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Economics

Department of Economics Undergraduate Studies Department of Economics

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Royal Holloway is widely recognised on the world stage as one of the UK’s leading teaching and research universities. One of the larger colleges of the University of London, we are strong across the sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities. We were ranked 12th in the UK (102nd in the world) by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2014, which described us as ‘truly world class’. 2

Department of Economics

As a cosmopolitan community, with students from 130 countries, we focus on the support and development of the individual. Our friendly and safe campus, west of central London, provides a unique environment for university study. We have been voted as one of the 16 most beautiful universities in the world (Daily Telegraph).


Economics Contents The Department of Economics at Royal Holloway is one of the UK’s top ten teaching and research centres in Economics. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, the Department was rated as third in London and 9th in the UK. Our intellectually stimulating and diverse programme of study is designed for students who like to question the status quo. Our degrees incorporate all of the major aspects of economic thought and are an excellent framework for pursuing employment in a range of industries and professions.

Why study Economics?

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Why choose Economics at Royal Holloway?

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Admissions and entry requirements

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Course information

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Degree programmes and structure

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Joint degree options

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Teaching and assessment

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Career prospects

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Other information

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facebook.com/RHULEcon @RHULEcon

Contact details

Head of Department Mike Spagat (PhD, Harvard) m.spagat@royalholoway.ac.uk General enquiries T: +44 (0)1784 443381 ugecon@royalholoway.ac.uk Department of Economics T: +44 (0)1784 414005 F: +44 (0)1784 439534

more information

This brochure is designed to complement Royal Holloway’s Undergraduate Prospectus and information on the department’s website at royalholloway.ac.uk/economics It is also available as a PDF at royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere

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Why study Economics? Economics is the subject of choice for students seeking careers in public and private management, in financial institutions, and in government. Managers need to know how markets work and how a business can prosper in its market environment. Policy-makers need to consider the constraints imposed by economic factors, but also the limits to the market and the role of government intervention. The real, practical skills gained from an Economics degree go beyond the understanding of economics itself. Economics students gain quantitative and computing skills that are widely applicable. They gain experience in logical reasoning, and also develop their communication abilities. Few other degree subjects provide this full complement of skills. Economics is a rigorous and intellectually challenging degree subject. Our students are supported through their studies by an established network of academic and departmental staff. By the end of their degree, our students have excellent graduate prospects as the market recognises and rewards the real knowledge and skills developed in an Economics degree.

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Department of Economics


Why choose Economics at Royal Holloway? Welcome The financial crisis and the new age of austerity have increased interest in Economics degrees. This is a particularly exciting time to be studying Economics. Royal Holloway is a particularly exciting place to do these studies. Our staff are researching at the boundaries of economic analysis. We are exploring the interactions of financial markets with the real economy; how education needs to be adjusted to meet the demands for higher skilled workers; the role for immigration in a slower growth economy; how the public sector needs to be organised to run efficiently; natural resources and the limits to growth; how to organise an economy where individuals do not always behave in a self-interested manner; and political economy questions such as how insurgencies develop in countries. In the next decade, the best education is not just about learning standard materials and preparing for standard examinations. Students will need to have a deeper understanding of the models and methods of Economics, and about how to apply those models in the real world. We think Royal Holloway is the ideal place for you to engage in that challenging and exciting future.

Professor Mike Spagat Head of Department

Royal Holloway’s Economics Department has established itself as one of the top in the UK for for research and teaching excellence. What distinguishes Economics at Royal Holloway? There are three main features: • D  ual research and teaching focus: Being part of a researchled department means that you will learn from experts in their fields. With our staff being at the frontiers of their subjects, it guarantees high quality teaching, cutting edge material, new exciting courses, and a continuously evolving undergraduate programme to respond timely to the needs of the market. • Excellent career prospects: The Department has an excellent placement record. Realising that employers are interested in the skills you develop through student life as well as the academic knowledge you gain through your studies, we have introduced a new careers programme: Economics@Work. This programme offers a series of employability workshops, events and guest speaker talks (including those by former Royal Holloway students) who are often able to provide advice, contacts and networking opportunities to current students. • C  ampus environment: Royal Holloway has a friendly and relaxing community environment where everyday interactions with student and staff from different departments and nationalities are a norm which adds to our cosmopolitan vibe. Having everything on your doorstep from your studies, friends, societies, sports and social life is one aspect that really sets us apart from other colleges of the University of London.

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Admissions and entry requirements The standard conditional offer ranges between AAB and ABB (dependent on the level of mathematics). We do not have any specific subject requirements at A-level; in particular, neither Economics nor Mathematics is required. However we do require at least a grade A at GCSE Mathematics or equivalent. The Department receives almost 1,200 applications each year for approximately 180 places on the programme. Our emphasis on undergraduate education means that we examine each application carefully, with particular note taken of your personal statement on the UCAS form. On the basis of your UCAS form, we are usually able to make a decision about whether or not to offer a place and do not typically call candidates for interview.

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Department of Economics

College Open Days An Open Day at Royal Holloway offers a unique opportunity to come and see the College for yourself. You will have the chance to meet our students and teaching staff, and get a taste of what university life is really like. Parents and friends are very welcome to come with you. Dates of Open Days can be obtained from the Department, or from our website: www.royalholloway.ac.uk/opendays Equal opportunities The Department strongly supports the College’s policy of equal opportunities and is proud of the diversity of its students and staff.


Course information First Year courses Principles of Economics covers standard microeconomic and macroeconomic analysis. The course is designed to be suitable for students with or without A-level Economics. Quantitative Methods in Economics is a two year sequence which introduces students to mathematical, statistical and computing techniques. To accommodate students of differing backgrounds (about half of our students have A-level Mathematics, for example), we apply a broad variety of teaching methods. In addition to standard lectures and classes, special workshops and tutorials are available to students. A course where students gain breadth in their knowledge of Economics, the Economics Workshop is a chance to reflect upon and discuss a variety of economic topics. Economic policy is the focus of the first year optional courses. The Philosophy of Economics and International Economic Policy are two such options. Students may also choose an option from another department in the College. Second Year courses In the second year, students take the economic analysis courses Microeconomics and Macroeconomics. They continue their quantitative studies in Quantitative Methods II. We have introduced a dual track system with Math and Regular tracks in the second year for Microeconomics and Quantitative Methods. The Math track considers economic models from a more rigorous mathematical point of view, whereas the Regular track will put more emphasis on intuition and the logic behind the models. This is to accommodate students with varying backgrounds and interests in quantitative methods. Finally, students on the Financial and Business Economics degree are required to take the courses in Financial Markets and Institutions and in Industrial Growth and Competition. Students on the Economics degree may take these options, or select from an expanding list of economic courses, or an option from another department. Final Year courses Economics single honours degree students choose four full unit courses (or 8 half unit courses) from a list of options. One option is EC3400 (Extended essay in Economics) where students undertake independent research to produce a dissertation which applies economic theory and quantitative analysis to a particular policy or business problem of their choice. Other options may include Financial Economics , Public Economics, Development Economics, Labour Economics, The Economics of Education, Industrial Economics and Origins of Financial Crises, although the availability of optional units varies from year to year. The Department has particular strength in a number of distinctive research areas including Experimental Economics, Economics of Warfare, Game Theory and Macroeconomics, all of which are offered as units in the final year. Financial and Business Economics students are required to take the courses in Financial Economics and Industrial Economics.

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Degree programmes and structure The Department offers two main Single Honours Economics degrees at Royal Holloway: • BSc (Econ) Economics • BSc (Econ) Financial and Business Economics Both these degrees provide an excellent background for starting a career or for further study. There is a common set of required courses that provide a rigorous training in quantitative economic analysis. Financial and Business Economics students then specialise in the areas of financial markets and industrial economics. The course units for each of these degree schemes are shown in the chart below. BSc (Econ) Economics Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

EC1101 Principles of Economics

EC2201 Microeconomics

Core

EC1102 Quantitative Methods

EC2202 Macroeconomics

EC1103 Economics Workshop

EC2203 Quantitative Methods II

4 units from Economics final year optional courses

Economics first year options or a course in another department

Economics second year options or a course in another department

or 3 units from Economics final year optional courses and 1 course in another department Optional courses include Economics of Warfare, Experimental Economics, Game Theory, Political Economy, Topics in Finance, Development and Economic History, Economics of Life, Econometrics, Financial Econometrics, Origins of Financial Crises, Environmental Economics, Industrial Economics, Economics of Inequality and a Dissertation unit.

BSc (Econ) Financial & Business Economics Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

EC1101 Principles of Economics

EC2201 Microeconomics

EC3313 Industrial Economics

EC1102 Quantitative Methods

EC2202 Macroeconomics

EC3314 Financial Economics

EC1103 Economics Workshop

EC2203 Quantitative Methods II

Economics first year options or a course in another department

EC2211 Financial Markets and Institutions

2 units from Economics final year optional courses

EC2212 Industrial Growth and Competition

or 1 unit from Economics final year optional courses and one unit in another department Optional courses include: Labour Economics, Macro Labour, Econometrics, Economics of Warfare, Topics in Economic History, and Development, , Economics of Life, Econometrics, Financial Econometrics, Origins of Financial Crises, Environmental Economics, Industrial Economics, Economics of Inequality and a Dissertation unit

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Joint degree options The department offers four joint and one minor honours degree: Joint The Department offers five joint honours degrees: • BSc Economics and Management Economics is the ‘home department’ for Economics & Management joint honours students. This means that we will deal with issues of registration and student welfare, and you should approach us with any questions or problems. The Economics and Management degree combines the core programme of the Economics degrees with that of the Management degree. The two parts of the degree, while looking at similar subjects, use different methods to understand them. Economics uses primarily quantitative and formal analysis, while Management emphasises the case study approach. • BSc Finance and Mathematics • BSc Economics and Mathematics

Minor • BA Politics, Philosophy and Economics The Economics, Politics and International Relations degree combines the core programme of the Economics degree with foundation and option courses offered by Politics and International Relations. These disciplines have many natural affinities between them, and their synergies lend themselves well to students who are interested ultimately in pursuing careers in various policy fields as well as in the areas of politics/ international relations and economics generally, in both the public and private sectors. The Politics, Philosophy and Economics degree will provide students with the opportunity to study three disciplines that are crucial for an understanding of the complex dynamics of today’s world. Students study a common foundation in the first year, and an advanced seminar and dissertation unit in their final year that develops links across the three disciplines – a distinctive feature of the course.

The Economics and Mathematics degree and the Finance and Mathematics degree combine the core programme of the Economics degrees with that of the Mathematics degree. These degrees provide an excellent background for a career in business or finance, since they develop the quantitative skills that are in the greatest demand. • BSc Economics, Politics and International Relations The Economics, Politics and International Relations degree combines the core programme of the Economics degree with foundation and option courses offered by Politics and International Relations. These disciplines have many natural affinities between them, and their synergies lend themselves well to students who are interested ultimately in pursuing careers in various policy fields as well as in the areas of politics/ international relations and economics generally, in both the public and private sectors. • BSc Accounting, Finance and Economics This newly launched BSc programme combines the disciplines of Accounting and Economics and will demonstrate how the theoretical models used within accounting and economics can apply to current financial contexts and solutions. If you’re goal is to work in the financial arena then this course will provide valuable context and skills that are directly applicable to organisations in the financial sector. Management is the ‘home department’ for Accounting, Finance and Economics.

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Mica Townsend BSc Economics and Management, 2010 “After the economics talk we were able to walk around campus and talk to current students. I spoke to two girls who were so enthusiastic and after that I knew that it was the place that I wanted to be. In addition, the course has a great reputation and I was able to combine my interests in Management and Economics in a joint honours programme.”

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Degree programmes and structure Example Joint Honours Programme BSc Economics and Management Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

EC1101: Principles of Economics*

EC2201: Microeconomics*

EC1102: Quantitative Methods in Economics I*

EC2202: Macroeconomics*

Choose two units from Economics final year options

MN1205: International Business

MN2201: Strategic Management

MN1305: Markets and Consumption

Choose one from:

MN1405: Accounting

MN2021: Management Information Systems

MN1705: Organisational Studies

MN2031: Production & Operations Management MN2041: Managerial Accounting MN2061: Marketing Management MN2071: Human Resource Management

MN3301: Modern Business in Comparative Perspective (Subject to Pre-requisites)

Choose one unit from Management final year options** Optional course include: include Industrial and Financial Economics, Game Theory, Political Economy, Economics of Warfare, Experimental Economics, Consumer Behaviour, Advertising & Promotion in Brand Marketing, and International Financial Accounting.

* required to take and to pass for the award of the relevant degree title ** the units available will be confirmed by the Department of Management

Example Joint Honours Programme BSc Finance and Mathematics Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

EC1101: Principles of Economics*

EC2201: Microeconomics*

EC3314: Financial Economics

EC1133: Workshop for Economics & Maths*

EC2202: Macroeconomics*

MT1300: Principles of Statistics

EC2211: Financial Markets and Institutions

Choose one unit from Economics final year options

MT1710: Calculus

MT2300: Statistical Methods

MT1720: Functions of Several Variables

MT2630: Graphs and Optimisation

MT1820: Number Systems

Choose one half unit from:

MT1820: Matrix Algebra

MT2220: Vector Analysis and Fluids MT2800: Linear Algebra and a Group Project MT2830: Rings and Factorisation MT2940: Real Analysis MT2320: Probability MT2720: Ordinary DEs and Fourier Analysis MT2860: Groups and Group Actions MT2900: Complex Variable

* required to take and to pass for the award of the relevant degree title ** the units available will be confirmed by the Department of Mathematics

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Department of Economics

MT3470: Mathematics of Financial Markets MT4470: Advanced Financial Mathematics

Choose two half units from Mathematics** Optional courses include Industrial and Financial Economics, Game Theory, Political Economy, Economics of Warfare, Quantum Theory, Quantum information and coding, Computational Number Theory and Public Key Cryptography


Example Joint Honours Programme BSc Economics, Politics and International Relations Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Students must take:

EC2201: Microeconomics*

EC1101: Principles of Economics*

EC2202: Macroeconomics*

Choose two units from Economics final year options

EC1102: Quantitative Methods of Economics*

Choose two units from available courses in Politics and International Relations**

Choose two from: PR1400: Introduction to Politics and Government PR1500: Introduction to International Relations PR1520: Classic and Contemporary Readings in Politics and International Relations

Choose two units from Politics and International Relations final year options** Optional courses include: Industrial and Financial Economics, Game Theory, Political Economy, Political Sociology, The Politics of the Internet and Information Security, Transnational Security Studies and a Dissertation unit.

PR1600: Introduction to Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

* required to take and to pass for the award of the relevant degree title ** the units available will be confirmed by the Department of Politics and International Relations

BA and BSc in Politics, Philosophy and Economics This course will provide students with the opportunity to study three disciplines that are crucial for an understanding of the complex dynamics of today’s world. Students will study a common foundation in the first year, and an advanced seminar and dissertation unit in their final year that develops links across the three disciplines – a distinctive feature of the course. Students have great flexibility to vary their degrees in the second and third years in such a way as to graduate with one of three awards: BSc Politics, Philosophy and Economics; BA Politics, Philosophy and Economics; and BA Politics and Philosophy with Economics. Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

EC1101: Principles of Economics (1 unit) EC1102: Quantitative Methods of Economics (1 unit)

Students must choose at least one, and no more than two units from available courses in each discipline of politics, philosophy and economics, for a total of four course units for the year.

PPE3000: Advanced Seminar and Dissertation in Politics, Philosophy and Economics (1 unit)

PR1400: Introduction to Politics and Government (1 unit)

As part of their second year philosophy students must take:

PY1001: Fundamental Questions in Philosophy (1 unit)

PY2001 Introduction to European Philosophy 1: From Kant to Hegel (0.5 units) PY2002: Mind and World (0.5 units) Economics courses are limited to: EC2201: Microeconomics (1 unit) EC2202: Macroeconomics (1 unit)

A further three units of courses from available options in politics, philosophy and economics must be undertaken. Students may concentrate their choices on courses from one of the disciplines, but must choose courses of at least one half-unit from at least two subjects. They may also divide their choices among all three subjects. Choices in Economics are subject to the following conditions: 1) Students can take third year Economics courses ONLY if they have taken and passed both EC2201 and EC2202 in year 2. 2) S  tudents who have taken either one of EC2201 or EC2202 are able to take the other course in Y3.

Depending on course selections and achievement, students who meet the minimum College requirements for award of degree will be eligible to exit with one of the following degree titles:

2) S  tudents who pass dedicated third year Economics courses of at least 0.5 units but less than two units will graduate with a BA Politics, Philosophy and Economics.

1) S  tudents who pass at least two units worth of dedicated third year Economics courses will graduate with a BSc Politics, Philosophy and Economics.

3) S  tudents who do not pass any third year Economics courses will graduate with a BA Politics and Philosophy with Economics.

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Teaching and assessment Our degrees are made up of 12 units. In each year a student takes half or full-unit courses amounting to four units. Most courses in the Department involve two hours of weekly lectures and a weekly tutorial or seminar group. In addition, there may be computer classes, additional tutorials or workshops. We adjust the teaching methods to the needs of the particular course and in light of the differing backgrounds of students. The core classes in the first and second year are taught mainly through lectures involving large groups of students, whereas for seminars and tutorials you will be allocated into smaller groups. In the third year, the class size varies from as low as 5 students to 50 and more depending on the popularity of a particular option. Overall, the department insists on small-group teaching in seminars and workshops to ensure

that students are well-prepared for their assessments. In-class lectures and tutorials are supplemented with online sessions and learning material. Assessment is through a combination of continuous assessment and end of year exams. The form of continuous assessment varies across courses and may include in-class tests, extended essays and projects, online tests and quizzes, take-home assignments and home works, and individual or group presentations. The department believes in an open-door education policy to ensure students have the necessary support. Throughout the degree, every student is assigned an academic staff as their personal advisor, creating a friendly support environment for students.

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Hannah Carter, BSc Economics “All the lecturers are very approachable and always willing to listen and help should you need advice. The very supportive atmosphere of the Economics Department has really helped me develop my skills and knowledge, both academic and personal.�

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Your future career 90% of our Economics graduates were in full time employment or further study within six months of graduation in 2013. Economics graduates are highly sought after because a degree in Economics equips you with key transferable skills such as numeracy, problem-solving, computing and other analytical skills. In addition, through various assessment methods, you will also develop excellent communication skills that enable you to present complex data to both technical and non-technical audiences.

Graduate profile

Economics graduates from Royal Holloway are working across a number of industries and professions including Schroder’s, Deloitte, Barclays, Ernst & Young, Cisco Systems, the BBC, and other international media outlets from magazines to newspapers. We also have Economics graduates working in various governmental organisations. The average graduate starting salary is £27000 (Complete University Guide 2013) and economic graduates are highly sought after across a range of professions from the Civil Service to the Bank of England. Graduate profile

Alumna:

Ying Zhou

Alumna:

Subject:

Economics

Subject: Economics

James Lambert

Graduated: 2007

Graduated:

Place of Work: NAFM

Place of Work: Ashurst

Position: Foreign Affairs

Position: Economist

“Spending the summer of my second year as an accountant at Shell in China enabled me to develop key soft skills. Communication, problem solving and independent thinking, alongside the academic skills that I gained through my degree.”

“It was a very friendly university where students of all backgrounds and departments mixed easily. Whilst the College had grown significantly, it was still sufficiently small to create an atmosphere in which one felt that one knew a good proportion of both staff and students.

2003 (BSc), 2004 (MSc)

This is a big differentiating factor from other universities.”

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Robbie Gibb Alumnus, Editor BBC “My degree was in economic and public administration. I wouldn’t claim to have been the most conscientious or brilliant of students, but the grounding I was given has been the foundation of my understanding of much of the current political debate on the state of the economy. I do enjoy occasionally interviewing some of my former tutors. My time to ask them the difficult questions.”

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Department of Economics


Your future career The Economics Department, in partnership with the Careers Service, provides opportunities to develop transferable skills to enable you to market yourself effectively for graduate jobs. Economics@Work Economics@Work is a series of employability workshops, events and guest speaker talks about jobs in Economics with • Practitioner insights • Case studies • Careers advice • Contacts and networking opportunities • Q&A Economics Careers Skills Certificate The aim of this course is to help enhance your employability skills. This will include tips on how to fill out job application forms and how to perform well on interviews. The course is delivered in two parts: Basic Economics Careers Skills and Advanced Economics Careers Skills. Individual career support The department in cooperation with the Career Services provides timely and targeted individual support and careers advice for students searching for work experience, internships and jobs. Summer internship Internships and summer jobs are a good way to gain some work experience. An internship or summer job allows you to test out different areas of interest and they can lead to graduate programmes or jobs offers. The department and the College provides students with a range of initiatives to help you find an internship: • Internship fair organised by the Career Services • S  antander sponsored specific internship programme for Royal Holloway students

Undergraduate careers support The Careers Service is conveniently situated within the same building as the Economics department and is affiliated with The Careers Group, University of London. At 100 years old is one of the largest and most established higher education careers organisations in Europe. Our affiliation with the Careers Group provides access to employers and careers events in London as well as locally. Undergraduate Careers Advisers offer plenty of hands-on support, along with one-to-one coaching sessions, designed to assist you with your career strategy. In addition to which Careers Advisors focus on areas such as entrepreneurship and provide a specialist service for international students. It is strongly advised that you prepare for a job as early as possible by fully utilising the Careers Centre facilities and attending activities and events to network and gain information. Our workshops will help you with: • Using social media for job hunting • Finding internships and work experience • CV’s. Applications, Interviews • Assessment centres • Making the most of the recruitment fair • What to do if you don’t know what to do! Careers activities and employer events • PWC, psychometric assessment skills session • Proctor & Gamble – R&D presentation • Deloitte, making successful applications, skills session • Ernst & Young, CV clinic • College of Law, is Law the careers for me? • RAF interviews • Centrica, succeeding at interview skills session • CV workshop, Job applications workshop • Centrica summer internship presentation

• A  ctive cooperation with Royal Holloway alumni to promote internship and job openings

Services for students who wish to:

• S  tep London Graduate Internship programme run by the Career Group at www.careers.lon.ac.uk

• Becoming more enterprising and entrepreneurial

Maximising your job opportunities Employers also look for such skills such as teamwork, problem solving and decision-making. Most successful job applicants have been involved with activities such as student societies (such as Economics Society, Entrepreneurs, the Law Society and the Management and Investment Society), sports teams, volunteering and part-time work. Your involvement with co-curricular activities can lead to you being awarded the Royal Holloway Passport, a recent initiative that helps you market your skills to employers.

• Start a business, social enterprise or charity • Enhance employability with enterprise skills www.royalholloway.ac.uk/rhentrepreneurs Start-up Wednesdays – workshops and skills development • S  tudent Societies – gain experience through involvement in societies • E  nterprise Lab – one to one business guidance/ incubation services • Competitions – raise funds for your business/social enterprise • E  nterprising Training – boot camps/ department workshops/ one off events

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Other information Departmental Support

Getting involved

The Department provides extra tutoring for all core courses. These sessions are held in small groups (from 1 to 5 students) and are arranged by demand only. They are aimed at providing students with additional feedback on assignments and ensuring that no one is left behind.

• S  ocial Events: Throughout the year, we hold several events exclusively for Economics students - such as the Autumn Ball, Spring Social and Summer BBQ. These events provide an excellent opportunity to socialise in a relaxed environment with your fellow students and academics.

We use online tools and learning platforms (such as Moodle, MyEconLab and MyMathLab) in all our courses. Recently, the Department have provided students with free eBooks for select modules. There are many advantages for eBooks including, speed: books are downloaded immediately; portability: can be read on most electronic devices; interactivity: you can take notes, underline, bookmark, and find extra information through hyperlinks; as well as it being environmentally friendly.

• R  HUL Economics Society: The Economics Society is a student led society which holds regular Economics themed debates, talks and events such as movie night and social outings and is a great way to meet peers with similar interests to you. If this does not interest you, there are many other clubs and societies for students throughout the College with a wide range of interests. You can find out more from our website: www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studentlife

Facilities To support students studying Economics we have dedicated use of well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms and a laboratory for experimental research (ExpReSS Lab). Computers and library resources for students are conveniently located across the main campus. Students also benefit from access to the University of London’s library resources. In addition, undergraduate students have exclusive use of the Economics Hub, which can be used as both a social and study space. Study abroad Royal Holloway has International Exchange partnerships with universities worldwide (such as Boston College, George Washington University, University of Florida, University of Sydney, National University of Singapore and others) and participates in the Erasmus programme. Our current students have the opportunity to study abroad for an academic year at one of our partner universities.

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Department of Economics

• S  tudent Mentoring Scheme: The Department has created a student mentoring programme where current 2nd and 3rd year Economics students act as mentors for fresher (1st year) students. Mentors are there for academic and non-academic issues, support and guidance, and for sharing experiences. Once you have progressed into 2nd and 3rd you will also have the opportunity to become a student mentor. Postgraduate opportunities Unlike other top research departments in the UK, we have opted for a small and select postgraduate programme so that all our postgraduate students receive considerable individual attention from members of staff. There are five main research groupings in the Department: economic theory; industrial and financial economics; political economy; labour economics and macroeconomics. The Department offers a choice of Taught Masters, an MPhil and PhD programme.


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Academic staff The Department displays strength across the core fields of the discipline – microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics – and in particular labour economics, development economics, experimental economics and economics history. Dan Anderberg, PhD (Lund)

Ronni Pavan, PhD (Chicago)

Public Economics, Labour Economics, Family Economics

Labour Economics, Applied Econometrics, Urban Economics.

Sophie Bade PhD (NYU)

Juan Pablo Rud, PhD (LSE)

Game Theory, Microeconomic Theory

Experimental Economics

Jesper Bagger, PhD (University of Aarhus)

Alessio Sancetta, PhD (Cambridge)

Labour Economics, Applied Econometrics, Macroeconomics

Financial Econometrics, Prediction Algorithms

Pedro Bordalo, PhD (Universite Paris VI)

Robert Sauer, PhD (NYU)

Behavioural Economics, Behavioural Finance, Decision Theory

Labour Economics, Applied Econometrics

Arnaud Chevalier, PhD (Birmingham)

Andrew Seltzer, PhD (Illinois)

Labour Economics, Education Economics, Family Economics

Economic History, Labour Economics, Experimental Economics

Francesco Feri PhD (Ca’ Foscari Venezia)

Hui-Fai Shing, PhD (Royal Holloway)

Economics and Social networks, Experimental Economics.

Economics of Gambling, Financial Economics

Jefferson Frank, PhD (Yale)

Michael Spagat, PhD (Harvard)

Macroeconomics, Labour Economics

Armed Conflict

Manolis Galenianos, PhD (Pennsylvania)

Cecilia Testa, PhD (LSE)

Macroeconomics, Search Theory, Labour Economics, Monetary Economics.

Political Economy

Ahu Gemici, PhD (Pennsylvania)

Labour Economics, Economics of Education

Empirical Microeconomics, Labour Economics, Family Economics Maris Goldmanis, PhD (Chicago)

Ija Trapeznikova, PhD (Northwestern) Jonathan Wadsworth, PhD (LSE) Labour Economics Applied Microeconomics

Microeconomic Theory, Industrial Organisation Daniel Hamermesh, PhD (Yale) Applications of Labour Economics Melanie Luhrmann, PhD (Mannheim) Applied Microeconomics, Microeconometrics, Public Economics Michael Mandler, PhD (Yale) Microeconomic Theory, Game Theory, Decision Theory Andrew Mountford, PhD (Brown) Macroeconomics, Economics Growth, International Trade Philip Neary, PhD (University of California San Diego) Game Theory, Experimental Economics Michael Naef, PhD (Zurich) Experimental Economics, Behavioural Economics, Neuroeconomics Prasandjeet (Vinay) Nundlall PhD (Brandeis) Finance and Development, Market Microstructure

The terms and conditions on which Royal Holloway, University of London makes offers of admission to its programmes of study, including those covered in this booklet, may be found in the Undergraduate Prospectus or Postgraduate Prospectus, copies of which are available on request from: www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere The information contained in this brochure is correct at the time of publication but is subject to change as part of the Department’s policy of continuous improvement and development.

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Notes

7047 06/14

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Royal Holloway, University of London Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX T: +44 (0)1784 434455 royalholloway.ac.uk

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Department of Economics

Economics undergraduate brochure  

The undergraduate brochure for Economics at Royal Holloway 2014

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