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Dec. 14, 2016 Lifestyle[13]

In five US states, including Wisconsin, it is legal to own any non-endangered animal. However, many cities have strict regulations regarding exotic pet ownership. Several people shared their views on how to properly care for exotic pets and whether it is ethical.

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GOP students, faculty speak up Kimberly Wethal Co-Editor in Chief

Editor’s Note: *Names have been changed to protect source integrity. In a continuation from the story “‘No matter who won, we lost’” from two editions ago, three of the many conservative voices on campus take their place in the spotlight. The challenge to several states, leading to a recount, the protests in major cities and the disparity between the Electoral College and the popular vote have led many conservatives to feel uneasy about identifying as Trump supporters. They are worried about the disintegration of respectful political discourse. For the two students featured, while President-elect Donald Trump would not have been their first choice out of all 17 candidates who ran for the Republican ticket, they remain hopeful he’ll put aside his “superficiality,” surround himself with good people and uphold conservative beliefs like pro-life values. One professor found himself concerned with the idea of academic freedom and the increasing trend of one-sided conversations that take place in college classrooms. Here are their stories. Election upset Freshman Louisa Fredriksson has been “extremely lucky” that those living in the rooms surrounding hers on the residence hall floor had a spectrum of political views. But on election night a month ago, the idea of someone on the floor voting for President-elect Donald Trump over Democratic supporting Hillary Clinton set off a scene of yelling on the second floor of Fricker Hall. For Fredriksson, it was upsetting. “It’s not that I was scared, but I was kind of worried that that was going to be par for the course moving forward when people had polit-

see reactions page 5

Photo by Kim Gilliland / Photo Editor

Jacqueline Schaefer, psychology major, has been named the winter commencement speaker for the ceremony on Saturday, Dec. 17. After graduation, Schaefer says she hopes to attend medical school and enter the field of psychiatry.

Moments that make Warhawks

Commencement speaker focuses on past, present, future Nicole Aimone Assistant News Editor

For Jacqueline Schaefer, graduating college isn’t going to be the biggest moment of her life. As the December graduation student commencement speaker, her goal is to inspire other graduates to see the potential in life’s moments past, present and future, with her speech titled “Moments that Make Us.” “Something that I’ve been focused on are those moments, that when they happen, you don’t realize the impact they’re going to have on your life,” Schaefer said. “Those moments are so small and so powerful, that I really wanted to be able to just think about them and reflect on them.” Schaefer wanted to focus on the graduates present, acknowledging just how significant college graduation is in the moment, as well as the implications the big event holds for their future.

“Graduation is one of those moments that really is just the start of something new, a whole new direction,” Schaefer said. “I wanted to think about that and also looking forward into the future, and how can we create these moments.” Schaefer not only wants her au-

“I want people to feel connected, to feel like in that moment we are one big Warhawk family,” –Jacqueline Schaefer

dience to both reflect and look forward, but also feel the sense of connection “I want people to feel connected, to feel like in that moment we are one big Warhawk family,” Schaefer said. “I want people to reflect on our common experience, but also reflect on where they came from, and how much they have changed.” For Schaefer, many people and experiences shaped her as well.

Schaefer says much of her success is owed to her parents for always encouraging her to be who and what she wanted to be. This meant attending University of Wisconsin-Whitewater with a psychology major and looking into the field of psychiatry. She decided to look into that field after a conversation with her father when he told her that he believed she had what it took to go to medical school. “I said, ‘Dad I really think I want to do this whole psychology thing, people are so fascinating, I want to figure them out, get inside their brains,’ and he asked, ‘what does it take to be a psychiatrist?’ Schaefer said. “He said, ‘I think you can do this.’” The decision to attend medical school came from the desire to learn more about the entire human body. “You get to spend two years in clinicals, being a part of all of those different medical fields,” Schaefer

see speaker page 5


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News

Patrick D. Chatman, II

Dec. 14, 2016

You did it! We are so proud of you and just know the future holds wonderful opportunities for you. You have accomplished so much. Keep moving “FORWARD,” you can get anywhere from here. We look forward to your future endeavors and career path that you have chosen. We’ll be here for you every step of the way. Love always, Dad, Mom, Sister, Grandparents, and Family.


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Dec. 14, 2016

News

Org supports students during holiday season Emily Lepkowski News Editor

For some students, going home for the holidays means comfort and relaxation. But for others it may not be the case. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students (LGBT*) may have a difficult time celebrating the holiday season if families are not as accepting of their gender identities, expressions or if they have not come out to their families at home. “I don’t think the majority of our LGBT* students are out at home,” LGBT* Coordinator Stephanie Selvick said. “And so they go home and they are not out in a variety of ways, and they have to hide that part of themselves and that is exhausting.” IMPACT and the PRIDE Center give students an environment to be themselves as well as provide on campus support. “Winter holidays can be more

isolated and it’s a challenge for those of us who do outreach to students who maybe don’t have support, It’s certainly a challenge,” Selvick said IMPACT will be putting on a ‘Holigays” party on Dec. 13 with a gift exchange, music and holiday festivities. IMPACT also hosts ‘Queersgiving’ every year, providing students an alternative to the traditional Thanksgiving celebration. “Most times, there’s gotta be somebody in your corner,” IMPACT president Megan Tickner said. “I think finding them and relying on them in a time where maybe it’s hard to rely on yourself, I think it’s really important.” Turning to digital communities for those who may be farther away from family and friends during the holidays is also a way for students to find support. “I think for the LGBT* com-

munity, even though we go home for the winter break, people at IMPACT, we have our email and our Facebook page so if anyone needs anything, doesn’t mean you can’t reach out onto it,” Tickner said. Selvick also started exploring other pride centers to see what kinds of solutions they offer, one of which she found, was a gay holiday movies watch list. “I think it goes back to this idea of a digital community so you get to see yourself represented in this holiday that we often don’t see,” Selvick said.

Graphic by Carlie Sue Herrick/ Graphics Editor

United Way Campaign

United Way is committed to providing education, healthcare and income to people in the US and around the world. The campaign rolled out on campus on Nov. 30, and ended on Dec. 9. The goal this year was to raise the level of involvement on campus from 3 percent to 5 percent. The campaign was also rolled out in Walworth and Jefferson counties, where many community businesses contributed money that went directly to residents in the area. At left: Chancellor Beverly Kopper speaks at the kick-off event for United Way on Wed, Nov. 30. Kopper is a member of the United Way foundations board. photo by Kimberly Wethal /Co-Editor in Chief

DON’T BE

TRASHY

PLEASE PLEASE

RECYCLE RECYCLE


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Dec. 14, 2016

Research program grants students hands-on-experience Shannon Columb Staff Writer

For the second time, representatives of the Research Apprenticeship Program (RAP) accepted honors for nation wide recognition of it’s work with diversity in education. RAP received the 2016 Diversity Program Achievement Award from the Wisconsin State Council on Affirmative Action in October. This is not the first time the program has received recognition; in 2015, RAP was recognized for its contribution to serving under-served student populations by the University

of Wisconsin System Board of Regents. The goal of RAP is to lessen the achievement gap between minority and majority students in terms of graduation rates. “It is actually quite wellknown that undergraduate research is [a tool] that can help the retention in graduation and students’ success in general,” Catherine Chan, director of Undergraduate Research said. RAP is a fairly new program at University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. Ever since its launch in 2011, it has empowered an array of students. The main focus of the pro-

Police Campus RepCamBriefs

Come check out the annual production of the Nutcracker on Saturday, Dec. 17 at 7 p.m. in the Young Auditorium. This production will be put on by The Dance Factory. Enjoy the talented dancers and high-end costumes in this classic play.

gram is to engage freshmen, sophomores, and transfers in research – which is typically reserved for juniors and seniors. “With RAP, I was able to learn about research hands on and eventually work on my own projects as early as sophomore year,” former RAP student, Kate Yetter said. The program allows students to work closely with mentors from all four undergraduate departments on various research projects Students are paid to create surveys, collect and analyze data and review literature

during the semester-long, paid opportunity. RAP has become so popular that there is currently a waiting list for spring semester. As Chan described, many students who participated in the program said it was very beneficial and ‘among one of the most influential experiences within the college career.’ For more information about RAP, visit www.uww.edu/urp/ rap.

Police Campus RepCamBriefs

The week of Dec. 12 will be the last week that the Holidays Around the World exhibit, presented by Roberta’s Art Gallery will be open at Old Main Lane. The exhibit shows how different cultures celebrate their winter holidays, like Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Ramadan Mubarak and St. Lucia Day.

Congratulations, Eric Moehring!!

Another step in your journey through life completed. We are proud of you and your success. –Mom, Dad, and Sis


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Dec. 14, 2016

Speaker: Love for medical field drives future said. “Which is fascinating to me. It got me hooked on the body.” Although Schaefer is entering medical school with the hopes of becoming a psychiatrist, she is excited so see what other specialties and fields have in store that may become her future. “I will definitely do a clinical in psychiatry, but then, if I can, I definitely want to do some pediatric ones,” Schaefer said. “I know I love kids, I’ve worked with them in a lot of different settings.” As for medical experience now, Schafer works at Rogers Memorial Hospital in Oconomowoc as a psychiatric tech. Her job involves working with many patients in the different psychiatric units, where she is available to answer questions, as well as make sure patients are follow-

ing the rules of the units and following their treatment plan. Much of her job requires her to spend time working with patients who have eating disorders, which has shown her how rewarding her future field can be. “I love working with these girls and seeing them, when they come in and their very ‘I can’t do this, I can’t eat, you don’t understand, I can’t because of a, b or c.’ They all have their own unique different reasons,” Schaefer said. “And slowly, sitting with them, and talking with them and helping them get to the point where they can eat, where they don’t hate themselves for eating. It’s so cool.” Throughout her three and a half years at Whitewater, Schaefer has been involved in

many organizations and leadership opportunities. At the start of her sophomore year, she was hired as a peer mentor to help freshmen students through their first year of college. She has also been a part of Psychology Club and is currently the vice president. Schaefer will give her speech at the graduation ceremony Dec. 17 at 10 a.m. in Kachel Fieldhouse. The ceremony will also be live broadcasted in Timmerman auditorium in Hyland Hall.

Reactions: Students, staff speak on key issues ical discussions,” Fredriksson said. “I don’t want my kids to grow up someday in an environment where they feel they have to walk on eggshells because no one knows how to respectfully talk about anything anymore.” Fredriksson, who was a third-party voter for the Constitution Party’s candidate Darrell Castle in the general election, found the primary election to be less than satisfactory, so she protested her vote during Wisconsin’s primary election day. “It’s always disappointing when you see that you had a huge pool of people, and then it came down to people that when they would debate, it was all just personal garbage that they were throwing that was so immature and childish,” Fredriksson said. “It was this generally disappointing time where everyone was voting for who they wanted to vote for, but it just didn’t seem like people were getting what they actually wanted.” Freshman Maryah Strieter has found that her conservative beliefs have been kept under-wraps throughout the election – even her roommate has no idea about her political ideologies. Right after the election, she logged onto Facebook to see statuses and commentary of friends who “wanted to kill anyone who voted for Trump.” The post-election reactions made her glad to head home that weekend.

While her parents knew that she could hold her own, they still worried about her after hearing news reports of college students getting “nasty,” Strieter said. “I said, ‘OK, I’m not going to say anything, because this is kind of terrifying,’” Strieter said.

her extended family to provide a “good mix” of ideas) and being a member of the Catholic faith. Being Catholic led to affirmation of her pro-life beliefs. “They kind of went hand-in-hand, and developed with each other,” Fredriksson said. Fredriksson hopes Trump is telling the truth about his pro-life stances Pro-life positions despite having been on record as proStrieter grew up in a conservative choice in years past. household, but she insisted on devel“I really hope and pray that that’s acoping her own beliefs. curate, because I know for some peoShe found affirmation through her ple, that their one issue and that’s why Catholic religion. As an adult, while they voted for him,” Fredriksson said. being pro-life isn’t the only principle “If he can hold onto that and lose that she votes on, it plays a big part. big bully aspect, I think he can really “I think I would be [pro-life] even if I do a lot of good things in this country.” wasn’t Catholic,” Strieter said. “We appreciate life from birth to natural death In the classroom … it’s always weirded me out that the Associate professor in the College government protects eagle eggs, but of Letters and Sciences Edward Burndoesn’t protect a child when they’re ham* has found himself more emoconceived.” tionally invested in this year’s camIt’s a big reason why the idea of cast- paign cycle because of what it meant ing a vote for Clinton didn’t feel mor- for academic freedom and the politics ally right for her, Strieter said. Strieter of higher education. believes in the right of women to make As a conservative, Burnham says he choices for their bodies, but she says feels the concept of academic freedom that once a child is conceived, “it’s not has been “distorted.” only her body in question.” “When we talk about academic freeFredriksson’s pro-life beliefs are also dom, I feel the rights of students have rooted in the combination of growing been compromised,” Burnham said. up in an ideologically conservative “Over the past couple of decades, I feel household (with liberal tendencies in classrooms in universities have been

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used to promote particular political agendas at the expense of learning, and serious debates and arguments … it’s a concern to me that this wonderful system of higher education that we have has been misused and exploited for political gain.” In regards to student’s rights, UW-Whitewater’s governance groups use a system of shared governance concerning certain policy decisions impacting the university. Burnham acknowledges that a large majority of faculty in the social sciences tend to hold liberal views – that’s not necessary a problem, he says – but the result is that “students lack an accurate portrayal of competing perspectives” that makes it impossible to have a good discussion. Burnham says the current campus environment where conservative ideologies are “shouted down” cultivates a climate where there are “right ideas” and “wrong ideas.” “There’s right now a culture of fear in students,” Burnham said. “I think we’ve seen enough instances where reprisals for espousing certain views … It’s the very existence of those ideas that people are finding offensive. The rise of things like microaggressions; I think those can really be exploited and can be used to silence a growing minority on campus.”


Briefs

Opinions Editor: Dusty Hartl

O Opinions

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Holidays Around the World Exhibit Merry Christmas! Happy Hanukkah! Joyous Kwanzaa! Ramadan Mubarak! Happy New Year! Happy St. Lucia Day! Come discover how holidays

are celebrated around the world. Wednesday, December 14, 2016 all day in the UC on the Second Floor.

The odd and logical Trump cabinet choices Royal Purple Editorial Staff Opinion

In January, President-elect Trump’s administration will take over the White House. Thus far there have been many questionable picks for his cabinet. There has only been thirteen appointments since Trump was declared the winner. Many staff picks include Dr. Ben Carson, Gen. James Mattis, Sen. Jeff Sessions, Com. John Kelly, Gov. Nikki Haley, and Reince Priebus. A lot of the names sound familiar enough, but do they have the experience to match it? As far as these picks go, I would say, like Montgomery Gentry says, that there is “one in every crowd” who would be considered ill equipped. One of these picks is Dr. Ben Carson for the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. This brain surgeon was a presidential hopeful during the Republican primary who dropped out and threw his weight behind Trump. Earlier in the month when asked if he would accept a cabinet position, an aide said “Dr. Carson feels he has no government experience; he’s never run a federal agency.”

Graphic by Carlie Sue Herrick / Graphics Editor

However, following that statement, Carson accepted the nomination. What experience does Carson hold in housing and urban development? The New York Times said, “he [Carson] has no expertise in housing policy.” The Housing and Urban Development budget is well over $47 billion that helps individuals with housing vouchers and renters insurance, among many things. Carson said, “what I do want to do is create ladders of opportunity, so that people don’t have to be dependent. Government should not keep people in a dependent state. It should be used as a springboard,

and not as a hammock.” Another questionable choice is Gov. Nikki Haley of South Carolina. Tapping her was a surprise to many as she was a vocal critic of Trump and it was thought she was passed over as a possible Vice President pick. NewsWeek said, “Haley, considered a rising star in the Republican Party, was elected to serve as governor of the Palmetto State in 2011. She is the first female and the first minority to hold the post.” Trump tapped her according to The Post and Courier, for “the governor’s work abroad centers mostly on her negotiations with

international companies looking to move into the Palmetto State. She’s also led seven trade missions overseas during her time as governor.” One of the more odd choices so far is Scott Pruitt for the Environmental Protection Agency. Pruitt is a vocal opponent to President Barack Obama’s climate change initiatives and labeled a friend of the fossil fuel industry. The New York Times said, “Mr. Pruitt, 48, is a hero to conservative activists, one of a group of Republican attorneys general who formed an alliance with some of the nation’s

top energy producers to push back against the Obama regulatory agenda. Fossil fuel interests greeted Mr. Trump’s selection with elation.” This is a concern for many that the EPA’s environmental progress will drawn back, opening the country up to lessened sanctions on the fossil fuel industry. Not all the appointments thus far have been as odd, many making sense. These include Reince Priebus for his experience in the party, James Mattis for his experience as a military general, etc. The hope is that Trump will make more respected decisions and that we, as Americans, make our voices heard. Contacting government officials and writing letter to the editor are just some of the ways to become more engaged in this process. Our voices should be heard, good and bad, and the Trump administration should take every measure to insure that we are all heard. Perhaps having more suitable candidates such as Rep. Paul Ryan, Gov. Mitt Romney, or even Sen. John McCain would be more well equipped to help led the country.

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Writers must include full first and last name, address, year in school or position at the university (if applicable). Contact information will not be published in the Royal Purple. Unsigned letters are automatically rejected. Opinions expressed in letters, columns or commentaries are solely the opinion of the author and not necessarily the opinion of the staff of the Royal Purple or UW-Whitewater. Please bring letters to the Royal Purple office, 66 University Center, or e-mail them to RP@uww.edu.

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Dec. 14, 2016

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Letters the Editor Theto Forum

Late nights, long hours worth the smiles On my way to my last budget meeting for the Royal Purple, I passed campus catering as they set up for an event. By one look at the fabric tablecloths, row of hot chafers, and a decoratively twisted stack of paper napkins, I was taken back to my freshman year when I worked for campus catering. My job duty has shifted from quivering as I pour water for the (now former) chancellor, to working in a newsroom. But the change in work roles is not what’s important, but rather the transformation of my love for work, confidence in myself, and increased admiration for creativity. I remember beating myself up for not remembering if the salad fork goes on the left side of the dinner fork or the right side. I remember my boss practically challenging my intelligence because I laid the butter knife horizontally on the butter plate instead of diagonally. I had so little motivation to thrive within my thirteen

hour shifts because all but a few made me feel good about the work I was putting in. Work endurance is catalyzed solely through passion, but also the faith of others around you. I’ve never thought that I’d be this happy working in an office until 2am or even 6am and yet every Monday night I leave the Royal Purple office after production night exhausted and with a smile on my face. I started at the Royal Purple as a staff writer my sophomore year, writing Wellness columns for Lifestyle, then eventually was hired as the Multimedia editor and then was hired as the Lifestyle editor my senior year. Today I can say I work with people who are wholeheartedly cheering me on and having faith in my work. I would like to start out by expressing my admiration for the staff environment I have been a part of this past semester by addressing two women who inspired me incredibly

through their encouraging words. “I love you all, but you all make be want to vomit” are the kind of words said by Co-Editor in Chief Ashley Mccallum that consistently inspire me to persevere. Jokes aside, I was lucky enough to have not one, but two editors in chiefs. Ashley Mccallum and Kimberly Wethal have changed the game of the Royal Purple. They have not only completely redesigned the look of the newspaper and enhance the paper visually, but their leadership has internally enhanced the Royal Purple. I came into my editorial position with no journalism, newspaper experience or any clue on how to work InDesign. Yet, Ashley and Kimberly have had enormous faith in me to push myself creatively and motivated me to learn more about the student journalism world. These women have been tremendous leaders while simultaneously attaining a great friendship. I would like to also

express my admiration for Dr. Terracina/ Dr. Mama T. Her strength, passion, and genuine interest in us as a student news staff radiates through her presence and guidance. Again, as someone who came into the student journalism world as an absolute amateur, Dr. T has consistently demonstrated a yearning for me to learn and improve through both criticism and encouragement. I would like to lastly give attribution to the staff as a whole, if I didn’t have to limit this letter to under 700 words I would express my admiration one by one. But please know that from the depths of my heart that if Myspace was still relevant you would all be in my heroes section. It’s not common that you can take a sample of people and make them all work together efficiently nonetheless, become friends. But with individual niches and a common absurd sense of humor, we all meet in the middle to create a charismatic,

hardworking and bizarre working environment. Thank you all for inspiring me, teaching me and cheering me on not only as an editor but as a person and a creator. Thank you for making me more upset about getting an internship than I thought I’d ever be. Expect excessive lingering every Monday on production night as I deny I’m not Lifestyle Editor anymore. Wow, I’m exceeding 700 words. I need to relax, I’ve been an editor for one semester. I can chill out. You’re not all that great. Just kidding I’m obsessed with you all. Never stop being you and keep on keepin’ on. Stay quaint, – Alena Purpero Lifestyle Editor

Royal Purple says good-bye for now My time with the Royal Purple was short, but oh so sweet! The countless laughs, overly exposed thoughts, and witty remarks made Monday nights my favorite nights of the week. Coming into the office and being able to say whatever was on my mind, was one of the most exhilarating feelings. I would like to think of myself as a minor source of entertainment on Monday nights, and even if my fellow RP folks were laughing at me instead of with me, it made me feel like a million bucks. I never questioned whether or not I belonged with these people, it just felt right. The staff is one of the most accepting, loving, and supportive group of individuals I have ever met. Monday nights were really tough sometimes, but luckily there are plenty of things that make the long nights much less hectic. First off, there are folks like Sarah Murphy, who are also extremely passionate about BBQ Chicken pizza and Dr. Pepper, and are willing to splurge on UNO’s with you once a week. Next, there’s support these peo-

ple have for one another. I received so much positive feedback from my coworkers every night. Whether I made an advertisement for the RP Facebook page, or a graphic of the infamous Ken Bone, I always felt as if I were Pablo Picasso’s offspring. Every ten minutes people were complimenting each other, whether it on a photo, graphic or story. Basically, we were all induced with a bit of self-admiration. Of course another thing that makes Monday nights a little less crazy, are the endless amount of laughs. My laugh induced stomach cramps are at an all time high after the night is over. There are these pieces of paper hanging on a wall filled with funny quotes from the staff, and boy oh boy I am excited to read all of them at the end of the semester. My time with the Royal Purple has provided me with the experience of being more involved with the university, allowing me to become fully immersed in all that is going on around me. There were so many things, that I wouldn’t have known about it they weren’t

mentioned in the paper. This experience made me appreciate writers so much more, and I feel so privileged to have worked alongside such talented peers. I would like to thank Ash Bash McCallum for believing in me, and trusting me with the responsibility of creating the graphics for the paper. Even though I always wanted to sneak in some sumo wrestlers, peace sign throwing aliens, or hidden text saying “Carlie is the greatest,” she let me stick around. Also a huge thank you to the virtuoso of the group, Kimberly Wethal. You are insanely talented and determined. Thank you for supplying me with continuous laughs, and for inspiring me to ask for a Canon for my graduation gift. If I didn’t know you, I would think you got paid to advertise for Canon. Brad Allen, thanks for being the best desk neighbor ever and constantly complimenting me on my graphics. A HUGE shout out to my boy Justin St. Peter, we were neighbors freshman year of College,

and here we are two chairs down from each other in the Royal Purple office. Justin’s partner in crime, Josh Sinclair, where do I start with the kid… He nearly broke my finger one time in a thumb war, and a month later we dated for 30 minutes “just cause.” To Alena Purpero, we ROCKED that Election Night coverage, even if we walked into the Brass Rail awkward as ever. Last but not least, a shout out to my roommate Sierra High (AKA SISI SOUNDS) and the one and only Karl Brandstaetter, I’m so proud of your dedication to appear in the Royal Purple every week. To the rest of the RP homies, I love you all and Monday nights will never be the same without you. I tried to fail college so I didn’t have to leave you all, but it’s my time to walk (or trip) across the stage at graduation. int, – Carlie Sue Herrick Graphic Editor


Biz & Tech Editor: Brad Allen

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BT Biz & Tech Morales’ mission: Latino success Graduating senior helps Latino students find jobs

ence with the Latino demographic.” Morales said that has been his driving motivator since day one. “The Latino population is the By Brad Allen backbone of America,” Morales Biz & Tech Editor said. “They account for some of the hardest workers and do some of the Lowering poverty levels among toughest labor in this country.” Latinos and increasing the number The inspiration to create the proof Latino college students hired be- gram was nurtured by one of Mofore graduation are not simple tasks. rales’ professors at UW-Whitewater. But a UW-Whitewater student has “I had the idea in my mind for a made these two of his goals as part of long time, and one of my professors, his greater mission to help the Latino David Gee, said he starts up compapopulation succeed. nies and is a member of the InnovaUW-W senior Benjamin Morales tion Center,” Morales said. has created a company to help LatiGee is a lecturer of management at no students build a portfolio for their UW-W and Co-Director of Launch job search, while also offering a mode Pad, an affiliate program of the Infor potential employers to gauge novation Center, which offers assismultiple students based on job skills tance to student startup companies. and possible needs for fluent SpanMorales pitched the idea to Gee, ish-English speaking employees. who then gave him 24 hours to go to Morales is a senior Spanish major the Innovation Center to pitch it to and will graduate this Saturday. his business partner, William Dou“Employers right now do not gan, as well. have an effective “They really “The Latino population liked the idea and method to seek out Latino talent is the backbone of this mission, which is who speaks fluent country. They do some to help the LatiSpanish,” Morales no demographic,” of the toughest labor said. Morales said. in the country.” He said he hopes Gee said part of that LatinoPro will Morales’ model “I realized someone change that. is promoting un“We’re providing needs to provide for derrepresented the capabilities for groups. them. I figured with employers to go in “He’s built a full all the tools at my and search directbusiness plan, and disposal, I could make he’s done really ly what candidate a difference with the they’re looking for well in order to based off skills,” Latino demographic.” help provide supMorales said. “This port for more stu—Benjamin Morales, would potentially dents after graduFounder of LatinoPro allow companies ation,” Gee said. looking for talent About 21 perthat speaks Spanish to have a portal to cent of Latinos struggle to afford better effectively prospect that talent.” groceries, compared to 13 percent Harvard Business Review has con- of Americans overall, according to ducted multiple studies on Latino job Feeding America. markets. Results show that compa“There’s tons of components that nies that hire Latinos into the work- go into poverty, and there’s no sinplace benefit by getting involved in gle way to address poverty; if there bigger market opportunities as a re- was, poverty would not be an issue,” sult, Morales said. Morales said. “I believe that allowing According to a 2014 study con- people to join a platform that’ll give ducted by the National Center for them the tools and opportunities they Educational Studies, 25 percent of all need to better their lifestyle and take Latino high school graduates in 2014 matters into their own hands, then it enrolled into public or private uni- could potentially empower people to versities in the U.S. change the lives of others as well.” About 55.3 million people in the Morales grew up living in poverty U.S. identify as Hispanic or Latino, in Mexico. comprising 17.3 percent of the total “I lived in a poor area in the inner U.S. population, according to a study city of Cancun—not the tourist area,” by Pew Research Center. Morales said. “I walked to school “I realized someone, in some sort of alone every day at a very young age.” platform, needs to provide for them His parents worked long hours and allow them to advance career nearly every day, leaving him responwise,” Morales said. “I figured with sible for getting to school by himself. all the tools and opportunities at my “However, if we see success on the disposal, I could really make a differ- Latino side of things, then I think this

Photo by Kim Gilliland / Photo Editor UW-Whitewater graduating senior Benjamin Morales recently started a company which focuses on helping Latino students to find jobs with employers looking for fluent Spanish-speaking employees.

is something we could focus on other demographics and find the solution for them as well,” Morales said. Typically, entrepreneurs are perceived to be white males from middle-class families, Gee said. But the Launch Pad program through the Innovation Center has been trying to diversify its member group and has been talking to different groups. Gee said very few universities offer the same quality entrepreneur program the Innovation Center offers. Gee completed his undergraduate at UW-W, and he said the Innovation Center is one of the best accelerator programs in the county. Career and Leadership Development (C&LD) will assist with the beta testing of the LatinoPro app, set to be available on Android and iPhone. C&LD director Ron Buchholz said part of their role is looking at lots of employers who might hire UW-W graduates and utilizing various job search tools to work with them. “Some employers come to us and

say ‘we’d like to diversify our workforce,’ or ‘we have specific language requirements,’” Buchholz said. “LatinoPro will be a wonderful way to address employer needs.” Buchholz said LinkedIn asks students describe themselves in a small space, and they may struggle with that. He added LatinoPro could help to make students look better, in order to help with their job searches. “Students don’t want to put all their effort into just one technique,” Buchholz said. “They want to have multiple tactics for finding jobs.” Buchholz said he doesn’t feel the program will present any sort of detriment to non-Latino students, because employers use a variety of techniques to find employees, and look to hire based on skill sets, with hopes for diversity in mind to best represent the community they serve. “He’s trying to help people who are unemployable at a higher rate than others, and I think that’s honorable,” Buchholz said.


Dec. 14, 2016

page 9

Congratulations Grads!

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Dec. 14, 2016

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Coming Soon

Lifestyle Editor: Alena Purpero

L Lifestyle

page 13

Extended story online

Check out the Royal Purple News’s website for an extended version on the story Permitted pets and loose lions.

Permitted pets and loose lions Exotic animal ownership regulations vary throughout Wisconsin, US By Alena Purpero and Brad Allen

If you could own any animal in the world, what would it be? You’ve probably heard this question before. Many times, probably. Some people would say dogs all the way. Others may claim cats are the best. And a select few would tell you the other two are crazy, and that owning a kangaroo is the way to go. The interesting part— all three are legal to own in five states, including Wisconsin. But before you take that leap and buy the pet kangaroo you’ve always wanted, it’s important to do your research first. For anyone interested in owning an exotic animals as a pet, but is unsure of the legal restrictions, the best thing to do is to extensively research the legality and practicality of owning that animal, because it can be a lifelong commitment. There is no federal law regulating ownership of most types of exotic animals. As long as the animal is not protected by the Endangered Species Act, said Tanya Espinosa public affairs specialist for the United States Department of Agriculture: Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service. Wisconsin is one of five states that has loose laws on exotic animals ownership. Citizens can privately own exotic animals which range widely from tigers, bears, wolves, lions, primates, kangaroos, Kinkajous, capybaras, parrots to large snakes. But while Wisconsin allows private ownership statewide, there are strict regulations on animal ownership within most cities or

Photos courtesy of Susan E. Reinholz

Above: A lion yawns in its enclosure at Valley of the Kings animal sanctuary in Sharon, Wisconsin. Left: A tortoise stops crawling forward to eat a few blades of grass. Right: A lion walks out of a shelter and into the snow.

municipalities. Both the Janesville and Whitewater City Government ordinances list that private ownership of any potentially wild or dangerous animals within city limits is strictly prohibited. It is legal to own a dog, house cat, pot-bellied pig or non-dangerous small animals such as guinea pigs, hedgehogs, chinchillas, iguanas and geckos. Tigers, bears, lions, wallabies, kinkajous, primates, kangaroos, penguins and capybaras are not legal to own within city limits. Mike Katzenberg, an employee of the Department of Natural Resources in Elkhorn, Wisconsin, said that any wild animal that is native to Wisconsin is illegal to own. UW-Whitewater senior Lauren Ziemer owns two exotic pets: A female hedgehog named Autumn, and a

male chinchilla named Vega. Ziemer bought both animals from owners who were no longer able to properly care for them. Ziemer said the biggest challenge in owning an exotic animal is understanding the pet itself. Maintaining proper care of these animals requires a lot of time and patience. “Chinchillas are the soft animal, and like any animal, it takes time and patience to gain their trust,” Ziemer said..“Never let a chinchilla outside. It’s too dangerous.” Hedgehogs hibernate at temperatures of below 74 degrees. They have poor eyesight, and instead use their sense of smell to interact with their environment. One common habit is anointing, in which a hedgehog licks new objects and then spits out foam onto its quills. The handling process

should begin at two weeks, Ziemer said, because if hedgehogs are not handled properly at that time, it could drastically affect handling attempts later on. “People ask if the spikes hurt, or ‘does she bite?’ Or ‘did you name it Sonic?’” Ziemer said. “They have some defensive behaviors, like curling into a ball. They’ll hiss when they’re angry and raise their quills when agitated. Chirping means contentment. Generally, you want to pet a hedgehog in the direction the quills lay. People are so surprised because it’s not the texture you would think.” The Royal Purple tested this theory, and found that hedgehogs’ quills are indeed incredibly soft. Lauren Schneider, an animal veterinary specialist at Whitewater Veterinary Hospital, said each species has

different caretaking specifics based on natural history in the wild. Handling is a big thing, and knowing what’s normal in behavior and sleep schedules can help determine what may be wrong. Schneider said replicating the natural habitat of various species is essential to creating a comfortable environment for exotic species. “Researching as much as possible is most important, because one may need to invest in changes to a specific room or finding items for a specific enclosure,” Schneider said. “There needs to be an investment of supplies before one ever owns an exotic pet.” Whitewater Veterinary Hospital has taken in wildlife that was injured and transferred

them to wildlife rehabilitators within the 48 hours that Wisconsin’s state law require. A multitude of wild animal rehabilitation facilities are located throughout Wisconsin. One of these facilities which offers a safe haven for mistreated or abandoned cats, big or small, is Valley of the Kings, located in Sharon, Wisconsin. Susan E. Reinholz, a Valley of the Kings volunteer, said it is frustrating to see so many animals dropped off at the rehabilitation site by incapable owners. “When I get there [to Valley of the Kings], I’m so grounded,” Reinholz said. “I could be there working for ten hours and not even realize it, because it’s something I’m enjoying, even in bad weather.”

Read the full story at www.royalpurplenews.com


Dec. 14, 2016

rp page 14

Lifestyle

By Sierra High Staff writer Graphic by Carlie Sue Herrick / Graphics Editor

classifieds

rpclassifieds@uww.edu – $5 for first 20 words, $.25 per additional word

One bedroom apt.

3 bedroom, 2 bath and attached garage for 3 students. Includes dishwasher, washer, dryer, parking, cable and Internet access.

Walton Drive Available June 1st, 2017 Off street parking with appliances and W/D No pets 1800 per month plus utilities 1800 security deposit

Part time: Wait staff Bartenders

Close to campus Call 262-745-7981 for showings

Call 920-397-0050 http://patelrentals.com

FOR RENT 5 bedroom house 5 student group

Duck Inn HELP WANTED

Now renting for 2016-2017

2017-18 School Year 597 N Tratt St.

Free parking Very clean

Help Wanted

No experience necessary 15 minutes from campus Competitive wages Call 608-883-6988 to schedule an interview. Ask for Jeff or Carleigh.

For Rent 2017-2018 School Year

Free: Dentist chair

2nd and 3rd shift Part time front desk

Desirable Downtown Apartments Main St. and Center St.

Come and move

Apply in person Please include weekly view of school schedule

One Bedroom Two Bedroom Three Bedroom Available

Baymont Inn

1355 W. Main St. Across from Walmart

Call (262)363-3332 rentwhitewater@gmail.com

Call 920-723-3862 Don Norman


Dec. 14, 2016

Lifestyle

rp page 15.

STI testing made accessible on campus By Alex Goodwin- Salas Staff writer

In respect of World AIDS Day on Dec. 1, the University Health and Counseling Services (UHCS) located in the Ambrose Health Center, worked with many student organizations, such as IMPACT and BSU to have rapid HIV testing done in the University Center. The AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin (ARCW) helped UW-W provide this service for students at the University Center by doing rapid testing, in which they get their results immediately. However, testing for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) can be done at any time at the UHCS. Wellness Coordinator, Valerie Vargas, spoke about gonorrhea and chlamydia, “as they are the two most common STIs among college students.” There are specific testing for those STIs at the UHCS. Vargas wants students to know about the Family Planning Only Services (FPOS) at UHCS. This is reproductive health care for eligible students. Students who are eligible will receive annual exams, contraception, STI testing and treatment, emergency contraception, pregnancy testing and counseling. “It is a great way for students to take care of their reproductive health without working through their parent’s insurance,” Vargas said. Safe sex is important to follow, but if a student does come back positive for a STI there are counseling services offered at the UHCS to help cope. This is a source to provide mental health care to students. “We’d, of course, simply want students to know that counseling services are free and confidential right her in the Ambrose Health Center,” said Matt Mallin, Co-Interim Executive Director of UHCS. Mallin spoke about how counselors would work with students to help them adjust during that time. They would also inform students how to manage their anxiety, talking to other and potentially future partners about their status and connecting them with community resources or support groups. Gwen Hering, Licensed Professional Counselor at the UHCS, addressed the stigmas of talking to counselors at the UHCS whether for STI counseling or any type of mental health counseling. She mentions a common stigma is a fear of being thought of as “crazy” or “weak.” Hering believes students are understanding that mental health is just as important as physical health. She wants to remind students of the importance of scheduling appointments with counselors if it is needed, and to not only focus on physical health. Hering agreed with Mallin in saying counselors will work with students to manage their anxiety with diagnosed with an STI. This can include the student and counselor meeting with a health provider together to discuss a diagnosis as a

Graphic by Carlie Sue Herrick / Graphics Editor

team.“The priority will always be the student’s immediate self-care,” Hering said. Hering elaborated on the community resources counselors would send students to. “The AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin is an invaluable resource for HIV-positive individuals,” Hering said. ARCW is Wisconsin’s largest HIV medical center and they provide counseling services and receiving PrEP. PrEP is pre-exposure prophylaxis, which is for individuals at a high risk of contracting HIV. ARCW Locations near Whitewater are in Madison, Milwaukee and Kenosha. There is a case manager, Melissa Bleiler, on staff at the UHCS as well. Per Hering, Bleiler can answer questions students may have about insurance policies and providing information about other agencies that provide services UHCS may not. “We provide a safe and nonjudgmental environment and space for students to be in,” Hering said. For more information contact UHCS by the web at uww.edu/uhcs, calling 262473-1300 or emailing at uhcs@uww.edu.


Arts and Rec Editor: Hannah Maes Briefs

AR Arts & Rec

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Give Her a Shot

Check out the Royal Purple website for Sam Frink’s article on the emergence of more women hunters on campus and why they stay in the game.

Hunter hits jackpot with banded goose Sam Frink Staff Writer

Shooting a banded goose, one that has been marked by different groups, but mostly the DNR (Department of Natural Resources) so they can track them for studies, is the equivalent of hitting the lottery for any goose or duck hunter. Much like a hole-in-one for a golfer some waterfowl hunters, who hunt geese and ducks, go a lifetime without one. UW-Whitewater senior, Mike Powers, punched his ticket into this elite group of waterfowlers last weekend while hunting near Jackson. “I have been hunting for 15 years and never even seen a band,” Powers said. “I knew what it was as soon as I walked up on that goose.” Birds are banded by the federal fish and wildlife service and various state agencies in an effort to track the migration patterns of migratory fowl. If a hunter kills one of these banded birds, they are to call in the number on the band to the Bird Banding Laboratory who will send the hunter a certificate, as well as tell the hunter where the bird was banded and approximately how old it is. After baseball, football and other team sports ended, hunting replaced the camaraderie those sports offered. Powers’ love of waterfowling stems from the quality time spent afield with his father. It’s something they can always count on doing together.

“With work and school, opening day for duck and goose season is always on the same day and easy to put on the calendar,” Powers said. “It makes it so we can always keep that date open.” After shooting the banded bird, Powers didn’t hesitate to call his father first to let him know. “I knew he would be excited and want to know where the bird came from, and all the other [details] from when I called it in,” Powers said. Powers is determined to add more bands to his collection. He hopes the next one will come while his father is beside him in the hunting blind.

Photos by Sam Frink / Staff Writer Above: Band that was around the leg of the goose Powers shot earlier in the season. Right: Mike Powers kneels next to two geese he shot when waterfowl hunting this year.

Graphic by Carlie Sue Herrick / Graphics Editor


Sports Editor: Justin St. Peter Assistant Sports Editor: Josh Sinclair

S Sports

Briefs

page 17

Ronaldo caps masterful year of soccer dominance Real Madrid and Portugal star forward Christiano Ronaldo won his fourth Ballon d’Or award for best men’s soccer’s player in the world for the past year. Ronaldo led Portugal to a European Championship and

led Real Madrid to a Champions League title. Ronaldo scored 51 goals in 54 games for club and country the past year. He defeated five-time winner Argentinian and FC Barcelona star forward Lionel Messi.

Warhawks get off to soarin’ start Hot shooting fuels ’Hawks hot start By Josh Sinclair Assistant Sports Editor

Losing. For the UW-Whitewater men’s basketball team, this is something they have yet to encounter. Seven games into the season, the Warhawks are a perfect 7-0 with an average margin of victory of 16.6 points per game. “We really play together and we are coming together as a unit,” freshman guard Zach Knobloch said. “We all have a good relationship with one another and that is key to have a successful team.” The Warhawks took down three more opponents, all at home, from Dec. 8-11 to bring their record to 7-0. The team started the week with a contest against the Rockford University Regents on Dec. 8.

The Regents used a 10-2 run midway through the first half to grab an early lead at 21-14. But the Warhawks regained the lead on a three-pointer from sophomore guard Andre Brown with 8:08 left in the first half, where that jump started an 18-2 run to grab a lead that the Warhawks used to coast into half. The Warhawks led the majority of the second half by double digits, aside from one run coming from Rockford which whittled the deficit down to five by the 5:58 mark. But by the time the clock got down to three minutes, the lead had been extended to a 15 point lead again. UW-W cruised to a 97-85 victory behind 23 points from junior guard Chris Jones and Knobloch added 17 points, 12 of which came in the second half. The second game came against Kalam-

azoo College on Dec. 10, and the Warhawks used a strong start to finish the Hornets early. “We knew it was going to be physical going in,” head coach Pat Miller said. “We knew that because of our athleticism they were going to try and junk up the game to keep it close.” If fouls are a determining factor in physicality, this game was as physical as it comes. 54 fouls were called and 67 free throws were taken in the contest. The Warhawks held the advantage in almost every category statistically: points off turnovers, points in the paint, fastbreak points, bench points and that led to a large gap when it comes to the scoreboard. Whitewater jumped out to a 10-0 lead and never looked back, leading by as much as 24 in the game. “We played well defensively,” Miller said. “We were better

with our activity and I think our guys know that. Offensively it was solid, not our best game, but 80 will do.” UW-W returned to the gym the next day, Dec. 11, for a contest against George Fox University. They rode an efficient offensive performance to trounce the Bruins. “We have so many guys that can score,” Knobloch said. “Not only score, but score in different ways and it is hard to shut down just one of us.” The Warhawks were scorching from every distance on the floor shooting 57.7 percent from the floor, 63.6 percent from three-point range and knocking down 29-of-45 at the free-throw line. “We are athletic and we used that today,” Miller said. “We were able to do some stuff purely based on our ability to get out and go.” Jones once again led the way for the

Photo by Kim Gilliland / Photo Editor

Sophomore guard Andre Brown adjusts to shoot an acrobatic layup in a game against Rockford University on Dec. 8. The ’Hawks cruised to a 97-85 victory.

Warhawks, leading one of five Warhawk players in double figures with a game-high 28 points. Jones leads the Warhawks in scoring, assists and is shooting a team best 56.2 per-

cent from the field. The ’Hawks resume its six-game home stand at 7 p.m on Dec. 19 against Trine University at Kachel Gymnasium.

Wrestling squad splits in WIAC contests

The UW-Whitewater wrestling team finished 1-1 with a victory over UW-Eau Claire but fell against UW-Platteville. The team also took fourth out of 10 in a tournament on Dec. 10 in Naperville, Illinois at the North Central College Invitational. The Warhawk wrestlers who didn’t compete at UW-PlatColumn by teville traveled to Josh Sinclair Naperville. Assistant Sports The Warhawks Editor (3-3 overall, 2-1 WIAC) started the week in Eau Claire for a WIAC matchup. The match began with the Warhawks jumping out to a 13-0 lead and UW-Eau Claire never challenged the ’Hawks the rest of the way. The Warhawks claimed wins at six of the 10 weight classes, lead by junior George Gonzalez, who used a technical fall at 184

pounds, to defeat the Blugolds’ Travis Cripe 19-3. Senior Zac Denny got the victory at 125 by a decision of 11-4. Denny, moved up and is now ranked second in the nation by the National Wrestling Coaches Association and by D3wrestle.com. “I try not to think about where I am ranked,” Denny said. “It just adds a mental barrier that you also have to cross. It’s hard enough to have to wrestle someone, I don’t need myself in my own head too.” Freshman Mike Tortorice

Junior Austin Quartullo tallied an escape in the third period and hung on for a 4-3 decision at 157 to score for the ’Hawks. The Warhawks doubled up the Blugolds for a final of 24-12. “I feel pretty good, it is still early in the season so we have time to train the things that we aren’t best with technique wise,” Denny said. “We have plenty of good competition in the room that is only going to make us improve as the year progresses.” The Warhawks then traveled to Platteville for another inter-con-

It’s hard enough to have to wrestle someone, I don’t need myself in my own head too. - senior Zac Denny

earned four points for the Warhawks with a 17-4 major decision over Scott Worlund at 133 pounds.

ference matchup. Denny and freshman Mac Casella posted major decisions at 125 and 141 pounds, respective-

ly, to lead the Warhawks but it wasn’t enough as the Warhawks lost 21-17. Casella posted an escape in the third round and hung on for a 10-2 victory. Junior Jordan Newman, ranked No. 1 by D3wrestle.com and No. 2 by the NWCA, was also victorious by a 5-2 decision. “We have a strong team over every level,” Denny said. “We have the expectation of conference champions and then we will see where we go from there.” The ’Hawks took 4th out of 10 teams led by the freshman wrestlers at 125, Hazen Rice and Tortorice took second and third in the weight class. Freshman John Broughton and Mike Kouvelis both took second at 157 and 165, respectively. The Warhawks will be in action next Jan. 5-6 at the NWCA National Duals in Fort Wayne, Indiana.


Sports

rp page 18

Dec. 14, 2016

Perfect storm: Flooding on the QB Defensive lineman excels on and off field By Justin St. Peter Sports Editor

NASA. Boeing Co. Football. John Flood does it all. The senior defensive lineman is a finalist for the 2016 Gagliardi Trophy, an award that goes to the most outstanding NCAA Division-III football. To date, 41 ballots have been cast for the award, including one from the fans from Nov. 21-Dec. 5 on d3football.com. The winner had not been announced at press time. In addition to his athletic accomplishments, he found time to work on projects sponsored by NASA and defense contractor Boeing. Flood, a math and physics major, has been part of the WIAC Scholastic Honor Roll every year as a Warhawk. His focus on the academic side allowed him to be a part of two major research projects. This past summer, Flood studied flow separation in aerospace engineering at the University of Arizona that Boeing sponsored. While playing football and attending to school now, he also is collecting data from a space telescope sponsored by NASA on campus. Flood said it was a really cool experience and that he really stresses academics. “The coaching staff here does a great job making sure that you really push yourself in all facets of your life, not just football,” Flood said. “They make sure that you’re a good student in the classroom and fit in in the community and excel in everything you do. That has just really been ingrained in me through Coach [Kevin] Bullis and some of the other coaches on the staff. It is important because now that my football career is over,

that is what I have to fall back on.” Flood started three of his four years on the defensive line for the Warhawks, winning national championships in his first two years with the program and falling short in the national semifinals the past two years. Now that Flood’s football career has come to a close, head coach Kevin Bullis still recalls how quickly Flood became comfortable in the program. “John was a young man that came in and was really mature from the beginning,” Bullis said. “He was a hybrid, d-lineman. Even as a freshman, he played two positions on the d-line. He picked it up very well… His skill sets in the sense of his intelligence and football smarts were off the charts. His growth really came in his leadership skills in getting confident leading his teammates.” Flood tallied 18 solo tackles, 29 total, eight stops for a loss of 47 yards, 4.5 sacks, two forced fumbles and recovered a fumble while playing that hybrid role when Bullis was still the defensive line coach his freshman year. Under former head coach Lance Leipold’s tutelage, the ’Hawks won the national championship. Flood said he was fortunate to learn from linemen who were veterans of the program. “It was good for me to get my feet wet that year,” Flood said. “I didn’t start, but I obviously played quite a bit. I really set the foundation for my career. It paved the way for me to be a leader of the team down the road.” Going into his sophomore year, there were many changes in the football program as Leipold left to head the D-I University of Buffalo program and took many of his top assistants with him. Bullis stayed behind and eventually earned the head coaching position. Bullis said that although his position on the team changed, the close

relationship with Flood remained. “It’s only been a couple weeks where he hasn’t been a player of mine,” Bullis said. “John is a guy that you could always trust him to be candid and honest with you. He is always forthright. He is a guy that you trust his judgment because of his intelligence and maturity. John is a guy that I hope he keeps in touch with me, I really do, because he is just an excellent human being.” That praise aside, Flood tallied 12 tackles, 24 total, 8.5 tackles for loss, two sacks, forced two fumbles and recovered two fumbles. Flood said his favorite play in a Warhawk uniform came t h a t year in the national semif i nal game UW-W won 20-14 over Linfield College (Oregon). Flood was able to beat his man and sack quarterback Tom Riddle and strip the ball. The ’Hawks recovered and closed the game out in the victory formation. Despite losing in the national semifinals to annual foe University of Mount Union last year, Flood tallied 20 tackles, with seven of them behind the line of scrimmage, and five sacks in 12 games. Coming into his senior season, Flood was named a team captain, which is something he says he took very seriously. It was a great honor because you spend so much time with the team, they really become your family,”

Flood said. “To know they think about you like that, it’s a really cool honor… As the season went on, I embraced it more and tried to be the best leader I could for the team. It was definitely a cool experience though.” Flood was part of a defense that saw UW-W complete a perfect regular season and get back on top of the WIAC conference. Although they fell to John Carroll University in the national semifinal, Flood still tallied 27 total tackles, 17 of them solo, five tackles for loss and three sacks. One of Flood’s favorite quotes is what he said last week following the loss, which goes, “some days you eat the bear, and some days the bear eats you.” Flood explained that his old baseball coach used to use it when taking out a pitcher after a bad outing. When the meaning is analyzed, it makes sense for the way Flood’s career ended. “Sometimes you can go out there and do the best you can and sometimes someone is just gonna be better than you,” Flood said. “You just got to live with it and accept it. You can go out there the next day and maybe next day you eat the bear.” Whatever Flood’s next stop is, it’s a good bet that he will be eating the bear.

Warhawks dispatch Coe College at home ’Hawks win hard-fought hoops contest at home with late run By Benjamin Lokken Staff Writer

The UW-Whitewater women’s basketball team continued its winning ways Dec. 10 with a 79-73 win over Coe College [Iowa] in Kachel Gymnasium. It was UW-W’s first game in two weeks, and first home game since Nov. 15. The Warhawks scored 22 points off of turnovers and out-rebounded the Kohawks 44-32. After the win, the team advanced to 7-0 on the season and 2-0 at home. The Warhawks came away with a hard fought home victory and showcased the variety of playmakers on the team with four different starters scoring in double figures. “It’s nice to see that anyone on our team can score and take over,” junior guard Brooke Trewyn said. “We came out with a W and that’s all that really matters.” Senior guard Reilly Stewart had a career high 21 points on 6-11 shooting which included three,

three-pointers. Stewart also contributed three rebounds. Junior forward Andrea Meinert recorded a double-double with 15 points and 12 rebounds, as well as 5 assists. Junior guard Malia Smith chipped in 19 points and 7 rebounds. Trewyn also had 10 points, 5 rebounds and 3 steals in the win. The team spent the two weeks off between games practicing and preparing for their return to their home court. “We really focused on improving the little things and staying sharp,” head coach Keri Carollo said. “The energy in the gym has been really good.” It was a back and forth game that featured runs by both teams. The long layoff certainly didn’t Keri Carollo hurt UW-W early on in the game as they jumped out to a 13-5 lead midway through the first quarter. The ’Hawks built up a 36-23 lead late in the second quarter. Coe would trim the Whitewater lead to 36-31 at the half with 8-0 run that includ-

ed two three-pointers. The Warhawks shot 44 percent from the field but only shot 50 percent on free throws in the first half. The early parts of the second half were more of the same with UW-W maintaining its lead for most of the third quarter and even stretching it to as much as seven points on multiple occasions. However with 1:27 left in the third quarter, Coe tied the game at 48 with a fastbreak layup. Coe would take the lead less than 30 seconds later with a pair of free throws and hold onto it for the remainder of the quarter and led 52-50 at the start of the 4th. Coe extended its lead to five points early in the 4th quarter, but the Warhawks slowly began to wear it away as play continued. The game was back and forth for most of the 4th quarter with the game being tied on four different occasions. The Warhawks finally took the lead for good with 4:38 left in the game and closed out the game outscoring the Kohawks 18-12 in the final 4:45 of the game. The Warhawks return to action Tuesday, Dec. 13 against Carroll University (Wisconsin) at 7 p.m. in Whitewater.


Sports

Dec. 14, 2016

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Rodgers is leading the Pack back If you asked me three weeks ago to pick the teams that will make the NFL playoffs, the Green Bay Packers would not be one of them. Three weeks later, the Packers don’t just have the look of a playoff team, but a dangerous one if they get in. The month of November was not kind to the Packers. They went 1-4 in the month including embarrassing blowout losses against the Tennessee Titans and Washington Redskins. During the fourColumn by game losing streak, Kyle Weaver Senior Staff Writer the team seemed in utter disarray. The defense couldn’t stop anything and was giving points at a historically bad rate. The offense was stagnant and lacked the explosiveness of previous Mike McCarthy and Aaron Rodgers led teams. With the team sitting at a concerning 4-6, Rodgers said that he is confident the team can “run the table”. This has become something of a rallying cry for fans and players alike. Now after three straight wins, it’s

starting to feel less like talk and more like reality. The biggest of the three wins came this week against the Seattle Seahawks. Seattle came into the game needing just one more win to clinch the NFC west division on lock up a playoff spot. Green Bay is fighting for its playoff life and a win against a top team in the NFC would help them out substantially. It’s no secret that the Packers and Seahawks are familiar with each other, having played at least once in each of the last three seasons. Sunday’s game was something of a coming out party for a team that many picked to win the Super Bowl this year. The Packers dominated all phases of the game. The offense started fast with a 66yard touchdown from Rodgers to Davante Adams on the opening possession of the game. Seemingly everything went right for the Packers on Sunday. The exact opposite could be said about the Seahawks who turned the ball over six times. The Green Bay defense that was a laughing stock a month ago intercepted Russell Wilson five times. Seattle’s offense was out of sync all

game as Wilson missed easy throws to wide-open receivers and forced the ball numerous times. The Packers were able to carve up the vaunted Seattle defense thanks to great field position from the turnovers, winning 38-10. This was only the second time since 2012 that the Seahawks had lost a game by more than 10 points, which also came against the Packers in week two of last season. 2016 has been the year of the injury. Key players all over the league have been lost for the year. The NFC North in particular may be the most banged up division in the league. The Vikings, Lions and Packers are all fighting for a playoff spot with several injuries to impact players. Already dealing with a left hamstring injury, Rodgers tweaked his right calf on the opening drive of the game. Although he stayed in the game for three quarters and threw three touchdowns, he was seen limping up the field and looked uncomfortable. Rodgers was pulled from the game with 10 minutes remaining in the fourth quarter. Although the score was out of reach for a Seattle comeback, seeing Rodgers sitting

Bucks: Young, wild and free

The Milwaukee Bucks knew they were gambling when general manager John Hammond selected Giannis Antetokounmpo 15th overall in the 2013 NBA Draft. He was an ordinary basketball player trying to make a name for himself. In his rookie season, Giannis appeared to be the only bright spot for the Bucks, seeing that Milwaukee finished the season with a franchise worst 15-67 record. Despite the frustration as a team, Giannis from time-to-time showed flashes. Yes, he averaged only 6.8 points and 41 percent shooting through 77 games, but he was 18 years-old. Column by The Greek Freak, at the time, was Tyler Job only one of the pieces to the puzzle in Staff Writer assembling an “Own the Future” type team. The Bucks wasted little time in getting another piece when the franchise selected Duke forward Jabari Parker, number two overall in the 2014 draft. Jabari, similar to Giannis, showed fans his potential at the start of 2014 campaign. He was averaging roughly 12 points per game and 49 percent shooting before going down with a torn ACL in mid-December that year. The attention turned to Giannis, and he took it upon himself to step up and become the top player. Flash forward to 2016. After a disappointing 2015 season by finishing 33-49, the Bucks decided in the draft and free agency to make some moves to the roster that was in dire need of veteran experience, three-point shooting and defense. In the 2016 draft, the Bucks took another gamble by selecting center Thon Maker 10th overall in the first round. Similar to Giannis, Thon was not very wellknown and had a lot of questions surrounding him. The Bucks took guard Malcolm Brogdon out of the University of Virginia, 36th overall. The Bucks in the second round then took guard Malcolm Brogdon out of Virginia, 36th overall. Milwaukee in free agency then locked up several players to multiple key positions. Milwaukee signed guard Matthew Dellavedova, along with forward and threepoint shooter Mirza Teletovic. The Bucks also signed veteran guard Jason Terry late in free agency. The Bucks also traded for stout scoring forward Michael Beasley and promising young wing Tony Snell.

Everything looked good before the start of the season, but in September, Bucks fans received gruesome news when star player Khris Middleton ruptured his hamstring. It is still uncertain if he will be able to return to the court this season. But, the Bucks felt it had a roster deep enough to go without K-Midd, and it seems they have lived up to expectations so far. In a team filled with ball movement, shooting and defense, Milwaukee is starting to become more consistent as a team every game. Not only more consistent, but the development into two potential NBA superstars. Jabari is now averaging about 19 points per game and is in the midst of developing a quality jump shot. He has even expanded his game to the three-point line, where he is shooting 33 percent. The Greek Freakis showing massive strides. The 22-year-old team captain is averaging roughly 22 points per game and about 53 percent shooting, who is also developing consistent jumpers. While Giannis is not as consistent as Jabari on jump shots, his drives to the basket are absolutely jaw-dropping. His strides between defenders, his spin move, his length, everything. The Greek Freak has also shown how versatile he is on both ends of the court. His ball handling is only improving, his shooting is on its way and his defense is already ridiculous. His 2.2 blocks per game average goes to show of how lethal his defense can be. At what seems such an early stage in his career, Giannis is already being discussed as the first Bucks allstar since Michael Redd in 2004. With a player who looks as if he has 10 years of NBA experience is phenomenal. Jabari Parker, who has always shown how aggressive and athletic he can be, is not too far away from being in the all-star conversation either. Not even two months into the season, Milwaukee has already defeated the defending NBA Champion Cleveland Cavaliers once. The team also gave the Golden State Warriors and San Antonio Spurs close games but fell just short in both. With the 2016 season in full force, all the pieces of the puzzle are there. Now it is just a matter of watching the Bucks grow and become a more consistent team as the calendar turns.

on the bench with that much time left gave Packer fans everywhere a scare. It was a relief to see him laugh and socialize on the sideline during the fourth quarter. It made me more confident that it was just precautionary, and he will be ready next week. But, the remaining schedule is no cakewalk. Three division games and two on the road will decide if the Packers make their eighth straight trip to the postseason. First up is a trip to Chicago to take on a struggling Bears team. The final two games of the season against the Minnesota Vikings and the Detroit Lions have playoff implications for all three teams. Green Bay and Minnesota are fighting just to make the postseason. Detroit at 9-4 could make all this playoffs talk history by winning their remaining three games and locking up the division. It wouldn’t be the first time a Packers team had to win out just to make it in. The 2010 super bowl winning team had to win their final two games just to make it into the playoffs. Here’s to hoping this year’s team can capture some of that magic.

RECYCLE ME ;)


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Sports

Dec. 14, 2016


Dec. 14, 2016