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Sixth Form Curriculum 2020-2022


Royal High School Bath Head Mrs K Reynolds, MA Academic Deputy Head

Mr H Briggs, BA (Hons), MA

Pastoral Deputy Head Mrs E Cunningham, MA (Hons) Head of Sixth Form

Mr N Hayward, BA (Hons)

Deputy Head of Sixth Form

Mr K Newman, BA (Hons)

IB Diploma Programme Co-ordinator

Ms J Taylor, BSC (Hons)

Head of HE Mr T Hardcastle, BSc (Hons) Head of Careers Mrs L Scott, MA (Hons)

Wednesday 25 September 2019

Sixth Form Information Evening

Monday 7 October 2019

Bursary Application Deadline

Contact admissions@rhsb.gdst.net to access GDST bursary applications Monday 4 November 2019

Deadline for applications for

Scholarships Sixth Form Scholarship Examination Music, Drama and Sport Auditions Written Assessments Tuesday 5 November 2019

Scholarship Examinations

Monday 25 November 2019

Provisional subjects submitted


Contents General Information Page Welcome from the Head of Sixth Form 7 A Level Reform 8 Subject Structure 9 Subject Options 9 Entry Requirements 11 The UCAS Team 12 Sixth Form Scholarships and Bursaries 14 Careers 15 The Sixth Form Library 16 ICT Provision 16 Additional Learner Support 16

A Level Curriculum Options Biology 18 Chemistry 19 Design Technology 20 Drama and Theatre 21 Economics A (Pure Economics) 22 English 23 Fine Art 24 French 25 Geography 26 German 27 History 28 Italian 29 Latin 30 Mandarin (AS only) 31 Mathematics 32 Music 33 Music Technology 34 Physical Education 35 Physics 36 Psychology 37 Religious Studies: Philosophy and Ethics 38 Textiles 39 Spanish 40 Physical Education 41 A Level Enrichment 43


International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme Curriculum Options The IB Diploma Programme 48

Group 1: Language A1 English 49 Mother Tongue Language A 50

Group 2: Second Language French B 51 German B 52 Latin 53 Mandarin B 54 Spanish B 55

Group 3: Individuals and Societies Economics 56 Geography 57 History 58 Philosophy 59 Psychology 60

Group 4: Experimental Sciences Biology 61 Chemistry 62 Computer Science 63 Physics 64

Group 5: Mathematics Mathematics 65

Group 6: The Arts/Electives Design Technology 66 Music 67 Theatre 68 Visual Arts 69

Diploma Programme Core Creativity, Action and Service 70 Extended Essay 71 Theory of Knowledge 72

Sixth Form Life

Activities 73 Additional Challenges and Opportunities 73 Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme 74 Foreign Language Leader Award 74 Royal High School Tripos 75 Leadership Opportunities 75

Results / Leavers’ Destinations A Level Results 77 IB Results 78 Leavers’ Destinations 79


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Welcome Joining the Sixth Form is a new beginning in your educational life. As soon as you arrive, you quickly discover what makes it feel different from your earlier experiences studying for GCSEs or IGCSEs. Firstly, the lessons have a new emphasis, with more importance placed on self-study and independent research.

If you are keen on public speaking, come along to debates or take part in the MUN. If leadership interests you, apply to be a Prefect or a Mentor – or Head Girl! As for subject-based clubs, there are many of them throughout the school, from MedSoc if you are interested in pursuing a degree in medicine, to Litlunch where you can discuss contemporary fiction from around the world over a slice of cake.

Your relationships with your teachers will feel different too. No doubt you will enjoy the discursive basis to many of your lessons as ideas are discussed and debated, with the onus very much on you to offer your own perspective.

Many girls set up and run their own clubs. And if you really wish to make your mark, join the Ball Committee and help organise the spectacular May Ball which takes place in the summer term.

Class sizes are smaller and there will be periods each day when you are not in lessons and are able to prioritise how to best use your time. You may choose to study over a coffee in the Sixth Form Café or to use the silent space of the well-stocked Sixth Form library to make progress with whatever it is you are working on.

Above all, Royal High Sixth Form is a place to grow and develop, academically and socially, and where the girls who are here are at the centre of everything we do. I look forward to seeing you in the Sixth Form.

A good Sixth Form should be an inspiring place in which to spend your time. You’ll feel challenged on a regular basis, feeding off the atmosphere of common purpose and academic endeavour. It is a place where you can feel your mind being stretched and your sense of ambition honed. Academically, you will grow in confidence and in terms of pastoral support, our Sixth Form is second to none. The tutor system is based on individualised one-to-one tutorials where your tutor can offer support and guidance when you face difficulties. The ethos and culture here is designed to support you in every possible way so that you are able to flourish in whatever you attempt.

Mr N Hayward Head of Sixth Form

Outside lessons, opportunities abound. If you are interested in working with younger girls, we have a Big Sister mentoring programme.

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A level reform Introduction

As many of you know, there have been major reforms of the A level system taking place in the last few years. For students entering in the Sixth Form in September 2019 all the subjects that we currently offer have been revised and accredited to fit the new, two year linear model.

The biggest change in the new-style A levels has been the decoupling of AS from A level, to create a standalone qualification. In the new structure, the AS result cannot count towards the full A level grade. To gain an A level, candidates have to take papers covering the whole two year course, all at the end (this is what is meant when the new A level is described as ‘linear’). If they took AS after a year, they would still have to take the full exam, covering all the first year’s work, again.

This will be of great benefit to your daughter as all her subjects will follow a similar structure – two years of teaching followed by exams and coursework submission (in some subjects) at the end of the Upper Sixth. This model will allow us to use all our resources to ensure that your daughter is given the support that she needs to make great strides as a learner who will become a successful undergraduate.

It is not in the spirit of the current reforms to take AS exams in an A level subject during the Lower Sixth since this will not benefit the student in terms of exam credit, and the study leave and distraction involved loses valuable classroom contact time. Internal exams are taken in the summer term of Year 12, which will give students and teachers a valuable indication of their level of attainment at this stage in the course.

To support this development we are also able to offer additional opportunities as part of Sixth Form study which will enrich her learning and give her an edge over candidates when making her university application.

This will also help students to make their university subject choices and inform teachers’ judgments about making predicted grades for UCAS.

Summary of the recent changes to A level •

• • •

Greater variety in question types has been introduced – including multiplechoice in some subjects.

A levels are still graded A*-E and the new, reformed, specifications are not designed to be harder than the old AS/A2 model qualifications. Content of all courses has been updated. Coursework is part of assessment in some subjects (e.g. English, History, Geography, Art, DT). In the Sciences, Practical Work will be reported separately on certificates, and will not count in the final grade (although questions about the nature of practical work is now part of the material that students are examined on).

AS qualifications still exist but as a separate qualification, worth 40% of a full A level on the current UCAS Tariff and these exams cannot count towards A level grades. A number of AS courses are available for students to take alongside their full A level courses as part of our challenging and exciting Enrichment programme. These include Maths, Mandarin, Computing and Photography. These AS courses are taken with fewer fortnightly lessons than a full A level over two years, with exams at the end of Year 13.

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Subject structure The Sixth Form offers two possible programmes of study: A levels or the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. We try to enable every girl to take her preferred options, whether she chooses to study the IB or A levels. However, not every course combination is possible and we do need a minimum number of students to ensure the viability of courses. Subjects with a very low uptake of students may only run at either IB or A level, not both.

A Level Programme

challenge of a fourth full A level. If this is the case, please contact the Head of Sixth or a member of the curriculum team.

The curriculum model for A levels at the Royal High allows students to focus in depth on the subjects they wish to take whilst providing additional opportunities to develop wider interests and skills that are essential in creating rounded and successful undergraduates and professionals.

The curriculum model for A levels at the Royal High is based on ten hours of lessons per fortnight per subject. This generous allocation is designed to give students the scope to study each of their subjects in depth while also having the time to develop an independent, exploratory approach by reading widely and researching around the subject.

In most cases it is advisable to take three full A level courses. This is because all universities, including Oxbridge and Russell Group universities, make their standard offer on the basis of grades in three A levels. Oxford University, for example, has stated “We advise candidates not to spread themselves too thinly across too many subjects, where they may risk dropping a grade or two in their results. Our offers are made on the basis of exam grades rather than UCAS Tariff points, so three A*/A grades would be sufficient to meet most conditional offers, but two A*s and two Bs would not.” There is an exception to this rule in the case of a student opting to take Further Maths.

To complement academic studies, all students follow a programme of lessons in PSHEE ‘Education for Life’, UCAS preparation, study skills, enrichment and sport. Leading on from the study skills course is the opportunity for students to complete the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ). Students will also have the option to choose an additional two-year qualification as way of enriching her experience and educational portfolio for university applications. Grades are awarded from and A* to E for full A levels.

We do recognise, however, that students of exceptional ability may desire to take up the

Subject Options A level (choose any 3 subjects) • • • • • • •

Art Biology Chemistry Classical Civilisation Computer Science Design Technology Economics A (Pure Economics)

• • • • • • • • •

English French Further Mathematics Geography German History Italian Latin Mathematics

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• • • • • • •

Music Physics Physical Education Psychology Religious Studies (Philosophy and Ethics) Spanish Theatre Studies


International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme The IB Diploma Programme requires students to choose one subject from six subject areas, three to be studied at Higher Level and three at Standard Level. Higher Level subjects are taught for seven hours 45 minutes per fortnight whilst Standard Level have five hours each fortnight. Lesson time is also allocated to two of the three Core requirements of the programme: Theory of Knowledge (TOK) and Creativity, Action and Service (CAS). The third Core requirement, an Extended Essay (EE) of 4000 words, is launched in the Summer term of the Lower Sixth and completed independently in conjunction with a supervisor: each student chooses their own subject and topic.

All courses are taught over two years. Coursework and oral assessment are an integral part of the programme, and the final external examinations are taken in May of the second year. The IB Diploma is graded out of 45 points. A possible 7 points are available for each subject and 3 extra points can be gained through TOK and the Extended Essay. A minimum of 24 points, of which 12 points must be in the Higher Level subjects, is necessary to pass the Diploma. Students who do not achieve this receive a certificate in each subject. All subjects are offered at Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL) unless otherwise stated. (Choose one subject from each column, three at SL, three at HL)

Subject Options IB (choose one subject from each column, three at SL, three at HL) Group 1 • Language A: English Literature • English Group 2 • French B • German A • German B • Spanish B • Mandarin B • Latin B • Mother Tongue Language A (SL)

Group 3 • Geography • History • Philosophy • Psychology • Economics Group 4 • Biology • Chemistry • Physics • Design Technology

Group 5 • Maths: Applications and Interpretation HL/SL • Maths: Analysis and Approaches HL/SL Group 6 • Theatre • Visual Arts • Design Technology • Music • Elective (Second subject from Group 2, 3 or 4)

50 one hour lessons per fortnight

A level

IB Diploma 2 Year Programme

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Enrichment Qualification Our aim is to offer our students the richest and most varied educational experience we can. To this end, in addition to their A level subjects, students study an Enrichment subject which is taught for four hours per fortnight. Most Enrichment subjects lead to an additional qualification, such as a GCSE or an AS level, enhancing the academic profiles of the students who take them. Enrichment courses run subject to student interest. Enrichment subjects typically include: Sports Engagement Programme Government and Politics (AS level) Advanced Cookery Computer Science (AS level)

Mandarin (AS level) Mathematics (Further Maths or AS Maths) Photography (AS level) Music Technology (AS level)

Entry Requirements

entrance assessments may be required in some cases. Some students will be required to take papers to assess their ability in English, Maths and option subjects.

If you are not already a student of Royal High School Bath, and are considering joining the Sixth Form, your first step should be an informal visit to see our Sixth Form facilities. You will also meet the Head, Head of Sixth Form and other members of staff, as well as being able to talk to some of our current Sixth Form students.

Making Your Choices Please submit your choices via Firefly by 26th November. The option blocks will then be created from the subject combinations you have given us. Shortly after this we will request final confirmation of the subjects you wish to take.

Please contact the registrar, Francesca Orr f.orr@rhsb.gdst.net, or telephone, 01225 313877 and, of course, you are very welcome to attend one of our Open Day events.

We will do our best to fit in all your choices but occasionally this might not be possible. If you subsequently change your choices after the timetable is made, then you will need to use the existing option blocks and check with the curriculum team, as some courses may be full. You should always feel that you can talk to us about this and ask our advice.

Entry is dependent on a minimum of six GCSEs at grades 9-6. Candidates are also expected to achieve grades 9-6 in the subjects they wish to study at A level or at Higher Level in the International Baccalaureate Diploma. In addition, students are required to achieve at least a grade 4 in Maths and English Language GCSE. For some subjects, a grade 6 or above in a related discipline is recommended. For example, Psychology would require grade 6 or above in English, Mathematics and Science.

Choosing your Subjects – A level Programme There are certain university courses and career paths (e.g. Medicine) which require specific qualifications as a condition of entry. Think carefully about the area(s) you are interested in pursuing and ensure that (i) subjects choices required in this area match your academic strengths (ii) choose appropriate subjects for this area.

In some subjects, we would recommend continuing to study them only if a grade 7 or higher is achieved at GCSE. More advice will be given about this following results. NB Students wishing to take Music A level also need to have Associated Board Grade 4 or above in an instrument or singing. Offers are normally made on the basis of predicted grades and school reports, but

You will receive more advice about this in your academic interview with a senior member of staff in the Autumn term.

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Choose subjects which you enjoy and are good at - enjoyment is very important due to the depth of study required;

subjects that are chosen from each group. In particular, students need to think carefully about their choice of subject from Group 6, The Arts and Electives. Would-be medical students will need to opt for a second science. For university courses involving Mathematics, including Physics, Architecture and certain Engineering courses, one of the HL Maths courses may be required.

•  Choose sensible combinations of subjects which allow you to develop and demonstrate a range of skills; •  Consult your teachers about your potential; •  Think about the qualifications needed for your future career.

If you have further questions regarding your A level or IB choices please contact me h.briggs@rhsb.gdst.net .

Choosing your Subjects – IB Diploma Programme The principle of breadth is built into the IB Diploma programme but students still need to think carefully about the combinations of

Mr H Briggs Interim Head

The UCAS team How we support you In the Autumn Term of Year 13 most members of the Sixth Form make their applications for Higher Education. This can be a daunting prospect for both students and their parents. At the RHS Sixth Form we have an experienced UCAS and Tutor team to support and guide you through the application procedure. We are confident that we are able to offer the best possible help to ensure that your application is successful so that you gain the university place for which you are best suited.

• • • •

In the Summer Term we focus on making decisions and preparing to apply. We help you to decide where you want to apply and show you how to do so, we encourage you to attend University open days, of which up to three may be on a school day, and we make time available for Work Experience

This is why our system works so well we start early! In the Autumn and Spring terms of Year 12 we work with the careers department who prepare you for applying to UCAS: • • • •

aptitude survey and are provided with detailed feedback. We provide information about Gap years Interview techniques are discussed and guidance offered. Interviews with local careers officers can be arranged. University Admissions Officers give talks to all the Lower Sixth and parents at a Higher Education Evening.

Most important of all is the fact that we hold three Higher Education days in the Sixth Form. This is unique to our Sixth Form and ensures that every student has the specialist help and guidance they need to help them apply for courses they will enjoy, at universities that will suit them.

You are shown how to produce a CV and write a letter of application. You are given an individual careers interview by a specialist. Outside speakers talk about a variety of careers. Students complete a professional

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• •

Advice is given on writing the Personal Statement and staff show students how to apply to UCAS on-line. Specialist staff give advice to those contemplating Medicine or Veterinary courses. There is also a seminar session and individual advice for those considering Oxbridge, accompanied by informal lunches with former students who were successful Oxbridge applicants. Personal Statements are started at this point and a member of the UCAS and Tutor team is assigned to offer individual guidance to each student. Advice is tailored to the needs of IB students to ensure a clear understanding of UCAS tariffs.

• • •

The choice of referee – why we are so special The student is allocated the most appropriate referee for their needs: this referee will usually be a subject specialist who knows the student well, or may be a member of staff with experience and expertise in particular applications. Tutors offer guidance at all stages of the application process.

The universities make their decisions. The UCAS team is available throughout the year to offer guidance about accepting offers. Should there be any ‘hiccup’ over your examination results in July (IB Diploma) or August (A level) the same team is ready to help you find a course which suits you.

We aim to complete all Personal Statements in the Summer Term, and to have the bulk of the reference written too. This ensures that students will be able to concentrate on their A level or IB2 studies once they return after the summer holiday. Students register on the UCAS website and start to input their details, ensuring a speedy application process in the autumn.

Our UCAS procedure ensures that every student gets the best possible individual help, drawing on the talents of the whole staff. Because references are written by specialists in their fields your reference will be written by someone who knows what the University Admissions tutors require – and by someone who knows you well. We are proud of the help we can offer you – it represents a genuine partnership between the student, parents and teachers.

Autumn Term – Year 13 – applying through UCAS •

Housemistresses, PE staff, leaders of CAS activities, so that the reference is as full as possible. Students have individual help from the UCAS team during the application process. Anyone likely to face an interview is given specialist training in a small-group workshop session. Medical, Dental and Veterinary applicants, along with Oxbridge applicants, have individual help from specialist members of staff to aid them with their applications. As a result of our early deadlines for the whole process, students’ applications will reach admissions tutors early – offers are often made early for the more popular courses, and with the enormous increase in the number of applicants expected each year this could be a real advantage. Mock interviews are arranged for students likely to be interviewed by their chosen universities. These take place before the main university interviews begin so that students feel thoroughly prepared.

After receiving their internal exam grades, students complete their personal statements, with the full support of their tutors. References are written, and referees discuss these with the students at oneto-one meetings. References are based on reports from subject staff and others who are able to support a student: e.g.

Good Luck with your application! Mr T Hardcastle Head of HE

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Scholarships and financial assistance (Bursaries) Academic Scholarships in Year 12

across the papers and make decisions about the allocation of the awards. External candidates’ results will be considered alongside a school reference. Candidates will take the papers on Tuesday 5 November 2019.

For entrance into Year 12, both internal and external students can apply for one of three scholarships:

The STEM Scholarship This award recognises a student’s aptitude for Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths, and may be applied for if a student is considering taking A levels in two or more scientific subjects. The students will be expected to take examination papers in TWO subjects of their choice, within this spectrum.

Students must choose TWO subjects from one column and ONE from the other:

The Arts Scholarship This award recognises a student’s aptitude for subjects such as English, History, Classics, Modern and Ancient Languages, Religion and Philosophy and Geography and may be applied for if a student is considering taking two or more A levels in the arts. The students will be expected to take examination papers in TWO subjects of their choice, within this spectrum.

Block A

Block B

English

Maths

History

Biology

French

Chemistry

Spanish

Physics

German

Computer Science

Mandarin Geography Religion and Philosophy Latin/Greek Economics

The IB Scholarship (for those taking the IB Diploma)

Specialist Awards in Art, Dance, DT, Drama, Music and Sport

Owing to the holistic nature of the IB Diploma, students will be expected to take THREE examinations in a combination of arts/science subjects of their own choice.

The successful candidates for Specialist Awards will be expected to make a commitment to their chosen subject area throughout their Sixth Form career and to follow the subject through both A level or IB Diploma. They will be expected to take part in concerts, productions and other extra curricular activities appropriate to their subject area.

Year 12 Scholarship applications are submitted in October of Year 11 and students are required to submit a personal statement to support their assessment test. A committee, consisting of the Head of Sixth Form, Head of Academic Extension and Deputy Head (Academic) and chaired by the Head, will assess candidates’ performance

The Art portfolio should be submitted by Monday 4 November 2019, and the

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Academic, Art, Dance, DT, Drama and Music and Sport auditions/ interviews will take place in week commencing 4 November 2019.

circumstances. This financial assessment is undertaken by the GDST’s fees department. In order to be considered for financial assistance, parents will need to complete a full financial assessment. Details can be obtained from the Registrar, Francesca Orr.

GDST Financial Support (Bursaries) The Girls’ Day School Trust has an extensive scheme of financial assistance awards. You are entitled to apply for a financial assistance to cover the two years in the Sixth Form and this will be awarded on a student’s performance at school combined with an assessment of the family’s financial

An application for financial assistance should be made through the Registrar, Mrs Francesca Orr f.orr@rhsb.gdst.net by Monday 7 October 2019. She will give access details to the GDST log-in page.

Careers As a Sixth Form student, you will have access to a tailored Careers Education and Guidance programme. The programme will prepare you for the important choices you will be making about your future by broadening your mind to opportunities and developing your self-awareness.

you need it. She has worked in a number of industries, as well as overseas, and has experience of recruitment. Lu works from the Sixth Form and is available for Careers advice on Monday and Wednesday afternoons.

Work Experience

Employability and adaptability are cornerstones of the programme, as the demands of the labour market change and evolve.

You are encouraged to make use of your networks to arrange work experience to help inform your choices, and in preparation for Higher Education. Please let us know if you need support with this, as we are continually making new contacts.

Resources We are constantly building our network of professionals, from our alumnae, to our parent body, our staff to our contacts, to give you access to information and experience.

Careers Experience Courses These short courses are run by major employers in the UK, usually in the Christmas, Easter and summer holidays. They can provide an excellent insight into careers in specific industries or specialisms.

We also have digital and printed resources to help you explore possibilities: from Higher Education to entrepreneurial ideas; apprenticeships to gap years.

Mrs L Scott Head of Careers

Advice All Year 12s will have an interview with a Governor in the Autumn term to hone your interview skills and help you to crystallise your plans beyond Sixth Form. Mrs Lu Scott is also available to help you access our networks, and offer advice when

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The Sixth Form library The Sixth Form has a dedicated Senior Library based on the first floor of the Winfield Centre. This attractive facility holds approximately 4000 subject specific books to support the IB and A level courses, together with a range of periodicals and specialist journals both in printed and electronic formats. Students are also directed to further online resources through the Library portal pages, and qualified Librarians offer sessions in information and research skills.

Whilst the Main Library is still open to Sixth Form students, the Sixth Form Library offers a dedicated study centre at the heart of the Winfield Centre, available 8am – 5.30pm weekdays. The Library is also used as a seminar room for guest visits or weekly activities such as the English departments ‘Litlunch’.

ICT provision All Sixth Form students are required to bring a laptop or similar device for the duration of their studies at the Royal High School.

that important coursework should not be lost should the student’s device become accidentally lost or damaged.

This can link wirelessly to the school wide network.

We also have a school portal, called Firefly; a secure, password protected, internet site where e-mails and files can be accessed from any computer with internet access.

Files can be saved to Microsoft Office 365, which automatically backs up files so

Additional learner support There is a dedicated department to provide for the needs of any student that requires additional help. This includes overseas students for whom English is an Additional Language (EAL), as well as students diagnosed with additional learning needs. Depending on the level of support required, some support services may incur an additional cost.

We have a Learning Support Co-ordinator who can provide guidance in study skills to support an individual student’s needs. We also have a full-time EAL teacher who provides specialist tuition. There is a weekly EAL Group Discussion for new Sixth Form students who need to build their confidence and fluency, plus additional English lessons to support academic subjects or prepare for IELTS as required.

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Curriculum Options 17


Biology Course outline AQA Biology is the study of life in all its intricacies and wonders. Biology looks at the past and how we came to be here, while also investigating the way our body functions, how to fix it when it goes wrong, and even how to interject before problems arise.

The control of gene expression.

Biology studies the interactions between all the species living on Earth, factors that can affect their success and efforts that can be taken to preserve the vast array of organisms in existence today. The course is assessed as follows: Theoretical knowledge and the focus on current practical techniques will support your development as a future scientist. You will learn about the core concepts of biology and about the impact of biological research and how it links to everyday life. You will learn to apply your knowledge, investigate and solve problems in a range of contexts.

Paper 1 (35%) 2 Hours Any content from topics 1-4. Includes short and long answer questions and extended response questions Paper 2 (35%) 2 Hours Any content from topics 5-8 Includes short and long answer questions and a comprehension question. Paper 3 (30%) 2 Hours Any content from topics 1-8. Includes structured questions, critical analysis of experimental data and one essay from a choice of two.

Year 12 • Biological molecules. • Cells. • Organisms exchange substances within their environment. • Genetic information, variation and relationship between organisms.

There is no coursework, however relevant required practical knowledge will be assessed in all papers. Enrichment • Sixth Form Biology students are invited to attend and joint- lead in our ‘Dissection club’ . • We promote participation in the Intermediate Biology Olympiad for Year 12 students and the Biology Olympiad in Year 13. • There is a residential field trip in the summer term in which students will put their ecology studies into practice.

Year 13 • Energy transfers in and between organisms. • Organisms respond to changes within their internal and external environment. • Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems. 18


Chemistry Course outline AQA Chemistry is studied in three main branches: • • •

some abstract processes and structures. It will train you to sort and analyse data, communicating the outcomes using appropriate scientific language. This is a tremendously valuable skill which is well regarded no matter what course of study is pursued beyond A level.

Physical Chemistry – the understanding of how chemistry works. Organic Chemistry – the study of compounds containing carbon (the chemistry of life). Inorganic Chemistry – the study of the elements and patterns in the Periodic Table.

A level Chemistry is a challenging and rewarding course of study, which requires absolute commitment to make a success of the subject. The calculations aspect of the course requires a good Mathematical grounding from GCSE.

In Year 1 you will be given a solid grounding in foundation Chemistry. You will develop your GCSE understanding of the reactivity of atoms and molecules and gain an understanding of atomic and molecular structure. The construction of the Periodic Table is considered and organic chemistry is introduced.

There are many opportunities to get involved in additional activities. Why not come along to the Sixth Form Science Society, help out with the KS3 Science Club or offer to mentor a younger student in their studies. For potential medics and vets we run a Medical Society for you to meet, discuss and debate the requirements of your chosen careers. Many students subscribe to Chemistry Review for extra reading.

In Year 2 you gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of the three branches of Chemistry. Paper 1 assesses bonding, energetics, equilibria, redox and inorganic chemistry, while Paper 2 assesses kinetics and organic chemistry. The third paper assesses practical skills, data handling and a synopsis of all the theoretical content. All three papers are 2 hours long. There is also a practical endorsement of the experiments carried out through the course. Chemists are highly valued scientists, providing expertise in the fields of medicine, veterinary science, pharmacy, dentistry, chemical engineering, polymer science, materials science and many other disciplines. For all of these employment areas advanced higher education training is required. Entry to such courses invariably demands Chemistry as an essential qualification.

“Chemistry is an exciting subject, which provides answers to the secrets of the natural world.”

Chemistry will expand your thinking and help you develop sophisticated models of 19


Design Technology Course outline AQA The course contains content which will jump into science and maths giving contextual understanding and application, this will reflect 15% of the examination content. Core technical knowledge of design principles, technical manufacture, and materials will form the basis of the remaining theoretical content. The course is taught in a linear format with both examination papers taken on completion of the second year.

and prototype most products. With twin head 3D printers, 40W metal tube laser and a full sized 4 axis CNC router, whether you choose to prototype fully with CADCAM or more traditionally in the fully equipped modern workshop you have fantastic opportunities. The department is stocked with a wide variety of materials and resources and of course the expertise to help you access the equipment. Students are encouraged to participate fully in the department and we really try to encourage the “can do and the more you put in and the more you get out” attitude to learning. A level students can access the department facility outside of lesson time so long as a member of staff is present. Students are encouraged to engage in activities beyond the curriculum which might involve competitions, enterprise or enrichment activities.

Examination Paper 1 - 2.5 hrs - 30% • Mixture of short and extended responses • Technical principles Examination Paper 2 - 1.5 hrs - 20% • Mixture of short and extended responses • Product analysis • Commercial Manufacture Extended Coursework Design and Make - 50% • Students own design context

Careers • Product Designer • Graphic Designer • Architect • Industrial Designer • Creative Director

Studying A level Product Design is an opportunity to satisfy your creative appetite combined with a healthy serving of academic rigour. The course provides a thought provoking qualification giving students the theoretical knowledge, confidence and practical skill to succeed in any number of careers. Students will develop their intellectual curiosity about the design and manufacture of products. They will investigate historical, social, environmental and economic influence on design, whilst enjoying opportunities to put their learning in to practice by creating innovative solutions to realistic design contexts.

• • • • • • •

Engineer, Teacher TV and Film Set Designer Retail Manager Production Management Civil/Structural/ Architectural Engineering

“Design Technology is the one subject which cohesively makes use of information and knowledge I have learnt in other curriculum areas. The opportunities for design are endless and The Royal High Technology department only limited by my own imagination.” is fully equipped with all modern manufacturing machinery required to make 20


Drama and Theatre Course outline WJEC EDUQAS This highly practical specification provides learners with the opportunity to work as either performers and/or designers on three different performances. This is an exciting, rigorous and dynamic course. Overall students will study 5 different texts, and assessments vary from live performance, portfolios and written exams. Students are able to submit acting or technical pieces for examinations.

Alongside course study, Sixth Form Drama students are offered the opportunity to watch some of the best live performances in various theatres around the country including Chichester Festival Theatre and the Bristol Old Vic. Students are offered the chance to work with visiting theatre companies including Frantic Assembly and Kilter Theatre Company and also to participate in workshops with visiting practitioners. A level students are encouraged to participate in school productions as well as producing their own performances.

Component 1: Theatre Workshop (20%) Learners participate in the creation, development and performance of: • One reinterpretation of an extract from a text, using the working methods and techniques of either an influential theatre practitioner or a recognised theatre company.

Recent alumni have gone on to train at nationally and internationally recognised Drama schools and Universities such as : Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, The Guildhall School of Music and Drama, Bard College New York and both Royal Holloway and Goldsmith Universities. Many students go on to pursue professional careers in the theatre, television and film, both as actors and behind the scenes as directors, producers and technicians. Recent alumni have enjoyed careers in the West End and English National Opera as well as establishing their own theatre companies.

Students will also complete a creative log that justifies and explains their ideas for performance Component 2: Text in Action (40%) Learners participate in the creation, development and performance of: • One devised piece using the working methods and techniques of a second different influential theatre practitioner or recognised theatre company • One extract from a text in a contrasting style to the devised performance. Component 3: Text in Performance (40%) Learners explore: • Two complete performance texts from different historical periods • One extract from a third contrasting text.

Drama is equally important in such fields as: Law; Medicine; Teaching; Advertising; PR; Logistics; Events Management. Top business and finance firms appreciate Drama and Theatre students for their inherent leadership, problem-solving, and people management competencies. Many of our students have been awarded places at illustrious universities including those of the Russell Group and Oxbridge.

In Components 1 and 2 learners are given the opportunity to develop performing and/or design skills as appropriate to their interests.

“Theatre can help us build our future, rather than just waiting for it; it is a rehearsal for the revolution.” 21


Economics A Course outline Edexcel Economics is a subject of interest to anyone who likes current affairs and is concerned about global issues such as poverty, economic development or the environment. Economics is in the news every day, as countries all over the world continue to come to terms with the aftermath of the Credit Crunch and the global recession.

healthcare service and tackle traffic congestion? These are some of the problems that you will examine in this fascinating and challenging subject. All our students enjoy the close relationship we have with the University of Bath’s Economics Society and benefit from working with lecturers and undergraduates in school. Our students also attend a day long Economics Forum at the university meeting and listening to leading economists.

The course is taught through 4 distinct themes: • Theme 1: Introduction to Markets and Market Failure. • Theme 2: The UK Economy, Performance and Policies. • Theme 3: Business Behaviour and the Labour Market. • Theme 4: Global Perspective.

We will be visiting a major company as part of the course. This year we went to the Jaguar factory in Birmingham to see at first hand what a world class production plant is like, and how the company retains its edge in a ferociously competitive market.

There are 3 exam papers, each 2 hours long, there is no coursework

“I chose Economics at A level because it is a subject that encompasses all that I am passionate about. I have always been interested in current affairs and studying Economics at this level has just enforced this interest. I have decided to continue studying it along with Politics at university because, after gaining an insight into economies and how they work, I am hungry to learn more.”

Economics is an ideal subject if you want to study PPE, Economics, Politics, Philosophy, Accountancy, Management, International Relations, work in the City or Law, be an entrepreneur, a journalist or a civil servant. Economics complements both arts and science subjects. Those who are most suited to Economics are able to communicate their ideas in words and numbers, so you need to be literate and reasonably numerate. If you find Mathematics difficult then you might find some Economics tricky to follow. Most Economics degrees require A level Mathematics. Economics at A level will develop your knowledge and understanding of how a modern economy works and the options available to the government when trying to improve its performance. How can we increase growth, reduce unemployment, prevent inflation, provide an efficient 22


English Course outline Edexcel Studying English Literature in the sixth form is a rewarding experience. Whichever course you pursue you can be sure that it will fascinate and challenge you. You will be offered a rich diet of ideas with lessons centring around discussions where we will explore the texts from different angles and perspectives. As always, our aim will be to develop your ability to think critically and to express yourself with confidence and flair. The English Department is central to the vibrant cultural life of the school. Trips to the theatre run frequently and debating and public speaking are a regular fixture of Sixth Form life. Students also participate in editing the school magazine. Once a week, a lunchtime LitLunch session is held in the Sixth Form library – a great way of broadening horizons and sharing ideas while winding down over a slice of cake. The English Department is famously supportive and approachable and we will do everything we can to help you achieve your full potential.

our way through the course. There is also a coursework component which we will tackle in the spring and summer terms of Year 12: you will have the chance to compare two texts on a similar theme, exploring your own ideas about the characters and language. So what is an A level lesson like? Clearly, A level lessons can take a myriad of directions but a typical one might begin with the text in question from which a passage or scene may be read and explored. Debate and discussion is vitally important because it enables a work to be seen from a variety of perspectives. As teachers, we always seek to elicit your contributions and to hear your views, so try to be brave and speak up. When you express your opinions in class it helps you develop academically too – you are learning to see ideas three-dimensionally and to explore them from different angles. Whatever you opt for, if you have an enquiring mind and enjoy reading and discussion, this is the perfect choice for you.

The course offers you the chance to explore English Literature in all its diversity. You will encounter a wide range of texts, all the way from the rumbustious bawdiness of Chaucer’s ‘The Wife of Bath’ to the haunting strangeness of some contemporary fiction. You will explore modern novels such as Khaled Hosseini’s ‘A Thousand Splendid Suns’, and Margaret Atwood’s ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’, a disturbing depiction of a dystopian society. Alongside these modern classics, you will study older works such as Mary Shelley’s ‘Frankenstein’ or Thomas Hardy’s ‘Tess of the D’Urbervilles’. Drama figures strongly too, with plays such as Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’ or ‘King Lear’ as well as works by other authors such as Marlowe’s ‘Doctor Faustus’. At the heart of the course is a superb collection of modern poetry which we will read and study as we work

There are four sections of the course: • Drama (30%): Written Exam - 2 hours 15 mins. • Prose (20%): Written Exam - 1 hour. • Poetry (30%): Written Exam - 2 hours 15 mins. • Coursework (20%).

“I studied English at A level because I enjoy reading and talking about books. The course has helped me develop my essay-writing skills and my ability to express my ideas clearly and cogently - a valuable skill for later life. What I loved most though were the discussions and debates, with everyone getting passionately involved in exploring what they thought about the characters or ideas in the book they were studying.” 23


Fine Art Course outline AQA specification A We follow the AQA syllabus in Art and specialise in Fine Art. This gives every student who joins this course the opportunity to work as she wishes towards her own artistic aspirations.

environment where students feel secure enough to develop their own ideas; where they can be brave in their experimentation. The Art School houses four professional working studios, an Art Library and facilities for print making, sculpture photography and lens based media. The department also offers opportunities to visit galleries abroad with a biennial trip to New York and trips in the UK to events like the Frieze Fair and other major galleries.

We work in a number of media but believe very strongly in drawing and it being the very foundation of all studies in Art. There are opportunities to develop your studies in a number of areas; including sculpture, printmaking, painting, photography and lens based media. The A level Fine Art course consists of two distinct units of work. One is the ‘Personal Investigation’, which is the coursework element (60%) and the other is the examination, which is completed at the end of the course (40%). There are a number of career options if you choose to study Art and Design. The normal route is to, on completion of your A levels, complete a foundation course at Art School. Then you specialise in your chosen area, be it fashion, photography, graphic design, film making, game design etc. You can also go on to study History of Art. You could be a painter. You could work in television or web design. You could work within the fashion industry. You could work within advertising or the film industry. There is also architecture and interior design. If you are truly creative you will find your way into a rewarding artistic environment, where you can express your talents. As teaching staff we are all practising artists who believe very strongly in the value of art in our society and how it can enrich ones life. We endeavour to develop a working

“The Art School has helped me to discover what I love about art, both in the studios and beyond.” 24


French Course outline AQA At A level you will be building upon the skills learnt and developed at IGCSE – listening, speaking, reading and writing – but the topics will be more contemporary and more relevant to your age, experience and interests and therefore more engaging and motivating.

training for the workplace.

You will increase your knowledge of countries where French is spoken through the study of the language in its cultural, literary and social context.

Learning a language takes you beyond the classroom and into the way of life of another nation. French culture is so rich and varied. You will learn about French art, music, literature and cinema. There will be opportunities to read poetry and listen to songs, and even to write some of your own, if you wish. There will be films to watch, perhaps as a backdrop to the literary texts under discussion.

Apart from the more obvious careers in interpreting, translating and teaching, French students and graduates are highly sought after in the fields of business, banking, accountancy and the law.

You will be assessed on speaking, reading, listening and translation which will be based on the areas of study. For the writing you will produce essays related to stimulating films and literary texts. The A level topics cover current trends (for example cybersociety), current issues such as; positive features of a diverse society, aspects of culture (contemporary music, cinema etc.), and aspects of political life, a very contemporary topic.

Of course, there will also be the chance to spend time in France through study visits – the best way to improve your spoken French and gain an in-depth understanding of contemporary French society.

“Studying French at A level has been invigorating, enlightening and more than anything, fun. From learning about French culture to reading French literature, the A level course has enabled me to gain an insight into such a fascinating country.” You will take 2 papers are A level, as well You will have an additional lesson each week, in which you will work on your spoken French with our conversation teacher, and prepare for the oral tests. as an oral examination (30%): 21-23 mins/60 marks • •

Paper 1 (20%): Writing - 2 hours/80 marks. Paper 2 (50%): Language/Reading/ Writing - 2 hours 30mins/100 marks.

Modern linguists are in high demand because of the analytical and communication skills developed through learning a language. The presentations that you will be required to give in class, for example, will be good 25


Geography Course outline Educas Geography is one of those subjects that you will find yourself using in so many ways in the future. These will range from simply having a better understanding of current affairs, to utilising your map work, research and communication skills in almost any career choice. Directly related careers include environmental science research, town planning and overseas development work. However, most employers will value your world understanding as well as your sophisticated analytical skills, demonstrated through tasks like your fieldwork project. Geographers leave Higher Education to work in many fields including international finance, marketing, public relations and journalism.

and their effects on the world around us. Finally we look at climatic hazards such as hurricanes and tornadoes. The human topics cover the changes and pressures affecting cities, and also rural areas, in different countries. We learn about how global oceans are managed and looked after. We discuss the emotions and complexity of migration issues. We look at issues relating to our use of energy resources and how sustainable our actions are. In addition to the three written examination units, students will also undertake a personal investigation based on fieldwork data collection. This research and the report produced is an excellent preparation for university skills. The course will develop skills in essay writing and structured responses. It will enhance spatial literacy and understanding of very topical issues in the world around you. It is a useful preparation for many aspects of future life and study.

We will undertake a total of four days fieldwork across the two years, which will partly contribute to your personal investigation. We run international trips to such places as Iceland, Morocco and the Azores. We teach students to use sophisticated computer mapping and analytical software (GIS) to examine spatial relationships. We are recognised as an Esri Centre of Excellence in GIS education. Our department was also awarded the Royal Geographical Society Ordnance Survey Award for Excellence in Secondary Education in 2015, and has also won a Pearson Silver Teaching Award. In 2016, our department was awarded the prestigious ‘Centre of Excellence’ status by the Geographical Association.

The course assessment comprises three papers worth 80% and one personal investigation worth 20%.

The Geography A level course is a two year linear programme. It contains a mixture of human and physical geography units. Physical topics include the study of Earthquakes and volcanoes. There is a choice of studying coasts or glacial processes. We also examine the water and carbon cycles

“It gives me insights into different cultures and different geographical areas across the globe. It helps develop an understanding of how everything on our planet is critically interlinked” 26


German Course outline AQA Year 1 and 2 of the course will allow you to extend your knowledge of the language by building upon the skills learnt and developed at GCSE, becoming more proficient at listening, speaking, reading and writing.

their linguistic simultaneously.

and

vocational

skills

Past students have studied German and Law, German and History, German and Russian. The transferable skills of linguists make them highly sought after across all professions; including banking, business, accounting, the media, travel and tourism. On average, languages graduates earn 8% more than their peers.

Many topics are covered,for example; youth culture (music, fashion), the family, the effects of communication technology, festivals and traditions, aspects of multiculturalism in German speaking countries, aspects of the artistic and political culture in the target language countries such as German reunification and its consequences.

We believe that it is essential for students to experience the German language and culture first hand. All students are given the opportunity to take part in the German exchange trip to Münster where they follow a tailor made programme.

An exciting and rewarding part of the course is the study of a film and literature, both of which will give you insights into the culture of the language.

There may also be the opportunity to participate in a language visit to Berlin, visiting a language school and experiencing the fascinating city of Berlin.

By the end of the course you will feel confident about speaking, writing and understanding German. In addition you will have gained an insight into Germany, Switzerland and Austria, their people, language and culture. Taking German at A level will give you the potential to pursue it at a higher level, possibly with another subject.

Students are encouraged to use German in a wide range of contexts. All our audio material is available on the school intranet and websites are used regularly in lessons, to keep the subject matter topical and up to date. In addition, we have an extensive selection of DVDs, which aid students to widen their experience and understanding of the culture of German speaking countries.

Paper 1 Listening, reading and writing (50%). Paper 2 Writing (20%) writing about the film and text studied. Paper 3 Oral (30%) discussion of a topic and an individual research project.

“Taking German at A level allowed me to broaden my horizons, both culturally and academically. It’s challenging but definitely worth it for the satisfaction when everything falls into place. Having the chance to study German literature has also been a brilliant opportunity. German has been exciting, academically rigorous, but most of all a lot of fun.”

As a linguist, a huge array of career options is open to you. German is the most widely spoken language in Europe with 110 million speakers. German speaking nations are at the forefront of design, environmental and scientific technology. German can be combined with many other subjects at university, allowing students to develop 27


History Course outline OCR Apart from being extremely enjoyable, enabling students to learn about the past and, through it, come to a far better understanding of the present, History also offers students the opportunity to acquire and improve on many of the key skills which have been identified as a priority for universities and employers alike. In particular, critical analysis of source materials or interpretations of the past, and consistent lines of argument supported by detailed factual evidence are invaluable skills. History is the gateway to many professional careers: law, journalism and the media, politics and the Civil Service and indeed many other careers requiring analytical and communication skills – such as medicine and banking.

industrialising society posed to the political establishment. Specifically, we look at how the Government reacted to the ‘Age of Revolutions’ and their approach to political and social reform. Students are assessed through the critical analysis of contemporary sources and evaluative essays. Russia and its Rulers 1855-1964 (40%) A thematic approach is crucial to this substantial paper that explores changes and continuities from Tsarist to Communist regimes. The revolutions of 1917 form a watershed but through analysis of Russian society, economy and governments, students will appreciate why Stalin can be called ‘The Red Tsar’. Assessment requires students to grapple with historians’ varied interpretations of events as well write synoptic essays that cover the entire 100 year period.

For our A level course we have selected three examined units which all centre on Revolutions: potent ideas of liberty and equality which challenged British rule over America and then crossed the Atlantic to pose serious questions to the British constitution and continued to reverberate through Europe, arguably culminating in the February Revolution in Russia in 1917.

Coursework (20%) Using the skills developed across their other papers, students select a topic to research and write a 4,000 word essay. This must evaluate both varied historical interpretations of the past and conflicting contemporary evidence in order to reach a clear judgement.

American Revolution 1740-1796 (15%) We study why and how American Independence was achieved. Starting with understanding the nature of colonialism, students study enlightenment thought and the concepts of liberty and freedom in order to understand how these challenged British ideas of government and rule. The concept of historical significance is explored in depth.

History is the gateway to many professional careers: law, journalism and the media, politics and the Civil Service. Academic careers, such as teaching in schools or universities and research fellowships, are also possibilities. The industry offers innumerable openings: historical sites, tours and retail.

Britain in the Age of Revolution 1783-1850 (25%) Complementing the American unit we explore the challenges that a rapidly

Students are given the opportunity to attend external lectures and field trips.

28


Italian Course outline AQA Italian A level is offered to those who have already taken GCSE/IGCSE Italian.

you to read and study great works by Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Pirandello, Calvino and others in the original language.

The A level course focuses on language acquisition and knowledge of Italian culture (changes in Italian society; politics and culture of the Italian speaking countries/ communities; Italy: immigration, migration and the gap between North and South, and history from the fascist era to the present day). During your A level course you will have to take part in a presentation and discussion in Italian based on your independent research project and related to the Italianspeaking cultural and social context.

You will have the opportunity to practise your spoken skills in the weekly conversation lessons conducted by a native Italian speaker and during the Italian lessons. We believe that visiting the place the native language is spoken is an essential part of learning languages. We advise going on a course in a language school in Italy, staying with a host family and attending lessons in Italian language and other cultural aspects.

We run many supporting clubs and activities, which all provide extra opportunities to develop language skills, pronunciation and knowledge of Italian culture. At this level, these activities include the Key Stage Three Italian club and Key Stage four and five Italian film club. Why study Italian? Italian is an important language for people in business, the arts, technology and many professions. It is useful if you are planning careers in art history, music, linguistics, education and international relations. Italy is a world leader in the culinary arts, interior design, fashion, graphic design, etc. If you are planning a career in one of those fields, you will benefit from knowing Italian. Art historians need Italian. According to UNESCO over 60 per cent of the world’s art treasures are found in Italy.

“Poca favilla gran fiamma seconda� A great flame follows a little spark

Italian language, literature, history, and culture have been a source of admiration and study for many writers from Chaucer and Shakespeare to E.M. Forster, and so many other writers around the world. Italian is a language of poetry and music, which allows 29

- Dante Alighieri


Latin Course outline OCR Latin will help your ability to think cogently as well as to write with clarity, conviction and panache. It underpins the study of other modern foreign languages, such as French, Italian and Spanish, whilst broadening your vocabulary in English and developing your critical thinking skills. Through analysis of the language, Latin is a perfect complement to scientific and mathematical studies, as well as standing proud in its own right.

translation and comprehension of unseen passages of Latin from a number of different authors, which will build upon your previous knowledge. The literature components of the course will involve translation and stylistic appreciation of both prose and verse set texts, by such famous authors as Cicero, Tacitus, Virgil and Ovid, all whose influence lives on today. By studying such a variety of authors, you will come to appreciate some of the finest classical literature and have a deeper understanding of its cultural context.

Students with a qualification in Latin stand out to universities and employers alike and is a superb basis for any career. Armed with numerous transferable skills and a deep appreciation of our western civilisation’s heritage, Latin can lead you to politics, journalism, the media, law, and medicine to name just a few possible careers. Latin is all around us and its study will give you a deeper understanding of the modern world through a study of its cultural and linguistic roots. Several successful media figures from JK Rowling to Tom Hiddleston were inspired by their study of ancient languages and have found that the treasures of the ancient world have paid them richly in their adult lives. The study of Latin is not just a step along the career path, but a gift that will stay with you forever.

Latin not only sharpens the brain and delights the soul, but there are also several opportunities for study beyond the classroom. Typical experiences include study days in the UK, theatre trips and author visits, as well as residential trips which are offered further afield from Hadrian’s Wall to Italy.

There is no coursework requirement but four written examinations as follows: • Unseen Translation (33%) 1 hour 45 mins. • Prose Comprehension (17%) 1 hour 15 mins. • Prose Literature (25%) 2 hours. • Verse Literature: (25%) 2 hours.

AS Classical Greek is also available as an enrichment option.

The study of Latin in the Sixth Form allows for greater insight into the rich and varied culture of ancient Rome through the study of its diverse literature. The language component of the examination involves the

“It intrigues me to discover just how much Latin benefits my use of the English language as well as the other modern foreign languages that I study” 30


Mandarin Course outline Edexcel (AS only) - offered in the Enrichment block) Our AS Level Chinese is offered as an enrichment course which provides the advanced learners the opportunity to study Chinese up to AS level within two years. The enrichment course syllabus is based on contemporary topics which you will find useful for work, higher education and for personal use. It will give you a solid grounding in the language skills and knowledge of contemporary society.

festivals, customs, films and TV, music and books. At the end of the two years’ study, students will sit EDEXCEL Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Chinese, the AS level exam. The course is examined over 4 core areas; Listening, speaking, reading and writing – 25% for each skills.

The course covers two core themes which include Changes of Contemporary Chinese Society and Chinese Culture. In the first year, four major topic areas are taught for Theme 1 Contemporary Chinese Society: family structures and generation gap, family plan and aging problems, school life, job opportunity and balance between work and life.

“Mandarin Chinese is such a unique language. I love writing the Mandarin characters because they offer you space to imagine the pictures hidden behind them. Moreover, learning Mandarin is exciting and opens up a window into other cultures and ways of thinking.” “Learning without thinking begets ignorance. Thinking without learning is dangerous.” Confucius Lun Yu Chapter 2

In the second year, another four topics will be introduced for Theme 2 Chinese Culture: 31


Mathematics Course outline Edexcel The full A level is a two-year linear course, with 66% of the content dedicated to Pure Maths. This will cover Algebra and Coordinate Geometry, and you will learn the intricacies of Trigonometry and Calculus, and be introduced to Logarithms. As you progress into Year 13, you will take this learning further to develop skills in Calculus so that you can solve differential equations and find volumes by rotating functions about the x or y axis. You will also be introduced to Vectors and further Series Expansions. The remaining 34% will be divided between the two applied topics of Mechanics and Statistics. Mechanics explores forces and their effect on the world. The Statistics topic includes Probability, Correlation and Normal Distributions.

Many careers require you to have an A level in Mathematics, or highly recommend it: Engineering, Economics, Operations research, Accountancy, Environmental Science, Finance, Insurance, Software design, Social planning, Medicinal trials, Aviation, Construction, Design, Veterinary Science, Medicine, Risk Analysis, Programmer, to name but a few. For those not opting for an obviously Mathematical career, it is still an option which shows employers that your mind works logically and that you have a breadth to your education. Employers love candidates who are highly numerate. We encourage girls to engage in the wider applications of Mathematics, and in the past have organised trips to the Maths In Action lectures in London, and to the Maths Inspiration talks in Cardiff and Bristol. As a member of the Further Maths Network we are up to date on local opportunities to engage in activities and lectures organised by the Universities of Bristol and Bath. The Senior Maths Challenge is always fully supported by our students and we have a record of success in the regional finals of the Senior Team Maths Challenge.

You can opt to take Further Mathematics as an AS or full A level. Here you will move at a faster pace through the Pure Maths and will take the Applied elements to a higher level. The Pure content will be at least 30% of this AS level and at least 50% of the full A level. The remainder comprises options which could be yet more Pure content, additional Mechanics or Statistics, or could introduce the field of Decision Maths, which looks at Optimisation Problems and Algorithms, and is linked closely with Computer Science. Further Maths is a good choice if you want to do Maths, Physics or Engineering at University, or if you just love Maths!

“Doing Maths has given me much more confidence in my other subjects. It has helped my sciences and taught me how to approach problems logically“ 32


Music Course outline Pearson Edexcel Music A level caters for all musicians, singers or instrumentalists, who have already achieved a GCSE grade B and/ or achieved grade 5 standard or above on their instrument/ voice. It provides an extension to the skills learned at GCSE with the opportunity to develop more detailed knowledge of specific topics through focused study. As one of this country’s biggest industries, music is an ever expanding subject with countless benefits. A level Music is challenging and rewarding, and can lead to university and conservatoire degree courses in a wide range of institutions. It demands commitment but provides scope for personal and intellectual development.

must be at least 4 minutes in duration. One composition must be from a list of briefs assessing compositional technique, carrying 20 marks for this component. This composition must be at least 1 minute in duration, unless the brief specifies a longer minimum duration. The total time across both submissions must be a minimum of 6 minutes Component 3: Appraising Written examination: 90 minutes 40% of the qualification 100 marks Knowledge and understanding of musical elements, contexts and language. Application of knowledge through the context of six areas of study, each with three set works – Vocal Music, Instrumental Music, Music for Film, Popular Music and Jazz, Fusions, New Directions. Application of knowledge to unfamiliar works. One written paper of 2 hours, with a total of 100 marks. One audio CD per student, with the extracts to accompany questions on the paper, will be given. This paper comprises two sections: A and B.

It encompasses three areas of focus: Component 1: Performing Non-examined assessment: externally assessed 30% of the qualification 60 marks A public performance of one or more pieces, performed as a recital. This can be playing or singing solo, in an ensemble, improvising, or realising music using music technology. The total performance time across all pieces must be a minimum of 8 minutes. Performances must be recorded after 1st March in the year of certification and all materials for assessment submitted to arrive by 15th May in the year of certification.

Music offers a wide range of career paths, from all kinds of performance work to composing for TV/film/radio, access to the performing arts and theatre, journalism and research, teaching, music therapy, instrument making, studio technology and much more. It has a close affinity with dance and literature too, offering broader career choices. The range of jobs can seem quite endless. There are more jobs than ever in music business related areas, such as careers in digital marketing, social media, PR, technology, label services, ticketing and merchandising, and it is also common to find music graduates in consultancy, finance, banking and legal jobs.

Component 2: Composing Non-examined assessment: externally assessed 30% of the qualification 60 marks A total of two compositions, one to a brief set by Pearson and one either free composition or also to a brief. One composition must be from either a list of briefs related to the areas of study, or a free composition, carrying 40 marks for this component. This composition 33


Music Technology Course outline Edexcel This qualification is designed to open up a range of exciting and useful tasks and to encourage students to learn about the subject. Students are encouraged to explore their musicality and create original material using technology. There is an emphasis on practical tasks with all tasks appropriate to the styles of music that use music technology.

composition. •

Component 3: Listening and analysing (25%) 75 marks Written examination: 1 hour 30 mins

The content is designed to develop a broad range of skills including project management, appraising and analysis, creativity and imagination. Students will be able to progress to undergraduate study in Music Technology including; • • • •

The purpose of this component is for students to develop listening and analysing skills through the study of a range of music production techniques used in unfamiliar commercial recordings.

Music technology. Sound production. Sound design. Technology based composition (film, tv, video games).

Knowledge and understanding of recording and production techniques and principles, in the context of a series of unfamiliar commercial recordings. Application of knowledge related to all three areas of study:

Component 1: Recording (20%) 60 marks Non-examined assessment: externally assessed.

1. Recording and production techniques for both corrective and creative purposes 2. Principles of sound and audio technology 3. The development of recording and production technology.

The purpose of this component is to assess students’ skills in capturing, editing and mixing sounds to produce an audio recording with increased sensitivity and control. •

Creating, editing, manipulating and structuring sounds to produce a technology-based composition.

Component 4: Producing and analysing (35%) 105 marks Written/practical examination: 2 hours 15 mins.

Production tools and techniques to capture, edit, process and mix an audio recording.

This component assesses students’ knowledge of the techniques and principles of music technology through a series of written and practical tasks, in the context of audio and MIDI materials provided by Pearson. The production stages of sound creation, audio editing and mixing will be covered.

Component 2: Technology based composition (20%) 60 marks Non-examined assessment: externally assessed. The purpose of this component is to assess students’ skills in creating, editing and structuring sounds with increased sensitivity and control to develop a technology-based 34


Physical Education Course outline AQA The A level PE course is assessed through 2 written papers and a practical moderation at the end of Year 13. Whilst GCSE PE is advantageous, there is no requirement to have studied PE previously as long as students are highly motivated and are regular participants in club sport.

Science, Technology in Sport, Sport and Business, Teaching, Sports Development and Management. Additional degree choices include Physiotherapy, Chiropractic Care and Psychology, although students have also gone on to read areas such as Biology at their chosen university. Past students have gone on to study Sports Science at a range of Russell Group Universities and Loughborough and Bath, which are regarded as the top universities for those subject choices.

The theoretical component of the course (worth 70% of your final grade) will be taught across the 2 years with the following being the expected split: Year 1: Applied anatomy and physiology, skill acquisition, sport and society, exercise physiology, biomechanics, sports psychology and the role of technology in sport.

A level PE is seen by higher education establishments as a scientific subjects but equally one that provides valuable personal qualities that sees students settle quickly into University life. We are proud of our academic results from our small cohorts of dedicated students. Over the past 3 years all students have achieved A*-C grades at A level demonstrating our students desire to study the subject at a high level.

Year 2: Builds on the concepts covered in Year 1 and includes energy systems, memory, injury prevention and rehabilitation, projectile motion, fluid mechanics, sport psychology and technology. The main focus of Year 1 is participation in sport, whereas the focus in Year 2 shifts towards the elite performer.

A level students at RHS excel in their chosen Sports and are supported by staff to achieve their goals. They are encouraged to participate in sport both within and outside of school to the highest possible standard.

The practical component of the course (worth 30% of your final grade) is assessed internally, with external moderation. You will be assessed in your performance in 1 sport, either as a coach or as a player/ performer (15%) you should therefore be participating regularly in this sport at club and/or representative level. You will also analyse and evaluate your performance through a verbal or written presentation (15%).

“PE has allowed me to gain an understanding of many areas of sport from important historical events, such as the Berlin Olympics, to learning how different energy systems are used during exercise. “

The broad nature of A level Physical Education allows students to pursue a variety of university courses. Popular routes into Higher Education include Sport 35


Physics Course outline AQA Topics you will study in Year 1: Measurements and their errors, Particles and radiation, Waves, Mechanics, Materials and Electricity.

mechanics. Employers are also keen on the analytical and problem solving skills that Physics students learn as part of their education.

In the second year of the course you will study the following topics, and an option topic: Further mechanics, Thermal physics, Fields and Nuclear physics.

There simply are not enough people with Physics based degrees to fill all the job vacancies and as a result, companies offer excellent salaries to attract the best candidates.

The option topic will be chosen from the following: Astrophysics, Medical physics, Engineering physics, Turning points in physics and Electronics.

In alternate years, a trip to CERN in Geneva takes place for all physics students in Years 12 and 13. The trip will enhance your understanding of the particle physics module and enable you to see the cutting edge science being undertaken by a collaboration of over 700 scientists.

The decision as to which option topic will be studied will be based upon the teaching strengths of the teachers and the interests of each class. All of the topics you study will be examined in 3 papers at the end of the course, which will include a variety of assessment styles.

If you like a challenge, you can take part in the British Physics Olympiad, which is a national physics competition that is designed to test your knowledge and understanding with stimulating questions, and which will enable you to see the real-world problemsolving potential of Physics. You can also participate in the HiSPARC project, which is a collaborative research project with Bristol and Birmingham Universities to measure and investigate cosmic rays with extremely high energy.

Throughout the course you will undertake practical activities to link theory to reality and to develop essential practical skills. These skills will be formally assessed by your teachers and the assessment will lead to a practical endorsement at the end of your course. A level physics will give you the opportunity to study and think about the world around us, the world inside us and the world beyond us. You will find out how discoveries that have been made in Physics are applied by innovators and inventors to improve lives.

If you are particularly interested in pursuing engineering as a career, there is the possibility of undertaking either an Engineering Education Scheme project or a National Engineering Competition project about how engineers can solve the challenges of the 21st century.

Although there are some obvious careers that follow from studying Physics such as Architecture or Engineering, there are also a huge number of other types of employment that benefit from knowledge of topics such as electricity, thermal physics, and

“Physics is diverse and challenging, Physics can deal with things that matter to ordinary people, and commands respect from employers!� 36


Psychology Course outline AQA Year 2

Psychology is the scientific study of human behaviour and the mind. The aim of the Psychology course is to encourage students to develop a sense of wonder about how the behaviour of other people can be explained using psychological theories. By examining research that relates to everyday issues and events, students will naturally become curious about themselves and the world they live in.

• •

Biopsychology (e.g. biological rhythms, localisation of function of the brain). Issues and debates in Psychology (e.g. gender and culture, free will and determinism, the ethical implications of research). Inferential statistics.

Students will also study the following three options: • Relationships (e.g. virtual relationships in social media, theories of romantic relationships). • Eating behaviour (e.g. biological and psychological explanations of anorexia nervosa and obesity). • Forensic Psychology (e.g. biological explanations of offender behaviour, offender profiling).

Psychology students will gain a knowledge and understanding of scientific methods and the theoretical underpinnings of the research. Students will develop their critical thinking skills by learning to analyse, interpret and evaluate scientific information gained from research. Practical skills will be developed when students design and conduct their own research, find relevant sources to support their hypotheses, and present their findings in a report format. Students will become proficient at presenting their findings using descriptive and inferential statistics.

Paper 1: Introductory topics in Psychology (33.3%) 2 hours Paper 2: Psychology in context (33.3%) 2 hours

Year 1 • • • • • • •

Paper 3: Issues and options in psychology (33.3%) 2 hours

Social influence (e.g. conformity, obedience and minority influence). Memory (e.g. models of memory, explanations for forgetting). Attachment (e.g. explanations of attachment, types of attachment). Biopsychology (e.g. the nervous system and the function of the endocrine system). Psychopathology (e.g. explanations and treatments of phobias and depression). Approaches in Psychology. Research methods, scientific processes, and techniques for data handling and analysis.

In each paper there will be a combination of multiple choice, short answer and extended writing

“It is a valuable subject to give you a greater insight into the human mind, and why we behave the way we do.”

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Religious Studies Course outline OCR Religious Studies at A level allows you to be introduced to an academic approach to Philosophy and Theology through a set of topics which build upon what you have done at GCSE. It can also be studied by someone who has never done GCSE Religious Studies. The main emphasis throughout the course is to develop a reasoned argument. This means that you will be encouraged to think for yourself; look for flaws in arguments; and come to conclusions about the success or failure of theories. Neither belief in a religion, nor lack of belief, is a necessity for this course. You need to have an open mind and a desire to study people’s beliefs in depth and to examine your own ideas.

prejudice and dogmatic assertion” (Martha Nussbaum: “Philosophical Interventions” (Reviews 1986-2011)”) The A level is assessed by three 2 hour exams at the end of Year 13, all of equal weight. Philosophy of Religion • Ancient philosophical ideas from Plato and Aristotle • The nature of the soul, mind and body • Arguments about the existence or nonexistence of God • Religious Experience • The Problem of Evil • Ideas about the nature of God • Issues in religious language.

Religious Studies is a well-established subject at A level and at university. It is recognised as an academic subject by the universities, and one which equips students with highly transferable skills such as the ability to formulate arguments clearly, to make reasoned judgments and to evaluate highly complex and multifaceted issues. The subject leads to all sorts of careers in the arts, law, journalism, politics, languages. It helps with people-centred careers and medical ethical decisions. But most of all it teaches you to think and question and argue logically and coherently.

Religion and Ethics • Normative ethical theories: • Natural Law • Utilitarianism • Kant • Applied ethics • Euthanasia • Business ethics • Sexual ethics • Ethical language and thought • Debates about conscience Developments in Christian Thought • Ideas of human nature: free will, death and the afterlife • The Nature of God: Creator and Incarnation • Christian ethical theory, and action: Bonhoeffer • Christianity in modern society: • Feminist theology • Liberation Theology • The challenge of Secularism: Freud and Dawkins

Religious Studies is not about asking useless questions about things that cannot be answered. It is not about answering the question of the meaning of life. It is a real and relevant exploration of the quest for meaning and understanding. As another female philosopher said: “It seems to me that good philosophy will always have a place in the investigation of any matter of deep human importance, because of its commitment to clarity, to carefully drawn distinctions, to calm argument rather than 38


Textiles Course outline AQA This new creative and thought-provoking qualification gives students the practical skills, theoretical knowledge and confidence to succeed in a number of careers. Especially those in the creative industries.

Exams consist of short answer, multiple choice and extended response questions. Careers • Fashion Design • Production and Manufacture • Fashion Promotion/ Publicity • Textile: Design Research, Production, Marketing • Marketing and Sales • Advertising and Promotion • Media Work • Editor

They will investigate historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic influences on design and technology, whilst enjoying opportunities to put their learning in to practice by producing products of their choice. Students will gain a real understanding of what it means to be a designer, alongside the knowledge and skills sought by higher education and employers. This qualification is linear which means that students will sit all their exams and submit all their non-exam assessment at the end of the course.

• • • • • • • •

Illustrator Photographer Writer Fashion Merchandising Buyer Theatrical Costuming Wardrobe Designer Educators - Teacher, College/ University Lecturer Freelancing and Consulting

“Textiles are not just a pleasure to look at, they are a marvel to be experienced with all five senses.”

Assessments Non-exam assessment (NEA) • Substantial design and make task • 45 hours • 100 marks • 50% of A level • Evidence: Written or digital design portfolio and photographic evidence of final prototype Paper 1 • Written exam (25%) • 2 hours • 100 marks Paper 2 • Written exam (25%) • 2 hours • Section A: Product Analysis (40 marks) • Sections B: Commercial Manufacture (60 marks) 39


Spanish Course outline AQA The Spanish A level course enables students to develop their linguistic skills alongside their understanding of the culture and society of the countries where Spanish is spoken. You will study the following topics in the context of the Hispanic world: • •

• •

translating, business, politics, law, development - the list is long) the other skills that you develop are directly transferable in other areas. These skills include communication, flexibility, global awareness and a rigorous and detailed approach to study, among others. Don’t forget that learning Spanish opens up huge possibilities for travel and business in Spain, South America and Central America as well as in some important areas in the USA.

Technological and social change, for example social media and equal rights. Highlights of Hispanic artistic culture, including a focus on Spanish regional identity and the cultural heritage of past civilisations, for example the Inca civilisation. Aspects of the diverse political landscape of the Hispanic world, for example Latin American dictatorships. The influence of the past on present-day Hispanic communities.

In the Spanish department we believe that going to a country where Spanish is the native language is an essential part of the course. We advise going on a course in a language school in Spain and staying with a host family. We take every opportunity to get involved in Spanish or Latin American cultural activities such as Art exhibitions, theatre performances and film. We have 3 native speakers in the department who inspire our students and ensure that language skills are of the highest order.

In Year 1 you will study a film and in Year 2 we will read a novel. This will enhance your language skills and give you an insight into the target language culture. You will also research a topic of your choice and discuss this in the oral assessment. By the end of the course you will be able to speak Spanish with confidence and fluency, and be able to use your language skills at a high level, for example in the workplace, at further study in higher education or on a placement year abroad as part of a degree course.

“I chose Spanish because it’s a fun and challenging subject. Knowledge of a foreign language is a great life skill that is very attractive to employers.”

“Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world, so learning it The A level examination consists of three opens up a lot of doors. Spanish culture is components. Component 1 assesses fascinating and being fluent in a second listening, reading and writing skills (50%). language is definitely a valuable skill.” In component 2 you will write about the film and novel that you have studied (20%). Component 3 is the oral assessment (30%) Apart from all the jobs that use languages directly (travel, teaching, interpreting/ 40


Physical Education Course outline

Physical Education in the Sixth Form allows a breadth of choice and options to students. With one two-hour session each week, a vast programme of on-site and off-site activities is run seeing students use the local sports centre for classes such as Zumba, legs, bums and tums, pilates and yoga in addition to swimming, badminton, basketball, squash, tennis and table-tennis. Students can also use the school gymnasium in their own time and participate in an array of recreational sporting activities outside of their curriculum PE time.

Competitions as well as individual players being nominated for the relevant talent pathway. Amongst current Sixth formers we have nationally ranked swimmers, regional fencers, senior club netball players and U18 club hockey players. Tours and Trips The PE Department run an annual senior netball and hockey weekend to various locations, usually combined with some shopping opportunities at a suitable nearby establishment! Alongside this are overseas tours, ski trips and overnight sports trips to GDST Trust Rallies and Wimbledon. The PE Department is a busy and active one that aims to support all students, recreational and elite towards achieving their goals whether these be to increase fitness, or to compete in the Olympics.

Students are encouraged to nominate activities they wish to pursue, which PE staff will endeavour to satisfy. 1st team squad training runs for the major sport each term once each week during allocated PE time with lunchtime practices supporting the coaching of the squad. Excellent coaching is a priority for our senior teams, our hockey is supported by Mrs Sally Potter, Bath Buccs Club coach, and our netball, by Mrs Natalie Roddy, chairperson of Team Bath Netball Club, and Miss Rachel Shaw, England Athlete. Extension Opportunities We encourage all students to extend their commitments beyond the School. There are regular times when the gym is reserved for Sixth Form students, to enable frequent access to the gym facilities and dance studio/aerobics DVD area. Many students take up this opportunity and our aim is to encourage students to maintain an active and healthy lifestyle throughout their busy academic studies. Talented athletes are recommended to extend their skills through the relevant club routes and are afforded many extension opportunities within the busy fixtures programme. Our teams are involved in Trust Rallies, Local, Regional and National 41


Enrichment 42


A level enrichment Girls are offered a rich, diverse curriculum.

Government and Politics (GCSE) Contact: Mrs Harriet Pagnamenta h.pagnamenta@rhsb.gdst.net

Alongside their A level subjects, girls also take a fourth ‘Enrichment’ subject, designed to complement and broaden their learning.

This course is designed primarily to introduce students to the principles and practice of the British political system. Emphasis is placed on the major issues and party political debates arising from the British system, with a comparison to other political systems. Students entering the course should have an interest in current political affairs, and be prepared to read a quality daily newspaper (Independent, Times, Telegraph, Guardian). The course is examined in the form of short answers, essays and documentary analysis. We study the workings of democracy and political institutions in the AS such as Parliament, the Prime Minister and Cabinet, the electoral system, devolution, political parties, the Judiciary.

The range of ‘Enrichment’ subjects varies from year to year but currently comprise: •  •  •  •  •  •  • 

Computer Science (AS) Further Maths (A level) Photography (AS) Government and Politics (AS) Sports Leaders Advanced Cookery Music Technology (AS).

Classical Greek (AS) Contact: Miss Claire James c.james@rhsb.gdst.net This course is only available to students who will have gained a GCSE qualification in Classical Greek.

Advanced Cookery Course Contact: Mrs Victoria Hurley v.hurley@rhsb.gdst.net

The AS builds on the GCSE, introducing students to a greater range of vocabulary, accidence and syntax. The course comprises 50% language, with one paper lasting 1 hour and 30 minutes, and 50% literature, with this paper lasting 2 hours. The literature examination requires the detailed study of prose and verse literature, inspiring and motivating students to gain a deeper understanding of the life and culture of the ancient world.

This comprehensive and exciting introduction to advanced cooking will give you a thorough understanding of culinary techniques, and the chance to explore the science behind them. With training in how recipes work, time management, menu planning, food presentation, food safety and hygiene, pupils will gain a solid practical foundation as well as an impressive repertoire that will enable them to cook confidently, either independently or in a group.

Students will develop their understanding of the Classical Greek language and the related ancient literature, values and society, making this a rich and rewarding qualification which complements both the Arts and Sciences.

As well as learning an essential toolbox of cooking skills, students will learn to cook a range of delicious recipes from around the world. The course promotes a positive attitude

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towards food and students will be trained in healthy eating and adapting recipes for a balanced lifestyle. They will learn how to buy and store food sensibly, be taught store cupboard recipes and creative uses for leftovers, and be given an introduction to wine.

storyboards, thumbnail sketches and/or diagrams, where appropriate. This promises to be an engaging and enriching course, where a genuine interest in Photography can be developed to such a point that each image or series of images created can become both informed and meaningful.

By the end of this 5 term course, whether going on to fend for themselves at university, cook for friends and family or cook professionally, your students will have developed the skills, knowledge, confidence and enthusiasm to enjoy a lifelong love of food and cooking.

Mathematics (Further Maths or AS Level Mathematics) Contact: Mr Craig Graham c.graham@rhsb.gdst.net

With demonstrations from guest speakers and chefs from local restaurants, you will learn essential skills and preparation of interesting and adaptable dishes.

We offer GCSE Resit, Mathematics AS, and Further Mathematics A level (Full A level).

You will cover; healthy food choices – balanced meals and menu planning, how to buy and store local and seasonal foods, using up leftovers, time management, hygiene and food safety, and lots of practical cooking skills. You will gain a certificate in Food Safety in Catering Level 2, and a school based certification listing skills covered.

Sports Engagement Programme Contact: Miss Pip Atkinson p.atkinson@rhsb.gdst.net

The Sports Engagement Programme works with girls to develop skills that will allow them to lead groups of people in sport and other activities.

Photography (AS) Contact: Mr Graeme Preedy g.preedy@rhsb.gdst.net

Students will be introduced to a variety of experiences that explore a range of photographic media, techniques and processes. They will be made aware of both traditional and new technologies.

The programme teaches valuable leadership skills such as organisation, planning, communication and teamwork through the medium of sport.

Mandarin (AS or GCSE) Contact: Mrs Yuanrong Liu y.liu@rhsb.gdst.net

Students will be encouraged to explore relevant images, artefacts and resources relating to a range of art, craft and design from the past and from recent times, including European and non-European examples. Students will use sketchbooks/workbooks/ journals to underpin their work where appropriate. They may wish to develop their drawing skills in order to produce

Please see the Mandarin A level page to gain an overview of the benefits of studying Mandarin. Please discuss course options with Mrs Liu.

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Computer Science (AS)

‘Computing Principles’ and ‘Algorithms and Problem Solving’.

Contact: Mrs Kelly Lycett k.lycett@rhsb.gdst.net

It opens up doors to further study, especially if taken alongside Maths and Further Maths. There is no need to have studied GCSE in this subject but a strong problem solving ability and logical thinking go a long way. There is no coursework-style assessment and so detailed programming knowledge is not required, rather an ability to use computational thinking to creatively solve problems. There is a huge gender bias in this subject and we are proud to be able to encourage girls to believe that this subject that they can excel in.

Computer Science is a practical subject where students can apply the academic principles learned in the classroom to realworld systems. It’s an intensely creative subject that combines invention and excitement, and can look at the natural world through a digital prism. This course is suited to those who would enjoy finding out more about the technical world around them. Students sit two written papers in the second year of the course:

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) The Extended Project Qualification provides an excellent opportunity for our A level students to develop their study skills and to research a topic that interests them.

All students will chart their progress in a Logbook which encourages personal reflection, and therefore a key benefit of the qualification is that students emerge with a better understanding of their own learning style.

The course comprises an introduction into important skills such as research and referencing, followed by the opportunity to undertake an independent research project based on a topic of the student’s choice.

The EPQ is undertaken in its entirety in Year 12 and is worth the equivalent of half an A level in terms of its UCAS tariff points. It is very highly respected by Russell group universities, many of which provide students with ‘staggered’ offers, for example AAA OR AAB with an A at EPQ.

All students are assigned a supervisor with whom they meet regularly for academic support and guidance.

The EPQ is popular with universities because it shows genuine interest in learning, researching and working independently; all key indicators that a student is likely to make a success of university life! It also provides students with excellent material for the UCAS personal statement.

The project itself may take one of two formats: •  A 5000-word essay. •  The production of an artefact accompanied by a 1500-word statement.

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PSHEE - ‘Education for Life’ The PSHEE programme, which runs for an hour a fortnight, ensures that students engage in considering the wellbeing and safety of themselves and society.

These cover a range of topics including: •  •  •  •  •  • 

It fosters the values of respect and tolerance that make for healthy relationships and communities. We often invite outside speakers from business and industry and from our alumnae network, to present to the students.

Career topics Interview and presentation skills Leadership skills Communications skills Online profiles Working with charities

We also look to develop first aid awareness, well-woman issues, relationships, drugs and alcohol and finance.

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International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme 47


The International Baccalaureate Diploma The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme is an internationally recognised qualification, accepted by universities across the world. It has an holistic approach to sixth form education, with the student at the very centre. The key attributes developed during the course, which is assessed at the end of the two years, are represented in the IB Learner Profile, and feature strongly in the list of qualities expected by top universities and the CBI. The IB is different from A levels in two other key respects: every student must fulfil the requirements of all three elements of the Core; and all students study six subjects, three at Higher Level (HL) and three at Standard Level (SL).

Subjects are scored on a 1-7 scale with 3 further points available from TOK and the Extended Essay. A Diploma can be obtained with a total of 24 points, but many students score well above this. The worldwide average is 30, and our average score in 2018 was 39 points..

The Core consists of Theory of Knowledge (TOK), an exploration of how you know what you know, which is embedded in the academic subjects; the Extended Essay (EE) which provides an opportunity to write a 4000 word research essay on a topic of particular interest to you; and Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS) which allows you to develop further skills through involvement in, and reflection, on a range of activities and projects outside the academic.

What does the IB expect of its students? That they will become IB learners and develop these essential qualities: Enquirers Knowledgeable Thinkers Communicators Principled Open-minded Caring Risk Takers Balanced Reflective

Of the six academic subjects, one subject must be taken from each of groups 1 – 5, but for the sixth subject there is flexibility: you may choose one of the Arts subjects (Visual Arts, Music, Theatre Studies) or you can choose a second subject from Groups 2 - 4, or a School Supported Mother Tongue.

“The IB puts you significantly ahead in the global race for the best universities.” Lisa Freedman, editor of The Good Schools Guide

and who, above all, enjoy their studies.

Assessment in all subjects is by both internal assessment and by externally marked examinations.

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English A Literature Course outline

The IB Diploma offers you the chance to explore the diversity of world literature alongside more familiar works by British authors. IB English, at both Standard and Higher Level, offers the opportunity to indulge in a very wide range of literature from across the world. With a broadly based curriculum, you can explore texts in translation such as modern Japanese novels and classic authors such as Ibsen and Kafka. It also enables you to express your interpretations in a variety of ways, as you develop your ‘Learner Profile’. For example, you can record your response to the texts we study in the form of pictures, videos or podcasts in addition to the more traditional method of writing. You are encouraged to read literature ‘through various lenses’ so contemporary perspectives and issues are explored through novels, plays, poems and short stories.

2. Individual Oral internal assessment: SL (30%) - 15 minutes/40 marks. HL (20%) - 15 minutes/20 marks. This component consists of a prepared individual oral delivered by the student to the teacher one to one in an exam room. The student will lead a discussion on two of the texts studied (one must be in translation) in relation to a global issue present in both. Own thesis. Choose an extract max 40 lines from two texts, 1-4 SL, 1-6 HL, 10 bullet points on each. Global theme: Examine the ways in which the global issue of your choice is presented through the content and form of the two works you have studied and chosen.

Practically speaking, the course divides into three assessed elements. For Higher Level only, the coursework is a 1500 word essay on a text of your choice. One major element of the IB is its focus on oral assessment, and for both HL and SL you will lead a discussion with a teacher on one of two texts that you have studied for this unit. It will have a global theme which you will be able to choose (e.g. ‘the treatment of women’).

3. Examination external assessment • Paper 1: Guided Literary Analysis. SL (35%) - 1 hour 15 mins/20 marks. HL (35%) - 2 hours 15 mins/40 marks. Two passages in two literary forms each with a question. HL: write an analysis of both texts with or without their prompt question SL: choose one passage and write an analysis of it, with or without its prompt question.

The exams vary a little according to whether you are doing Higher or Standard Level, but in each case you will have two papers. The first will ask you to focus on an unseen poem and prose extract, requiring you to analyse language in detail. The second asks you produce a comparison essay based on texts you have studied, picking one question from a choice of four.

Paper 2: Comparative Essay external assessment. SL (35%) - 1 hr 45 mins/30 marks. HL (25%) - 1 hr 45 mins/30 marks.

Four general questions, choose one question. Choose two texts from texts 1-9 (SL) or 1-13 (HL) from your course but not those used for IO, then write a comparative essay.

The course is assessed as follow: 1. Coursework essay - HL only (20%) : 1,500 words on one text; 20 marks. 49


Mother Tongue Language A Course outline

The IB is committed to enabling students around the world to continue studying the language and literature of their mother tongue to the highest level, and therefore offers students the opportunity to achieve a bilingual diploma by taking a second language A subject, alongside English Literature. The benefits of studying your mother tongue are enormous: • • •

You prepare ten separate passages on the two texts but you do not know which of the pieces you will finally be asked to use. The three texts from Part 3, all drawn from one genre, are studied in preparation for the second of your final examination papers.

You receive a bilingual Diploma You remain in touch with your own language and culture while studying in a foreign country and language You may find yourself with additional career opportunities

The first paper is a written response to an unseen poem or piece of prose.

Our MFL department is able to support the following language A courses, subject to take-up: • • • •

“I wanted to continue studying German because it is my first language, because I enjoy German literature and because, even though I may not return to Germany for University, I want to keep a little bit of my homeland with me always.”

French HL/SL. German HL/SL. Spanish HL/SL. Mandarin HL/SL.

“To continue studying Mandarin is important to me because I think and dream in both English and Mandarin, which means greater variety. To stop studying my mother tongue would mean losing one of the constants in my life and a vital part of my culture.”

As with English A, you read widely: you study ten texts from three to four different genres and from at least three historical periods across the four distinct parts of the course. All texts are chosen in discussion with the IB Coordinator. The first two texts, in Part 1, are both works written in other languages. You read them in your own language but discuss them in English. At the end of Year 12, you write a 1500 word essay, which is sent for external assessment, on one of those texts. The texts in Parts 2 and 4 are assessed orally, in an examination at the end of Year 13. The exam, which is recorded and sent away to native speaker examiners, consists of two parts: a prepared presentation on a topic of your own choice dealing with two texts from Part 4; and a more detailed commentary on a short passage from one of the Part 2 texts. 50


French B Course outline

The IB Diploma course aims to develop oral and written skills in a range of contexts such as letters, speeches, newspaper articles, diaries, factual pieces, instructions, analytical essays and imaginative work. You will study topics of global and personal relevance; the environment, the family, cultural diversity, health, tourism, conflict, politics, popular culture and the media. You will work towards developing an understanding of the structure of the language by close examination of texts. At Higher Level you will read two works of French literature.

will be opportunities to read poetry and listen to songs, and even to write some of your own, if you wish. There will be films to watch, perhaps as a backdrop to the literary texts under discussion. Of course, there will also be the chance to spend time in France through study visits – the best way to improve your spoken French and gain an in-depth understanding of contemporary French society.

You will take 2 papers at IB, as well as an oral examination (25%) 12-15 mins/30 marks SL • Paper 1 (25%): Written French - 1 hour 15 mins/30 marks . • Paper 2 (50%): Listening and Reading - 1 hour 45 mins/65 marks. HL • Paper 1 (25%): Written French - 1 hour 30 mins/30 marks. • Paper 2 (50%): Listening and Reading - 2 hours/65 marks.

“IB French is a world away from GCSE – the course is less defined by topic areas giving more freedom in your work. We really enjoy the variety of work; from film and music to literature and culture work. IB is great preparation for the use of any language ‘in the real world’ because of the tasks undertaken including the interactive oral and many different writing styles.

Modern linguists are in high demand because of the analytical and communication skills developed through learning a language. The presentations that you will be required to give in class, for example, will be good training for the workplace. Apart from the more obvious careers in interpreting, translating and teaching, French students and graduates are highly sought after in the fields of business, banking, accountancy and the law.

We like the way that a two-year course allows so much linguistic development before the examinations and have had a lot of fun on the course so far.”

Learning a language takes you beyond the classroom and into the way of life of another nation. French culture is so rich and varied. You will learn about French art, music, literature and cinema. There 51


German B Course outline

The IB Diploma Course aims to develop oral and written skills in a range of contexts such as letters, emails, speeches, blogs, diaries, factual pieces, analytical essays and imaginative work. As a linguist, a huge array of career options is open to you.

You will study topics of global and personal relevance; the environment, the family, cultural diversity, health, immigration, popular culture and the media.

German is the most widely spoken language in Europe with 110 million speakers. German speaking nations are at the forefront of design, environmental and scientific technology. German can be combined with many other subjects at university, allowing students to develop their linguistic and vocational skills simultaneously.

In year 1 of the course and then at a more sophisticated level in Year 2, you will be building upon the skills learnt and developed at GCSE, becoming more proficient at listening, speaking, reading and writing. At Higher Level, an exciting and rewarding part of the course is the study of literature, which will give you insights into the target language culture.

Past students have studied German and Law, German and History, German and Russian. The transferable skills of linguists make them highly sought after across all professions; including banking, business, accounting, the media, travel and tourism. On average, languages graduates earn 8% more than their peers.

By the end of the course, you will feel confident about speaking, writing and understanding German. In addition, you will have gained an insight into Germany, Switzerland and Austria, their people, language and culture. Taking German at IB level will give you the potential to pursue it at a higher level, possibly with another subject.

We believe that it is essential for students to experience the German language and culture first hand. All students are given the opportunity to take part in the German exchange trip to MĂźnster where they follow a tailor made programme.

Paper 1 (25%) tests writing and involves showing one’s writing skills in the form of a text, for example a blog, email or speech, etc.

There may also be the opportunity to participate in a language visit to Berlin, visiting a language school and experiencing the fascinating city of Berlin.

Paper 2 (50%) tests listening and reading comprehension skills.

Students are encouraged to use German in a wide range of contexts. All our audio material is available on the school intranet and websites are used regularly in lessons, to keep the subject matter topical and up to date. In addition, we have an extensive selection of DVDs, which aid students to widen their experience and understanding of the culture of German speaking countries.

Paper 3 (25%) is the oral. At Standard Level, you will have to speak about a picture and discuss topics studied. At Higher Level, this involves analysis of a literary extract, followed by general conversation.

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Latin Course outline

The IB Diploma programme provides an opportunity to explore the language, literature and culture of ancient Rome. Through the study of classical texts and interaction with the culture of Greece and Rome the course: • encourages an awareness and appreciation of the different perspectives of people from ancient cultures • develops students’ appreciation of the literary • merits of ancient texts and the issues raised in them • provides opportunities for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through individual research. There are three parts to the course:

ancient civilisations that have played a vital part in shaping many modern societies. The language itself has had a major influence on the development of most modern European languages, while the rich and varied literatures of Greece and Rome have left their mark on almost every genre of modern writing.

Paper 1: The study of one author (Cicero or Ovid’s Metamorphoses) to develop language skills and ensure an ability to translate an unseen passage from his work (a Latin dictionary may be used in the examination) 1 hour 15 minutes / 90 marks (35%) Paper 2: Detailed study of a selection of literature from a variety of Roman authors (with supplementary reading in translation) involving critical analysis of each author’s style, choice of vocabulary and figures of speech. 1 hour 30 minutes / 45 marks (45%)

The study of Classical Languages gives important insights into the cultures that produced them and offers a bridge between the contemporary world and the civilisations of antiquity. Much contemporary thinking is still informed by the political, religious and legal principles of the Greek and Roman world and the course includes a study of their historical development and wider cultural achievements. Opportunities are also offered in the research section of the course for a study of their technological and artistic achievements, which remain an inspiration for artists, architects and civil engineers across the world. Latin is therefore an ideal choice of subject to combine with other courses such as English, History or Philosophy, Theatre or Visual Arts, Mathematics, Medicine and the Sciences, as the Classical world has had such a great influence upon each of these areas.

Part 3: Individual Research Dossier – students may select for their research project any topic of particular interest ranging from the language, literature, history, religion, mythology, archaeology, art and architecture. The Research Dossier is an annotated collection of primary source materials which may include quotations from Classical authors and/or visual material such as pictures, diagrams, and photographs. 24 marks (20%) The Standard Level and Higher Level syllabus requirements share elements, including authors. The difference between SL and HL is reflected both in the breadth and depth of study and in the assessment of the objectives.

The Classics Department provides many opportunities to attend external lectures, visit museums, exhibitions and local archaeological sites. Residential trips are also offered further afield to Italy and Greece. Students are also encouraged to assist in the many classical activities and clubs running in both Senior and Prep School.

The study of Latin is a key to opening up the classical cultures of Greece and Rome 53


Mandarin B Course outline

The IB Diploma course aims to develop oral and written skills in a range of contexts such as letters, speeches, newspaper articles, diaries, factual pieces, instructions, analytical essays and imaginative work. IB Chinese (Language B) exposes students to a range of topics from environmental to cultural issues and either a literature, film study or topic based component. The core topics are experience, identity, human ingenuity, sharing the planet and social organization and social relationships. Authentic materials are used in class, and pedagogical textbooks regularly introduced as supplementary exercises. Demonstrating the ability to write a 360-480 word paper within 1 hour and 15 minutes is one of the key skills in the IB language curriculum. Listening is introduced into assessment for the first time in the new syllabus. Students are expected to do a speaking assessment where two visual stimulus are provided and student will need to show their oral abilities through description, presentation and discussion in Mandarin. Reading skills are assessed through 3 reading materials to check students’ understanding of the target language. Students are encouraged to communicate in Mandarin with the teacher within and beyond the class. They are also required to practice with native Chinese speakers out of class. The course is examined over 4 core areas; Listening, speaking, reading and writing – 25% for each skills.

“The IB Mandarin Chinese course helps you understand what is behind the language, what makes it powerful, and how it actually functions in Chinese society.“ 54


Spanish B Course outline

The IB Diploma course aims to develop oral and written skills in a range of contexts such as letters, speeches, newspaper articles, diaries, factual pieces, instructions, analytical essays and imaginative work. You will study topics of global and personal relevance; the environment, the family, cultural diversity, health, tourism, conflict, politics, popular culture and the media. You will work towards developing an understanding of the structure of the language by close examination of texts. At Higher Level you will read two works of Spanish or Latin American literature.

become more and more important in our professional and personal lives. The whole philosophy of the IB Diploma with its emphasis on international education, a holistic approach and independent learning lies right at the heart of our teaching. We offer all the opportunities students could wish for to access authentic, contemporary material, through our IT facilities and through our emphasis on the importance of connecting with the country in as many ways as we can. We have three native speakers in the department, who help raise standards of achievement in Spanish at every level.

The IB examination consists of three components. Component 1 assesses written Spanish (25%), component 2 assesses reading and listening (50%) and component 3 is an individual oral (25%).

“Spanish ties in really well with other subjects and the IB lets me explore all of them together in depth” “‘I wanted to carry on with my languages but I didn’t think I could do A level. Standard level over two years allows me to keep my options open”

The importance of studying languages is recognised by companies, organisations and schools not only for specific language skills but also for communicative ability and cultural awareness. The IB has global relevance and learning a language is central to its philosophy. Our students will have an excellent academic level, but will also have a grounding in international education – the ability to recognise that others can be right and thus enabling them to operate confidently and successfully in an international context. This key skill can only 55


Economics Course outline

The IB course will give you a sound grasp of the theory that economists use to explain events, predict what will happen, and advise governments on how to run the economy.

It’s not just about means, Economics is also concerned with ends. What sort of society and world do we want to live in? Is the global distribution of income and wealth ‘fair’? If not, what can and should be done about it?

the subject. The IB Economics course has a strong international dimension, so we are not always looking at the United Kingdom, or even the developed world in our studies. Indeed, development economics is one of the core areas of the course. The subject will certainly contribute to your education as a global citizen.

There are 4 different sections of the IB Economics Course, Higher (HL) and Standard (SL) students cover all 4 sections, but HL students explore them in greater depth. • •

• •

The subject will help you to understand much about the contemporary world, its challenges, conflicts and possibilities for improvement.

Section 1: Micro Economics - how markets work and why they fail. Section 2: Macro Economics: what do governments want to achieve for the economy and how do they try to achieve these aims. Section 3: International Economics - Why do countries trade? What are the costs and benefits? Sections 4: Development Economics - Why are some countries richer than others? How can a country develop economically?

To succeed in Economics you need to have an enquiring mind, good analytical reasoning skills and sound basic numeracy. You also need to keep abreast of what is happening in the world. This is what really brings the subject to life. At its best, Economics can shed light in dark corners and make a difference to the world.

“Studying Economics has helped me to think about the news very differently. Standard Level - 2 exam papers, each 40% We look at normal news articles and find and an Internal Assessment worth 20% all of the Economics within it. There is much more Economics in our everyday Higher Level - 3 exam papers totalling 80% life than we think, unless you are looking of the final mark, and an Internal Assessment for it“ worth 20%. We have a responsibility to future generations to avoid major climate change, how can it be achieved at the lowest cost to the current generation? Should healthcare and education be the responsibility of individuals and families, or should the State provide these, financed out of taxation? If these questions arouse your interest, there is a strong probability that you will enjoy 56


Geography Course outline

Geography gives an opportunity to really develop your “internationalism”. The IB Diploma course in Geography is divided into Higher and Standard Level. Higher Level and Standard Level students will study the core themes on population change, climate change and our use of food, energy and water resources. Geography will develop your critical thinking skills and alongside the TOK course you will begin to question issues such as the politics behind map drawing and whether we should bother with environmental issues. You will leave the course with the strong sense of our international links and responsibilities which will be reinforced though your study of a foreign language. You will also be able to apply your scientific method and mathematical skills in analysing fieldwork data. Employers will be impressed by your range of skills. You will be highly suited to directly related careers and further study including environmental science research, town planning and overseas development work. Many also find work within fields of International Finance, Marketing, Public Relations and Journalism. Should you decide to write your Extended Essay in Geography, the department will support you in developing your ideas, collecting data and doing research further into an issue of your choice.

Higher Level students will study a further unit of extension topics related to the processes of globalisation, migration and global development. There are various optional units we select from. Standard level will complete two of these while Higher level students will complete three. These include river processes and management including managing flood risk; studying the hazards associated with earthquakes and volcanic events; understanding the changes affecting urban areas. Additionally there is one coursework component for both Higher and Standard Level, which will be based around writing up the results of a field trip study. Course assessment is based on 20% or 25% coursework for Standard or Higher level, with the rest based on two examination papers for Standard level and three for the higher level students.

The Geography department a fieldwork visit where we collect data which you will utilise within your coursework project. We run international trips too, and have visited places such as Iceland, Italy and Morocco. We teach students to use sophisticated computer mapping and analytical software (GIS) to examine spatial relationships. Our department is recognised as a centre of excellence in GIS education, has won the RGS Ordnance Survey Award for Secondary Education, and a Pearson Silver Teaching Award. In 2016, the department was awarded the ‘Centre of Excellence’ status by the Geographical Association.

“Geography connects you to the world and everything that is happening within it.” 57


History Course outline

The study of History allows understanding of a rapidly changing world. Conflict and its resolution figures prominently in IB History studies. A sense of proportion and perspective will be provided and greater knowledge of different times and cultures will emerge. The History IB course is a truly global course which extends the knowledge gained at GCSE level by looking at events from new global perspectives – including those of Japan and China. History will provide the vital underpinning for challenging careers in the 21st century and students frequently go on to study International Relations and other related disciplines at university.

regimes. We study Mao’s China and compare and contrast it to Hitler’s Germany. For the Cold War we compare the impact on two countries, of two leaders and look indepth at two crisis from two different world regions.

We study Modern World History at both Standard and Higher Level. The Standard Level course involves two examined papers and an Internally Assessed essay. At Higher Level there is additional third examined paper Paper 1: Move to Global War This is a source-based examination that involves the evaluation of contemporary evidence and historians perspectives on two major case studies: Japanese expansion in East Asia and Italian/ German expansion in the 1930s.

Paper 3 (Higher Level Only) This is an essay based paper with a vast range of topic options enabling candidates to extend their Paper 2 knowledge to even greater depth. We also teach units on Imperial and Communist Russia. ‘

Paper 2: Authoritarian States and Cold War This essay based paper involves global comparisons. The Authoritarian States paper involves an in-depth study of dictatorial

“Investigating the rich stories of history gives us the context in which we can better understand the past, the present and the future.” 58


Philosophy Course outline

IB Philosophy gives you the chance to think about the abstract questions that we sometimes overlook – how do I know I’m the same person I was when I was in year 7? Am I free? Do I have a purpose in the world? Can I make my own choices? It’s interesting to hear what philosophers say about this and see how far we agree with them. The distinguishing feature of IB philosophy is the emphasis on ‘doing philosophy’ rather than just learning about it. The course is focused on stimulating your intellectual curiosity and encouraging you to examine both your own views and those of others. You are expected to investigate and explore the ideas for themselves. You will learn to develop your own philosophical voice and to think for yourself. You will learn to scrutinise texts and arguments in order to analyse and evaluate them. You will also learn to take your philosophical skills and apply them to real life situations.

cannot be answered. Philosophy is not about answering the question of the meaning of life. Philosophy is real and relevant and is the subject that deals with real knowledge. Why should you do it? As another female philosopher said: “It seems to me that good philosophy will always have a place in the investigation of any matter of deep human importance, because of its commitment to clarity, to carefully drawn distinctions, to calm argument rather than prejudice and dogmatic assertion” (Martha Nussbaum: “Philosophical Interventions” (Reviews 1986-2011)”)

Philosophy takes a structured and questioning approach to some of the deepest and fundamental areas of life, asking challenging questions such as: What is it to be human? Do we have free will? What do we mean when we say something is right or wrong?

Paper 1 covers two compulsory areas of study: Core Theme: What is a human being? (both SL and HL). • Human nature Optional themes: (SL choose one, and HL study both). • Political Philosophy (SL and HL) • Ethics (HL)

Philosophy develops highly transferable skills such as the ability to formulate arguments clearly, to make reasoned judgments and to evaluate highly complex and multifaceted issues. Philosophy leads to all sorts of careers in the arts, law, journalism, politics, languages. It helps with people-centred careers and medical ethical decisions. But most of all it teaches you to think and question, and argue logically and coherently about yourself and the world. Whenever important laws are drawn up in this country philosophers are asked to help decide them. Philosophers aren’t just academics; they look at real moral, political and cultural issues. Philosophy is not about flying round in circles asking useless questions about things that

Paper 2: Prescribed Philosophical text: (SL and HL). • Plato: The republic Paper 3: Exploring philosophical activity (HL only). • Reading philosophical texts to discuss the Nature, purpose, methods and outcomes of philosophy Internal assessment: (HL and SL)

“I chose philosophy because I wanted to take a subject which was thought provoking, new and different.”

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Psychology Course outline

Students opting to study the IB programme will study Psychology in group 3 (Individuals and Societies). We will study the influence of biological, cognitive and sociocultural factors on behaviour. Options • Abnormal psychology • Psychology of human relationships (HL only)

The aim of the Psychology course is to encourage students to develop a sense of wonder about how the behaviour of other people can be explained using psychological theories. By examining research that relates to everyday issues and events, students will naturally become curious about themselves and the world they live in.

Standard Level is assessed as follows: Paper 1 (50%) 2 hours. Section A: three short answer questions on the core approaches (27 marks) Section B: one essay from a choice of three on the core approaches (22 marks)

Psychology students will gain a knowledge and understanding of scientific methods and the theoretical underpinnings of the research. Students will develop their critical thinking skills by learning to analyse, interpret and evaluate scientific information gained from research.

Paper 2 (25%) 1 hour. One question from a choice of three on one option (22 marks) Internal assessment (25%) A report on an experimental study conducted by the student (22 marks)

Practical skills will be developed when students design and conduct their own research, find relevant sources to support their hypotheses, and present their findings in a report format. Students will become proficient at presenting their findings using descriptive and inferential statistics.

Higher Level is assessed as follows: Paper 1 (40%) 2 hours Section A: three short answer questions on the core approaches (27 marks) Section B: one essay from a choice of three on the core approaches (22 marks) Paper 2 (20%) 2 hours Two questions from a choice of three on one option (22 marks each) - Total 44 marks

Students will develop an awareness of the cultural differences in behaviour when we explore multi-cultural research from individualistic and collectivistic cultures. . Core • The biological approach to understanding human behaviour. • The cognitive approach to understanding human behaviour. • The sociocultural approach to understanding human behaviour. Research methods

Paper 3 (20%) 1 hour Three short-answer questions form a list of six static questions on approaches to research (24 marks) Internal assessment- 20%

Simple experimental study (SL/HL) Internal assessment

A report on an experimental study conducted by the student (22 marks)

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Biology Course outline

The IB Diploma course aims to develop a broad, general understanding of the principles of Biology. Biology studies the interactions between all the species living on Earth, factors that can affect their success and efforts that can be taken to preserve the vast array of organisms in existence today.

Section B: Short answer and extended response questions from the option Internal Assessment (20%) An individual practical project, to be carried out in the summer term of Year 12

Theoretical knowledge and the focus on current practical techniques will support your development as a future scientist. You will learn about the core concepts of biology and about the impact of biological research and how it links to everyday life. You will learn to apply your knowledge, investigate and solve problems in a range of contexts.

The HL course is assessed as follows Paper 1 (20%) 1 hour 40 multiple choice questions

The core themes start with the building blocks and tools of Biology: cell biology, molecular biology, genetics, ecology, human physiology, evolution and biodiversity. The option will then expand upon the topic of human physiology

Paper 2 (36%) 2 hours 15 mins Section A: One data based question and several short answer questions Section B: Two extended response questions (from a choice of three)

The higher level will study all of the above and will build on the topics of nucleic acids, metabolism, cell respiration and photosynthesis, plant biology, genetics and evolution and human physiology. The higher level explores human physiology in greater depth.

Paper 3 (24%) 1 hour 15 mins Section A: Several short answer questions from the core and AHL material Section B: Short answer and extended response questions from the option Internal Assessment (20%) An individual practical project, to be carried out in the summer term of Year 12

The SL course is assessed as follows Paper 1 (20%) 45mins 30 multiple choice questions

Enrichment • Sixth Form Biology students are invited to attend and joint- lead in our ‘Dissection club’. • We promote participation in the Intermediate Biology Olympiad for Year 12 students and the Biology Olympiad in Year 13. • There is a residential field trip in the summer term in which students will put their ecology studies into practice.

Paper 2 (40%) 1 hour 15 mins Section A: One data based question and several short answer questions Section B: One extended response question (from a choice of two) Paper 3 (20%) 1 hour Section A: Several short answer questions from the core material 61


Chemistry Course outline

Chemistry is studied in three main branches: Physical, Organic and Inorganic. Physical Chemistry considers how matter interacts, why chemical reactions happen and how they can be controlled. Organic Chemistry considers the study of carboncontaining compounds. There are an enormous number of organic compounds, many of which are essential to the processes of life. Inorganic Chemistry considers the elements of the Periodic Table and their compounds. The study of inorganic chemistry relies on patterns and predicting trends. The mathematical demands of the Higher Level course require confidence with numeracy.

technology. In addition to learning concepts, developing manipulative skills and powers of analysis, you will become aware of the world wide moral, social, environmental and economic implications of the developments of science. In this way you will be equipped for further study, or to be scientifically literate, responsible global citizens. There are many opportunities to get involved in additional activities. Why not come along to the Sixth Form Science Society, help out with the KS3 Science Club, or offer to Mentor a younger student in their studies (which can count towards CAS hours). For the potential medics and vets we run a regular Medical Society for you to meet, discuss experiences and debate current topics with fellow students aiming for similar courses.

The IB Diploma course contains 11 topics studied at Standard Level, with all of these extended at Additional Higher Level. These topics cover all three branches of Chemistry. In addition you will study 1 option at either level. It is likely that we will teach the Medicines option from the 4 possible options to choose from. Though extremely motivated students may choose to self study a different option. The course is assessed by 3 papers at the end of the second year plus an Individual Investigation worth 20% of the final mark. In addition to the examined content you are required to complete a number of hours of practical work including the Group 4 project.

In addition to your classroom studies you will need to complete an Individual Investigation on a topic of your choice. You will also need to complete a 4000 word Extended Essay. If you choose to write about a Chemistry related subject, you will also be expected to carry out some form of practical/analytical work. You will undertake a 10 hour project with students studying other Group 4 subjects. This will provide you with an opportunity to collaborate with others on a joint task.

Chemistry is a subject of global impact. It has a profound effect on our planet, is involved at some level in almost every aspect of everyday life and plays a vital role in a technological society. The IB group 4 (science) courses aim, among other things, to provide you with opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global context that will stimulate and challenge you. This will enable you to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques that characterise modern science and

There are many opportunities to get involved in additional activities. Why not come along to the Sixth Form Science Society or help out with the KS3 Science Club. For the potential medics and vets we run a regular Medical Society for you to meet, discuss experiences and debate current topics with fellow students aiming for similar courses. 62


Computer Science Course outline

The IB Computer Science course is engaging, accessible, inspiring and rigorous. Computer science requires an understanding of the fundamental concepts of computational thinking as well as knowledge of how computers and other digital devices operate.

For those wishing to pursue the subject at university, the IB course is a fantastic introduction and along with Higher Level Mathematics, will allow students to get to top universities. Several universities are now also offering fully sponsored degrees and there are many degree apprenticeships available with organisations such as GCHQ, Facebook, Accenture and the BBC.

It has the following characteristics: • • • • •

Draws on a wide spectrum of knowledge. Enables and empowers innovation, exploration and the acquisition of further knowledge. Interacts with and influences cultures, society and how individuals and societies behave. Raises ethical issues. Is underpinned by computational thinking.

Practical programming experience will be an essential element of developing higherlevel thinking skills; this may be assessed as a part of the internal assessment. There is no designated language.

Girls interested in careers in other subjects can still benefit from opting for Computer Science, as technology pervades the modern Four course options are available: Databases, workplace, and those who understand how Modelling and simulation, Web science, and these systems work will have the edge. Object Oriented Programming Extra-curricular opportunities include External Assessment national competitions such as the BEBRAS Paper 1 (45%) compulsory content computational thinking challenge and Paper 2 (25%) option topic cybersecurity events. There is an active Digital Leaders program in the school as well Internal Assessment as outreach sessions for younger children. A 30 hour programming project which is the It may also be possible to arrange work development of a computational solution experience in local tech companies, during plus 10 hours dedicated to the group 4 the summer holidays at the end of Year 12. project. Together worth 30%

“I believe computers are the future of every job and I also think it’s quite cool to be studying Computer Science“

Girls’ schools who offer post-16 Computer Science are rare. We are proud to offer this increasingly popular subject to enable girls to compete equally in a technical world.

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Physics Course outline

If you opt to study the IB Diploma, you will study many of the same topics as you did at GCSE but in greater depth. The core topics that you will study will include Forces, Thermal Physics, Waves, Electricity and magnetism, Circular motion, Gravitation, Radioactivity and Energy production. If you study to Higher Level you will cover the more difficult aspects of these topics and further areas such as Fields and Electromagnetic induction.

If you like a challenge, you can take part in the British Physics Olympiad, which is a national physics competition that is designed to test your knowledge and understanding with stimulating questions, and which will enable you to see the real-world problemsolving potential of Physics. You can also participate in the HiSPARC project, which is a collaborative research project with Bristol and Birmingham Universities to measure and investigate cosmic rays with extremely high energy.

At both Standard and Higher Level you will also study one of the following option topics: Astrophysics, Engineering physics, Imaging and Relativity. The decision as to which topic will be studied will be based upon the teaching strengths of the teachers and the interests of each class.

If you are particularly interested in pursuing engineering as a career, there is the possibility of undertaking either an Engineering Education Scheme project or a National Engineering Competition project about how engineers can solve the challenges of the 21st century.

Practical work will be carried out throughout the course and you will also carry out an individual scientific investigation which will take about 10 hours. This will be formally assessed and contribute to your overall group 4 subject mark. You will also need to collaborate, not just with students in the class, but internationally. Participation in the Group 4 project, a collaborative activity involving students from the different group 4 subjects, will encourage this as well as your imagination.

“Physics asks interesting questions about the nature of our Universe. I really like the fact that the subject combines this philosophical aspect with the neat logical mathematical side”

“The way of thinking that Physics If you choose to carry out the extended develops is very useful, as is the ability essay in this subject you can carry out a to understand Technology” further piece of experimental research into Harjinder Obki, Lawyer for Google any area that interests you, as long as it is approved by your teacher. In alternate years, a trip to CERN in Geneva takes place for all IB physics students in Years 12 and 13. The trip will enhance your understanding of the particle physics module and enable you to see the cutting edge science being undertaken by a collaboration of over 700 scientists. 64


Mathematics Course outline

2019 brings us the exciting new IB curriculum, which divides into two parallel categories: Applications and Interpretation, and Analysis and Approaches. Currently we offer Applications and Interpretation at Standard Level, and Analysis and Approaches at both Higher Level and Standard Level. Applications and Interpretation will have a significant amount of Pure maths content, but will focus on how Mathematics can be applied in real life. There will be more attention on mathematical modelling, calculating and interpreting statistics, the use of matrices for solving systems of equations, and a study of how arithmetic and geometric sequences can help in the repayment of loans. Also the use of logarithms, statistical hypothesis testing and solution of differential equations in context to solve everyday problems plays a prominent role.

will be required to purchase a Graphical Display Calculator, the exact model to be decided nearer the start of the course. A good training in post GCSE Maths is recommended or essential in careers like Engineering, Economics, Operations research, Accountancy, Environmental Science, Finance, Insurance, Software design, Social planning, Medicinal trials, Aviation, Construction, Design, Veterinary science, Medicine, and Risk analyst, Programmer, among others. Pursuing your own paths of enquiry in the portfolio/project will strengthen your ability to present mathematical arguments logically and succinctly. Employers love candidates who are highly numerate.

You would opt for the Analysis and Approaches course if you are a scientist or a social scientist using Mathematics to assist you in the interpretation of experimental results. The Standard Level on this strand would be the option preferred by those not needing Mathematics in their Higher education or workplace. Analysis and Approaches HL is a challenging course which would suit the student wishing to go on to study a degree course with a strong focus on Mathematics. It focuses on the more abstract concepts needed to take Maths further. There will be some financial applications as well as the development of proofs in algebra and trigonometry. The Calculus is taken to a very high level, including the study of continuity, limits and L’Hopital’s Rule.

We encourage girls to engage in the wider applications of Mathematics, and in the past have organised trips to the Maths In Action lectures in London, and to the Maths Inspiration talks in Cardiff and Bristol. As a member of the Further Maths Network we are up to date on local opportunities to engage in activities and lectures organised by the Universities of Bristol and Bath. The Senior Maths Challenge is always fully supported by our students and we have a record of success in the regional finals of the Senior Team Maths Challenge.

“Maths has been a great help in Physics. Learning to follow things logically helps me form arguments in my essay-writing subjects.”

Analysis and Approaches SL would suit those going into degrees that have a mathematical element, but are not purely based on Maths, such as Medicine, pure sciences and combined science. All courses require the use of Technology, and students

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Design Technology Course outline

Studying Design Technology within the IB diploma program aims to develop internationallyminded people whose enhanced understanding of design and the technological world can facilitate our shared guardianship of the planet and create a better DT at IB focuses on analysis, design development, synthesis and evaluation. The creative tension between theory and practice is what characterises design technology within the Diploma Program sciences subject group.

additional higher level topics aim to introduce aspects of innovation. • • • •

Design Technology requires the use of the design cycle as a tool, which provides the methodology used to structure the inquiry and analysis of problems, the development of feasible solutions, and the testing and evaluation of the solution. A solution can be defined as a model, prototype, product or system that students have developed independently.

All SL and HL students complete a design project (40%) as an internal assessment task. This project allows students to demonstrate their investigative, analytical, design thinking, design development, prototyping, testing and evaluation skills and mirrors the design processes used across the various industries that integrate design practice.

DT achieves a high level of design literacy by enabling students to develop criticalthinking and design skills, which they can apply in a practical context. While designing may take various forms, it will involve the selective application of knowledge within an ethical framework.

At SL, the design project requires students to identify a problem and develop a solution. It is assessed against four common criteria: • • • •

A well-planned design programme enables students to develop practical skills alongside strategies for creative, critical thinking.

• • • •

Analysis of a design opportunity. Conceptual design. Development of a detailed design. Testing and evaluation.

At HL, the design project is assessed against two additional criteria:

All SL and HL student study: • •

User-centred design (UCD). Sustainability. Innovation and markets. Commercial production.

• •

Human factors and ergonomics. Resource management and sustainable production. Modelling. Raw material to final product. Innovation and design. Classic design.

Commercial production. Marketing strategies.

The SL course is assessed through a multiple choice paper (paper 1), a core paper, which consists of a short response and extended answer questions (paper 2), and the internal assessment design project. At HL, paper 1 has more questions, and students answer an additional paper (paper 3) consisting of three structured questions based on the HL extension material, one of which is based on a case study.

HL students examine four further topics designed to extend and deepen their understanding of the subject. The four 66


Music Course outline

IB Music is an exciting and broad syllabus and is suitable for all those who enjoy listening to and playing music of any sort and are keen to learn more about music and how it works. The key areas of focus are performing, composing and history/analysis (at SL this depends on which options are chosen). The scope of the course is very wide so much of the lesson time is spent investigating the widest possible variety of music from different time periods and places, whilst focusing on particular areas of interest amongst those in the group. This journey of discovery requires an openness of mind and can be very rewarding. The course involves less practical application of music theory than A level, though a working knowledge of basic theory is essential. One particularly interesting feature of the course is the Musical Investigation, a self-directed project comparing music from two distinct cultures. One of the following options: (50%) a) Solo Performance - A solo recital of approximately 15 minutes. b) Group Performance - A recital as a member of an ensemble lasting between 15 and 30 minutes. c) Creating -Two contrasting compositions with recordings and a written statement.

There are three elements to Standard Level Music: Listening Paper (30%) This is a 2¼ hour exam paper at the end of the course, and is the main focus for much of the lesson time. Students study two set works in detail for this exam. They are usually very contrasting works, one of which is a substantial piece of classical music. Students are asked to place them in their musical and historical context and will need to be able to analyse and compare them in detail.

Higher Level Sections (i) and (ii) of Higher Level are the same as the corresponding sections of Standard Level, except that Higher Level candidates must answer extra questions in the listening exam. There are no choices at Higher Level – both solo performance and composition are compulsory.

The remainder of the exam is one of the most interesting parts of the course: a number of short extracts of music from different time periods and places are played and students will be asked to comment on them. Some may be known to them, but most will not be! It is essential to build up analytical skills during the course to deal with any music that arises.

Solo Performing (25%) A solo recital of approximately 20 minutes. Creating (25%) Three contrasting compositions recordings and a written statement.

Musical Investigation (20%) A written media script of around 2000 words investigating the relationship between two musical genres. Recent examples chosen by students include a comparison of Steve Reich’s minimalist piece Drumming with a Ugandan percussion piece, and of Miles Davis’ So What with the Indian piece Rag Bhairav.

with

Coursework SL: Musical investigation and the performance/composition option are completed as coursework. HL: Musical investigation, solo performance and composition are coursework. Internally assessed: 50%, externally assessed: 50%. There is no setting in IB Music.

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Theatre Course outline

The focus of this exciting course is Theatre as a form of creative and cultural enquiry. IB Theatre gives you the opportunity to make theatre as a creator, designer, director and performer. Over the course of the two years you will be expected to research and develop your understanding of a range of world theatre and to experiment with different ways of presenting work to an audience.

opens doors into the world of Theatre, Film, Broadcasting and Digital Media. The student will gain a wide understanding of the different skills involved and also gain intellectual comprehension of how ‘action research’ impacts on development in these converging spheres. Other professions relying on confident use of interpersonal skills- such as Law, Advertising, Museum Curating, Teaching and Politics- are well served by the groundwork of completing this expansive course. The level of awareness of Internationalism within contextualised cultural appreciation also leads naturally to careers in the Civil Service, Foreign Office or International Business.

Assessment: 100% coursework All students complete three pieces of coursework, with Higher Level students completing a fourth coursework piece. There is no final examination. All students complete the following tasks: Director’s notebook: Students choose a published play text and develop ideas regarding how it might be staged for an audience.

Students are involved in a wide range of creative activities. Alongside the numerous visits organised to local and London theatres, the department offers the IB student the opportunity to participate as a mentor and leader in whole-school and sixth form performances. Recent productions include: ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’; ‘A Christmas Carol’; ‘Oh! What A Lovely War’; ‘Guys and Dolls’; ‘The Crucible’; ‘Antigone’ and ‘The Tempest’.

Research presentation: Students plan and deliver an individual presentation (15 minutes maximum) to their peers in which they outline and physically demonstrate their research into a convention of a theatre tradition they have not previously studied. Collaborative theatre project: Students collaborate, and create and present an original piece of theatre (lasting 13 to 15 minutes) for and to a specified target audience, created from a starting point of their choice. Higher Level students also complete the following task: Solo theatre piece: Students research a chosen theatre theorist. They identify an aspect(s) of the theorist’s ideas and create and present a solo theatre piece (4-8 minutes) based on this aspect(s) of theory.

“It’s a qualification that’s recognised throughout the world.” “I wish I had chosen the Higher Level in Theatre!”

As with A level Theatre Studies, the IB course 68


Visual Arts Course outline

The IB Diploma course offers students an ideal opportunity to discover Art. We follow a Fine Art programme which allows students to develop their work in a number of areas – especially focusing on current fine art practice. There is, of course, an international awareness that should be developed through such a programme of study.

route is, on completion of your IB Diploma, to complete a foundation course at Art School. Then you specialise in your chosen area, be it fashion, photography, graphic design, animation, games design etc. You can also go on to study History of Art.

The department offers opportunities to visit galleries abroad, with a biennial visit to New York and trips in the UK to events like the Frieze Fair and other major galleries. The IB Visual Arts Programme consists of three distinct areas of study; Exhibition 40%, Process Portfolio 40%, Comparative Study 20%

You could be a painter. You could work in television or web design. You could work within the fashion industry. You could work within advertising or the film industry. There is also architecture and interior design. As teaching staff we are all practising artists who believe very strongly in the value of Art in our society and how it can enrich one’s life. We endeavour to develop a working environment where students feel secure enough to develop their own ideas; where they can be brave in their experimentation. All lessons are taught in the Art school, which houses four professional working studios, an art library, facilities for printmaking and sculpture, photography and lens based media.

The Art Department boasts a variety of media, large spaces to work in and excess of inspiration. Students can fully embrace their topics, with a library and computers within the department. There are a number of career options if you choose to study Art and Design. The normal 69


Creativity, Activity and Service Course outline

Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS) is at the centre of the IB Diploma. It provides an opportunity for you to follow talents, hobbies and interests outside the classroom and to develop many other skills which are valuable to life beyond school. It is not taught, though some school time is dedicated to CAS activities.

undertake at least one project, combining two or more of the elements, but in addition you can do Yoga (A), Ceramic and Pottery (C), Rock Climbing (A), singing in a Choir (C), editing the school magazine or the College Magazine (C), coaching a football team (A), training for and running a half marathon (A), participating in a school Drama production (C), helping a child learn to read (CS), helping an elderly person keep their independence (CAS), MUN (C), dance (CA), debating (C), participating in Race for Life (AS), Duke of Edinburgh Award Expedition (A), Young Enterprise (C) and much more.

While CAS is not formally assessed in the sense of examinations, in order to obtain a Diploma you do need to fulfil the requirements of three Creativity, three Activity and three Service activities during the two years of the course. You also pursue one or more long term projects such as the Red Cross International Ambassadors, the Crane Academy Team, or working outside school for a charity. Assessment is through the reflections you engage in before, during and after each activity. A CAS log or journal is essential so that you monitor your own learning in such areas as ethical and global awareness, collaboration and perseverance and assess how and in what ways you have been able to help others.

“I was able to meet some of the most special people in my life and to more clearly define my values and future goals.” “I felt like I was physically doing something to help people in need.”

Importance of CAS CAS focuses you on the core of the IB educational philosophy: your development as a whole person. Your activities, freely chosen, will enable you to appreciate the potential of people by pushing your own personal growth and helping others with theirs; to become aware of humanitarian issues in the world and the ethical responsibilities you have as a global citizen; to discover more about your own talents; to develop greater autonomy and to enjoy yourself and others as human beings. Variety of Activities While you will need to develop initiative and find activities of your own outside school, there is a wealth of activities offered within school. As indicated above, it is essential to 70


The Extended Essay Course outline

Central to the aims and philosophy of the IB, and the element perhaps most valued by the universities, is the research project, called the Extended Essay. Soon after your entry into the Diploma Programme you will choose a subject which you would like to pursue to a deeper level. This does not have to be one of the six academic subjects which you have chosen to study, but does need to be something about which you feel passionately and can write in depth. Once you have chosen your subject, you receive a supervisor and work together with her/him to narrow down your topic to one that can be handled thoroughly in 4000 words.

des droits de l’homme relatives á l’interdiction du port du voile intégral en France.

Over a period of approximately twelve months, ending at the very start of Year 13, you work through the various stages of research and creation: developing your thesis, making notes and learning how to reference properly, gathering evidence, revising your thesis in the light of the evidence, drafting your essay, discussing the draft with your supervisor and then writing a final essay. At the very end, you will also have a viva (an oral examination) with your supervisor. When you have finished, you will be prepared for any research work that a university might present to you, either as an undergraduate or a post-graduate, and you are therefore extremely well-equipped for the next stage in your education. Examples of Extended Essays written by IB students at the Royal High School are: •

English - To what extent do Thomas Hardy (in Tess of the d’Urbervilles) and Angela Carter (in Nights at the Circus) explore the conventional portrayal of late Victorian woman? Human Rights in France - Une analyse 71

Biology - Is the diving reflex in humans an evolutionary relic or a physiological adaption?

History - To what extent were the Western allies justified in their reaction to the erection of the Berlin wall?

World Studies - How did street art in black South African communities help to change and transform disadvantaged communities during apartheid?

Chemistry - How do the storage conditions of kiwi fruit affect their vitamin C content?

Physics - What is the relationship between wind-induced oscillation and the dimensions of a suspended bridge?

Visual Arts - How does Diane Arbus expose the extraordinary amongst the everyday and the familiar in the bizarre?

Film - How much are the films of Pedro Almodovar a triumph of style over substance?


Theory of Knowledge Course outline

The key issues addressed in Theory of Knowledge (TOK) lessons are: • How do we know? • Can we be certain of anything? • The search for truth • Areas of knowledge • Persuasion and propaganda • Knowledge and culture. The course is assessed through: • a personal or pair presentation (freely chosen). • a personal essay (chosen from a list of IB titles).

learning and experience together. It makes you stop and think about your own world paradigm, and to examine the role of emotion, reason, perception, language, imagination, faith, intuition and memory in your own contributions to enquiry and debate.

Theory of Knowledge is also delivered through the six academic subjects. A typical Humanities/Arts lesson might revolve around discussion of myth: what is a myth? to what extent can it be said to be true? what kind of knowledge can it give us?

It links with many extra-curricular activities, too, such as Debating and Public Speaking, Model United Nations, and the Red Cross International Ambassadors.

A Science lesson might consider how science progresses, whether the knowledge it provides is certain, or what constitutes an experiment.

“When learning, examples for discussion will be drawn from across the globe. Stimulus material is taken from a wide variety of international sources.”

Theory of Knowledge is at the heart of the IB Diploma because it is about the acquisition and processing of information and the ability to criticise and improve upon arguments and data presentation.

“Theory of Knowledge will be taught by specialist staff so that the Humanities/ Arts side of the spectrum and the Mathematics/Science side are properly covered.”

Theory of Knowledge challenges students to question the bases of knowledge, to be aware of bias and to develop a personal way of thinking based on analysis of evidence expressed in rational argument but with due respect for emotion. Theory of Knowledge is the key element in the IB’s educational philosophy. It unifies and transcends the academic subjects, encouraging appreciation of other cultural perspectives and the development of a coherent approach to learning. Many IB students have commented that Theory of Knowledge is the most fascinating part of the IB Diploma because it draws 72


Co-curricular programme surrounding area and even from abroad. It is a big, very exciting and extremely informative event, much enjoyed by all the participants. You will learn a great deal about the countries you represent as well as meeting new people and making new friends. There will be opportunities for energetic debating and also for preparing challenging written resolutions with your team. The Model United Nations is also organised within universities and so this opportunity to take part in Year 12 can prove good experience and training for those of you interested in furthering your knowledge of international affairs during your Higher Education.

Activities The co-curricular activities of students form a vital part of life at the Royal High School Sixth Form. For IB students such activity will be absorbed into the CAS element of their Diploma programme but we want all our students, IB and A level, to take up the great opportunities that are available in the Sixth Form. The co-curricular programme is coordinated by Mrs Julie Hughes and run by a body of staff, students and external advisers. The programmes provide a variety of activities which take place throughout the week and the weekend, and enable staff and students to share interests. They also encourage students to come up with their own initiatives, suggesting community links or possible ‘inhouse’ activities. Sixth Form students can expect to work closely with staff, ensuring that all the necessary arrangements are in place for a successful and worthwhile activity, hence gaining valuable managerial skills.

A member of a previous MUN delegation writes: “Model United Nations is an organisation that enables young people to get involved in debating the worldwide issues that concern the real United Nations. Each delegation represents a different member country of the UN and hence adopts its policies and opinions on the issues being discussed. A delegation consists of five to seven people who attend the MUN Conference and each delegate is on a different council, ranging from the human rights to the economic council.

A wide range of physical activities is available for students. While for some this will involve a regular commitment to a Sixth Form team, for others the emphasis will be on fitness or the physical challenges of expeditions and adventurous activities such as those which form part of the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme.

A delegate can propose and debate her own resolution or simply contribute by supporting or amending another country’s resolution, or by questioning other speakers.

Additional Challenges and Opportunities

MUN is an excellent opportunity to explore any interests you may have in politics and current affairs in addition to displaying and improving your public-speaking skills. Moreover, while it is an exciting challenge, it is also very enjoyable and an excellent chance to meet new people and learn more about world issues.”

Model United Nations In the Spring Term one or more teams of Year 12 and Year 13 students take part in the Model United Nations conference. This takes place on the first weekend of March and teams are sent from all over Bath, the

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Duke of Edinburgh Award The Award is offered at three levels : Bronze, Silver and Gold. At Gold Level, there are five sections to be completed for the award to be gained.

These are: • •

• •

Skills Take up a new hobby or achieve a new target in an existing one. Voluntary Take part in some form of voluntary work for a charity or a neighbour. Physical Participating in some form of exercise involving a sport. Expedition The bit everyone talks about. You will be supported in the training and

the expeditions. Expeditions on foot are run directly through the school. Residential (Gold only) Five days and four nights, away from home with people you mostly don’t know, carrying out a worthwhile project or activity.

Each section of The Award takes on average an hour a week; the sections can be done separately or simultaneously depending upon the amount of time participants are able to dedicate. The award is your own endeavour, but support is at hand if you need it.

Foreign Language Leader Award The Foreign Language Leader Award is an opportunity for Sixth Form students to develop their communication, organisation and motivational skills by leading others through basic language activities. Students with a GCSE or IGCSE in a foreign language can participate in the course which is tutored by the Head of Modern Languages.

• • •

Development of knowledge about language. Development of intercultural understanding. Planning a foreign language event.

The one-year course is a nationally recognised award that gives students the opportunity to develop the skills that are so highly valued by institutions of higher education.

There are five units to the course: • Planning, leading and reviewing a language activity. • Development of leadership skills.

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Royal High School Tripos The Tripos offers recognition for the extra-curricular activities that a student is involved in. Open to all Year 12s, it is designed to foster curiosity, service and a sense of challenge. It has three main strands that must be met to obtain the award. These strands are based around the Royal High Learning Habits nurtured through our curriculum in the Senior School. To pass the Tripos award, a student must fulfil threshold criteria for each of the three strands.

that knowledge has in itself an inherent value; The second element, Civitas, aims to nurture the importance of service to community and to show commitment to a cause at a school, local or nation level; The third element, Contas, aims to cultivate a student’s sense of challenge, to encourage them to endeavour and have the courage to reach beyond their current grasp.

The first element, Curiositas, aims to foster intellectual curiosity and inquisitiveness about the world that extends beyond a student’s chosen subjects and to appreciate

For further details, please see Mr Ben Lacy, or email b.lacey@rhsb.gdst.net

Leadership opportunities The application process for the Sixth Form Leadership Team takes place in the Spring Term. Girls who are interested in becoming a Prefect or Mentor submit application letter and are interviewed.

tutors to deliver tutor sessions and offer guidance to girls within the tutor group. They will receive mentoring training so that they can work with younger students, offering guidance and support.

Sixth Form Leadership Team: Head Girl Deputy Head Girls (2) Prefects (8) Sport Prefect Key Stage 3 Mentors (12)

The experience of holding a position of responsibility develops vital skills such as organisation, public-speaking and team work. It also offers useful insight into how a team functions in order to mobilise support and create enthusiasm for different events and initiatives. Sixth Form Leaders will be expected to be proactive, creating ideas independently while also displaying tact, discretion and responsibility.

The Prefect team works alongside the Head of Sixth Form and the Deputy Head of Sixth Form, helping with the daily running of the Sixth Form, event management, public relations and ensuring that all students are welcomed and supported.

Members of the Leadership team are invited to attend the GDST Summit which takes place in London, in September.

Mentors are each allocated a Key Stage 3 tutor group to support. They work with the

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Results and Leavers’ Destinations 76


IB Results 2019 Across the board, our IB Diploma students scored an average of 36 points out of 45, well above the global average of 30 points. Students secured places at leading Russell Group universities including King’s, studying STEM subjects such as Biomedical Sciences and Medicinal Chemistry. Psychology has also proved to be a very popular degree course amongst this particular cohort. We are delighted that the school’s performance in the IB Diploma is strong year on year and its popularity is soaring, with cohorts averaging around 20 going through the current Sixth Form.

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A level Results 2019 Sixth Form students at the Royal High School Bath celebrated success in their A level examinations, with an impressive 75.3% scoring A*- B grades. A level Mathematics was the most popular subject taken by Royal High School girls with 62% of grades in this subject achieving an A* or A grade. This has been a particularly strong year for STEM subjects; four students are heading to medical school, with 42% smashing gender stereotypes by going on to study a wide range of courses including Mathematics, Chemistry and Engineering at leading UK institutions such as Imperial College, University of Manchester, and University College London. A*/A grades comprised 45% of total grades, with 70% going to their first choice university, and over 50% of students will be going on to Russell Group universities. We are also proud that our students will go on to study such varied courses as Fine Art at Central St Martins, Fashion in Paris, and Automotive Engineering for Motorsports in Bristol.

SUBJECT A*-C A* A B C D E U TOTAL Arabic 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Biology 20 3 9 5 3 2 2 0 24 Chemistry 18 3 8 5 2 1 2 0 21 Chinese 14 0 12 1 1 0 0 0 14 Classical Civilisation 4 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 4 DT & Product Design 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 3 DT & Textiles 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 Drama 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 Economics 9 0 2 6 1 2 0 1 12 English Literature 18 1 6 9 2 2 1 0 21 Fine Art 15 6 1 7 1 1 0 0 16 French 5 0 0 4 1 0 0 1 6 Geography 9 2 5 2 0 0 0 0 9 German 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 History 7 0 3 4 0 0 0 0 7 Latin 3 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 3 Mathematics 24 6 12 2 4 2 2 1 29 Mathematics Further 6 1 2 2 1 1 0 1 8 Music 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Physics 5 0 2 3 0 1 0 2 8 Psychology 9 1 3 4 1 0 1 0 10 Religious Studies 9 2 2 2 3 1 0 0 10 Spanish 7 0 1 4 2 0 0 0 7 Sports/PE Studies 2 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 3 TOTALS Cumulative %

193 26 76 66 25 15 9 6 223 86.5 11.7 45.7 75.3 86.5 93.3 97.3 100

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Destination of Leavers 2019 University

Course Title

University

Aberystwyth Psychology with Year in Industry Arts London Photography Bath Civil and Architectural Engineering Bath Education with Psychology Birmingham Biomedical Science Birmingham Medicine Birmingham Medicine Bristol English Cardiff Biological Sciences Cardiff Medicine Cardiff Metropolitan Psychology Foundation UCL Biochemistry UCL Biotechnology UCL English UCL Mathematics and Statistical Science DeMontfort Media and Communication DeMontfort Pharmacy Durham Law Durham Psychology East Anglia Medicine Edinburgh Japanese Edinburgh Accounting and Finance Exeter Mathematics with Accounting Exeter Law with Business Exeter Human Biosciences Exeter Neuroscience Exeter Law Imperial College Biological Sciences London Imperial College Chemistry London Institute Francais Fashion Design de la Mode King’s College London English Lancaster Psychology Liverpool Egyptology and Archaeology Manchester Mathematics with Finance Oxford History

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Course Title

Plymouth Quantity Surveying Ravensbourne Fashion and Brand University London Management Reading English Literature Royal Holloway Mathematics and Management Royal Veterinary Bioveterinary Sciences College Sheffield Computer Science with Foundation Year Southampton Biomedical Sciences with Integrated Masters Southampton Law Southampton Physiotherapy St Andrews Latin Surrey Business Management (HR Management) Westminster Biomedical Sciences with Foundation Year West England Automotive Engineering with Foundation Year West England Criminology West England Criminology West England Criminology with Foundation Year Victoria College Life Sciences Toronto Warwick PPE Winchester Primary Education with QTS York Human Geography and Environment Students Applying to University

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First Choice 40 Russell Group 29 Art Foundation 6 Gap Year 15 STEM 24 Medicine/ Health 6 STEM and Medicine 30

TOTAL COHORT: 78 Students


Girls making their mark

Senior School Lansdown Road, Bath, BA1 5SZ Tel: 01225 313 877

www.royalhighbath.gdst.net Email: royalhigh@rhsb.gdst.net @royalhighbath

Profile for Royal High School Bath

RHS Sixth Form Curriculum 2019-2021  

Curriculum information for Sixth Form girls at Royal High School Bath

RHS Sixth Form Curriculum 2019-2021  

Curriculum information for Sixth Form girls at Royal High School Bath

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