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From the beginning: An introduction to Dr Tim Rudman FRPS Tim Rudman

Where it all began My first photographic recollection is probably age 10 or 12, eagerly taking the basic family camera to the beach at Hove to photograph a small yacht that had floundered in the surf. It was lying on its side and I clearly recall waiting patiently for a wave to cascade over it for that ‘decisive moment’ shot that nobody else would have. I finished the roll over the next few days and took it to the chemist for processing and eventually I sent it to the newspaper. It didn’t make the front page. It was old news. I had a lot to learn about the turnover on a daily newspaper! I have no further photographic recollections until I photographed Elvis Presley. The year was 1962, the place the Seattle World Fair. Odd-jobbing my way around America during my first medical student long ‘vac’ I turned to unexpectedly see Elvis strolling through the fair just behind me during a filming break. I fumbled out the old family Box Brownie (I was not into photography!), located him on the tiny murky viewfinder, fired, wound on and fired three shots. Nobody at home believed my story that he spotted me first and called out ‘Hey. Is that Tim Rudman’? Although the moment was memorable, the photographs definitely were not.

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My photographic epiphany came shortly after in a bookshop. After browsing medical textbooks my eye caught the cover of a coffee table black and white photography art book – ‘Cowboy Kate and other stories’ by South African photographer Sam Haskins. I was transfixed. It wasn’t the fact that the model wore little more than a Stetson and a gun belt (it was the ‘60s after all!); it was the high contrast, grainy graphic elegant dynamic compositions. I had never seen black and white photography used as an art form in this way and I knew in that moment that I had found my medium, replacing my black and white sketching hobby. Within weeks I had found a community darkroom and was trying to learn how to print. Fifty years later I still am. As Pablo Casals said when asked why at 83 he still practised four hours a day, ‘Because I think I am making progress’.

Choosing Analogue Today all my work is all made with B&W film and printed in my darkroom. The finished work may not however always be ‘black and white’ in appearance as I most commonly either pre-visualise it or re-interpret it in various colour hues by using different developers, processes, toners and techniques. The journey has been an interesting and absorbing one.

Derelict West Pier #19.

➤ AnAlogue MAgAzine ➤ 8

➤ APRIL 2019 ➤ 7

Profile for Royal Photographic Society

Analogue magazine issue 8 - from the RPS Analogue Group  

Contents * From the beginning: An introduction to Dr Tim Rudman FRPS -Dr Tim Rudman * Adventures with infrared Aerial Ektachrome 8443 - Eric...

Analogue magazine issue 8 - from the RPS Analogue Group  

Contents * From the beginning: An introduction to Dr Tim Rudman FRPS -Dr Tim Rudman * Adventures with infrared Aerial Ektachrome 8443 - Eric...