   healthier  in  a  way  that  works  for  them. At  the  same  time,  people  who  have  had   success   with   one   particular   exercise   plan   or   diet   program   should   not   try   to   force   it   on  others.   Not   only   might   the   plan   that   worked   for  them  not  work  for  the  friends  they  try   to  recruit,  but  they  might  end  up  unneces-­ sarily   insulting   someone   by   telling   them   they  have  to  join  the  latest  diet  or  exercise   craze.

Sydney Michuda graphic/0LFKXGD6.#XZZHGX

But  there  is  a  difference  between  adopt-­ ing  a  healthier  lifestyle  and  creating  an  eat-­ ing  disorder. If   someone   begins   exercising   more   and   eating   better   in   a   healthy   way,   they   should   be   supported   instead   of   criticized   or  judged. However,   people   who   are   concerned   that  a  friend  or  fellow  student  is  attempting   to  lose  weight  in  an  unhealthy  way  should   rightly  try  to  get  them  help. It   can   be   tough   to   alter   an   unhealthy   lifestyle  in  favor  of  a  healthier  one.  Habits   such  as  eating  junk  food  and  sitting  on  the  

couch   instead   of   being   active   can   be   dif-­ ¿FXOWWREUHDNHVSHFLDOO\LQFROOHJHZKHQ PDQ\ VWXGHQWV GRQœW KDYH WKH IDFLOLWLHV WR cook  for  themselves. Students   who   take   their   health   into   their   own   hands   by   deciding   to   exercise   and  eat  better  do  not  deserve  to  be  judged   any  more  than  students  who  have  not  made   the  same  choices  do. If   an   individual   decides   to   alter   their   diet  or  exercise  routine  to  become  health-­ ier,   others   should   support   and   encourage   them  instead  of  judging. rp@uww.edu

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EDITOR  IN  CHIEF...................................................................Andrea  Behling MANAGING  EDITOR...............................................................Carley  Rymkus NEWS  EDITOR.....................................................................Samantha  Jacquest ASSISTANT  NEWS  EDITOR.....................................................Michael  Riley OPINION  EDITOR.........................................................................Abbie  Reetz BUSINESS  EDITOR.....................................................................Carrie  Wojcik LIFESTYLE  EDITOR.................................................................Abbey  Bowen ARTS  &  REC  EDITOR.............................................................Ben  Holzhueter SPORTS  EDITOR.............................................................................Zach  Hicks ASSISTANT  SPORTS  EDITOR.........................................Kevin  Cunningham COPY  EDITOR...........................................................................Jonathan  Block COPY  EDITOR.........................................................................Chris  Johannsen PHOTO  EDITOR......................................................................Dan  Pomykalski GRAPHICS  EDITOR..............................................................Sydney  Michuda FACULTY  ADVISER....................................................................Peter  Janecky

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EDITORIAL  POLICIES          The  Royal  Purple  is  an  independent  student-­run  weekly  newspa-­ per  published  at  the  University  of  Wisconsin-­Whitewater  and  is  writ-­ ten  and  edited  by  students.  The  editorial  staff  is  solely  responsible  for   content  and  editorial  policy.           The   Royal   Purple   is   printed   by   Community   Shoppers,   Inc.   in   Delavan,   WI,   weekly   during   the   school   year   with   a   circulation   of   7,000  copies.  Postage  is  paid  at  Whitewater,  WI  53190-­1790.  Single   copies  are  available  on  campus  and  in  the  community  for  free.  Ad-­ ditional  copies  are  available  for  $1  each  at  the  Royal  PurpleRI¿FH Subscriptions  ($20/semester)  are  available.          Advertising  Deadlines:  All  ad  sizes  are  due  no  later  than  4  p.m.  the   Thursday  prior  to  Wednesday  publication.  The  actual  ad  hard  copy   DQGFODVVL¿HGVDUHGXHQRODWHUWKDQQRRQWKH)ULGD\SULRUWR:HGQHV day  publication. 2012  ROYAL  PURPLE

How can students achieve a healthier lifestyle? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  a  major  one  that   everyone  forgets  is  taking   time  for  themselves.â&#x20AC;?     -­Caitlin  Conroy, junior

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Have  a  schedule  of  a   workout  plan  and  stick   with  it,  because  otherwise   \RXÂśOOORVHPRPHQWXP´ -­Elena  Busalacchi, freshman

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Try  to  sleep  as  much  as   you  can.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;To  have  a  healthier  life-­ style,  students  could  sleep   much,  much  more.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Try  and  eat  a  mix  of   everything  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  fruits,  veg-­ etables,  complex  carbs,   proteins  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  and  work  out   regularly.â&#x20AC;? -­Cody  Roedner, freshman

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat  a  lot  of  fruit  and   try  and  keep  an  active   OLIHVW\OHVR\RXGRQÂśWJHW sucked  in  to  just  sitting   around  all  day.â&#x20AC;? -­Bowar  Dahmen, freshman

-­Mike  Weiss, senior

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:ULWHUVPXVWLQFOXGHIXOOÂżUVWDQG last  name,  address, �� year  in  school  or   position   at   the   university   (if   appli-­ cable)  and  a  phone  number.  Contact   information  will  not  be  published  in   the   Royal   Purple.   Unsigned   letters   are  automatically  rejected.          Opinions  expressed  in  letters,  col-­ umns  or  commentaries  are  solely  the   opinion  of  the  author  and  not  neces-­ sarily  the  opinion  of  the  staff  of  the   Royal  Purple  or  UW-­Whitewater. Please  bring  letters  to  the  Royal  Pur-­ ple RIÂżFH  8QLYHUVLW\ &HQWHU RU e-­mail  them  to  RP@uww.edu.

-­Jon  Mack,   junior

AN  AWARD-­WINNING  PUBLICATION 2011  ACP  BEST  OF  THE  MIDWEST  CONTEST FOURTH  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;BEST  OF  SHOWâ&#x20AC;?

2010  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST SECOND  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;GENERAL  EXCELLENCEâ&#x20AC;?

2010  ACP  BEST  OF  THE  MIDWEST  CONTEST FIRST  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;BEST  OF  SHOWâ&#x20AC;?

2010  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST FIRST  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;FEATURE  WRITINGâ&#x20AC;?

2010  ACP  BEST  OF  THE  MIDWEST  CONTEST THIRD  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;FEATURE  WRITINGâ&#x20AC;?

2010  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST FIRST  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;GRAPHICSâ&#x20AC;?

2009  ACP  BEST  OF  THE  MIDWEST  CONTEST FIRST  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;SPORTS  REPORTINGâ&#x20AC;?

2010  WNA  BETTER  NEWSPAPER  CONTEST FIRST  PLACE â&#x20AC;&#x153;BEST  EDITORIALâ&#x20AC;?


WEDNESDAY February  20,  2013

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tell  me  what  you  eat,  and  I  will  tell   you  who  you  are.â&#x20AC;?

Lifestyle  Editor: Abbey  Bowen

 -­Jean  Anthelme  Brillat-­Savarin PAGE  7

Chartwells  makes  healthy  eating  easy  By Cassandra Schenck Staff  Writer

Many   college   students   generally   struggle   to   keep   a   healthy   diet   with  their  on-­the-­go  lifestyles.       The   UW-­Whitewater   Din-­ ing   Services   in   partnership   with   Chartwells   will   continue   to   im-­ prove   its   servic-­ es   to   encourage   healthy   eating   for   students   on   campus.     C h a r t w e l l s   recently   added   a   Rakowiecki nutritional   kiosk   in   Esker   Dining   Hall,   partnering     ZLWK¿WFRP   Marketing   director   for   UW-­ Whitewater   Dining   Services   in   partnership  with  Chartwells,  Ann   Rakowiecki,  said  she  encourages   students   who   eat   in   the   dining   halls  on  campus  to  check  out  the   nutrition   facts   in   the   food   by   us-­ ing  the  new  kiosk.     Students   can   use   this   touch   screen  kiosk  to  scroll  through  the   food   served   at   the   dining   hall.   It   shows   nutrition   facts   and   allows   students  to  leave  comments.   The   kiosk   is   not   limited   to   only   the   food   served   at   Esker   Dining  Hall,  but  also  to  other  din-­ ing   facilities   on   campus   such   as   Uno   Due   Go,   UC   Graham   Street   CafÊ,   Library   Food   for   Thought  

and  others,  Rakoweicki  said.     Chartwells   has   also   partnered   ZLWK ÂżWFRP 6WXGHQWV FDQ create   an   account   at   this   website   DQG ÂżQG RXW SHUVRQDOL]HG KHDOWK tips  based  on  individual  needs.          This   website   allows   students   to  create  their  own  healthy  eating   plan   and   choose   goals   like   build-­ ing   lean   muscle,   m a i n t a i n i n g   weight   or   losing   weight.            â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  program   helps  students  to   Schultz eat  right  and  lose   weight   if   they   desire  to  in  a  healthy  way  and  not   a  drastic  way,â&#x20AC;?  Rakowiecki  said.   Registered   dietitian   for   UW-­ Whitewater   Dining   Services   in   partnership   with   Chartwells   Jes-­ VLFD 6FKXOW] VDLG VKH OLNHV WKH idea   that   the   website   allows   stu-­ GHQWV WR ÂżJXUH RXW D SODQ WR VWD\ healthy.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  helps  you  learn  how  to  add   in   exercise   with   healthy   eating,â&#x20AC;?   6FKXOW] VDLG Âł+HDOWK\ HDWLQJ doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   mean   eating   salads   ev-­ eryday  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  learning  to  incorporate   every  food  in  your  diet.â&#x20AC;?   For   students   who   may   not   GLQH RQ FDPSXV 6FKXOW] RIIHUHG some  tips  for  easy  healthy  eating   and   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anytime   students   are   on  the  go,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  that  they   VWLOO WKLQN IUHVK´ 6FKXOW] VDLG

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  means  that  they  can  grab  an   apple   or   banana   and   pair   it   with   protein  like  peanut  butter.â&#x20AC;?   The   recommended   serving   of   IUXLWVDQGYHJHWDEOHVDGD\LVÂżYH WR QLQH FXSV 6FKXOW] VDLG 6KH said   that   it   is   important   for   stu-­ dents   to   educate   themselves   on   ZKDW D SURSHU VHUYLQJ VL]H LV VR they  can  keep  track  of  how  many   servings  they  are  getting  per  day.       â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any  lean  proteins,  like  nuts,   will  keep  you  the  fullest  the  lon-­ JHVW´ 6FKXOW] VDLG Âł$Q\ VQDFN with   carbs   and   protein   will   give   your   brain   fuel   for   in   between   classes   as   well   as   sustain   you   so   you  are  not  getting  hungry  in  the   middle  of  class.â&#x20AC;?   Although   energy   drinks   may   NHHS \RX DZDNH 6FKXOW] UHFRP mends   that   students   only   drink   these  in  moderation.     For   students   who   do   not   like   milk,   a   good   substitute   to   make   sure  they  are  consuming  calcium   would  be  to  eat  broccoli,  spinach   RUGULQNVR\PLONDQGIRUWLÂżHGRU DQJH MXLFH 6FKXOW] VDLG VKH HP SKDVL]HV WKH LPSRUWDQFH RI WKH dining  facilities  to  meet  the  needs   of   students   who   have   certain   re-­ strictions  in  their  diets  due  to  al-­ lergies  or  medical  issues.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  are  always  looking  to  up-­ date  food  items  for  students  who   may   need   certain   items   in   their   GLHWV´6FKXOW]VDLG   Esker   Dining   Hall   has   a   glu-­

Andrea Behling photo/%HKOLQJ$0#XZZHGX

Chartwells in partnership with UW-Whitewater Dining Services installed a nutrition kiosk in esker. The device allows students to look up facts about their food.

ten-­free   area   for   students   who   may  have  Celiac  disease  and  can   only   eat   certain   foods.   There   are   also   plenty   of   vegetarian   options   on  the  menu  for  students  who  pre-­ fer  no  meat.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  changes  that  the  campus   is   making   to   encourage   healthier   HDWLQJ ZLOO EH EHQHÂżFLDO WR WKRVH students   who   take   advantage   of   the   programs   we   have   to   offer,â&#x20AC;?   6FKXOW]VDLG   Another   way   students   can   keep   up   with   menus   on   campus  

is  to  download  the  app  for  smart   phones  called  â&#x20AC;&#x153;App  On  Campus.â&#x20AC;?   This  app  allows  students  to  view   upcoming   menu   items   for   differ-­ ent  dining  facilities  and  check  out   the  nutritional  facts  in  the  food.   Promoting   healthy   eating   campus  wide  is  an  important  part   WR5DNRZLHFNLDQG6FKXOW]   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Small   changes   in   your   diet   make   long   term   differences,â&#x20AC;?   6FKXOW]VDLG SchenckCJ08@uww.edu

UW-­â&#x20AC;?Whitewater  students  â&#x20AC;&#x153;take  the  plungeâ&#x20AC;?  into  freezing  water   Â&#x201E;More  than  $22,000  online   ÂżUVWH[SHULHQFHWKLV\HDUZLWKWKH3RODU   But   of   course,   the   spotlight   of   the  

donations  raised  locally for  Special  Olympics   By Bethe Croy Staff  Writer

Photo submitted

Left to right: John Bukacek, Jon Michels, Tracy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mara and Steven Hulen â&#x20AC;&#x153;took the plungeâ&#x20AC;? on Feb. 16 in Cravath Lakefront Park. The Polar Plunge raises money for the Special Olympics Wisconsin.

 )UHH]LQJWHPSHUDWXUHVLFHFROGZD ter   and   hundreds   of   people   willing   to   brave  them  both  gathered  for  the  annual   Polar   Plunge   event   hosted   by   Special   Olympics  Wisconsin  last  weekend.   The  event  took  place  on  Feb.  16  in   Cravath  Lakefront  Park  in  order  to  help   raise   funds   for   the   Special   Olympics.   Participants   â&#x20AC;&#x153;take   the   plungeâ&#x20AC;?   into   ice   cold  water  after  raising  funds  to  support   their  individual  plunge  teams.   Since  its  inception  in  1999,  the  Po-­ lar   Plunge   has   raised   more  than  $14  million   for  Special  Olympics.   This   year,   Whitewa-­ ter   has   raised   more   than  $22,000  in  online   pledges  and  donations   alone. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mara   This  event  attracts   many   UW-­Whitewater   students,   many   of   whom   participate   with   their   student   RUJDQL]DWLRQV 7KLV \HDU WKH$PHULFDQ Marketing  Association  was  a  participat-­ ing  group.   Three   students   from   the   group,   ju-­ nior   Tracy   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mara,   freshman   Steven   Hulen  and  senior  Brad  Becker,  had  their  

Plunge.     For  these  three,  it  took  a  lot  of  men-­ tal   preparation,   and   in   Hulenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   case,   a   lot   of   chili,   to   get   ready   to     jump   into   IUHH]LQJZDWHULQPLG)HEUXDU\LQ:LV consin.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   guess   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   wanted   to   do   it   for   a   couple   of   years,   and   the   opportunity   came  up,â&#x20AC;?  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mara  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  support  the   Special  Olympics,  and  I  do  a  lot  of  work   with   handicapped   individuals   on   cam-­ pus   and   outside   of   campus,   so   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   a  good  opportunity  to  give  back  to  the   community.â&#x20AC;?   In  addition  to  supporting  the  cause,   the   others   said   they   felt   motivated   by   gaining   the   experience   and   simply   to   satisfy  curiosity.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   just   feel   like   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   one   of   those   things   you   gotta   do   at   least   once,â&#x20AC;?   Becker   said.   Âł,W ZDV IXQ DQG GHÂż nitely,  it  was  cold,  but   LWZDVGHÂżQLWHO\ZRUWK the  experience.â&#x20AC;? Hulen   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mara,   Hulen   and   Becker   had   multiple   ways   of   fundrais-­ ing  for  the  event  ahead  of  time  as  well.   Using  the  internet  and  social  media,  go-­ ing   door-­to-­door   and   giving   the   easily   UHFRJQL]DEOHSRODUEHDULFRQVWRGLIIHU ent  businesses  around  town  were  just  a   few   primary   methods   they   used   to   get   donations.  

experience   was   actually   â&#x20AC;&#x153;taking   the   plunge.â&#x20AC;?   For   Hulen,   the   best   part   of   the   ex-­ perience   was   the   anticipation   before   the  plunge.  He  said  waiting  until  it  was   their  turn  built  the  adrenaline  and  made   it  more  exciting.     On   the   other   hand,   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mara   said   waiting   was   the   worst   part,   and   while   she  thought  the  moment  they  hit  the  wa-­ ter  was  the  best  part,  Hulen  said  it  was   the  worst.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Literally,  the  air  just  got  taken  right   out  of  you,â&#x20AC;?  Hulen  said.     Becker  said  the  best  part  was  not  be-­ fore  or  during  the  plunge,  but  after.  He   believed  that  standing  in  the  cold  winds   DIWHU FRPLQJ RXW RI WKH IUHH]LQJ ZDWHU was  the  true  test  of  endurance.  Âł,WKLQNLWUHDOO\UHGHÂżQHVZKDW\RXU perspective   is   of   cold,â&#x20AC;?   Becker   said.   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mara  and  Hulen  strongly  agreed.     All  three  came  to  the  conclusion  the   3RODU 3OXQJH ZDV DQ DPD]LQJ H[SHUL ence  they  think  other  students  should  go   through.  Not  only  does  it  support  a  good   cause,  it  is  also  something  to  mark  off  of   the  bucket  list.                Though  the  three  students  are  unsure   if   they   will   participate   next   year,   they   said  they  are  all  glad  they  were  a  part  of   it  this  year,  and  they  hope  other  students   will  also  embrace  the  opportunity.   CroyEK18@uww.edu


Dateline Page 8 Here Royal Purple

Lifestyle

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com February 20, 2013

  Make  this!  Future  teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s     edition  

   Sensory  balloons  

Supplies  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  need: -­  balloons Ã&#x20AC;RXU ULFH ZDWHU FRIIHHJURXQGV -­  bowl IXQQHO LI\RXKDYH RQHRU\RXFDQXVH UROOHGSDSHU

Step  1 )LOORQHEDOORRQZLWK ZDWHU

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Step  3 8VHDIXQQHOWR¿OO WKHRWKHUEDOORRQVZLWK Ã&#x20AC;RXUULFHDQGFRIIHH JURXQGV

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Step  5   +DYHWKHVWXGHQWV SLFNXSHDFKEDOORRQ DQGJXHVVZKDW¶V LQVLGH 7KLVOHVVRQSODQFDQKHOS VWXGHQWVXQGHUVWDQGQDWXUDO VHQVHVHVSHFLDOO\WRXFKDQG VPHOO Information and photos by Abbey Bowen


Dateline Here February 20, 2013 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

Lifestyle

Royal Purple Page39

HOROSCOPES Capricorn,  12/22-­1/19 Valentine’s  Day  is  over,   thank  goodness.  Put  all   the  stress  of  pleasing   your  loved  one  behind   you  and  focus  on   yourself.

Cancer,  6/22-­7/22 It’s  never  too  late  to  get   back  into  shape.  Make   a  dedication  to  yourself   this  week  to  go  to  the   gym  three  or  four  times.

Aquarius,  1/20-­2/18 Time  is  of  the  essence   this  week.  Make  sure   you  study  hard  but  also   leave  room  to  have  a   little  fun.

Leo,  7/23-­8/22 Don’t  let  the  drab,  dreary   weather  get  you  down!   A  sunny  destination  is   waiting  for  you.  Just  push   through  these  last  few   weeks  of  winter.  

Pisces,  2/19-­3/20 It’s  time  to  rethink  your   fashion  choices.  Are   you  really  dressing  to   impress?  Watch  “What   Not  to  Wear”  at  least   twice  this  week  for   inspiration.  

Virgo,  8/23-­9/22 There  are  great  things  in   the  future  for  you,  but   don’t  let  the  success  get   to  your  head.  Arrogance   is  one  of  the  most   unattractive  attributes  a   person  can  have.  

Aries,  3/21-­4/19 Make  sure  your  anxiety   takes  a  major  chill  pill   this  week.  There’s  no   use  worrying  about   things  you  can’t   control.  

Libra,  9/23-­10/22 Dedicate  an  entire  hour   every  day  to  something   you  really  love.  Paint   a  picture,  call  your   grandma,  listen  to  your   favorite  band’s  newest   album,  etc.  

Taurus,  4/20-­5/20 Work  hard  to  truly   GH¿QH\RXUGUHDPVLQ life  this  week.  College   is  about  chasing  your   goals  for  the  future.   Just  make  sure  you   know  exactly  what   they  are.  

Scorpio,  10/23-­11/21 You  never  thought  peer   pressure  would  be  an   issue  for  you  in  college,   but  unfortunately  it  has   followed  you  from  high   school.  Don’t  give  in  to   temptation.  You’re  better   than  that.  

Gemini,  5/21-­6/21 Listen  to  your  own   advice  for  a  change   and  take  a  leap  of  faith   toward  happiness.  It  may   be  scary,  but  it  will  all   pay  off  in  the  end.  

Sagittarius,  11/22-­12/21 Do  one  thing  that  truly   scares  you  every  day   this  week.  This  will  help   \RXJDLQFRQ¿GHQFHDQG overcome  your  fears.  


WEDNESDAY “We  should  consider  everyday   lost  in  which  we  don’t  dance.”  -­Nietzsche

February  20,  2013

Arts  &  Rec  Editor: Ben  Holzhueter

PAGE  10

“I  believe  its  one  of  the  only   activities  that  works  every  part   of  your  body  and  every  muscle.   Flexibility  is  an  important  thing   that  a  lot  of  people  forget  about   that  has  really  good  health   EHQH¿WVIRU\RXUPXVFOHVDQG everything  else.”

Konkol

-­  Carly  Konkol, Junior  

“It  is  really  healthy,  and  I  can’t   imagine  going  through  college   without  dance  right  now.  I  look   forward  to  it  every  night.  If  I   had  a  bad  day  or  something,   you  just  know  you  get  to  go  to   dance  and  let  that  all  out  and   feel  better.” Ranieri

-­  Tori  Ranieri, Sophomore

Dan Pomykalski photos/3RP\NDOVNL'-#XZZHGX

Information gathered from healthguidance.org

Sydney Michuda graphic/0LFKXGD6.#XZZHGX

Motown music in the Young Auditorium „  ‘Masters  of  Motown’   ODUWRWKH¿UVWWLPHDOOWKHDFWVRI needed  to  be  brought  to  campus.

peformance  highlights   Black  History  Month By Kaitlyn Taylor Staff  Writer

Motown   went   on   tour   together.   The   songs   will   also   be   accompa-­ nied   by   choreographed   dancing   just  like  the  original  performers. Performer  John  Hodges  said  he   has  been  performing  since  he  was   14  years  old,  and  music  has  been  a   part  of  his  life  ever  since.   “If   we   can   make   somebody   forget  about  their  troubles  that  day   and  put  a  smile  on  their  face,  that’s   the  reward  I  get,”  Hodges  said. President   of   the   Black   Stu-­ dent   Union   on   campus,   Kourtney   Blevins,   said   this   event   was   something   that  

“This  event  is  something  peo-­ ple   should   know   about,”   Blevins   said. Blevins   said   she   loves   being   part  of  the  BSU,  because  they  are   a  big  family.  She  said  they  all  de-­ pend  on  each  other  and  she  knows   they  will  always  be  there  when  she   needs  help. February   is   Black   History   Month,   but   LaMuro   said   every   culture  should  be  celebrated  every   month. Blevins   agreed   with   LaMuro,   and  she  said  black  history  is  every-­

one  else’s  history  too  because  it  is   a  part  of  American  history. Blevins  said  the  BSU  will  host   a   huge   program   for   black   history   month   and   everyone   is   welcome   to   come   and   get   a   sense   of   black   culture. The  event  will  be  held  at  7  p.m.   on  Feb.  28,  in  the  Hamilton  Room. Motown   music   has   a   lot   of   soul   in   it   but   also   has   a   lot   to   do   with  what  was  going  on  during  the   1960s  and  1970s  in  America. Hodges   said   segregation   had   D ELJ LQÀXHQFH RQ 0RWRZQ PX sic   but   the   music   also  

The   Temptations,   Marvin   Gaye,   Smokey   Robinson   and   Gladys   Knight   were   all   part   of   an   era   that   tend   to   take   many   down   memory   lane.   For   those   who   weren’t   around   to   remember   these  musical  icons,  the  chance  to   experience   tradi-­ tional   Motown   will   be   available   on   campus   in   a   one-­night-­only   performance. “Masters   of   Motown”   will   LaMuro perform   at   7:30   p.m.   on   Feb.   23,   in  the  Young  Auditorium. The   show   includes   three   fe-­ male   singers,   three   male   singers   and  four  live  musicians. Leslie   LaMuro,   marketing   di-­ rector   of   the   Young   Auditorium,   agreed  with  Hodges  about  the  mu-­ sic   bringing   back   memories   and   said  it  would  do  the  same  for  stu-­ dents.   “This  event  will  probably  bring   back   memories   when   students   were  little  at  home  with  mom  and   Photo submitted dad,”  LaMuro  said. “Masters of Motown” will perform one night only at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 23 in the Young Auditorium. The group performs Motown Hodges  said  their  show  is  simi-­ music from the 1960s and 1970s that performer John Hodges said will bring some down memory lane.

brought  people  together  because  it   was  so  good. “There   was   a   big   party   and   people   were   segregated   on   each   side  of  the  room,  but  people  didn’t   care   about   color   anymore   and   came   together   because   they   were   listening   to   the   music,”   Hodges   said. Blevins  said  music  played  a  big   part  during  slavery  because  slaves   did  not  know  how  to  read  or  write   and  music  was  a  way  to  keep  them   motivated  and  get  through  the  day. “It  is  a  way  we  can  be  creative   and   talk   about   different   issues,”   Blevins  said. LaMuro   said   African   Ameri-­ cans  did  so  much   with  so  little. “They   didn’t   Blevins have  a  lot  of  ma-­ terial   wealth,   but   had  a  lot  of  wealth  in  their  hearts,”   LaMuro  said.  “And  this  comes  out   in  Motown  music.” Hodges   said   he   is   excited   for   everyone   to   come   out   and   enjoy   their  music. “We   are   looking   forward   to   everyone   coming   out   who   want   the  sounds  of  Motown,  and  we’re   going  to  give  it  to  them,”  Hodges   said.   “Just   like   it   was   back   in   the   early  ‘60s  and  ‘70s.” MegowKE11@uww.edu


Dateline Here February 20, 2013 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Side  Effectsâ&#x20AC;?  is  an  unpredict-­ able  psychological  rollercoaster.   The   movie   in   a   nutshell   is   long,   twisting,   thrilling   and   long   (although  it  was  only  an  hour  and   46  minutes). I   wanted   to   see   this   movie   as   soon   as   I   saw   previews   for   it   a   couple  of  months  ago,  and  I  was  so   H[FLWHG ZKHQ LW ÂżQDOO\ FDPH RXW 7KHÂżUVWKRXURUVRZDVJUHDWEXW from   there,   it   was   a   rollercoaster   of  ups  and  downs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Side   Effectsâ&#x20AC;?   begins   with   Martin   Taylor,   played   by   Chan-­ ning   Tatum,   being   released   from   prison  after  he  served  a  few  years   for   insider   trading.   He   comes   home   to   his   patient   wife   Emily,   played  by  Rooney  Mara.  

Emily   has   been   dealing   with   depression  since  her  husband  was   arrested  and  relapses  when  he  re-­ turns   home.   She   ends   up   in   the   hospital   after   a   suicide   attempt   and  begins  seeing  psychiatrist  Dr.   Jonathon   Banks,   played   by   Jude   Law.   Banks   de-­ cides  to  prescribe   Emily  a  new  pill   that   treats   de-­ pression.   How-­ Commentary by ever,   the   pill   Sam Jacquest causes   Emily   to   News Editor sleep   walk,   and   it  all  unravels  from  there. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  about  all  I  can  say  with-­ out   ruining   the   plot,   but   let   me  

Downtown Student Housing 2 and 3 Bedroom Apartments Locations available:

t 176 West Main Street t 175 West Main Street Parking Included Call Jim at 414-881-4774 or Nick at 262-370-2884

Cultural Affairs Presents

Come hear the soulful sounds of Motown!

Saturday, February 23 7:30 pm

www.facebook.com/Young.Aud

UW-W Stu. $14.50/$12.50/$9.50 Gen Public $29/$25/$19

Horizons Family Series Presents



Sunday February 24 3:00 pm Family fun for everyone! Jefferson County Human Society will be on hand to talk about pet adoption. www.jchs-wis.com

UW-W Stu. $9 Gen Public $15/$13/$9

Tickets 262-472-2222

On-line www.uww.edu/youngauditorium

Arts & Rec

tell   you,   what   occurs   due   to   the   pillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   side   effects   will   leave   you   in   shock.   Hence,   the   name   of   the   movie. Those   events   took   up   almost   half  of  the  movie.  After  that,  there   are   constant   twists   and   turns   that   left  me  exasperated  and  in  shock.   I  enjoyed  most  of  it,  but  it  also  got   dragged  on  a  bit  too  much.   All   of   a   sudden,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   learning   these   major   background   stories   of   three   different   main   characters   and  it  became  a  bit  much  at  some   points. But  I  have  to  say,  most  of  the   acting  was  extremely  convincing. Channing   Tatum,   while   he   played   his   part   well,   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   do   much  for  me.  It  was  probably  be-­ cause   I   had   scenes   from   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Magic   Mikeâ&#x20AC;?   stuck   in   my   head,   but   I   couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   completely   believe   that   his   character   would   be   smart   HQRXJK WR JHW ÂżOWK\ ULFK IURP LQ sider  trading.

2 Royal Purple Page 11

Law   and   Zeta-­Jones   were   both   the   compassionate   psy-­ chiatrists   you   would   expect,   although   the   way   their   char-­ acters  developed  played  a  key   role   in   the   progression   of   the   plot.   Law   suddenly   uses   his   profession   to   turn   into   a   mas-­ ter  manipulator  that  I  never  saw   coming,   while   Zeta-­Jones   turns   out  to  be  someone  completely  dif-­ ferent  from  my  initial  reaction. Mara   played   depression   very   well.  Everything  from  the  way  she   talked   in   low   tones,   to   how   she   wore   her   hair   made   her   part   le-­ gitimate.  After  you  see  the  movie,   you   will   learn   how   important   it   was  that  Mara  acted  her  part  well. While  the  story  was  great,  the   acting  was  executed  well,  and  the   twists   of   the   movie   were   shock-­ ing  in  a  good  way,  it  did  give  me   a  dragging  feel  at  some  points.  It   made  an  hour  and  46  minutes  feel  

like   a   marathon   with   all   the   new   developments   late   in   the   mov-­ ie.     6R LW ZDV JRRG EXW GHÂżQLWHO\ had  some  downfalls,  which  is  why   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  only  getting  a  3.5  out  of  5  for   me. However,   while   I   thought   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Side   Effectsâ&#x20AC;?   dragged   unneces-­ sarily,   I   can   easily   see   someone   else   thinking   it   was   just   right,   so   I   strongly   encourage   any   thriller-­ lovers  to  see  it. JacquestSL01@uww.edu


Arts & Rec

Dateline Page 12Here Royal Purple

3 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com February 20, 2013

Sydney Michuda graphic/0LFKXGD6.#XZZHGX

Sydney Michuda graphic/0LFKXGD6.#XZZHGX

262-472-5100

Classifieds

262-472-5100

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Fax: 262-472-5101 Email: rpads@uww.edu Web Site: www.royalpurplenews.com Cost: Business/Community- $5.00 for first 20 words, 0.25 for each additional word; Students: First 20 words FREE! Deadline: Fridays at noon

Help Wanted Alumni owned restaurant: The Speakeasy in downtown Janesville looking for servers, bartenders, and cooks. Email resume to ckarl@chadkarl.com

Sublease 1 Bedroom sublease for 1st or 2nd semester. Fremont St, close to downtown. 5 other girls, must be female. Rent $1650 plus all utilities. Email gabrielnm13@uww.edu “Spring 2013 Sub-Leaser Needed: 1 second floor room available in house on Church St. 2 adjoining second floor rooms are also vacant. 5 minute walk to campus. Paying $400/month including heat and electric. Sub-leasing for $350. Contact robleybb13@uww.edu” Roommate Sublease Needed for 1st and/or 2nd Semester. 1 person needed to live with 4 other guys in a 5 bedroom house across from campus.Your own bedroom and parking. Will prorate for 1st Semester, 2nd Semester is $1,900. Call for a showing. 920-296-1137

For Rent

For Rent

APARTMENT FOR RENT by semester PALMYRA ONE BEDROOM Now renting, whole house 2-3 with Intern options. Furnished studio/ With A/C. $475 per month with bedrooms, LR, DR, free off kitchenette, located 2 blocks from Unimatching security deposit. Newly street parking. $625/month versity in extremely quiet building. Only updated! Only 15 min. from UWEastside. Pet negotiable. Whitewater! 1 month free rent with intensive study students with excellent 262-473-4351 1 year lease 414-254-5080 references, recommendations by Professors, and proof of academic standing need Apartment for rent. Available apply. Includes all utilities, internet, cable, 2013-2014 school year. Large 2 washer /dryer and off street parking. No bedroom. Includes heat, water, Pets/No Smoking. $425/month with one month security deposit. Call Fairhaven for cable, internet, parking, and air conditioning. New kitchen with interview. 262-473-2140 – ask for dishwasher. Call 262-949-2390. Paul or Kathy. Huge 5 bedroom house available for 2013-2014 school year. Parking, washer dryer, and AC included. Call 262-949-2390 Two 2 bedroom downtown apartments. Heat/water included. Security entrance. $600.00 mo/ based on 2 occupants. Additional occupants add $50.00/mo. per person. Lease June-May. No pets or smoking. 473-7217

Large 2 bedroom apartment for rent- Jan 1, $650/month+utilities. off street parking, washer/dryer in unit, large rooms, walking distance from downtown. call/text 608-235-6447 Renting Sept. 2013-Aug. 2014. Small family business. Off street parking, quiet locations. Clean!! All sizes $435-$1400 monthly. Call 262-903-0400. 2-5 bedroom units available for the 2013-2014 school year. Close to campus, most utilities included, free parking, for more information call Chris at 1-262-613-3457

Furnished room near UWW. Internet, cable TV, laundry included. Nonsmoking with kitchen facilities. $350 a month. Call 262-607-0022 Person needed to sublet room in a large Need a new place for spring semester? Large 2 bedroom apartment for house on Main Street close to downUnhappy with your roommates? 3 bed- rent- Jan 1, $650/month+utilities. town. Nice sized room on second floor room, 1 bath house. In a “quiet” neighbor- off street parking, washer/dryer in with 3 windows. Available immediately! hood. 10 minute walk to campus. Located unit, large rooms, walking dis$1950 for the semester. Negotiable. on Prince Street. For more info Call tance from downtown. call/text Email bergar13@uww.edu 414-339-0506. 608-235-6447

For Rent 291 Janesville St. Near campus, pet friendly, 3 bedroom. Washer/dryer/dishwasher included with spacious backyard. $900/month. Call 414-690-7996 House for rent 2013-14. 4 Bedrooms, Den, 3 Bathrooms. Free parking/washer/dryer. Close to campus, food, and shopping. Call 920-988-8106 Apartments for rent 2013-14. Downtown location. 1,2,3,4 bedroom, utilities & private parking incl. Call 262-510-3462

For Rent

Downtown 1,2,3,4 Bedroom Apartments. Lofts, Studios, & Flats. All utilities included. On site laundry. Rec Room. Security cameras. Elevator. Triple J Properties (414) 8810883. www.triplejpropertiesllc.com. triplejpropertymgmt@yahoo.com

3 bedroom house. 1 block from campus. Washer and dryer included. Off street parking. 2 bathrooms. Clean and nice! 2013-14 school year. 608-558-5460.

Spring semester (January-May 2013) only. 3 Br house available immediately within walking distance to campus. Special rate for Spring Semester only; $675 per month plus utilities & snow shoveling. 1 month security. 3 student maximum. 262-949-0885

Now renting for the 2013-2014 school year. 1 bedroom apartments. Close to campus and downtown. Allow for small pets. Very clean. Parking included for most apartments. Please call Bilhorn Properties LLC 262.949.3166.

Bilhorn Properties LLC

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TODAY!


WEDNESDAY â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  dead  are  never  dead  to  us,  until  we   have  forgotten  them.â&#x20AC;?

February  20,  2013

Sports  Editor: Zach  Hicks

Assistant  Editor:

 -­George  Eliot

Kevin  Cunningham PAGE  13

A  forever-­â&#x20AC;?lasting  impact Legacy  of  former athlete  lives  on  in   teammatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  hearts

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks,   Pointers,   on  collision   course

Feature Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hoops Analysis

By Andrew Bayliss Staff  Writer

2Q'HFEUDLQFDQFHU took  the  life  of  a  20-­year-­old  who   lived  her  years  to  the  fullest.   While  former  UW-­Whitewater   YROOH\EDOO SOD\HU /LVD 3DQLFL LV gone,   her   legacy   and   impact   she   made   on   everyone   she   met   will   remain   strong   for   many   years   to   come  on  campus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every  time  people  say  or  hear   her   name,   their   eyes   light   up,â&#x20AC;?   /LVDÂśV \HDUROG EURWKHU $OHF Panici   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   lived   this   viva-­ cious,  zestful  life.  No  matter  where   VKHZHQWVKHZDVDOZD\VEULQJLQJ joy  to  someone  else.â&#x20AC;? 'XULQJ3DQLFLÂśVWZR\HDUEDWWOH ZLWK EUDLQ FDQFHU WKH RXWSRXULQJ of   support   from   her   coaches   and   teammates   on   the   Warhawks   vol-­ OH\EDOOWHDPZDVJUHDW Junior   setter   Heidi   Buss   said   the   team   stayed   close   with   Panici   GXULQJKHUEDWWOH Buss  and  other  teammates  rou-­ tinely  visited  Panici  when  she  was   no  longer  at  UW-­Whitewater,  and   Panici,   in   return,   went   to   every   match  she  could. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   Lisa   would   come   to   tournaments,  we  were  so  inspired,â&#x20AC;?   Buss  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  motivation  we  got   IURPKHULVLQGHVFULEDEOH´ That   inspiration   came   to   a   fe-­ YHU SLWFK DW WKH YROOH\EDOO WHDPÂśV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dig  Paniciâ&#x20AC;?  fundraising  night.   ,Q6HSWHPEHUZLWK3DQLFL in   attendance,   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   played  

By Justin St. Peter Staff  Writer

Submitted photo

Lisa Panici poses next to a tree in Breckenridge, Colo. in 2011. Panici, a former member of the volleyball team at UW-W, received Z\WWVY[MYVTOLY[LHTTH[LZMLSSV^Z[\KLU[H[OSL[LZHUKTLTILYZVM[OL<>>JVTT\UP[`K\YPUNOLYĂ&#x201E;NO[HNHPUZ[JHUJLY

what   head   coach   Stacy   Boudreau   FDOOHG WKHLU EHVW JDPH RI WKH VHD son. On   match   point   against   St.   Olaf   College,   the   entire   crowd   in   Kris   Russell   Arena   was   chanting   Paniciâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  name. Alec  Panici  said  the  support  his   sister  received  from  her  teammates   and   the   fans   at   UW-­Whitewater   was  important  to  her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those   girls   [Lisaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   team-­ mates]   knew   Lisa   like   not   many  

Submitted photo

Lisa Panici and Alec Panici pose for a photo. Lisa lost her battle to cancer on Dec. 26, 2012. The two were close, and according to Alec, Lisa led a â&#x20AC;&#x153;zestful life.â&#x20AC;?

others   have   gotten   to   know   her,â&#x20AC;?   PHPEHULQVSHFLDOZD\V he  said.     -RKQVWRQ VDLG D UXQ LV EHLQJ He  and  Buss   organized   in   said   the   impact   Paniciâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   memory   Panici   left   on   DQGZLOOEHDIXQ them   is   a   com-­ very  time  people   draiser  for  cancer   ELQDWLRQ RI D say  or  hear  her  name,   research.   fun-­loving   per-­ In   addition,   sonality   and   a   their  eyes  light  up. many   of   Paniciâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   willingness   to   teammates   wear   Alec  Panici, work   hard   for   EUDFHOHWV FRP brother  of  Lisa  Panici what   she   want-­ memorating  their   ed.   friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  life. -XQLRUEORFNHU Alec   Panici   Ariel   Johnston   plans   to   start   a   said  Paniciâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  personal  catchphrase   QRQSURÂżW RUJDQL]DWLRQ WR KHOS ZDVÂł,ORYHWRVZHDW´EHFDXVHVKH EURWKHUVDQGVLVWHUVZKRVHVLEOLQJV enjoyed  doing  whatever  it  took  to   KDYHEHHQDIĂ&#x20AC;LFWHGZLWKFDQFHU EHFRPHWKHEHVW â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   people   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   realize   Buss   said   her   friendship   with   that  cancer  is  a  huge  thing,  and  it   3DQLFLWDXJKWKHUWRÂżJKWIRUZKDW DIIHFWV HYHU\ERG\´ KH VDLG Âł$V VKHEHOLHYHVLQ DVLEOLQJLWÂśVKDUGWRZDWFKVRPH Âł(YHQ EHIRUH one   you   love   go   she   was   diag-­ through  that.â&#x20AC;? nosed,   she   was   Panici   said   the  hardest  work-­ he   aims   to   help   ing   person   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   other  people  who   ever   met   in   my   KDYH EHHQ SXW life,â&#x20AC;?   Buss   said.   in   his   position,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   was   that   EHFDXVH SXWWLQJ Johnston Buss crazy-­fun  girl  that   RWKHUV ÂżUVW ZDV HYHU\RQHZDQWHGWREHDURXQG´ something  Lisa  always  did. 7R KRQRU 3DQLFLÂśV EXEEO\ SHU 7KHOHJHQGDU\EDVNHWEDOOFRDFK VRQDOLW\ D FHOHEUDWLRQ RI OLIH ZDV Jim   Valvano   once   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cancer   held  in  lieu  of  a  funeral. can   take   away   all   of   my   physical   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  were  just  so  many  lives   DELOLWLHV that   she   touched,   that   it   wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   It   cannot   touch   my   mind.   It   EH GRLQJ KHU MXVWLFH WR PDNH LW D cannot   touch   my   heart.   It   cannot   doom   and   gloom   funeral,â&#x20AC;?   Alec   touch  my  soul.â&#x20AC;? Panici  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  wanted  people  to   Lisa   Panici   was   proof   of   that,   OHDYHVPLOLQJDQGFU\LQJEHFDXVH DQG KHU EURWKHU DQG IULHQGV VDLG thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  Lisa  would  want.â&#x20AC;? nothing  ever  stopped  her  from  put-­ 7KH:DUKDZNV YROOH\EDOO SUR WLQJRWKHUVEHIRUHKHUVHOI gram   and   Paniciâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   family   want   to   BaylissAE30@uww.edu commemorate   their   lost   family  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

   E

The   Warhawks   are   looking   for   redemption.  After  winning  the  regu-­ lar  season  crown  last  year,  they  lost   the   WIAC   tournament   champion-­ ship  to  UW-­River  Falls.   After  that  loss,  the  `Hawks  went   on  a  run  to  win  the  national  champi-­ onship.  UW-­Stevens  Point  hopes  to   sweep  the  regular  season  and  WIAC   tournament.   UW-­Oshkosh,   UW-­Eau   Claire   and   defending   WIAC   tournament   champion  UW-­River  Falls  all  do  not   qualify   for   the   tournament,   leaving   the  top  six  seeds  open.   The   playoff   system   works   like   the  NFL  playoffs,  where  the  higher   seed  gets  home  court  in  every  game.   The  top  two  seeds,  the  Pointers  and   WKH C+DZNV JHW ÂżUVWURXQG E\HV 7KH ELJ GLIIHUHQFH LV WKH KLJKHVW seed  remaining  holds  the  champion-­ ship  game  on  their  home  court.   The   No.   15-­ranked   Stevens   Point  Pointers  (21-­4,  14-­2  in  WIAC)   have  swept  the  season  series  over  the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks.  The  regular  season  WIAC   FKDPSVDUHOHGE\JXDUG$XVWLQ5\I who   averages   7.4   points   per   game   and  3.6  assists  per  game.   Trevor  Haas  leads  a  trio  of  play-­ HUVWKDWKDYHGRXEOHGLJLWSRLQWWRWDO averages   (11.9).   The   Pointers   lead   WKH OHDJXH LQ DVVLVWV DQG ÂżHOG JRDO percentage.   They  also  have  the  highest  aver-­ age  attendance  in  the  league,  making   LWHYHQPRUHGLIÂżFXOWWRZLQRQWKHLU court.   ,WZRXOGEHDVKRFNHULIWKH\GLG not  at  least  make  the  championship   game   where   they   would   have   the   ERLVWHURXVFURZGLQWKHLUIDYRU â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   have   a   very   good   atmo-­ sphere   up   there,â&#x20AC;?   guard  Eric  Bryson   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   crowd   gets   into   it;Íž   they   get  a  lot  of  people   to   show   up   at   the   game.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   a   fun  atmosphere  to   Miller play  in.â&#x20AC;? The   No.   14-­ranked   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks   are   D JDPH EHKLQG WKH 3RLQWHUV  13-­3  in  WIAC).  They  enter  the  tour-­ nament   hot,   having   won   their   past   seven  games.   They   have   the   highest   scor-­ ing   offense   in   the   conference,   with   three   players   averaging   more   than   10  points  per  game.  Quardell  Young   averages  12  points,  3.8  assists  and  2   steals  per  game.  He  leads  the  WIAC   LQVWHDOVSHUJDPH/XNH.QREOHDY erages   11.1   points   per   game   and   is  

See  WIAC  Page  15


Sports

Dateline Page 14Here Royal Purple

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hawks No.   5   UW-­River   Falls.   UW-­ Superior  may  be  the  higher-­seeded   team  and  have  home  court  advan-­ tage,   but   they   have   lost   their   last   WKUHH JDPHV 7KH ÂżUVW ORVV LQ WKH teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   three-­game   losing   streak   was   to   the   Falcons.   The   season   series   was   tied   during   the   regular   season,  because  the  Yellowjackets   beat  the  Falcons  earlier  in  the  year   at  home.   The   Falcons   are   not   coming   into  this  game  at  a  good  place  ei-­ ther,  losing  two  of  their  last  three.   ([SHFWWRVHHVHQLRUIRUZDUG%ULW tany  Gregorich  become  the  differ-­ ence   in   this   game   for   the   upset-­ minded  Falcons.   Gregorich   averages   13   points   SHU JDPH ZKLOH VKRRWLQJ  SHU FHQW IURP WKH ÂżHOG 7KH IRRW inch  forward  also  leads  the  team  in   UHERXQGVZLWKSHUJDPH8: River   Falls   is   the   top   team   in   the   conference   in   rebounding   margin   per   game,   so   look   for   Gregorich   to   be   the   difference-­maker   both   LQVLGHDQGRXWLQWKLVIRXUYVÂżYH seed  matchup.   Assuming   the   Falcons   do   pull   the   upset,   they   would   then   travel   to   UW-­Whitewater   on   Friday   for   D VHPLÂżQDO PDWFKXS ZKLFK ZRXOG be   a   rematch   for   the   top-­seeded   Warhawks.  After   beating   them   on  

Continued  from  page  1 Saturday  in  what  could  have  been   seen  as  a  meaningless  game  for  the   Âś+DZNVFRQVLGHULQJWKHWHDPKDG the   No.   1   seed   already   clinched,   the  Falcons  will  be  looking  for  re-­ venge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   [Gregorich]   is   tough   and   she   does   everything   for   them,â&#x20AC;?   head  coach  Keri  Carollo  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   can   rebound,   she   scores,   and   she   brings  the  ball  up  for  them.  Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a   great  player,  so  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hard  to  stop.â&#x20AC;? Gregorich  ended  up  fouling  out   of   the   game   on   Saturday,   but   she   recorded   13   points   with   four   as-­ VLVWV7KDQNVWRWKHÂś+DZNVÂśSUHV suring  defense,  she  also  committed   VL[ WXUQRYHUV :LWK D KLJKHQHUJ\ defense   and   a   girl   that   can   domi-­ nate  the  paint  in  senior  center  Cort-­ QH\.XPHURZH[SHFWWKHÂś+DZNV to   keep   their   unbeaten   record   at   home  this  season  alive  against  the   potential  upset-­minded  Falcons. Look  for  senior  guards  Megan   Wenig   and   Katie   Kitzke   to   be   the   difference  for  the  Titans.  They  are   the  top  two  scorers  for  the  team  on   the   season,   and   provide   the   team   with  senior  leadership  in  the  back-­ FRXUW ZKLFK LV EHQHÂżFLDO WR DQ\ team  looking  to  make  a  run  in  post-­ season   play.  A   win   for   the   Titans   over   the   Pointers   would   set   up   a   matchup  on  Sunday  in  Whitewater.

The   season   series   between   the   Âś+DZNVDQG7LWDQVZDVDVSOLWZLWK both  teams  winning  on  their  home   court.   The   last   matchup   between   the   two   was   an   intriguing   one   as   &DUROORZDVORRNLQJIRUKHUWK career  victory,  and  the  winner  was   guaranteed   to   be   the  WIAC   regu-­ ODUVHDVRQFKDPSLRQ7KHÂś+DZNV ZRQWKDWPDWFKXSLQZKDW was   a   tight   game   throughout.  Af-­ WHUDUXQEHIRUHWKHÂżUVWKDOI HQGHGWKH7LWDQVOHG The   leading   rebounder   for   the   7LWDQVLVIRRWLQFKVRSKRPRUH guard   Katelyn   Kuehl.   Kuehl   was   held  to  two  points  in  the  last  meet-­ LQJDQGDWIHHWLQFKHVWDOOWKH IRRWLQFK.XPHURZVKRXOGEH able   to   control   the   paint   and   the   glass.     If   things   go   Kumerowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   way   GRZQORZDQGWKHÂś+DZNVÂśGHIHQVH can  keep  the  pressure  on  its  oppo-­ QHQWV IDQV VKRXOG EH H[SHFWLQJ D WIAC  championship.   ,I WKH Âś+DZNV HQG XS SOD\LQJ UW-­Stevens   Point,   it   would   be   their   fourth   straight   conference   championship   matchup,   with   the   ÂżUVWWKUHHJRLQJWKH3RLQWHUVÂśZD\ ,IDUHPDWFKZHUHWRRFFXUH[SHFW WKH Âś+DZNV WR EH ORRNLQJ IRU UH venge  this  time  around  at  home.   CunninghKT25@uww.edu

Sydney Michuda graphic/0LFKXGD6.#XZZHGX

2 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com February 20, 2013

Sports Briefs Swim  and  Dive The   Warhawks   menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   and   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  swimming  and  diving   teams   recorded   school   history   EHVW ÂżQLVKHV E\ SODFLQJ WKLUG in  the  WIAC  championship  on   6DWXUGD\)HE 7KH PHQÂśV WHDP ÂżQLVKHG EHKLQGÂżUVWSODFH8:6WHYHQV Point  and  second  place  UW-­La   Crosse.   On   the   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   side,   8:/D&URVVHWRRNÂżUVWZKLOH UW-­Stevens   Point   took   sec-­ ond.   Sophomore   Amy   Spaay   ZRQ WKH \DUG EUHDVWVWURNH and   was   named   Swimmer   of   WKH 0HHW IRU WKH  :,$& FKDPSLRQVKLS +HDG FRDFK Joel   Rollings   won   the   WIAC   Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Swim  Coach  of  the  Year   honor  for  the  second  time  in  his  

career. Wrestling $IWHU D \HDU VWUHWFK RI WIAC   championship   titles   by   UW-­La   Crosse,   the   Warhawks   have   now   won   back   to   back   WLWOHV IRU WKH ÂżUVW WLPH VLQFH  The   WIAC   championship   used   the   dual   meet   format   for   WKHÂżUVWWLPHLQFRQIHUHQFHKLV WRU\ 7KH Âś+DZNV ÂżQLVKHG WKH VHDVRQLQ:,$&GXDOV Tennis Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   and   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ten-­ nis   head   coach   Frank   Barnes   HDUQHGKLVWKFDUHHUZLQDW 8::RQ6DWXUGD\)HEDW Grinnell   College   in   Grinnell,   Iowa.

Track gains momentum After   strong   weekends,   both  teams  look  toward   WIAC  Championships

events,â&#x20AC;?   head   coach   Mike   John-­ son  said.   6RSKRPRUH /H[LH 6RQGJHURWK KDGDELJGD\IRUWKHÂś+DZNVWDN LQJ ÂżUVW SODFH LQ WKH ORQJ MXPS DQGVHFRQGSODFHLQWKHPHWHU Track and Field dash.   :LWK WZR VROLG ÂżQLVKHV DW WKH By Shawn Poole Staff  Writer Cardinal   Classic,   the   menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   and   The   UW-­Whitewater   menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ZRPHQÂśV WHDPV H[SHFW WR KDYH D and   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Track   and   Field   great  showing  at  the  WIAC  Cham-­ WHDPV VHFXUHG D  ÂżQLVK DW WKH pionships  hosted  by  UW-­Stevenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Cardinal   Classic   this   past   Friday   3RLQWRQ)HEDQG The  WIAC  is  a  strong  confer-­ at   North   Central   College   in   Na-­ HQFHRQWKHPHQÂśVVLGHKDYLQJVL[ perville,   Ill.     The   No.   3   ranked   PHQÂśVWHDPWRRNKRPHÂżUVWSODFH of  the  top  12  teams  in  the  USTF-­ CCCA  top-­25  poll.   OHGE\IRXUÂżUVWSODFHÂżQLVKHV   UW-­La   Crosse   is   the   top   0RULDUW\ %URZQ*ULIÂżQ team,   followed   by   UW-­Oshkosh   FURVVHGWKHOLQHÂżUVWLQWKHPH and  UW-­Whitewater  rounding  out   WHU GDVK ZLWK D WLPH RI  VHF RQGV ZKLOH 1LFN %HH ÂżQLVKHG the  top  three.     UW-­Eau  Claire  is  currently  the   VHFRQG ZLWK D WLPH RI  VHF No.  7  ranked  team,  with  UW-­Plat-­ onds.     Justin   Bowers   took   home   WHYLOOH KROGLQJ GRZQ WKH 1R  ÂżUVWSODFHIRUWKH ranking   and   UW-­Stevenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Point   Warhawks  in  the   the   No.   12   ranked   team.   UW-­La-­ long   jump   with   crosse  is  going  for  its  12th  straight   a   jump   of   7.35   WIAC   Indoor   Championship   and   meters.     Cory   WIAC  record  38th  championship.   =DHVNH ÂżQLVKHG Âś+DZNVMXQLRU%HQ:DWVRQLVD third   in   the   long   favorite  in  the  shot  put  this  year  at   jump   with   a   Johnson the  Indoor  Championships.   MXPS RI  Watson,   a   recent   UW-­W  Ath-­ meters.   lete  of  the  Week  winner,  recorded   Marcus   Smith   dominated   in   WKHWULSOHMXPSZLWKDMXPSRI WKHWKEHVWWKURZLQ'LYLVLRQ,,,  WR WDNH KRPH DQRWKHU ÂżUVW DWWKH:,$&4XDGPHHWRQ)HE On   the   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   side,   the   SODFHÂżQLVKIRUWKHÂś+DZNV WIAC   has   three   of   the   top   12   6PLWK ÂżQ teams   in   the   ished   almost   USTFCCCA   top-­ three   full   me-­ 25  poll.     my  Miskowicz   ters   ahead   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153; U W -­ O s h -­ second   place   and  Shelby  Mahr  are   kosh  has  been  the   ÂżQLVKHU %URFN dominant   pro-­ Massie   from   lethal  in  the  throws. gram   recently,â&#x20AC;?   Lewis   Univer-­ Mike  Johnson, Johnson   said.   sity.   head  coach â&#x20AC;&#x153;UW-­La   Crosse   7KHÂś+DZNVÂś and   UW-­Eau   [ PHWHU Claire  are  always   team   of   Devin   competing  for  the   Granger,   Bryce   top  spot  in  the  WIAC  as  well.â&#x20AC;?   Rudebeck,   Kevin   Gorman   and   UW-­Oshkosh   holds   down   the   -DUHG'HQXÂżQLVKHGZLWKDWLPHRI No.   1   ranking,   while   UW-­La-­ ZKLFKWRRNÂżUVWSODFH crosse  jumped  up  four  spots  from   The   No.   12   ranked   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   WHDPÂżQLVKHGVHFRQGLQDÂżHOGRI ODVW ZHHN WR WKH 1R  UDQNLQJ UW-­Whitewater  fell  from  the  No.   12  teams.   Amy   Miskowicz   took   home   a   5  ranking  to  the  No.  12  ranking  in   WKLUG SODFH ÂżQLVK %HWKDQ\ 1HX this  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  poll. RP   Predictions:   Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s:   (1st)   berger   took   fourth   and   Shelby   UW-­W,  (2nd)  UW-­L,  (3rd)  UW-­O 0DKUVL[WK Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s:   (1st)   UW-­O,   (2nd)   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amy   Miskowicz   and   Shelby   UW-­W,  (3rd)  UW-­L. Mahr   are   lethal   in   the   throws   as  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

   A

Jenny Dupuis photo/'XSXLV-&#XZZHGX

Senior center Cortney Kumerow, right, looked to get into the paint early and often in the 66-60 victory over UW-River Falls. The win gave the Warhawks their eighth straight victory heading into the WIAC tournament on Friday.

returning   sophomores   because   of   their   strength   in   many   throwing  

PooleSD13@uww.edu


Sports

Dateline Here February 20, 2013 www.RoyalPurpleNews.com

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3 Royal Purple Page 15

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Sydney Michuda graphics/0LFKXGD6.#XZZHGX

 

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February 20, 2013 Issue