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Art of the Ancient World Greek, Etruscan, Roman, Byzantine, Eg yptian, & Near Eastern Antiquities

Celebrating our 67th Anniversary

Volume XX - 2009

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No. 86 - Art of the Ancient World - Vol. XX - January 2009 We are pleased to issue this catalog celebrating our 67th anniversary of dealing in classical numismatics and our 55th year of dealing in ancient art. It illustrates in full color 215 selected antiquities priced from $1,500 to over $3,000,000. This publication is one of a continuing series primarily illustrating new acquisitions featured in our New York and London galleries, where over two thousand fine works of art are on permanent display. All of the antiquities in this catalog are displayed at our New York gallery, the largest and most extensive collection of the ancient arts ever exhibited for sale. In addition to the many masterworks of ancient art, there is a wide variety of fine items on display priced from $100 to $1,000 and up, including Greek and Roman coins, Old Master prints and drawings, and antique Egyptian prints and photographs, perfect for the beginning collector or for that very special gift. A few of the pieces illustrated may not be available since they were sold while the catalog was in preparation, but a number of other newly acquired objects will be on display in our New York gallery and on our website: www.royalathena.com, updated weekly.

We unconditionally guarantee the authenticity of every work of art sold by Royal-Athena Galleries. ©2008 Jerome M. Eisenberg, Inc. Composed and printed in the United States of America.

Every object purchased by our galleries has been legally acquired. If imported by us into the United States, we have done so in compliance with all federal regulations and have given full consideration to all international treaties governing objects of cultural importance. Antiquities priced at $10,000 or more are now checked and registered with the Art Loss Registry in London. All of our objects are clearly labeled with complete descriptions and prices. Condition reports on all the objects are available upon request. We encourage browsing and are happy to assist and advise both the amateur and the serious collector. We urge our prospective clients to ‘shop around’, for we are proud of our quality, expertise, and competitive pricing. Appointments may be arranged outside of regular gallery hours for clients desiring privacy. Updated price lists for our catalogs are available upon request. For terms and conditions of sale see the inside back cover. COVER PHOTOS Important large Egyptian bronze kneeling pharaoh. XXVIth Dynasty, 664-525 BC. H. 11 3/4 in. (29.8 cm.) No. 184 Back cover: Highly important large Egyptian bronze priestess of Amun. XXIInd Dynasty, 9454-715 BC. H. 37 in. (94 cm.) No.185 Text and catalog design by Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., and F. Williamson Price Photographs by Brent M. Ridge

We will be exhibiting at The American International Fine Art Fair, Palm Beach, February 3-8, 2009 TEFAF, The European Fine Arts Fair, Maastricht, The Netherlands, March 13-22, 2009 BAAF Brussels, The Brussels Ancient Art Fair, Brussels, Belgium, June 4-9, 2009 BAAF Basel, The Basel Ancient Art Fair, Basel, Switzerland, November 6-11, 2009 (Check our website to confirm the dates)

royal-athena galleries established 1942 153 East 57th Street New York, NY 10022 Tel.: (212) 355-2034 Fax.: (212) 688-0412 ancientart@aol.com Monday-Saturday, 10 - 6

Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D. Director

VISIT OUR WEBSITE, updated weekly with our latest acquisitions:

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Royal-Athena at Seaby 14 Old Bond Street London W1S 4PP UK Tel.: (44) 207-495-2590 Fax.: (44) 207-491-1595 Monday-Friday, 10 - 5


Art of the Ancient World Greek, Etruscan, Roman, Byzantine, Eg yptian, & Near Eastern Antiquities

Table of Contents CLASSICAL ART Greek Marble Sculptures Roman Marble Sculptures Roman Limestone Sculptures Greek Wall Paintings Greek Bronze Sculptures Etruscan Bronze Sculptures Roman Bronze Sculptures, etc. Ancient Bronze Animals European Bronze Age Art Ancient Arms and Armor Ancient Terracottas Attic Black-figure Vases Attic Red-figure Vases South Italian Vases Etruscan Vases Ancient Glass Classical Silver Ancient Varia

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2 5 22 23 24 28 29 38 39 40 45 48 51 54 58 60 61 62

Classical Gold Jewelry Byzantine Gold Jewelry

64 67

BYZANTINE AND MEDIEVAL ART

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EGYPTIAN ART Egyptian Stone Sculptures and Reliefs Egyptian Bronze Sculptures Egyptian Wood and Cartonnage Egyptian Faience Egyptian Ushabtis Egyptian Varia

70 74 82 86 87 88

NEAR EASTERN ART

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COLLECTING ANCIENT ART 94 ROYAL-ATHENA GALLERIES 94 Expertise and Ethics 95 Royal-Athena Galleries Catalogs Inside back cover

Photos above, left to right: No. 21: Roman marble portrait head of a bearded young man. Earlier 3rd Century AD. H. 12 in. (30.5 cm.) No. 18: Roman marble over-lifesize portrait head of the emperor Gallienus, AD 253-268. H. 13 in. (33 cm.)


Introduction As we enter our 55th year of dealing in ancient art we are pleased to present in our 86th publication an outstanding selection of antiquities assembled primarily from old collections in the United States and Europe. A large number of these objects were originally purchased from us over the past several decades and we are delighted to offer them again to a new generation of enthusiasts. We have devoted over half a century to selling carefully attributed works of art with particular attention to their provenance. This diligence has resulted in an astonishingly low percentage of claims against legal ownership – less than 0.0003% or one out of every 4000 objects! In view of the increasing legislation being passed in several countries to restrict the trade in illegally exported antiquities (which we applaud), we may assure our clients that we continue to proudly conduct a very ethical business and take all of the proper steps to insure that our inventory is free of any possible claims. Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph. D.

Greek Marble Sculptures 1 ARCHAIC GREEK MARBLE HEAD OF A FEMALE with elaborate hair style; probably from a monumental relief. Late 6th-5th Century BC. H. 12 1/8 in. (31 cm.) Ex French collection.

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2 HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF APHRODITE (VENUS) the goddess of erotic love, beauty, and marriage, with large eyes, steadfast gaze, and a straight nose with its broad ridge flaring into the forehead and the eyebrows. The full lips are arched, the mouth closed. The centrally parted hair is bound by a fillet. 2nd-1st Century BC. H. 9 1/2 in. (23.5 cm.) Ex Dehoust collection, Belgium; Funcke-Auffermann collection, Germany. Cf. A. Adriani, Testimonianze e monumenti di scultura alessandrina, 1948, 5 and 19, pls. I-II and XIV, 1. 3 HELLENISTIC MARBLE CYBELE, the Great Mother goddess enthroned, wearing a himation and polos, holding a tympanon and patera; a small lion resting on her lap. 3rd-2nd Century BC. H. 10 in. (25.4 cm.) Cf. G. Richter, Catalogue of Greek Sculptures in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1954, p. 75, no. 127. 4 HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF A GODDESS depicted with her head turned and tilted left, the oval face with a spade-shaped forehead, the fleshy lips pursed, the unarticulated almond-shaped eyes with thick upper lids, the wavy hair parted at the center, bound in a band, the sides rolled back and tied in a chignon. 2nd-1st Century BC. H. 5 1â „4 in. (13.3 cm.) Ex collection of Frederico Castelluccio, Italy, assembled in the 1950s-70s .

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5 HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF A GODDESS in Polykleitan style, her centrally parted hair bound with a double fillet. 1st Century BC. H. 12 1/8 in. (31 cm.) Ex French collection. 6 HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF ARSINOE III PHILOPATOR, 246-204 BC. Later 3rd Century BC. H. 6 1/4 in. (16 cm.) Ex Audebeau collection, Paris, acquired in Egypt in the 19th century. Sister and wife of Ptolemy IV and mother of Ptolemy. She took active part in the government as far as was tolerated by the all-powerful minister Sosibius. She rode at the head of the army to fight Antiochus the Great at the battle of Raphia in 217 BC. 7 HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF A PTOLEMAIC QUEEN, probably Cleopatra II, ca. 185–116 BC. 2nd Century BC. H. 4 3/8 in. (11.1 cm.) Ex French collection. She was a queen (and briefly sole ruler) of Egypt, daughter of Ptolemy V and Cleopatra I. She became regent for her son Ptolemy VII on her husband's death in 145 BC.

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8 ROMAN MARBLE ATHENA HEPHAISTIA She stands in a relaxed pose with her weight on her left leg; her chainmail tunic with the aegis is unclasped from her right shoulder. Her helmet is set on the back of her head in a non-combative stance and her now fragmentary shield with a blazon of Medusa is slung on her left shoulder. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 43 3/4 in. (111.1 cm.) Ex Gaston Feuardent (1843-1893), Paris, a prominent antiquarian and numismatist; collection of a French architect, acquired before the 1940s; Jean Roudillon, 1958; Jean-Philippe Mariaud de Serres, acquired 2003. The Hephaisteion was the festival begun in 421 BC and dedicated to Hephaistus and Athena as the indigenous patrons of metalworkers and craftsmen.

Roman Marble Sculptures 9 ROMAN MARBLE HEKATEION depicting the triple-aspected Hekate Dadouchos as protector of the home, guardian of the soul, and goddess of the crossroads, carrying torches to light the way. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 27 3/8 in. (69.5 cm.) Ex French collection. Cf. L. Budde - R. Nicholls, A Catalogue of the Greek and Roman Sculpture in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, 1967, no. 92. The Athenians were particularly respectful toward her, and once a month they placed offerings of food at crossroads, where her influence was the strongest.

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10 IMPORTANT ROMAN MARBLE SCULPTURE KNOWN AS THE PASQUINO GROUP : MENELAOS SUPPORTS THE BODY OF PATROKLOS After a Hellenistic prototype of the 3rd Century BC, depicting the scene in Homer’s Illiad, XVII. Ca. 2nd Century AD. H. 27 3/4 in. (70.5 cm.); L. 28 1/4 in. (73 cm.); W. 14 3/4 in. (37.5 cm.) Menelaos attempts to protect the body of Patroklos from the Trojans, but finally he is driven off by Hektor. The Trojan commander strips Achilles’ beautiful armor from the corpse and puts it on in place of his own. Then, almost immediately, a battle develops over Patroklos’ naked corpse. Finally, the body of Patroklos is rescued and is safely carried back to the Achaian camp. Ex J. K. collection, Florida, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1995. The most complete original example known. A major work of art. See the fragment on the Piazza Pasquino, Rome, and another much-restored 1st Century example in the Loggia dei Lanzi, adjoining the Ufizzi Gallery, Florence.

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Visit our website , updated weekly, to view more of the nearly 100 marble sculptures in our current inventory as well as our latest acquisitioins. www.royalathena.com

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11 ROMAN MARBLE RECLINING OKEANOS, THE WORLD-OCEAN, in an unusually sensitive pose, holding a rudder, with a ketos (sea monster). The ancient Romans and Greeks believed this deity to be the embodiment of an enormous river encircling the world. He was the ocean-stream at the Equator on which floated the habitable hemisphere (oikoumene). 2nd Century AD. H. 17 3/4 in. (45 cm.); L. 35 in. (89 cm.) Ex J. K. collection, Florida, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1990. An important work of art. Cf. E.M. Koppel, Roemischen Skulpturen von Tarraco, no. 84. In Greek mythology he was personified as a Titan, a son of Uranus and Gaia. Keto, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus, was a hideous monster, the personification of the dangers of the sea, unknown terrors, and bizarre creatures. Eventually, the word ‘keto’ came to refer to any sea monster. The family of whales, the cetaceans, derive their name from her.

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12 ROMAN MARBLE OVER-LIFESIZE HEAD OF ARES (MARS), the god of war, of the so-called Borghese type and based upon a 4th century BC original by the Greek sculptor Alcamenes. 1st-2nd Century AD H. 16 in. (40.6 cm.) Ex collection of Sir Francis Sacheverell Darwin, Sydnope Hall, Two Dales, Matlock, Derbyshire, acquired in the 19th century. 13 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF ASKLEPIOS, god of medicine and health, depicted with an unusually strong expression. 2nd Century AD. H. 6in. (15.2 cm.) Ex French collection. 14 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF ASKLEPIOS, god of medicine and health, depicted with his typical impassive expression. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 9 3/8 in. (24 cm.) Ex French collection.

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15 ROMAN MARBLE PORTRAIT HEAD OF THE EMPEROR CARACALLA, AD 211-217 This rare depiction of the emperor has been somewhat idealized into a helmeted representation of Ares (Mars), the god of war. Ca. AD 209-217. H. 11 in. (27.9 cm.) Ex English collection. Marcus Aurelius Septimius Bassianus Antoninus Augustus Caracalla was the eldest son of Septimius Severus. His reign was notable for the Constitutio Antoniniana, granting Roman citizenship to freemen throughout the Roman Empire in order to increase taxation, debasing the silver content in Roman coinage by 25% in order to pay the legions, and the construction of a large thermae outside Rome, the remains of which are known as the Baths of Caracalla.

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16 ROMAN MARBLE PORTRAIT HEAD OF THE EMPEROR SEVERUS ALEXANDER, AD 222-235, or a contemporary. Ca. AD 230. H. 13 3/4 in. (35 cm.) Ex collection of M. de W., Belgium, acquired in the 1930s. His advisers were men like the famous jurist Ulpian, the historian Cassius Dio, and a select board of sixteen senators; a municipal council of fourteen assisted the urban praefect in administering the fourteen districts of Rome. The extravagance of the court was ended; the standard of the coinage was raised; taxes were lightened; literature, art and science were encouraged; the lot of the soldiers was improved; and, for the convenience of the people, loan offices were instituted for lending money at a moderate rate of interest. On the whole, the reign of Alexander was prosperous until the rise, in the east, of the Sassanids. In the war that followed, according to Alexander's own dispatch to the senate, he gained great victories, and returned to Rome with a triumph in 233.

17 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A SOLDIER wearing a legionary helmet with cropped crest, visor, and chin straps; probably from a high relief. 2nd Century AD. H. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Ex French collection.

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18 ROMAN MARBLE OVER-LIFESIZE PORTRAIT HEAD OF THE EMPEROR GALLIENUS, AD 253-268 A remarkable, sensitively carved portrait showing the son of the emperor Valerian in early manhood. Ca. AD 260-268. H. 13 in. (33 cm.) Ex R.F. collection, Brussels, acquired in the 1970s. Cf. Max Wegner, Das rÜmische Herrscherbild – Gordianus II to Carinus, Berlin 1979, pp. 106-120, pl. 45; pp. 108-110, no. 117f, pl. 45. Compared to other Roman emperors of the age, Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus was an exception, as far as he was not a soldier-emperor. He was rather a thoughtful, intellectual ruler, possessing sophisticated Greek tastes. Between AD 254 to AD 256 he campaigned along the Danube, securing this troubled frontier against the barbarians. In AD 256 he then moved west to fight the Germans along the Rhine. But this success cannot disguise what was a desperate situation for Gallienus. The Franks were attacking in large numbers, crossing the Rhine and forcing their way into Gaul. Gallienus could do little but accept the establishment of a realm by the Marcomanni, north of the Danube -- a challenge earlier emperors would have never accepted. In order to come to peaceful terms with this new kingdom it is said that Gallienus even took a Marcomannic princess as a second wife. During the rest of his reign he was occupied with quelling rebellions and repulsing invasions until at the siege of Mediolanum, he was struck down in the dark as he emerged from his tent. In a final irony, he was deified by the senate at the request of emperor Claudius II Gothicus, one of the men who had brought about his assassination.

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19 ROMAN MARBLE PORTRAIT HEAD OF THE EMPEROR VITELLIUS, AD 69, Ca. AD 60-69. H. 10 in. (25.4 cm.) Ex English collection. Aulus Vitellius Germanicus acceded to this position following the quick succession of the previous emperors Galba and Otho in a year of civil war known as the Year of the Four Emperors. His claim was challenged by Vespasian. War ensued, leading to a crushing defeat for Vitellius at the Second Battle of Bedriacum, but before he could abdicate, he was executed. 20 ROMAN MARBLE OVER-LIFESIZE PORTRAIT HEAD OF THE EMPEROR CLODIUS ALBINUS, AD 193-197, Late 2nd Century AD. H. 16 in. (40.6 cm.) Ex French collection. Albinus was born into a wealthy, senatorial family and received an aristocratic education. A Governor of Britain and a noteworthy military commander he was proclaimed emperor by the legions in Britain and Hispania upon the death of Pertinax in AD 193. Septimius Severus had also been proclaimed emperor and offered Albinus the title of Caesar and right of succession which he accepted. They fell out and in AD 197 after a crushing defeat Albinus comitted suicide.

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21 ROMAN MARBLE PORTRAIT HEAD OF A BEARDED YOUNG MAN depicted with a closely cropped beard and moustache, calm expression, and level gaze. His hair is elaborately carved and drilled with thick deep-set curls, each individually rendered. Earlier 3rd Century AD. H. 12 in. (30.5 cm.) Ex collection of Gawain McKinley, London, acquired before May 1966. This is a particularly fine head from a period from which little fine quality sculpture remains. The bean-shaped pupil is typical of late Severan portraiture and the closely cropped beard popularized by the soldier emperors who followed, ca. AD 235 and onwards. Cf. J. Frel, Roman Portraits in the Getty Museum, 1981, pp. 108-110, nos. 89 and 90.

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22 ROMAN MARBLE PORTRAIT BUST OF A PATRICIAN YOUTH, POSSIBLY DRUSUS MINOR, son of the emperor Tiberius, or a contemporary, with fine features and a pronounced forehead. Ca. AD 35-40. H. 14 3/4 in. (37.5 cm.) An exceptional portrait said to have been found in the waters off Spain. Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VI, 2, 1991, no. 17. 23 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A YOUNG MAN, with closely cropped hair. Late 2nd-early 3rd Cntury AD. H. 9 7/8 in. (25 cm.) Ex French private collection acquired in 1970.

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24 ROMAN BLACK MARBLE PORTRAIT HERM OF TWO WRESTLERS OR BOXERS with cropped hair, furrowed brows, and general brutish appeaarance. A rare subject, probably from a gymnasium. Late 2nd-early 3rd Century AD. H. 7 3/4 in. (19.7 cm.) Ex private collection, Brussels, Belgium. 25 ROMAN MARBLE PORTRAIT BUST OF A BOY with cropped hair in front and long tresses at the back; perhaps the son of a barbarian chieftain. Late 2nd-early 3rd Century AD. H. 21 1/2 in. (54.5 cm.) Ex J. K. collection, Florida, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1986. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 265A.

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26 ROMAN MARBLE PORTRAIT BUST OF A YOUNG MAN, sensitively carved with short curled hair, and a draped cloak. Ca. AD 120. H. 21 1/2 in. (54.5 cm.) Exhibited: Spink & Sons, London, 1970. Ex English collection; J. K. collection, Florida, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1995.

27 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A PATRICIAN WOMAN her hair in two rows of drilled curls across the brow. Ex French collection. Later 1st Century AD. H. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.)

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28 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A PATRICIAN SEVERAN WOMAN, her exceptional coiffure of individually curled locks of hair forming a deep corona around her calm expressive face. Behind this her hair is combed into a thick braid which continues down her back, bound with thin twisted bands of hair. Very fine style. Ca. AD 190-225. H. 11 in. (28 cm.) Ex Belgian private collection.

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29 ROMAN MARBLE STELE DEPICTING A HUNTER RIDING A HORSE which leaps a falled log. In his raised right hand he carries a rabbit by the rear leg. 3rd-4th Century AD. H. 11 3/8 in. (29 cm.) Ex French collection. 30 ROMAN MARBLE STELE Within an arched naiskos, a man sits on a rocky outcrop as a boat with a warrior holding a shield approaches. The worn Greek inscription ends with the word xaire: farewell. Syria, 2nd Century AD. H. 33 3/8 in. (85 cm.) Ex old English collection known in 1950. The meaning of the scene is that of the deceased about to embark for Elysium, possibly alluding to the ship coming to fetch Philoktetes from Lemnos. Cf. Munzen und Medaillen, XXVI, October 1963, no. 186. For a related boatman stele, see F. Poulsen, Catalogue of Ancient Sculpture, Ny Carlsberg, 1951, no. 167. For Greek grave stelei in the Roman period, see A. Muehsam, Berytus, 10, 1953. Reliefs & Vessels

31 ROMAN MARBLE CINERARIUM carved with a garland of flowers and fruits that drapes from the rams’ horns. Two birds stand atop the garland, underneath the inscription panel: DIS MANIBVS CLAVDIAE TRYPHANAE VIX ANNIS XXXXV M ANTIONIVS PRISCVS CONIVGI BENE MERENTI FECIT 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 7 1/2 in. (19.1 cm); W. 13 1/4 in. (33.7 cm.) Ex American private collection, New York.

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32 ROMAN MARBLE KRATER carved all around in high relief with a Dionysiac revel of dancing nude satyrs and maenads with tympanon, flutes, a panther, a cista mystica, and theater masks -all related to the cult of Dionysos and probably a depiction of a Roman version of the Anthesteria Festival during which the opening of the first wine casks occurs in honor of Dionysos, the god of wine. Ca. 2nd Century AD. H. 11 3/4 in. (29.9 cm.) Diam. of top 21 3/4 in. (55.3 cm.) Ex old English collection, acquired in the 1940s. For related Roman marble vases see D. Grassinger, ‘Römische Marmorkratere,’ Monumenta Artis Romanae XVIII, 1991. It also may represent scenes from the Lenaia Ritual which was a ribald and comedic winter festival in honor of Dionysos held on the 12th-15th of Gamelion (usually during the full moon in January). The bawdy and comic nature of this festival was intended to revive spring and fertility during the barren months of the year. In ancient times, this was one of two festivals where comedies were debuted. Many of the surviving plays by Aristophanes were written for this festival since Dionysos was also the god of the theater, hence the masks. The characters on this vase form a musical procession, called a thiasos, which was part of the celebration during these festivals.

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Roman Limestone Scu lpt ures 33 ROMAN LIMESTONE SARCOPHAGUS RELIEF SECTION: YOUTH HOLDING A SIMPULUM and a beaked oinochoe. His elaborate costume is heavily detailed with incisions. This relief is from the lower part of a sarcophagus decorated with a depiction of the deceased reclining on a funerary couch with the servants below. Palmyra, ca. AD 220-240. H. 17 in. (43 cm.) Cf. M. Colledge, The Art of Palmyra, 1976, pl. 102, pp. 77-78; R. Stoneman, Palmyra and Its Empire, 1992, pl. 16, for another in the Palmyra Museum. Ex French collection; private collection, Westlake Village, California.

34 ROMAN LIMESTONE SARCOPHAGUS RELIEF SECTION: YOUTH HOLDING A KANTHAROS His elaborate costume is heavily detailed with extensive incisions. At right is an elaborately turned ‘couch’ leg, and above him the panelled edge of the couch. Palmyra, ca. A.D. 220-240. H. 24 1/4 in. (61.5 cm.) Ex French collection; private collection, Westlake Village, California. See notes to the previous relief.

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Greek Wal l Paintings 35 PAIR OF GREEK WALL PAINTINGS OF WARRIORS ON HORSEBACK, helmeted, wearing short belted chitons, and holding spears. One rides to the right, the other to the left, both under a reverse wave meander surmounted by a palmette. Paestum, late 5th-4th Century BC. H. of outside frames 57 in. (144.8 cm.) W. 41 1/4 in. (104.8 cm.) Ex Charles Ratton, Paris, 1970; collection of Patti Cadby Birch (d. 2006), US Virgin Islands, acquired in New York in 1989. Mrs. Birch was a Trustee of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and funded the curatorial chair in Islamic art which bears her name; she was also an Honorary Trustee of the Museum of Modern Art.

23 For an extensive, illustrated study of this group of tomb paintings, see: B. Andreae, et al., Malerei f체r die Ewigkeit -- die Gr채ber von Paestum, 2007. While the Paestan tomb paintings showed indebtedness to a Greek formal vocabulary, the representations were found to have few parallels in Greek or West Greek sepulchral art, but many close analogues in Etruscan tombs. The most common Paestan themes concern funeral ritual, i.e. offering bearers and funeral games such as boxing, wrestling, and horse and chariot races. The dress and armor of the figures in the paintings established that they belong to the corpus of so-called Oscan tomb painting known largely from sporadic finds in Campania and Lucania since the early nineteenth century and may be associated with the Greek workshops at Paestum of vase painters trained in Apulia or working under Apulian influence.


Greek Bronze Sculp tures 36 EAST GREEK BRONZE GROUP: TWO ZEBUS AND A MAN standing behind them reaching under each animal’s croup, all on an integrally cast plate base. Ex German collection. Very rare. Cesme, Anatolia, ca. 610 BC. H. 2 3/8 in. (6 cm.); base: 2 3/4 in. (7 cm.) x 2 1/2 in. (6.5 cm.) For other bronzes from this area see British Museum: BM.52.9-1.10, acquired in 1852. 37 HELLENISTIC BRONZE SLAVE striding forward, his left hand supporting a large wineskin slung over his shoulder attached to a chest strap with pendant gourd. His right hand is raised toward his mouth and his hair is pulled back and tied in a top-knot. 3rd Century BC. H. 3 1⁄2 in. (8.8 cm.) Ex French private collection formed between 1930-1960, and thence by descent. 38 GREEK BRONZE NUDE VICTORIOUS ATHLETE standing in a relaxed pose, his muscular torso well defined, and wearing a diadem. Based upon the statue of Agias attributed to Lysippos, 337-332 BC. Ca. 330-300 BC. H. 5 1⁄4 in. (13.3 cm.) Ex J. K. collection, Florida, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1990.

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25 39 GREEK BRONZE NUDE ZEUS (JUPITER) HURLING A THUNDERBOLT, his left leg advancing, his right hand drawn back about to throw a thunderbolt along the sight line defined by his extended left arm. His long hair is pulled to the back of his head and tied in a chignon at the nape; his lower legs and right arm repaired in antiquity with tin. 5th -4th Century BC. H. 7 1/4 in. (18.5 cm.) Ex German collection. 40 LATE HELLENISTIC BRONZE NUDE ZEUS (JUPITER) standing in a relaxed pose, his right arm bent and held out before him with the palm open, his eyes inlaid in silver. 1st Century BC/AD. H. 5 1/8 in. (13 cm.) Ex J. K. collection, Florida. Published: J. Eisenberg, Gods and Mortals, 1989, no. 36. This type is roughly based on the colossal bronze Zeus by Myron that stood with Athena and Herakles in the Heraion on Samos. See no. 127ff. in Tiverios, "Zeus" in Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologicae Classicae. 41 GREEK BRONZE KORE wearing a long pleated chiton with her himation wrapped around her waist and left arm; holding a dove with her left hand. Ca. 440 BC. H. 5 3/8 in. (13.6 cm.) Ex Julius Carlebach collection, New York, ca. 1965; J. K. collection, Florida. Exhibited: The Divine and the Domestic: Ancient Art from the Mediterranean, Bayly Art Museum, 1998.


42 IMPORTANT LATE HELLENISTIC BRONZE NUDE EROS, love’s messenger, in a relaxed pose about to alight, with forelocks tied in top-knot. The eyes were once inlaid; the left arm lacking. Ex J. K. collection, Florida, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1992. 1st Century BC./AD. H. 25 3/4 in. (65.5 cm.) A superb sculpture. Published: C. Mattusch, et al, The Fire of Hephaistos - Large Classical Bronzes from North American Collections, exhibition catalogue, Harvard, 1996, pp. 251-254, no. 29: ‘The child’s head is turned to his right, and his eyes, which have deep round holes for pupils, gaze outward. He has the pudgy facial features of a little boy, a dreamy expression, and prominent ears. There are short bouncy curls in front of each ear, but the rest of his long wavy hair is rolled up neatly around the sides and back of the head, as if tucked over a headband. He wears a bowknot of hair just above his forehead.’

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Etruscan Br onze Sculptur es 43 ETRUSCAN BRONZE ALEXANDER THE GREAT, nude but for a cloak over his left forearm and shoulder, holding a phiale in his extended right hand. Ca. 2nd Century BC. H. 7 in. (18 cm.) Ex French collection, acquired in the 1970s. 44 ETRUSCAN BRONZE BEAKED OINOCHOE with finely engraved carinated body. The handle is in the form of a nymph leaning against the rim, a beaded garland draped across her breasts. 4th-3rd Century BC. H. 5 1/4 in. (13.5 cm.) Incised with an Etruscan inscription, UDAI, meaning ‘votive.’ Ex Henri Smeets collection, Weert, The Netherlands; John Hewett collection, London; Agatha Sadler collection, London. Published D. Mitten, Master Bronzes of the Classical World, Fogg Art Museum, 1967, no. 224.

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Roman Bronze Sculptur es 45 ROMAN BRONZE ASKLEPIOS, GOD OF MEDICINE, the god of healing depicted wrapped in a himation, his muscular torso exposed, his curly hair bound with a fillet. Ca. 1st Century AD. H. 6 3/4 in. (17.1 cm.) This sculpture is probably based upon the cult statue at Epidaurus, the center for his worship. Born a mortal, educated by the centaur Cheiron, he became so skilled in the art of medicine that he was said to be able to raise the dead. For this impiety Zeus slew him with a thunderbolt. Sometime after his death, at the command of Apollo and the Moirai (Fates), Asklepios was returned from Hades and apotheosized into a god.

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46 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE HERMES (MERCURY) wearing a laurel wreath on his winged head. In his right hand he holds a caduceus and with his left hand supported by a column, he holds the infant Dionysos; a cloak is draped from his shoulder over his left forearm. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 4 1/4 in. (11 cm.) Ex German collection. Choice. Hermes was the messenger of the gods and patron of contests, travelers, and business. 47 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE EROS HOLDING A DOVE. Love’s messenger, rising from an encircling akanthus, wears a circlet of flowers; his eyes are inlaid with silver. 1st Century AD. H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm.) Ex collection of B.H.S., a retired military officer, St. Petersburg, Florida, formed in the 1950s-early 1970s. Choice. 48 GALLO-ROMAN BRONZE ZEUS ABOUT TO HURL A THUNDERBOLT A later provincial interpretation of the so-called Artemision Zeus from Athens, ca. 460 BC; lacking hands and feet. 3rd Century AD. H. 4 3/4 in. (12.1 cm.) Ex collection of B.H.S., a retired military officer, St. Petersburg, Florida, formed in the 1950s-early 1970s.

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49 LARGE ROMAN BRONZE NUDE APOLLO OR VICTORIOUS ATHLETE standing, his centrally parted and upswept hair bound with a fillet, eyes once inlaid; lacking both forearms. Around his hips is an enigmatic ring. Ca. 3rd Century AD. H. 18 1/2 in. (47 cm.) Ex Edward Smith collection, New Jersey; J. K. collection, Florida, acquired from RoyalAthena Galleries in 1982.

50 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE HERAKLES RECLINING ON A LION SKIN, his right knee raised and holding a kantharos with both hands; his club rests upon his left thigh; upon his head is a wreath. 1st-2nd Century AD. L. 2 5/8 in. (6.9 cm.) Ex German collection.

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51 ROMAN BRONZE BALSAMARIUM OF ANTINOUS, COMPANION OF HADRIAN After he drowned in the Nile in AD 130 he was deified and is depicted here wearing a bulla and emerging from a calyx; lid and handle lacking. Ca. AD 130. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm.) Ex German collection. Cf. parallel examples in the Antiken-sammlung, Munich, inv. no. SL30, and in the North Brabant Museum in Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands. 52 ROMAN BRONZE VASE: HERM BUST OF THE DIADUMENOS, his head turned to the right, his hair a mass of unruly locks bound in a fillet. Anatolia, 1st Century AD. H. 5 5/8 in. (14.9 cm.) Ex J. K. collection, Florida, acquired from Royal-Athena. Galleries in 1988. Published: J. Eisenberg, Gods and Mortals, 2004, no. 39. The original bronze statue was made by Polykleitos, about 440-435 BC, and this vase copies a bronze herm bust found in the Villa Surbana at Herculaneum, signed by the sculptor Apollonios, son of Archias of Athens, in the Augustan period. 53 ROMAN LARGE BRONZE APPLIQUE: BUST OF THE YOUNG DIONYSOS, the god of wine, with elaborate coiffure including grape clusters. He emerges from four large palmettes wearing a chiton wrapped with a goat skin tied over his left shoulder. 3rd Century AD. H. 7 1/2 in. (19.1 cm.) Ex collection of B.H.S., a retired military officer, St. Petersburg, Florida, formed in the 1950s-early 1970s.

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54 ROMAN BRONZE OVER-LIFESIZE HEAD OF A YOUTH with masses of curly hair; his eyes once inlaid; his lips with a groove for outline inlay now lacking. The back of the head is lacking. 3rd Century AD. H. 14 1/8 in. (36 cm.) Ex French collection, acquired from Galerie Odeon, Munich, in 1970.

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55 ROMAN BRONZE ROUNDEL WITH A BUST OF A YOUNG BARBARIAN The head is inclined to the right, with thick hair dressed in layers, wearing a bulla necklace. 1st-3rd Century AD. Diam. 7 1â „ 2 in. (19.2 cm.) Ex European private collection, from the late 1950s, thence by descent. 56 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE APHRODITE (VENUS), goddess of erotic love, wearing a diadem, a breast band (strophion) wrapped around her upper torso, and a cloak over her left shoulder and right thigh. Ca. 2nd Century AD. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Ex German collection. 57 ROMAN BRONZE PRIESTESS OF AN EASTERN CULT wearing an attribute headpiece, chiton, and necklace. She stands upon an integrally cast tripodal platform. 2nd Century AD. H. 11 1/8 in. (28.5 cm.) Ex French collection. A very rare type. 58 ROMAN BRONZE SELENE, THE MOON GODDESS, a crescent on her head, a cloak billowing over her head; right forearm lacking; once holding torches. 1st Century AD. Rare. H. 3 3/8 in. (8.6 cm.) Cf. D. Mitten, Master Bronzes of the Classical World, Fogg Art Museum, 1967, no. 251.

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59 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE APHRODITE REMOVING HER SANDAL The goddess of love, beauty, fertility, and marriage is nude but for a mantle draped over her arms, the drapery once forming an arching canopy over her head. She wears a crescentic diadem. Left hand and right foot restored. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 6 5/8 in. (16.8 cm.) Ex J. K. collection, Florida, acquired from RoyalAthena Galleries in 1989; J.B. collection, Miami, Florida. Cf. a similar example from Rome, now in the British Museum, no.186 in Schmidt,"Venus" in LIMC. Exhibited: From Olympus to the Underworld, Ancient Bronzes from the John W. Kluge Collection, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 26 March - 23 June, 1996. 60 ROMAN BRONZE ISIS-FORTUNA The pantheistic Romano-Egyptian goddess of fortune and destiny. 2nd Century AD. H. 7 1/8 in. (18.2 cm.) Ex collection of M. de Clercq, France, late 1800s; K. collection, Geneva, Switzerland. Published: A. de Ridder, 'Collection de Clercq', vol. III, Les Bronzes, 1905, p. 215, no. 308.

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61 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE OF MEDUSA, her hair, eyebrows, and snakes heightened with gold overlay; eyes inlaid with silver. Choice. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 5 3/4 in (14.7 cm.); W. 6 1/4 in. (16.1 cm.) Ex collection of B.H.S., a retired military officer, St. Petersburg, Florida, formed in the 1950s-early 1970s.

62 ROMAN BRONZE VOTIVE PLAQUE OF HEPHAISTOS (VULCAN), GOD OF THE FORGE, standing nude within an aedicula, or shrine, with an arched pediment supported by columns. In his right hand he holds a hammer about to strike an anvil atop an altar; in his left a pair of tongs. A rare type. Danube region, 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 5 1/2 in., (14 cm.) Ex P. P. collection, California. 63 ROMAN BRONZE VOTIVE PLAQUE OF THE NUDE HERAKLES standing, holding his club and a lionskin, within an aedicula, or shrine, with an arched pediment supported by columns. Danube region, 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 3 3/8 in. (8.5 cm.) Ex German collection.

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64 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE APHRODITE ANADYOMENE(VENUS) WITH WINGED EROS, both standing atop a half-circular dais with three steps. Her arms are raised, wringing out her hair after a bath, and at her left Eros offers her a lekythos of scented oil. 2nd Century AD. H. 9 3/8 in. (24 cm. ) Ex collection of M. de Clercq, France, late 1800s; K. collection, Geneva, Switzerland. Published: A. de Ridder, 'Collection de Clercq', vol. III, Les Bronzes, 1905, p. 52, no. 61.

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65 CRETAN BRONZE BULL 10th-9th Century BC. L. 3 1/8 in. (8 cm.) Ex collection of Dr. Henri Barbier, ca. 1935; Barbier-Mueller collection, Geneva, Switzerland 66 GREEK GEOMETRIC BRONZE VOTIVE: TWO DUCKS ATOP A SPHERICAL CAGE 8th Century BC. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm) Ex Barbier-Mueller collection, Geneva, Switzerland, acquired from N. Koutoulakis, Paris, about 1960.

Bronz e A ni mals

67 GREEK GEOMETRIC BRONZE BULL Laconia, ca. 800-750 BC. L. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm.) Ex collection of Henry H. Sturtevant, collected in Athens in the 1930’s by his aunt, an American sculptress. Cf. W.-D. Heilmeyer, Olympische Forschungen XII, nos. 576-7, pl.75. 68 ROMAN BRONZE LION HEAD BOSS, the border heightened with silver. 3rd Century AD. H. 3 5/8 in. (9.2 cm.) Ex collection of B.H.S., a retired military officer, St. Petersburg, Florida, formed in the 1950s-early 1970s. 69 PAIR OF ROMAN BRONZE ROARING PANTHERS retaining the original bronze-capped iron nails; probably from a lectica. 2nd-3rd Century AD. L. 7 1/2 in. (19.1 cm.) Ex collection of B.H.S., a retired military officer, St. Petersburg, Florida, formed in the 1950s-early 1970s. For a similar pair, see: Mann und Ross und Wagen, Ausstellung München, Praehistorische Staatssammlung, 1986, no. 30.

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European Bronze Age Art 70 PAIR OF CENTRAL EUROPEAN MIDDLE BRONZE AGE ARM SPIRALS OF THE SALGOTARJAN TYPE 15th-13th Century BC. Total length 8 1/2 in. (21.5 cm.) Ex German collection. Cf. M.Novotna, ‘The Axes and Hatchets in Slovakia’, Prähistorische Bronzefunde, IX 3, 1970, pl. 56, 13.14. 71 MIDDLE BRONZE AGE LARGE BRONZE ARM SPIRAL, graduated, the ends terminating in perpendicular spirals around a central boss. 15th-13th Century BC. L. 17 3/8 in. (44.2 cm.) Ex German collection. 72 CENTRAL EUROPEAN BRONZE AGE FIBULA A large, multi-piece bronze bar with green patina. Three horizontal needles with square cross-section terminating in spirals. A bent attachment hook in front of the large spiral. Eight connected stylised bird motifs (two incomplete) with rattle plates in the form of stylised swords hanging on rings. Ca. 1200 BC. W. 9 in. (23 cm.) Ex German collection. 73 CENTRAL EUROPEAN BRONZE AGE LARGE COPPER ADZE with tapering tip, central shaft-hole, and transverse flared and curved cutting edge. 3rd Millennium BC. L. 12 1⁄4 in. (31 cm.) Ex English collection. Cf. A. MacGregor, Antiquities from Europe and the Near East in the Collection of Lord McAlpine of West Green, Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 1987, p. 92, 7.3.

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Ancient Arms & Armor 74 CORINTHIAN BRONZE TYPE II HELMET, hammered from a single sheet of bronze with almond-shaped eye cut-outs, spoon-shaped nose-guard, and riveted edges; still retaining most of the rivets. 2nd half of the 7th Century BC. H. 9 in. (22.9cm.) Cf. H. Pflug, Antike Helme, Mainz, 1988, p. 76, pl. 20. Ex American collection. 75 GREEK BRONZE ARM GUARD FOR THE RIGHT SHOULDER OF A LUDIO, the Etruscan equivalent of the Roman gladiator. It also protected the upper arm with its strongly molded biceps. Extremely rare. 5th-4th Century BC. L. 10 5/8 in. (27 cm.) Ex collection of Axel Guttmann (1944-2001), Berlin, acquired in Krefeld in 1988. Achilles conducted funeral games in honor of Patroclus. This scene take place in Book 23 of Homer's Iliad. These games were athletic contests including armed combat, however, injury was limited to the first to draw blood. The Etruscans took it to a fight to the death between servants. First introduced to Rome in 264 BC, the sons of Junius Brutus honored their father at his funeral by matching three pairs of gladiators, named after the Latin word for sword, gladius. Originally this was part of a religious ceremony intended to insure that the dead would be accompanied to the next world by armed attendants and that the spirits of the dead would be appeased with this offering of blood.

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76 HELLENISTIC IRON HELMET OF THE BOEOTIAN TYPE, the crown tapering to a pointed apex with a spike, with a broad rim, the front molded with a contoured triangle scrolling to stylized volutes at either side suspending the cheekpieces. 2nd-1st Century BC. Total H. 19 1/2 in. (49 cm.) Ex German collection, acquired in Krefeld, Germany, in the 1990s. Cf. H. Pflug, et al, Antike Helme, 1989, pp. 159-163, pls. 20-33. For another helmet of this type but missing the cheekpieces and plume spike, see: H. Born, Restaurierung antiker Bronzewaffen: Sammlung Axel Guttmann, II, Mainz, 1993, no. VII; and M. Junkelmann, Römische Helme: Sammlung Axel Guttmann, VIII, Mainz, 2000, p. 13, pl. 4, foldout I (AG 359). 77 ROMAN BRONZE MASK OF A YOUTH FROM A PARADE HELMET with thin ocular slits, slightly open mouth, and hinge at the mid-forehead. Earlier 1st Century AD. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Very fine style. Ex German collection. Cf. J. Garbsch, Römische Paraderüstungen, Munich, 1978, p. 20, p. 63, no. 7, pl. 18, 2.

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Send for our catalogue Ancient Arms, Armor, and Images of Warfare 2004, 48 pp. - $5 It illustrates 21 additional helmets, several of which are still available. 78 GREEK BRONZE ‘BELL’ CUIRASS, an early form of bronze muscle armour, the anatomic features indicated in highly stylised relief. It has deep neck and arm cutouts, a flaring waistline, and traces of the former lining along the perimeter; holes at the shoulder for attachment to the backplate. 6th-5th Century BC. H. 15 in. (38 cm.) Ex collection of Axel Guttmann (1944-2001), Berlin, acquired in Krefeld in 1996. 79 GREEK BRONZE ANATOMICAL CUIRASS. A sacrificial breastplate, with perfectly detailed anatomical features, flanged edges, soldered nipples, and tubular hinges on the sides and shoulders, which was flattened and nailed up in a sanctuary. One of the heavy iron nails is still present in the left shoulder plate. 5th Century BC. H. 20 1/2 in. (53 cm.) Ex collection of Axel Guttmann (1944-2001), Berlin.

Visit our website to view our current inventory of some two dozen helmets. www.royalathena.com

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80 ROMAN IRON AND BRONZE IMPERIAL GALLIC HELMET OF THE WEISENAU TYPE, worn by Roman legionaries, replacing the Coolus type, and constituting the final revolutionary stage to the legionary helmet of the Galea type. Later 1st Century AD. H. without cheekpieces 8 3/8 in. (21.3 cm.) Ex Dutch collection, acquired in the 1980s. Rare. The term "Imperial Gallic" was coined by H. Russell Robinson. These helmets, featuring a pair of distinctive embossed eyebrows on the forehead area and tending to be carefully made and elaborately decorated, were the products of Celtic craftsmen in Gaul. Note: We have just acquired three more Roman legionary iron and bronze helmets of different types from the Netherlands. They may be viewed on our website.


81 IMPORTANT MIGRATION PERIOD BRONZE AND SILVER SEGMENTED HELMET, calotte-shaped, with riveted silver plates. The pierced forehead band and the two straps of embossed bronze plate are pinned with flat bronze rivets. Segments of very high quality silver sheeting are fastened to the bands with large knobbed rivets. There are remnants of zigzag decoration on two silver plates (left front and right rear). The longish nasal guard is of equally high quality silver. There is no indication that it ever had cheekpieces. 5th-6th Century AD. H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm) Exhibited and published: K.Theiss, Attila und die Hunnen, 2007, p. 248. Helmets from the fringes of the Roman Empire, the Barbaricum, are extremely rare, as only the highest level of nobility possessed them. This is a symbol of status, not a battle helmet. 82 MIGRATION PERIOD SWORD, THE SILVER HILT SET IN GOLD WITH GARNETS 5th -6th Century AD. L. 27 7/8 in. (71 cm.) Exhibited and published: K. Theiss, Attila und die Hunnen, 2007, no. 155a. From the Black Sea area, Northeastern Caucasus, Georgia (ancient Colchis). Swords with stone-decorated handguards served exclusively as representation of status or as a rank badge, like a scepter, and not as a weapon. Colchis was the location of the Golden Fleece sought by Jason and the Argonauts in Apollonius Rhodius' epic tale, Argonautica. The local practice of using fleece to sift gold dust from the rivers gives resonance to the imagery.

83 MIGRATION PERIOD SWORD, THE HANDLE STUDDED WITH GARNET CABOCHONS and inlaid glass. 5th -6th Century AD. L. 28 1/4 in. (72 cm.) Black Sea area, Northeastern Caucasus, Georgia (ancient Colchis). Exhibited and published: K. Theiss, Attila und die Hunnen, 2007, p. 222. Cf. another in E. Behmer, Das Zweischneidige Schwert der Germanischen Vรถlkerwanderungszeit, Stockholm, 1939, p. 106, no. 22; pl. XII, no. 4B. See also: Germanen, Hunnen, und Awaren, German National Museum, Berlin, 1988, p. 106, no. 12a.

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84 NEOLITHIC GRAY POTTERY VASE with two handles and overall decoration of punches and incised motifs filled with white clay. Vinca Culture, 5th-4th Millennium BC. H. 5 1/4 in. (13.5 cm) Ex Barbier-Mueller collection, Geneva, Switzerland.

Neolithic, Greek , & Etruscan Terracottas 85 NEOLITHIC GREEK POTTERY STEATOPYGOUS FERTILITY GODDESS standing, with dome-like head, spade-shaped face, slit eyes, and open mouth. Thessaly, 4700-3200 BC. H. 3 5/8 in. (9.2 cm.) Very rare, especially in so complete a condition. Ex French collection. Accompanied by a TL certificate. 86 MYCENAEAN TERRACOTTA GROUP OF TWO MEN IN A BIGA, a chariot drawn by two horses, with overall linear designs in red slip. Ca. 1400-1200 BC. H. 4 5/8 in. (11.7 cm.) Ex French collection. A rare type. 87 EAST GREEK TERRACOTTA ARCHITECTURAL TILE: BELLEROPHON AND THE CHIMAERA He is bearded and wears a costume with trousers of barbaric type. Phrygia or Lycia, ca. 550-525 BC. H : 12 1/2 in. (32 cm.); L : 17 1/8 in. (43.5 cm.) Ex French collection. Cf. J.-R. Trichon, ‘Deux plaques de cimaise en terre cuite d'Asie Mineure,’ 45 La revue du Louvre 6, 1976.


88 ARCHAIC GREEK TERRACOTTA STYLIZED GODDESS plank-like, with bird-like face, wearing a polos over her painted shoulder length hair. Boeotia, mid-6th Century BC. H. 6 1/4 in. (15.9 cm.) Ex private collection, Ascona, Switzerland; Royal-Athena Galleries, New York, 1990. 89 ARCHAIC GREEK TERRACOTTA STYLIZED GODDESS with bird-like face, wearing a polos, decorated in black and red pigment. Boeotia, mid-6th Century BC. H. 5 7/8 in. (15 cm.) Ex Arthur Silver collection, Los Angeles; Royal-Athena Galleries, New York, 1991.

90 ARCHAIC GREEK TERRACOTTA HORSE, with stripes in brown slip. Boeotia, 6th Century BC. H. 4 5/8 in. (11.7 cm.) Ex Swiss collection, 1990; J. S. collection, Shelby, Michigan. Exhibited: George Mason University Art Museum, 2003-2007. 91 ARCHAIC GREEK TERRACOTTA DEEP BUST OF A KORE wearing a tall polos; long locks of hair falling over her shoulder. Her arms are bent at the elbow and her hands are extended. Ca. 6th Century BC. H. 10 1/4 in. (26 cm.) Ex Baron v.d. E. collection, Belgium, acquired in the 1950-60s. Rare type.

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92 HELLENIZING TERRACOTTA THYMIATERION: DEEP BUST OF A GODDESS, probably Persephone. On her head is a kernophoros; a band with leaves and disks at the base, above her hair which falls in long curls and braids to her shoulders. Carthage, 4th-3rd Century BC. H. 12 in. (30.5 cm.) Ex German collection. Cf: S. Moscati, The Phoenicians, exhibition catalogue, Venice, Palazzo Grassi in 1988, p. 621, no. 219. 93 HELLENISTIC TERRACOTTA NUDE YOUTH, wearing a cap and holding a vase and a strigil. Boeotia, 3rd-2nd Century BC. H. 7 1/8 in. (18 cm.) Ex French collection. 94 HELLENISTIC TERRACOTTA APHRODITE, nude but for a himation draped over her left shoulder and legs. Ca. 2nd Century BC. H. 8 1/2 in. (21.8 cm.) Ex French collection. 95 ETRUSCAN TERRACOTTA VOTIVE HEAD OF A YOUNG WOMAN with a beautiful face and wearing her himation pulled up over the back of her luxurious, centrally parted, wavy hair. This was a symbol that she was ready to meet the gods. Cerveteri, 4th Century BC. H. 11 7/8 in. (30 cm.) Ex French collection.


A ttic B lack-figure Va ses 96 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE TYRRHENIAN NECK AMPHORA BY THE CASTELLANI PAINTER The upper register with a symposium, each couch with a pair of banqueters. Reverse: six dancing komasts; below, on front and back, two registers of animals. Ca. 550 BC. H. 13 7/8 in. (35.2 cm.) Ex Dr. Elie Borowski collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 175. 97 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE AMPHORA, THE DOT-BAND-CLASS, depicting a scene from the Iliad, with Ajax, son of Telamon, carrying the body of Patroklos from the battlefield; both are wearing plumed helmets, Ajax also carrying both spears and shields, flanked by two Trojans in Persian dress. Reverse: Dionysos, wreathed and holding a cornucopia, flanked by two maenads. Ca. 510-500 BC. H. 8 1â „2 in. (21.6 cm.) Ex Dutch private collection, acquired at Sothebys, May 19, 1975.

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98 ATTIC LARGE BLACK-FIGURE GROUP E PANEL AMPHORA: Gigantomachy. In the midst Poseidon kills Polybotes by dropping the island of Nisyros on him. At left Athena runs toward him pursued by an armored giant, and at right Ares fells another armored giant. Reverse: Warrior’s farewell. Ca. 540 BC. H. 19 5/8 in. (50 cm.) Ex private collection Dusseldorf, acquired from Herbert Cahn, Basel, Switzerland in 1988. Group E refers to the same workshop that produced Exekias, perhaps the greates of all black-figure painters.

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99 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE AMPHORA Herakles wrestling the Nemean lion. Reverse: Athena seated between two nude males. Ca. 500 BC. H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm.) Ex French private collection. 100 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE AMPHORA A warrior battles an Amazon; possibly Herakles and Andromache. Reverse: A draped female between two warriors; possibly depicting the capture of Helen. Ca. 500 BC. H. 9 in. (23 cm.) Ex French private collection. 101 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE LIP CUP WITH DANCING NUDE KOMASTS On either side there are three revellers wearing only helmets; within the tondo is a single helmeted dancer. Later 6th Century BC. H. 4 1/2 in. (11.5 cm.); D. 7 1/2 in. (19 cm.); W; 10 3/8 in. (26.4 cm.) Ex French collection. 102 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE LEKYTHOS Two females draped capite velato in black walking right between two apotropaic eyes. Ca. 500 BC. H. 11 3/4 in. (30 cm.) Ex French collection.

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103 ATTIC RED-FIGURE NOLAN AMPHORA BY HERMONAX A nude frontal Dionysos, wearing a laurel wreath and cloak draped over his arms from behind, stands holding a thyrsos, looking to the right. Reverse: A nude satyr holding an oinochoe, a wineskin, and a thyrsos strides to the left. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 14 3/8 in. (36.4 cm.) Ex North German private collection.

104 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE PAINTER OF THE LOUVRE CENTAUROMACHY The capture of Helen. Theseus on horseback, carrying a spear, pursues Helen and her sister Clytemnestra who both flee to the right. Reverse: Three draped youths. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 16 3/4 in. (42.5 cm.); W. 17 1/4 (43.8 cm.) Ex French collection. For the abduction of Helen on Attic vases see Kahil, ‘Helene’, LIMC, nos. 48-52.

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Attic Red-figure Vases


105 ATTIC RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS, CIRCLE OF THE PENELOPE PAINTER A standing bearded man holds a stick in his right hand. On the opposite side a cloaked youth stands in front of a column. Ca. 450 BC. H. 6 1/4 in. (16 cm.) Ex collection of the author H. P. Rohde. Exhibited and published: Odense Bys Museer, Storstrøms Kunstmuseum, Johan Rohde Ars Una, 2006, no. 135, ill. 184. 106 ATTIC RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS A draped youth, holding a strigil and juggling two balls in his left hand, walks by a meta. Reverse: Bearded male. Earlier 5th Century BC. H. 5 1/4 in. (13.5 cm.) Diam. 6 1/4 in. (16 cm.) Ex French collection.

107 ATTIC RED-FIGURE TREFOIL OINOCHOE Nike flying to right. Ca. 460 BC. H. 7 1/8 in. (18.2 cm.) Ex Sir Richard Hattatt collection, Hampshire, England; J. B. collection, Ferndale, Michigan, acquired from RoyalAthena Galleries in 1986. Exhibited: The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, 1982; Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University, Hamilton, New York, 1986-2007. 108 BOEOTIAN RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS with a kithara player walking to right, wearing a long elaborate dotted chiton and himation, with a foliate wreath in his hair. Reverse: A winged Eros seated on a rocky outcrop holding out a necklace in his extended hand, which he has taken from an open pyxis in his left arm. 4th Century BC. H. 5 1⁄2 in. (14 cm.) Ex French private collection.

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109 ATTIC RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER BY THE PAINTER OF MUNICH 2335 A Dionysiac scene centering a nude, Herakles-like satyr holding a thyrsos, flanked by two admiring maenads, one seated. At the left a nude satyr leaning on a staff watches as does another at the far right. Reverse: Three draped youths. Ca. 425-400 BC. H. 12 3/4 in. (32.6 cm.); W. 14 3/4 in. (37.5 cm.) Ex German collection. 110 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN-KRATER BY THE MELEAGER PAINTER Two nude warriors with shields, helmets, and spears, battle a cloaked man riding a rearing horse, while turning and lunging at the bearded soldier with a spear; a figure, further to the left, turns back to view the melee. Reverse: Three draped youths. Earlier 4th Century BC. H. 13 3/8 in. (34 cm.); W. 12 3/4 in. (32.4 cm.) Ex Ulla Lindner, Munich, 1960s; Dr. J. Bohler, Munich; German private collection. 111 ATTIC RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER A symposium with four young men reclining on two couches; a female flute player walking in front and a nude youth holding a tympanon kneeeling on the couch at left. Reverse: Three draped youths, one holding a strigil. Ca. 4th Century BC. H. 15 1/8 in. (38.5 cm.); W. 15 1/4 in. (38.7 cm.) Ex European private collection assembled in the 1970s and 1980s. 112 ATTIC RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER Four nude maenads and a satyr cavort around a laver in their midst, in which a nude, winged Eros alights. Reverse: Three draped youths. 4th Century BC. H. 15 3/8 in. (39 cm.), W. 17 in. (43.2 cm.) Ex Belgium private collection, acquired in the 1980s.

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South I talian Vases 113 PAIR OF APULIAN RED-FIGURE OINOCHOI NEAR THE WHITE SACCOS PAINTER One has a flying nude Eros carrying a patera and a torch, in pursuit of a rabbit; the other with a winged nude Eros capturing a swan. Ca. 330-320 BC. Hs. 15 1/2 in (38.6 cm.) and 15 in (38.1 cm.) Ex European collection, pre-1990s. 114 APULIAN RED-FIGURE KANTHAROS BY THE WHITE SACCOS PAINTER In profile, a female head wearing a diadem, jewelry, and saccos. Reverse: A winged Eros flying to left carrying a wedding casket and a phiale. Ca. 330-320 BC. H. 10 in. (25.5 cm.) Ex English collection; private collection, San Francisco. 115 APULIAN RED-FIGURE OINOCHOE NEAR THE WHITE SACCOS PAINTER Shape 8B, with a nude Eros flying to right holding a fan, a situla, and a phiale. It has a knotted, bifurcated handle with a large palmette below, and around the neck is a wreath with berries. Ca. 320-310 BC. H. 8 1/8 in. (15.6 cm.) Ex collection of Prof. Alcibiades N. Oikonomides (d.1988), Chicago (Classics professor at Loyola University), acquired in the 1970s; M.B. collection, Westlake Village, California.

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116 APULIAN RED-FIGURE OINOCHOE BY THE LAMPAS PAINTER A helmeted and cuirassed warrior holding a spear and shield at left and a draped female holding a mirror at right with a winged Eros holding a patera and candelabra between them. Ca. 370 - 360 BC. H. 14 3/8 in. (28.6 cm.) Ex private collection, Ascona, Switzerland, 1985 117 APULIAN RED-FIGURED AMPHORA BY THE GROUP OF BOLOGNA 572 A woman holding a situla and fan stands before a seated figure of Eros with phiale; a rosette-chain, a sash and a floral garland in the field, encircling meander below the scenes, a white-painted wreath around the mouth. Ca. 340-320 BC. H. 20 7/8 in. (53 cm.) Ex American private collection, acquired in London in 1974. Published: A.D. Trendall, The Red-figured Vases of Apulia, vol. II, Oxford, 1982, p. 751, 23/217, 20/326. 118 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER, THE GROUP OF LOUVRE K 240 Satyrs and maenads dance in thiasic ecstasy. Reverse: A draped youth and a maenad. 4th Century BC. H. 14 5/8 in. (37.2 cm.) W. 15 in. (38.1 cm.) E x French collection.

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119 LARGE GREEK POLYCHROME POTTERY LIDDED PYXIS, the domed lid with a central Dionysos head modelled in relief, the curly hair with a diadem, wearing pendant earrings. The front of the vessel is painted in pink, red, and pale blue with three revelling Bacchic erotes, one holding a thyrsos, another playing pipes, flanking a central dancing figure; on bird-shaped feet. Canosa, 3rd Century BC. H. 8 1⁄2 in. (22 cm.); Diam. 7 1⁄4 in. (18.5 cm. ) Ex private Belgian collection, acquired between 1920-1940; thence by descent in 1950. 120 APULIAN GNATHIA WARE HYDRIA with a laurel band on the front in added white. Late 4th Century BC. H. 12 3/4 in. (32.4 cm.) Ex Richards collection, Pontiac, Michigan. Exhibited: Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University, 1985-99. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, p. 37, no. 116

121 APULIAN GNATHIA WARE BELL KRATER with typical designs of grape clusters and foliage in added color. Ca. 340-320 BC. H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm.) W. 12 1/2 in. (31.8 cm.)

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122 CAMPANIAN LARGE RED-FIGURE CALYX KRATER BY THE NICHOLSON PAINTER in Apulianizing style. Two couples on couches: at left, a female musician plays to a youth drinking from a kylix; at right, a couple embrace, Eros near her head; two three-legged tables in front with food. Ca. 330-300 BC. H. 24 in (61 cm.) Ex W.W. collection, Essen, Germany.

123 CAMPANIAN LARGE RED-FIGURE BAIL AMPHORA A woman at her toilette with her maid; below, a helmeted Chalcidian warrior wearing a white chiton and a bronze belt, his right arm resting on a large circular shield, a woman walking toward him. Reverse: Two draped youths. 4th Century BC. H. 24 1/4 in. (61.5 cm) Ex Axel Guttmann (1944-2001) collection, Berlin.

124 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE OINOCHOE A running nude satyr. Ca. 350-330 BC. H. 8 3/8 in. (9.8 cm.) Ex private collection Chatham, New York.

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E truscan Va ses 125 VILLANOVAN POTTERY URN WITH LID IN THE FORM OF A CRESTED HELMET, with a handle on one side, a flaring rim, and incised geometric designs of meanders, triangles, hatched fields, and swastikas; the lid with similar incised decoration. 8th-9th Century BC. H. of urn 13 5/8 in. (34.6 cm.); H. of lid 9 in. (23 cm.) Ex collection of Axel Guttmann (1944-2001), Berlin. For a similar urn found at Campo del Tesoro, tomb 52, see: G. Montanari, La Formaziona della Cittá in Emilia Romagna, Bologna, 1987, pp. 219-221, fig. 150. 126 VILLANOVAN BLACK GLAZED VASE WITH DEEP COVER SURMOUNTED BY TWO HORSES, the cup wih spreading foot, and four double-looped handles; the horses facing each other. Ca. 8th Century BC. A rare type. H. 10 1/8 in. (26.4 cm.); Diam. 8 in. (20.3 cm.) Ex J.H. collection, acquired in 1990. 127 ETRUSCAN BUCCHERO TREFOIL OINOCHOE with an ovoid body decorated with molded nude dancers below a frieze of tear drops. Later 6th Century BC. H. 9 7/8 in. (25.1 cm.) Ex South German private collection, 1994. Cf. Richard D. De Puma, Etruscan Tomb-Groups (Mainz, 1986), no. SP3, pp. 76-77; G. Giglioli, L’arte Etrusca, 1935, pl. 52.1; O. Brendel, Etruscan Art, figs. 92-93

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128 ETRUSCAN BLACK-FIGURE WHITE GROUND AMPHORA Hermes, nude, wearing a short cloak over his shoulders, a cap on his head, runs to the right holding caduceus. Reverse: A running maenad, face and hands in added white. Ca. 520-500 BC. H. 11 3/8 in. (28.9 cm.) 129 FALISCAN RED-FIGURE KYLIX Tondo: winged goddess, probably Nike, wearing an elaborately detailed chiton, declaims to a seated, nude bearded god. On either side a female and two draped youths. Etruria, ca. 380-360 BC. Diam. 9 3/4 in. (24.8 cm.); H. 3 5/8 in. (9 cm.) Cf. a kylix cup in Boston, J. Beazley, Etruscan Vase Painting, Oxford, 1947, p. 111, pl. 26, seemingly by the same workshop.

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130 ROMAN COBALT BLUE GLASS AMPHORISKOS, mold-blown, the ovoid body with concentric horizontal ridges and a pointed base, with a cylindrical neck, flaring mouth, the rim folded out then in, and twin vertical handles. Later 1st Century AD. H. 4 1⁄4 in. (10.8 cm.) Ex Connecticut private collection, acquired in the 1970s. Cf. E. Stern, Roman Mold-blown Glass, 1995, pp. 158-159, nos. 66-67.

Ancient Glass

131 ROMAN MANGANESE PURPLE GLASS AMPHORISKOS, mold-blown, the ovoid body with concentric horizontal ridges and a pointed base, with a cylindrical neck, flaring mouth, the rim folded out then in, and twin vertical handles. Later 1st Century AD. H. 3 1⁄4 in. 8.3 cm.) Ex German private collection. 132 SASSANIAN FEATHERED GREENISH CLEAR GLASS BEAKER, 5th-7th Century AD. H. 3 7/8 in. (10 cm.) Ex German private collection, 133 SIX ROMAN BRONZE BELT FITTINGS WITH INLAID MOSAIC GLASS of white, red, and blue canes on alternating red, white, and blue fields. 3rd-4th Century AD. Widest 2 3/8 in. (6 cm.); highest 1 7/8 in (4.9 cm.); total length. 11 in. (27.9 cm.) Ex collection of B.H.S., a retired military officer, St. Petersburg, Florida, formed in the 1950s-early 1970s.

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He llenistic Silver Sculpt ure 134 HELLENISTIC SILVER APOLLO, probably a portrait of a Hellenistic prince in the guise of the god, perhaps Mithridates VI Eupator of Pontus, or his son Ariarathes IX Eusebes Philopator of Cappadocia, of slender and youthful form, standing in a graceful attitude with his weight on the left leg, his extended right hand holding a rhyton, the left hand a fragmentary bow, his head turned to the right, with full lips, straight nose with flaring nostrils, and eyes with indented pupils, his long unruly wavy hair bound in a diadem. Late 2nd -early 1st Century BC. H. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex New York private collection acquired in 2002. Published: R. Symes, Royal Portraits and Hellenistic Kingdoms, New York, 1999, no. 24, illus. Cf. Marie-Louise Vollenweider, MusÊes de Genève, no. 274, January 1987, pp. 4-5, cover illus; Treasures from an Ancient Jewelbox: Gold and Silver of the Ancient World, New York, 1992.

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135 HELLENISTIC SILVER FLORAL WREATH WITH GOLD BIRDS 3rd-1st Century BC. D. 6 5/8 in. (17 cm.) Ex Kalebdgian collection, acquired 1992. 136 LATE HELLENISTIC SILVER SPOON with segmented handle, partially reeded. 1st Century BC/AD. L. 5 3/4 in. (14.7 cm.) Ex German collection. 137 CYPRIOT LIMESTONE HORSE AND RIDER, the saddle and bridle with traces of red paint. 5th Century BC. H. 5 7/8 in. (15 cm); L. 4 3/4 in. (12.1 cm.) Ex collection of Josef Mueller, acquired before 1940; Barbier-Mueller collection, Geneva, Switzerland.

Ancient Varia

138 ROMAN FRAGMENTARY AMBER VASE carved in relief with two erotes pressing grapes underfoot, standing on a small platform, flanked on either side by large winged erotes, the one on the left holding a pail in his left hand, and both with the other hand resting on a tall basket laden with grapes at the back. 2nd Century AD. H. 2 1â „2 in. (6.3 cm.) Ex European collection, 1920s.

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139 ATHENIAN BRONZE ALLOTMENT PLATE (pinakia) with Greek inscription: PISTOKLES MURRI [nonsioV]. At left is a maker’s stamp : ‘B’ over a tripod. Ca. 367-360 BC. L. 4 1/2 in. (10.8 cm) Ex Eisenhofer collection, Regensburg, Germany. For the type and date see: J.H. Kroll, Athenian Bronze Allotment Plates, Harvard, 1972, pp. 87-90, nos. 78-113. Very rare. On the top left is a stamped B, under it a trilobate stamp of a standing owl facing front with closed wings; beneath it: [A/HQ]; to the right, a Gorgoneion. With plates like this judges were drawn by lot in Athens for one day in each case. The owner of this plate was a certain Pistokles from the city of Myrrhinus (on the east Attica coast, today's Merenda); every citizen eligible for jury service had one. Below is a photograph, courtesy of the Ancient Agora Museum in Athens, of a kleroterion, one of the ancient voting machines into which was inserted the allotment plate.

140 ROMAN BRONZE STEELYARD BALANCE AND WEIGHT: BUST OF ARTEMIS, in the form of a rectangular sectioned beam with conical terminals, engraved on three faces with graded divisions and stippled letters, the other face with a stippled inscription, one end of the beam with three attachment rings on different faces with two remaining suspended hooks, two additional hooks suspended on chains from a collar, and the counterpoise bust suspended from a short moveable chain. 1st-2nd Century AD. Beam L. 16 3/8 in. (41.5 cm.); bust H. 3 1/8 in. (8 cm.) German private collection, formed during the 1960s-1970s. 141 GREEK BRONZE KOTYLE on a pedestal foot, with hemispheric body, set-off lip, and bifurcated, curving handles ending in stylized duck head termini. Ca. 350-300 BC. H. 2 3/4 in. (7.2 cm.); Diam. 7 in. (18 cm.) Ex German collection. Cf. P. Themelis, The Tombs of Derveniou, 1997, pl. 38, nos. A 10-12.

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142 CENTRAL EUROPEAN BRONZE AGE GOLD RING made from gold wire wrapped back and forth. Ca. 1500 BC. Size 10.5. 8 g. D. 7/8 in. (2.2 cm.) Ex German collection. 143 GREEK GOLD FINGER RING WITH EROS standing within a border of wire C-scrolls and a beaded bezel. 4th Century BC. D. 2 1/8 in. (5.5 cm.) Size 9. 12.4 g. Ex German private collection. 144 HELLENISTIC GOLD FINGER RING WITH A DRAPED BUST OF A BEARDED RULER wearing a fillet tied at the back of his head; the basic shape in the casting, the details carved. A stylistic and iconographic comparison with coin portraits suggests this is a representation of Kamnaskires IV, king of Elymais. Rare. Ca. 62-55 BC. D.1 7/8 in. (4.7 cm.) Size 5.5. 13.9 g. Ex English collection.

Classical Gold Jewelry 145 HELLENISTIC GOLD EARRING WITH THE HEAD OF A LION, of twisted, tapering wire with lion head terminus. 4th-3rd Century BC. D. 3/4 in. (1,9 cm.) 3.04 g. Ex German private collection. 146 HELLENISTIC GOLD EARRING WITH THE HEAD OF A MAENAD, of twisted, tapering wire with maenad head terminus. 4th-3rd Century BC. D. 3/4 in. (1.9 cm.) 4 g. Ex German private collection.

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147 EARLY ROMAN IMPERIAL GOLD FINGER RING WITH AN EMERALD INTAGLIO of a woman wearing a laurel wreath and a stola. 1st Century BC/ AD D. 1 in. (2.5 cm.) Size 5. 1.30 g. The stola, a garment unusual for a goddess, along with the laurel wreath suggests this may represent a female of the imperial family, possibly Agrippina Major. Very rare. 148 ROMAN GOLD WEDDING RING carved with the customary clasped hands, dextrarum iunctio. 1st-3rd Century AD D. 5/8 in. (1.6 cm.) Size: 4.5. 9.1 g. Ex German collection. 149 ROMAN GOLD WEDDING RING Two clasped hands , dextrarum iunctio,. within a raised beaded bezel. 2nd-3rd Century AD D. 5/8 in. (1.6 cm.) Size: 4.5. 7.06 g. Ex German collection. 150 ROMAN GOLD FINGER RING WITH BEZEL SET CARNELIAN INTAGLIO OF ASKLEPIOS god of medicine, holding a staff with a coiled snake, and another god holding a staff. They stand on either side of an altar. 2nd-3rd Century AD. D. 7/8 in. (3.5 cm.) Size: 10 1/2. 3.5 g. Ex German collection. 151 ROMAN GOLD PENDANT SET WITH A GLASS CAMEO OF DIONYSOS with bunches of grapes in his shoulder length hair. 1st Century AD. L. 3/4 in. (2.1 cm.) 1.92 g. Ex German collection.

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152 PAIR OF ROMAN GOLD EAR PENDANTS, each with a granulated rosette suspending a rectangular mottled green glass plaquette with surround suspending a vasiform pendant from which hangs a pearl. 2nd Century AD. L. 2 5/8 in. (6.9 cm.) 9.43 g. Ex German private collection. 153 PAIR OF ROMAN GOLD EAR PENDANTS IN THE FORM OF A CLUSTER OF POMEGRANATES suspended from a hoop and heightened with granulation. 3rd Century AD. L. 2 1/8 in. (5.6 cm.) 13.94 g. Ex German private collection. 154 PAIR OF ROMAN GOLD, PEARL, AND GARNET EAR PENDANTS, each of navicella form fronted by bezel set cabochon garnets; beneath, a row of alternating pearls and garnets from which hang five waisted, tubular gold beads ending in pearls. 3rd -4th Century AD. L. 1 7/8 in. (4.7 cm.) 23.47 g. Ex German collection. 155 PAIR OF ROMAN GOLD EAR PENDANTS, each composed of a frontal dome with a ridged collar below with four pendant spheres forming an inverted pyramid, decorated with lines of granules, on partially plaited wire hoops. 2nd-3rd Century AD. L. 1 1/2 in. (4 cm.) 6 g. Ex English collection.

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156 BYZANTINE GOLD FINGER RING WITH A DOUBLE PORTRAIT OF AN IMPERIAL COUPLE, probably a representation of Justinian and Theodora, within a beaded bezel. Very rare. Later 6th Century AD. D. 3/4 in. (1.9 cm.) 9.74 g. English collection. One of the most important figures of late antiquity, Justinian's rule constitutes a distinct epoch in the history of the Byzantine Empire. The impact of his administration extended far beyond the boundaries of his time and empire. Justinian's reign is marked by the ambitious but ultimately failed renovatio imperii, or restoration of the empire. 157 BYZANTINE CAST GOLD FINGER RING INCISED WITH A CROSS FLANKED BY BIRDS. 6th-9th Century AD. D. 3/4 in. (1.9 cm.) Size: 9 1/2. 26.4 g. Ex German collection. 158 PAIR OF MEROVINGIAN GOLD AND EMERALD GREEN GLASS EARRINGS, Each circular wire with a polyhedron bead decorated with clusters of granulation and set with emerald green glass. Ex German private collection. Cf. Age of the Merovingians -- Europe without Borders, exhibition catalogue, State Hermitage Museum, 2007, p. 284, no. I.1.1. 5th-7th Century AD. D. 2 1/8 in. (5.5 cm.); 28,79g. These are exceptionally large earrings from the Merovingian period in central Europe, more specifically the Rheinland. This pair is in fact one of the largest known of this type. Cf, J. Hubert et al., L'Europe des invasions, Paris, 1967. 159 EARLY BYZANTINE PAIR OF GOLD AND GARNET PEACOCK APPLIQUES Possibly Avar. Exquisitely styled, with gold cloissons surrounding the conformingly carved garnets. 5th-6th Century AD. L. 1 1/8 in. (2.7cm; 2.5 cm. ) Ex German collection.

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160 BYZANTINE BRONZE VOTIVE PLAQUE OF ST. GEORGE HOLDING A CROSS and apparently levitating above a horned altar, all in the form of a wall with four tomb niches, the lower pair with incised palmettes above. The architectural elements are outlined in either tin or silver. 10th-12th Century AD. H. 4 1/4 in. (11 cm ); W. 6 1/8 in. (15.5 cm.) Ex German private collection.

Byz anti ne Art

161 BYZANTINE BRONZE HANGING CROSS suspending two Greek letters from either arm: alpha theta from the left and sigma pi from the right. Another smaller cross hangs from the foot. 6th-8th Century AD. H. 12 3/4 in. (30.5 cm.) Ex French collection 162 BYZANTINE BRONZE PENDANT CROSS Maria orans in the center with busts of the four evangelists in roundels, one on each transcept. 10th-12th Century AD. H. 3 1/2 in. (9 cm ); W. 2 in. (5.2 cm.) Ex German private collection. 163 BYZANTINE REDWARE TILE WITH MOLDED RELIEF OF ST. GEORGE AND THE DRAGON The stylized saint on horseback, the dragon rendered as a snake. 5th-6th Century AD. H. 10 in. (25.5 cm.); W. 8 7/8 in. (22.5 cm.) Ex German private collection, acquired in Cologne in 1970s. Probably from the provences of Africa Proconsularis or Byzancena and used to decorate wooden chests. Cf. Die Welt von Byzanz. Europas รถstliches Erbe, exhibition catalogue, Munich Staatliche Museum, 2004, no. 90.

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Medieva l Art 164 NORTH WESTERN CELTIC (VIKING) BRONZE OPEN-WORK APPLIQUE, lavishly worked to suggest entwined animal forms; small attachment holes. 8th-9th Century AD. W. 1 3/4 in. (4.6 cm.); H. 2 1/4 in. (5.8 cm.) Ex German collection. 165 NORTH WESTERN CELTIC (VIKING) BRONZE OPEN-WORK APPLIQUE, rectangular in form, lavishly worked to depict entwined sea serpents; small attachment holes on the edges. 8th-9th Century AD. L. 5 1/8 in. (13.2 cm.); H. 1 in. (2.5 cm.) Ex German collection. 166 KHAZAR OPENWORK SILVER GILT SQUARE ATTACHMENT centering a female face with a double flip hair style, each side formed from two navettes, a circle between and circles at each corner; four small attachment rings on the back. Ca. 9th Century AD. H. & W. 7/8 in. (2.2 cm.) The Khazars were a semi-nomadic Turkic people who dominated the Pontic steppe and the North Caucasus from the 7th10th century. The name 'Khazar' seems to be tied to a Turkic verb form meaning ‘wandering’. During the 7th century, the Khazars founded an independent Khaganate in the Northern Caucasus along the Caspian Sea. Although the Khazars were initially Tengri shamanists, many of them converted to Christianity, Islam, and other religions. During the eighth or ninth century the state religion became Judaism. At their height, the Khazar khaganate controlled much of what is today southern Russia, eastern Ukraine, Azerbaijan, large portions of the Caucasus (including Circassia, Dagestan, Chechnya, and parts of Georgia), and the Crimea. 167 COLLECTION OF TWENTY-TWO AVAR OPEN-WORK BRONZE ATTACHMENTS including belt tips, buckles, bridle pieces, and scabbard mountings; several pieces depicting animals. 5th-6th Century AD. W. 1-4 in. (2 - 12 cm.) Ex German collection. The Avars were a tribal confederation of Eurasian nomads.

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Egyptian Stone Sculptur es

168 EGYPTIAN OLD KINGDOM LIMESTONE RELIEF OF A MALE showing his upper torso and head wearing a short wig composed of 20 tiers of tight curls. He is bare to the waist and both arms are raised. Vth-VIth Dynasty, ca. 2498-2181 BC. H. 10 1/2 in. (26.7 cm.) Ex American private collection, acquired from Matthias Komor, New York, in the 1960s. 169 EGYPTIAN OLD KINGDOM LIMESTONE BREWER depicted tilted forward over her vat and wearing a long dress and typical wig of the period with a stripe in the middle, letting her hair appear as small wisps on the front of the forehead. Vth-VIth Dynasty, 2498-2181 BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17 cm.) Cf. C. Aldred, Le Temps des pyramides: de la prehistoire aux Hyksos, Paris, 1978, p. 201, no. 198. 170 EGYPTIAN MIDDLE KINGDOM DEEP LIMESTONE BUST OF A DIGNITARY wearing a striated wig and a tight sheath-like garment. His left hand, clutching a palette, is raised to his breast. XI-XII Dynasty, ca. 2133-1715 BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17 cm.) 70 Ex old French collection.


171 EGYPTIAN ASWAN PINK GRANITE HEAD OF RAMESSES III wearing a striped nemes headdress with uraeus. XXth Dynasty, reign of Ramsses III, ca. 1186-1155 BC. H. 10 3/8 in. (26.6 cm.) Formerly the property of a French religious order, Les Intellectuels ChrĂŠtiens, by bequest of Fr. Saint Solieux (d. 1990), who acquired it before 1983. Cf. the portrait in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (Boston 75.10); J. Vandier, La Statuaire Egyptienne, Paris, 1958, pl. CXXX, 2. Ramesses III was the second pharaoh of the 20th Dynasty and is considered to be the last great New Kingdom king to wield any substantial authority over Egypt. He was the son of Setnakht and Queen Tiy-merenese and is believed to have reigned from 1186 to 1155 BC. During his long tenure in the midst of the surrounding political chaos of the Greek Dark Ages, Egypt was beset by foreign invaders. In Year 8 of his reign the Sea Peoples invaded Egypt. Ramesses III defeated them in two great land and sea battles. He built important additions to the temples at Luxor and Karnak, and his funerary temple and administrative complex at Medinet-Habu is amongst the largest and best-preserved in Egypt; however, the uncertainty of Ramesses' times is apparent from the massive fortifications which were built to enclose the latter. Thanks to the discovery of the papyrus trial transcripts, it is now known that there was a plot against his life as a result of a royal harem conspiracy during a celebration at Medinet Habu. The conspiracy was instigated by Tey, one of his two principal wives, over whose son would inherit the throne. It is not known if the assassination plot succeeded, however, for he died before the summaries of the sentences were composed. In one respect the conspirators certainly failed. The crown passed to the designated successor, Ramesses IV. The mummy of Ramesses III was discovered in 1886 in the Royal Cache at Dier el Bahari along with many of his illustrious predecessors including Ramesses II. His tomb (KV11) is one of the largest in the Valley of the Kings.

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172 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM LIMESTONE RELIEF OF AMUN-RE OR AMON, the principal god of Egypt in the New Kingdom, for whom the great complex of Karnak at Thebes was built; traces of blue paint. XIXth Dynasty, ca. 1293-1185 BC. W. 11 in. (28 cm.); H. 10 3/8 in. (26.5 cm.) Ex A. Dufour collection before 1953; Barbier-Mueller collection, Geneva, Switzerland. 173 EGYPTIAN MIDDLE KINGDOM LIMESTONE HEADREST IN THE FORM OF A PYLON or temple entrance. On the sides in faint black and red line drawings are depicted several figures and a hieroglyphic text. XI-XIIth Dynasty, ca. 2133 - 1790 BC. H. 8 1/4 in. ( 21.5 cm ); W. 9 3/8 in. (24 cm); D. 4 7/8 in. (12.3 cm.) An unusual form for a headrest. 174 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM LIMESTONE RELIEF A priest stands before a dais on which Osiris is enthroned, behind him Isis holds an ankh, her left arm raised in worship. The priest pours a libation on a low table which is in front of a tall offering table on the dais; hieroglyphic text above the figures. XIXth Dynasty, ca.1293-1185 BC. H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm.); L. 14 1/2 in. (37 cm.) Ex French collection.

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175 EGYPTIAN GREENISH-GRAY GREYWACKE SACRED TRIAD OF HORUS, OSIRIS AND ISIS, from a statue of a kneeling naosphoros with a column of hieroglyphic text incised on the back pillar: Master of Secrets, Ruler of the Temple, Chief of the Grainary, Nome 12 (Hebyt). Osiris wears an atef-crown and carries the royal crook and flail, the falcon-headed Horus wears the Double Crown (pschent), and Isis wears a horned solar disk. XXVIth Dynasty, 664-525 BC. H. 12 1/4 in.(31.1 cm.); W. 4 3/4 in.(12.1 cm.); D. 9 1/2 in. (24.1 cm.) Ex Florida collection; private collection, Westlake Village, California. 176 EGYPTIAN SANDSTONE RAISED RELIEF OF OSIRIS ENTHRONED He wears an elaborate Atef-crown and holds an ankh in his right hand. Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. H. 16 1/8 in. (41 cm.) Ex M. Maspero, Paris; Belgian private collection; R. G. collection, Basel, Switzerland, acquired in 1995. 177 EGYPTIAN LIMESTONE TRIAL PIECE: BUST OF A PHARAOH wearing a tripartite nemes with a uraeus fronting the brow. Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.6 cm.) Ex French collection.

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178 EGYPTIAN LIMESTONE MASK FROM AN ANTHROPOID SARCOPHAGUS depicted beardless with prominent ears, wearing a bag wig. Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. H. 10 1/4 in. (26 cm.); W. 19 3/4 in. (50.2 cm.) Ex French collection. 179 EGYPTIAN LIMESTONE MASK FROM AN ANTHROPOID SARCOPHAGUS Ptolemaic Period 305-30 BC H. 19 5/8 in. (33 cm.); W. 13 in. (33 cm.) Ex French collection. 180 EGYPTIAN LIMESTONE MASK FROM AN ANTHROPOID SARCOPHAGUS wearing a head cloth or wig tucked behing his ears. Ptolemaic Period 305-30 BC. H. 11 3/4 in. ( 30 cm ); W. 13 1/8 in. (34 cm) Ex German private collection, acquired in the 1970s.

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E gyptian B ron ze Scu lp tu res 181 EGYPTIAN BRONZE NEITH, the goddess striding on an integral plinth, wearing the Red Crown of Lower Egypt with two uraei, and a long sheath, a bead necklace, armbands, and wristbands; a votive hieroglyphic inscription requesting life on the base. Late Dynastic Period, 664-342 BC. H. 10 3/4 in. (27.5 cm.) Ex collection of H. Hoffman. sold by Maurice Delestre, May 16,1895 to Charles Gillot; thence by descent. 182 EGYPTIAN BRONZE BASTET, cat-headed goddess of women and joy, holding an aegis in her left hand and a sistrum in her right hand. Late Period, 712-30 BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Ex collection of Jürg Marquard, Herrliberg, Switzerland. Cf. G. Roeder, Bronzefiguren, Mitteilungen aus der Ägyptischen Sammlung, VI, 1956, pp. 266-272, pl. 39f; S.SchoskeD. Wildung, Gott und Götter im Alten Ägypten, exhibition catalogue, Berlin, 1992, p. 14, no. 4. 183 EGYPTIAN BRONZE SITULA decorated with a relief frieze of seven deities above relief metopes of animals. Late Dynastic Period, 664-332 BC. H. 5 5/8 in. (14.5 cm.) Ex collection of Prof. Martin Eduard Winkler (1892-1982), thence by descent.

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184 IMPORTANT EGYPTIAN BRONZE KNEELING PHARAOH wearing the nemes, an usekh necklace, and the shendyt-kilt; he is holding his right hand on his chest and his left forearm in an upright position. The attitude is the henu pose, a traditional gesture expressing jubilation. Very rare. XXVIth Dynasty 664-525 BC. H. 11 3/4 in. (29.8 cm) Ex Hélène Servais collection, Brussels, acquired in 1935.

Only four other kings in this pose are known to us. Three are listed by Josephson; see: J.A. Josephson, Egyptian Royal Sculpture of the Late Period, 400-246 BC, Mainz, 1997, pp. 33-39, pl. 12; one in Paris (ex Hoffmann collection), bronze, H. 6 1/8 in. (15.5 cm); one in the British Museum (BM 11496, bronze, no measurement); and the one in his own collection (ex de Béhague collection, now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art), wood. H. 8 1/4 in. (21 cm). Cf. M. Hill, Royal Bronze Statuary from Ancient Egypt, Leiden, 2004. The fourth, a 9 3/8 in. (23.8 cm.) bronze dated to the XXVth Dynasty and from the collection of Roger Fernand Galliano, is now in a private collection.

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185 HIGHLY IMPORTANT LARGE EGYPTIAN BRONZE STATUE OF A PRIESTESS OF AMUN with inlaid stone eyes and separately cast short wig of tiny layered locks of hair. Her attached arms are outstretched, probably to hold two sistra (musical rattles). She retains her original gold necklace and remains of gold leaf on her wig. XXIInd Dynasty, 945-715 BC. H. 37 in. (94 cm) including her restored feet and ankles.

This was probably one of the several large bronze statues found in the Temple of Amun at Karnak in the early 19th Century. One of the two largest examples; the other is heavily restored. This is the only one in private hands; the others are in museums in Athens, Berlin, Leiden, London, and Paris. The Louvre acquired theirs in 1829. Ex S.O.S. collection, Basel, Switzerland, acquired in the late 1950s; J.A.L. collection, Chesterfield, Virginia. Doubtless, one of the most important Egyptian works of art to appear on the art market in a generation!

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Egyptian Wood & Carto nnage 186 EGYPTIAN WOOD ANTHROPOID SARCOPHAGUS, the painted face with a false beard and a tripartite striped wig, the body painted black with hieroglyphs in yellow. XXVIth Dynasty, 664-525 BC. H. 68 1/8 in. (173 cm.) Ex collection of Prof. Martin Eduard Winkler (1892-1982), thence by descent. 187 EGYPTIAN POLYCHROME WOOD SARCOPHAGUS LID, the red face with a striped tripartite wig with a red band. The body is decorated with numerous vignettes from the Book of the Dead; foot lacking. XXth-XVth Dynasty, 1070-715 BC. H. 73 1/4 in. (186 cm.) Ex French collection. 188 EGYPTIAN WOOD PTAH-SOKEROSIRIS, WHO represented the soil and its power to create life; mummiform. Late Period, 712-30 BC. H. 17 5/8 in. (45 cm.) Ex French collection

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189 EGYPTIAN WOOD MASK AND FRONTLET, the painted face with a false beard and a tripartite striped wig,the frontlet painted black with hieroglyphs in yellow. XXVIth Dynasty, 664-525 BC. H. 52 in. (132 cm.) Ex collection of Prof. Martin Eduard Winkler (1892-1982), thence by descent. 190 EGYPTIAN PAINTED WOOD COFFIN PANEL depicting the profile figure of Nut or the Goddess of the West wearing a close fitting sheath with a vertical wave pattern in alternating red and black paint, a tripartite wig fronted by a lotus and surmounted by a hieroglyph for bread. Late Ptolemaic Period, 1st Century BC. H. 43 1/2 in. (101 cm.) W. 21 in. (53.5 cm.) Ex private collection, San Francisco. 191 EGYPTIAN POLYCHROME WOOD MUMMY MASK with a broad collar, a false beard with curled tip, and a striated tripartite wig, a fragmentary winged scarab on top. XXVth-XXVIth Dynasty, 750-525 BC. H. 22 1/2 in. (57.1 cm.) Ex Japanese private collection acquired in Switzerland in 1974. Published: Kokusai Bijutsu, Ltd., Tokyo, 2nd Exhibition Catalogue, 1974, no. 16, illustrated.

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192 EGYPTIAN POLYCHROME CARTONNAGE MUMMY MASK WITH GILT FACE, wearing a tripartite headcloth and a false beard. Later Ptolemaic Period, 2nd-1st Century BC. H. 12 1/2 in. (31.8 cm.) Ex Prof. Alcibiades Okonomides collection, Chicago, Illinois, acquired before 1970. 193 EGYPTIAN POLYCHROME AND GILT CARTONNAGE MUMMY MASK, wearing a tripartite black head cloth, a human-headed scarab with out spread wings, and holding a sun disk fronting the brow. Retaining nearly all the original red, blue, black, and white pigment and original gilding of the flesh. Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. H. 15 3/8 in. (39 cm.) Ex French collection. 194 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM WOOD FURNITURE LEG: LION PROTOME, the head with sunken eyes, a broad flat nose, incised whiskers and rounded ears, with the curving locks of the mane beneath the jaw; the flattened front with two legs below, the forepaws with long arching claws; retaining an old collection number painted in red '06.280'. Ca. 1550-1070 BC. H. 13 1â „2 in. (34.5 cm.) For an almost identical example, compare to an excavated pair in the Egyptian Museum, Turin, also dated as New Kingdom. Ex private American collection, formerly the Blanchard Collection, Cairo, 1906; the Toledo Museum of Art, deaccessioned in 1993.

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Egyptian Faience 195 EGYPTIAN MIDDLE KINGDOM TURQUOISE FAIENCE HIPPOPOTAMUS, the embodiment of the god Set, the bringer of desert storms. His head is turned to his left, jaws agape; details added in black paint. Very rare. XIth-XIIth Dynasty, ca. 2133-1715 BC. H. 2 1/8 in. (5.4 cm); L. 2 1/4 in. (5.7 cm.) Ex Fouquet collection, Paris, ca. 1922. 196 EGYPTIAN GREEN FAIENCE AMULET OF SHU, THE SKY GOD, his head topped by by the solar disc, his arms raised, and his right knee touching the ground. Late Period, 712-30 BC. H. 2 3/8 in. (6 cm.) Ex collection of H. Hoffman sold by Maurice Delestre, May 14, 1895, to Charles Gillot; thence by descent.

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Egyptian Ushabtis 197 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE USHABTI OF NESBANEBDJED, Lord of Mendes, mummiform and holding hoes and a seed basket. With twelve incised registers of hieroglyphic text setting forth his name and title as well as the ushabti spell from Chapter VI of the Book of the Dead. Late Period, 712-30 BC. H. 8 in. (20.4 cm) Ex French collection. 198 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM POLYCHROME WOOD USHABTI OF BAK-EN-KHONSOU, Prophet of Amon, mummiform, holding hoes and a seed basket; a column of hieroglyphic text on the front. XIXth Dynasty, ca.1293-1185 BC. H. 8 in. (20.5 cm.) Ex French collection. 199 EGYPTIAN GREEN FAIENCE USHABTI, mummiform and holding hoes and a seed basket. With twelve incised registers of hieroglyphic text setting forth his name and title as well as the ushabti spell from the Book of the Dead. XXVIth Dynasty, 664-525 BC. H. 8 1/4 in. (21 cm) Ex French collection. 200 EGYPTIAN BRIGHT BLUE FAIENCE USHABTI with details in black, including the striped wig, hoes and seed basket; the front inscribed with hieroglyphs. XXIst Dynasty, ca. 1085-935 BC. H. 3 1â „2 in. (9 cm.) From the 2nd Cache at Deir el-Bahri, acquired in Egypt in 1912 by Doris Newbery, a relative of the Egyptologist Theodore M. Davis. Formerly on loan to the Yale University Art Gallery, 1948.

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201 EGYPTIAN OLD KINGDOM SPECKLED BLACK AND WHITE GRANITE CUP Ca. 2686-2181 BC. Diam. 6 1/4 in. (16 cm.) Ex French collection. 202 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM POTTERY JAR molded with four heads of Hathor imitating amulets, including two human heads of Hathor, her hair centrally parted and terminating in curls, wearing a collar on her long neck; alternating with heads of the cow-headed Hathor wearing a similar wig. XIXth Dynasty, ca. 1295-1070 BC. H. 4 1â „2 in. (11 cm.) Ex English collection. 203 EGYPTIAN FRAGMENTARY POTTERY MASK FROM A SINAITIC SARCOPHAGUS. New Kingdom, ca. 1570-1070 BC. H. 8 1/4 in. (21 cm) Ex collection of Josef Mueller, acquired before 1940; Barbier-Mueller collection, Geneva, Switzerland. 204 EGYPTIAN POLYCHROME TERRACOTTA NUDE ISIS, a double rolled fillet upon her head topped with stylized buds and a horned solar disk, The white body color heightened with orange, black, and rose pigments. Roman Period, 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 9 1/2 in. (24 cm.) Ex French collection.

Egyptian Varia

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Near Eastern Antiqu ities

205 NORTH SYRIAN BRONZE BOWL, the interior with a relief frieze showing two hunters wearing knobbed helmets, crouching on one knee before a lion and human-headed winged lion, a second lion attacked from either side by bulls. The central tondo with concentric rosette motifs bordered by a petal meander; floral plants within the field. Very rare. Ca. 700 BC. D. 13 1⠄4 in. (33.7 cm.) Ex European private collection, acquired in 1980. For a similar but smaller example in the collection of the Princeton University Art Museum, see. J. M. Padgett, The Centaur’s Smile - The Human Animal in Early Greek Art, 2003, pp. 124-126, no.9.

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206 WESTERN ASIATIC BRONZE DISK A bearded adorant wearing a long hairdo stands on a ground line and raises his hands in worship towards a large six-pointed star, a winged solar disc, a crescent moon, and the Pleiades (believed to be the home of Osiris); probably from a mirror. 7th Century BC. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.7 cm) Ex French collection. A very rare subject. It has been suggested by Dr. Andis Kaulins that it represents the Archilochus’ Eclipse of 6 April 647 BC. 207 WESTERN ASIATIC BRONZE MIRROR set with six gold figures of running ibexes with back-curving horns. their forelegs outstretched. Earlier 1st Millennium BC. Diam. 4 1⠄2 in (11.5 cm.) Rare. Ex Australian private collection, formed in the 1940s through the 1970s; thence by descent. 208 PHOENICIAN BRONZE CHALCOPHONE; the musical instrument composed of eleven coiled wire tubes and twin sounding bars, each bar with fifteen attachment holes and terminal spiral resonators, and four separate fragmentary attachment wires. 8th-6th Century BC. W. 7 1/8 in. (18.3 cm.) Ex French collection. The tubes would have been joined to the sounding bars by wooden pegs which the coiled wire tubes would have been wound around. Examples have been found in South Italian and Phoenician contexts dating from the 8th-6th Century BC. Similar instruments in later form appear on Apulian red-figure pottery.

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209 SYRO-PALESTINIAN BRONZE NUDE GODDESS standing with her braceleted arms at her side and wearing a broad collar. Her centrally parted, long, straight hair with two braids framing the face and another down the center at the back of her head. Very rare. Late 2nd Millennium BC. H. 8 in. (20.3 cm.) 91 Ex collection of an American diplomat, acquired between 1962-67.


210 ANATOLIAN BRONZE SCHEMATIC MALE IDOL wearing a pointed cap, a snake dangling from his right hand. Rare. Ca. 2nd Millennium BC. H. 4 1/8 in. (10.5 cm.) Ex German collection. 211 KOBAN CULTURE BRONZE AXE HEAD WITH A SPOTTED HOUND INCISED ON THE BLADE and three bands of zig-zags separated by two lines farther up the blade. Colchis, 8th-6th Century BC. L. 6 5/8 in. ( 17 cm ) Rare. Cf: On the way to the Golden Fleece. Archaeological Findings from Georgia, exhibition catalogue, Munich Staatliche Museum, 1995, p. 284, no. 230, pl. 107f. Fine style. Ex German private collection. 212 SYRO-PHOENICIAN POTTERY GROUP: BIRTHING GROUP OF THREE WOMEN. The mother stands supported by another from behind. The third sits in front of the mother holding the newly born infant. 5th-4th Century BC H. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.); L. 6 3/4 in. (17.2 cm.) Cf. Katz, Kahane, Broshi, From The Beginning, Archaeology and Art in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, pg. 93, no. 80, for a similar pregnant female figure found in the Akhziv excavations, but not a group. An extremely rare type, perhaps unique. 213 SYRO-HITTITE POTTERY VESSEL. Ovoid body with funnel-shaped neck and two strap handles between shoulder and neck. A lion’s head with details in high relief is applied to one side between two additional handles terminating in relief claws; on the other side is the tail. Earlier 1st Millennium BC. H. 6 1/8 in. (15.5 cm.) The so-called Syro-Hittite or post-Hittite states were Luwian-speaking political entities of Iron Age Syria that arose after the collapse of the Hittite Empire around 1180 BC and lasted until roughly 700 BC, the time of the Cimmerian invasion.

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214 PROTO-HISTORIC WHITE MARBLE ELEPHANT of stylized form, naively modeled standing on four stout legs, the back rounded, a small tail between the hind legs, with coiled ears, the trunk, now missing, flanked by two recessed channels with drill holes on either side. Ca. 3400-3000 BC. L. 2 1â „8 in. (5.4 cm.) Cf. D. N. Adams et al., When Orpheus Sang, An Ancient Bestiary, Paris, 2004, p. 41, fig. 26. 215 EARLY BRONZE AGE LARGE TERRACOTTA IDOL OF A SEATED MAN Schematically rendered with elbows bent, and slit eyes inlaid with green stone. Indus Valley, ca. 2800-2600 BC. H. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.) Ex German collection. Rare in this size. 216 BACTRIAN TERRACOTTA GROUP: TWO EQUESTRIAN ACROBATS Said to have been found in Uzbekistan. 2nd Millennium BC. L. 9 3/8 in. (24 cm.) Very rare. 217 SOUTH ARABIAN BRONZE VOTIVE OF A PRAYING YOUTH He wears a long tunic on which is incised a Sabean inscription. Rare. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Ex German collection.

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his objects of art, rather than depositing them in a vault or holding receipts. Also, art is not as volatile as stocks and bonds, the coin, gem, and collectibles markets, and especially the gold and silver markets. Sylvia Porter in her New Money Book recommends classical antiquities as one of the best types of art for rapid growth. Dr Eisenberg was first quoted on the investment value of ancient art in the February 9, 1966 issue of Newsday - over 40 years ago! - and most recently in Business Week.

Why Collect Ancient Art? There are several reasons for collecting fine works of ancient art: • The excitement of owning a beautiful work of art that has survived for perhaps some 2,000 years or more. • The decoration of one's home or office with unique objects whose beauty and desirability have withstood the test of time. • The creative satisfaction, enjoyment, and pride in forming a truly fine collection. • The probable appreciation in value.

Royal-Athena Galleries Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., the founder and director of Royal-Athena Galleries, is usually at the New York gallery and visits the London gallery several times each year. He is available by appointment for consultation, expertise, and appraisals; or for a telephone conference. At no obligation he will arrange a private viewing with guidance on a sophisticated long term program of collecting and investing in the fine arts. He also is in attendance at all the fairs in which we exhibit. Over the past 50 years we have sold more than 600 works of ancient art to many of the country's leading museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Sackler Art Museum at Harvard University, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Princeton University Art Museum, the Newark Museum, the Walters Art Gallery, the Detroit lnstitute of Arts, the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Milwaukee Public Museum, the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the J. Paul Getty Museum, as well as the British Museum, the Louvre, and a large number of museums in Canada, Belgium, Germany, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, Australia, and Japan. The catalogs of classical marble sculptures from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and from the J. Paul Getty Museum illustrate no less than 39 pieces acquired from our galleries. In addition, over one thousand objects purchased from us have been donated to many other museums, including the Freer Gallery of Art, the Sackler Gallery (The Smithsonian Institution), and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Dr. Eisenberg travels overseas several times annually to visit collectors, museums, clients, and many of the nearly 150 private sources, agents, dealers, and auction houses with whom he is in frequent contact. Since 1954 he has made over 200 overseas trips, purchasing over forty thousand antiquities for tens of millions of dollars. This aggressive purchasing policy, perhaps without parallel in the field, enables us to offer an extraordinary number of choice objects at very reasonable prices. Our willingness to buy in volume and to purchase our inventory outright, rather than to take it on consignment, results in extremely competitive pricing, often considerably below that of other galleries. Furthermore, exchanges and purchases are fre-

How to Collect Ancient Art Sylvia Porter lists ten sound rules as a guide in art collecting: 1. Study the field which interests you as much as possible. 2. Buy cautiously at first. 3. Make sure that your work of art has quality. 4. Deal with a top gallery or art dealer. “Some dealers and major galleries will guarantee the authenticity of the art works they sell, so check this point as well." (Not only have we been guaranteeing our ancient art for over fifty years, but to the best of our knowledge our two-day auction sale conducted by Parke-Bernet Galleries (now Sotheby's) in 1964 was the first auction sale by several years in which every piece was guaranteed - but by us!) 5. Have an understanding with your dealer or gallery about trading up - so he’ll repurchase or resell your works as you have more money to invest in high quality art. (We normally allow full credit for the exchange or upgrading of objects purchased from us.) 6. Do not buy art works just because they are a current rage. 7. Ask the advice of museum directors or curators whenever possible. 8. Decide upon your investing limit before you buy. If you fall in love with a more expensive object try to arrange for a time payment. (We certainly encourage this and offer flexible time payments!) 9. Spread your financial risks by buying a variety of art unless you are an expert in a particular field. 10. “Buy the best examples you can afford in any category.” We would add two other important rules: 11. Ask for the provenance of any potential acquisitions. 12. Do not buy objects that have been significantly restored. Beware of overly restored faces in both vase painting and sculpture.

Ancient Art as an lnvestment Historically, ancient art investments have yielded excellent long-term capital appreciation, usually 8% to 10% annually. Any investment in tangibles, especially works of art, should be projected for at least five to ten vears. Normally one should not hold more than 10% of their investment portfolio in art. Collecting fine art is a pleasurable way of hedging against inflation because the investor can enjoy

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quently made from many past and present clients who may be upgrading their collections or liquidating some of their holdings in order to collect in other areas. Exchanges or purchases are sometimes carried out with museums both in the United States and in Europe for their duplicate accessions or for objects not in their recent or current fields of specialization.

Expertise and Ethics Ancient art has been the specialty of our director for some 54 years, and numismatics for 66 years. His many publications on ancient art and numismatics span over five decades. The first volume of Art of the Ancient World by Dr. Eisenberg was published in 1965. Since 1968 Dr. Eisenberg has concentrated on expertise in the ancient arts, having lectured on this subject at New York University and presented several scholarly papers at the annual meetings of the Archaeological Institute of America, most recently on the ‘Roman’ Rubens Vase. His wide range of expertise is further revealed through other recent papers: on Egyptian bronzes at a Congress of the International Association of Egyptologists, on Etruscan bronze forgeries at an International Bronze Congress, on the ‘Greek’ Boston and Ludovisi thrones at the Magna Graecia Symposium in Venice, on Roman bronze forgeries at the 1999 International Bronze Congress, and on the Portland Vase as a Renaissance work of art at the 2003 International Congress of Classical Archaeology. In 1996 he was a Visiting Professor at the Institute of Classical Archaeology of the University of Leipzig, Germany. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Numismatic Society in 1952; a member of the Archaeological Institute of America in 1960 (and a Life Member in 1988); a Patron of the American Numismatic Society in 1955 (and a Life Associate in 1998); a Fellow for Life of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1966; and most recently, a Benefactor of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and an Honorary Fellow of the Egyptian Museum in Barcelona, Spain. Dr. Eisenberg has appeared as an Expert in the Courts of several states and has conducted appraisals for the U.S. Internal Revenue Service, the U.S. Treasury Department, the U.S. Customs Service, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the J. Paul Getty Museum, as well as many other prominent institutions. He was elected a Qualified Appraiser by the Appraisers Association of America in 1964 and has recently participated in several episodes of the Antiques Road Show. He served on the vetting committee of the European Fine Art Fair at Maastricht from 1993 to 2001 and was the Chairman and coorganizer of the New York Antiquarian International Fine Art Fair held in November 2001. Dr. Eisenberg has been a leader for several years in the promotion of the ethical acquisition of antiquities by museums and collectors and has delivered papers on this subject at the Archaeology Section of the U.K. Institute for Conservation in 1993 and at the 1998 International Congress of Classical Arch-

aeologists. He gave an address by invitation on the international trade in antiquities at the UNIDROIT Convention in Rome in 1993. He organized two symposia in New York in 1994 on public policy and the movement of antiquities and in 1998 on the acquisition of antiquities by museums for the International Association of Dealers in Ancient Art, of which he is a founding member and was a member of the executive board from 1993 to 2002. In 1999 he presented testimony to the United States Cultural Properties Committee on the legal and illegal trade in ancient art in Italy. In 2003 he was a featured speaker and panel participant in the U.S. Government Conference on Stolen Mideast Antiquities in Washington, D.C. Also in 2003 he featured on the European TV channel Arte and on BBC Radio’s File on Four in indepth interviews on the antiquities trade. He appeared on television on CBS News, Dateline NBC, PBS Jim Lehrer News Hour, and CBC Television (Canada), and was interviewed on the BBC and PBR Radio, and in print in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, Philadelphia Inquirer, Washington Post, The Times, and a dozen other publications. In 2004 he was featured on a Discovery Channel program and on Fox News on the antiquities trade. Also in 2004 he presented a paper on ‘The Mesopotamian Antiquities Trade and the Looting of the Iraq Museum’ to the American Bar Association. In 2005 he was interviewed on the antiquities market and the collecting of antiquities on National Public Radio in the US and in 2006 on National Public Television in Athens, Greece. In 2007 he delivered a paper on ‘Perspectives on the Antiquities Trade and the Collector: Past, Present, and Future’ at the symposium ‘The Future of the Global Past’ at Yale University. He was interviewed in depth for his expertise on Greek television in 2008.

Ancient Coins We carry a fine stock of select Greek silver coins from $100, Roman gold coins from $1,000, and Roman silver and bronze coins from $100. We began our business as ‘Royal Coin Company’ in January 1942, 67 years ago, and Dr Eisenberg, cofounder of the firm, has specialized in ancient coins, as sole proprietor, since 1952.

Acknowledgements Dr. Eisenberg wishes to express his gratitude to F. Williamson Price who has again diligently prepared and co-authored the catalog, to Brent M. Ridge who did nearly all of the photography, to the scholars who attributed and reattributed some of the sculptures and vases, especially Kees Neeft, Konrad Schauenburg, and Cornelius C. Vermeule, and to the several others who prefer to remain anonymous.

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Our website has been greatly improved and expanded as may be seen by the partial page of Attic vases illustrated below. It is now updated weekly with new acquisitions and features over 1000 antiquities! We invite you to become a regular visitor.

Wanted to Purchase: Fine Antiquities of All Periods We are prepared to travel world-wide to acquire select works of legally acquired ancient art for our continually expanding clientele. We will purchase collections of any size, act as your agent to sell your objects on commission, or exchange them for other select pieces from our extensive inventory. Send photographs and full details with your letter or e-mail.

International Association of Dealers in Ancient Art

Confederation Internationale des Negociants en Oeuvres d’Art

Art and Antique Dealers League

Appraisers Association of America

MINERVA Minerva, the bi-monthly, international review of ancient art, archaeology, and numismatics, published in England, was established by Dr Eisenberg, its publisher and editor-in-chief, in 1990. It features the most extensive and timely coverage by any magazine of worldwide excavations and exhibitions emphasizing Greece, Etruria, the Roman Empire, Egypt, and the Near East. The book reviews are concise and objective. It also includes the most extensive annotated listings of international museum exhibitions, meetings, and symposia in ancient art and archaeology. Sample copies: $8 or £4 postpaid. www.minervamagazine.com Subscription (6 issues per year):

U.S.A., Canada, and rest of world:

U.K.: 1 year £21, 2 years £39, 5 years £90. Europe: 1 year £23, 2 years £44, 5 years £100.

Surface: 1 year $50, 2 years $90, 5 years $220. Air: 1 year $66, 2 years $122, 5 years $296.

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Recent Royal-Athena Catalogs: • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XV, 2004) illustrates in full color 190 objects. (72 pages, $5) • Gods & Mortals: Bronzes of the Ancient World (2004, illustrates in full color 80 objects, 80 pages, $5) • Ancient Arms, Armor, and Images of Warfare (2004, illustrates in full color 100 objects, 48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVI, 2005, illustrates in full color 192 objects, 80 pages, $5) • Mythologies of the Classical World & Ancient Egypt (2006, 48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVII, 2006, illustrates in full color 233 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVIII, 2007, illustrates in full color 259 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIX, 2008, illustrates in full color 222 objects, 96 pages, $5) • All 8 of the above catalogs (total list price $40), with price lists: $30. (Add $50 for overseas airmail.)

Other Royal-Athena Catalogs Available • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. IV, 1985) illustrates in full color over 600 works of art. 208 pages, 192 color plates: $15 • The Age of Cleopatra: The Art of Late Dynastic Graeco-Roman Egypt (1988) illustrates in full color 151 selected works of art. (32 pages, $5) • Gods & Mortals: Bronzes of the Ancient World (1989) illustrates in full color 180 objects. (52 pages, $5) • One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases from Greece, Etruria, & Southern Italy (1990) illustrates in full color 186 vases. (48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. VIII, 1995) illustrates in full color 244 objects. (48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. IX, 1997) illustrates in full color 264 objects. (64 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. X, 1999) illustrates in full color 264 objects. (64 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XI, 2000) illustrates in full color 167 objects. (64 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XII, 2001) illustrates in full color 410 objects; 30 pages of glossaries and mythologies. (161 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIII, 2002) illustrates in full color 203 objects. (80 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIV, 2003) illustrates

in full color 225 objects. (80 pages, $5) • A number of the objects in the last several catalogs are still available. Price lists will be included. • All 11 of the above catalogs, 1985 through 2003 (total list price $70), only $50. (Add $50 for overseas airmail.) Orders for our catalogs may be charged to your credit card. Trade lnquiries We cordially invite inquiries from fellow art dealers, art consultants, architects, interior designers, and institutional collectors and investors. Special Presentations, Condition Reports, and Color Photographs of Objects We can supply special presentations with further information, such as condition reports, and 4 x 6 in. (10x15 cm.) or 8 x 10 in. (20x25 cm.) color photographs, often with other views or close-ups, on any of the objects illustrated in this catalog upon request. A selection of photographs may also be viewed at our London gallery or at the various fairs. Conservation and Mounting Services A professional conservator, Alina Bessarabova, working on our premises in New York, does expert conservation and restoration of ancient art and antiques. A same-day or a one day service is available for an additional charge. Small metal and wood mountings and bases are custom made but due to insurance restrictions this work is usually limited to objects purchased from us. We are pleased to accept trade accounts. Terms and Conditions of Sale All items are offered subject to prior sale. All prices are subject to change without notice, however, the current price list is valid through 2008. The following credit cards are honored: American Express,Visa, Mastercard. A deferred payment plan is also available. New York residents must add the appropriate sales taxes (currently 8 5/8%). No cash refunds may be made after 10 days of receipt; however, full credit is allowed on all objects purchased from our galleries with the exception of a few consigned items. All shipping and insurance charges will be billed to the purchaser. Title remains with RoyalAthena Galleries until payment is made in full.

royal-athena galleries established 1942 Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., Director

London (Seaby Antiquities)

New York Richard M. Novakovich Betty W. Eisenberg Suzanne George Brent M. Ridge Arkady Roytman Alina Bessarabova Andrew England

F. Williamson Price, Associate Director

Assistant Director & Manager Comptroller Office Manager Photographer Webmaster Conservator Intern

Mark Merrony, Ph.D. Gallery Manager; Editor, Minerva Consulting Editor, Peter Clayton Minerva Tony Curran Minerva Webmaster Intern Bianca Zonta


royal-athena galleries new york

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Royal-Athena Galleries, Art of the Ancient World, Volume XX - 2009