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CHUCKWAGON Saturday, June 16 * Gates open at 6 pm

* Chuckwagons at 7 pm

* Beer Gardens Open

* Night Cabaret - Julian Austin, 9pm–1am, at the Western Financial Arena

Sunday, June 17 * Gates open at 3 pm

* Chuckwagons at 4 pm

* Beer Gardens Open

Friday, June 22 * Gates open at 5 pm * Beer Gardens Open

* Rodeo at 6 pm * Bull Riding under Chuckwagons to follow the Lights

Saturday, June 23 * Gates open at 5 pm * Beer Gardens Open

* Rodeo at 6 pm * Bull Riding under * Chuckwagons to follow the Lights

* Night Cabaret - Julian Austin, 9pm–1am, at the Western Financial Arena

Sunday, June 24 * Gates open at 1 pm

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* Rodeo at 2:30 pm * Beer Gardens Open * Bull Riding * Chuckwagons to follow

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Chuckwagon Drivers Kurt Bensmiller Jerry Bremner Colt Cosgrave Rae Croteau Jr. Cliff Cunningham Troy Dorchester Jordie Fike Darcy Flad Troy Flad Rick Fraser Dave Galloway Jason Glass

Gary Gorst Logan Gorst Chad Harden Tim Haroldson Barry Hodgson Doug Irvine Jason Johnstone Reg Johnstone Larry MacGillivray Codey McCurrach Roger Moore Obrey Motowylo

Grant Profit Cody Ridsdale Evan Salmond Hugh Sinclair Kelly Sutherland Kirk Sutherland Mark Sutherland Mitch Sutherland Luke Tournier Chanse Vigen Mike Vigen John Walters

Chuckwagon History Although there are many legends pertaining to the history of chuckwagon racing, all seem to be some variation of the following: Back in the dusty days of old, cowboys lived and cooked out of the back of their chuckwagons that would accompany the cattle drives. Each cook would be responsible for feeding a dozen or so cowboys. The faster the chuckwagon got to the next campsite (best sites were closest to the water source) the faster the cowboys assigned to that wagon would get to eat. Naturally, bets and challenges would ensue. On occasion, to speed up the process, a few cowboys might even assist the cook and the night wrangler in loading the stove and cook tent, hence the ‘outriders’ who follow their wagon around the track in today’s Chuckwagon Race.

Chuckwagon Basics

Each chuckwagon is pulled by four horses (an outfit), and is accompanied by two outriders. There are four wagons in each race (heat). When the starting horn sounds, one outrider (the leaderman) releases the lead team; the other throws a rubber tub (stove) in the back of the charging chuckwagon before both riders mount their horses. Each wagon and its outriders must cut a figure 8 pattern around their respective barrels. They then proceed to race around the track. A chuckwagon’s running time ends when the nose of its first horse crosses the finish line. Each outrider must finish within 150 feet of its wagon or the driver will be penalized one second per late rider. Final times are tabulated based on running times plus any penalties incurred during the race (i.e. 1 second penalty for a false start, 5 seconds for knocking over a barrel). In this sport, penalty seconds can cost drivers thousands of dollars, and in some cases, championships.

Heat Sponsors #1

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RODEO Friday, June 22 * Gates open at 5 pm * Rodeo starts at 6 pm * Beer Gardens Open

* Ladies Barrel Racing * Bareback * Tie Down Roping * Steer Wrestling

* Saddle Bronc * Team Roping * Bull Riding under the Lights

* Ladies Barrel Racing * Bareback * Tie Down Roping * Steer Wrestling

* Saddle Bronc * Team Roping * Bull Riding under the Lights

Saturday, June 23 * Gates open at 5 pm * Rodeo starts at 6 pm * Beer Gardens Open

* Night Cabaret - Julian Austin, 9pm–1am, at the Western Financial Arena

Sunday, June 24 * Gates open at 2 pm * Ladies Barrel Racing * Rodeo starts at 2:30 pm * Bareback * Beer Gardens Open * Tie Down Roping * Steer Wrestling

* Saddle Bronc * Team Roping * Bull Riding under the Lights

Rodeo History From the earliest days, ranch hands have challenged one another at everyday tasks (similar to today’s Ranch Rodeo). The first rodeos saw top horsebreakers from various ranches ride to see who could ‘stick’ a bronc the longest, while ropers tossed loops to see who could catch and tie a steer or a calf the fastest.

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Who Is Guy Weadick? Guy Weadick was born in Rochester, NY in 1886. His natural gift for showmanship dexterity in roping turned him to vaudeville and rodeo. In 1906 he married Grace Maud Bensell (1883-1951) also known as Flores (or Florence) La Due, also a trick rider and roper. In 1912 he gained the financial backing of the Big Four: A.E. Cross, Patrick Burns, George Lane, and Archibald J. McLean, and staged the first Calgary Stampede. Weadick also managed the next Calgary Stampede, held in 1919. It became an annual event in 1923 and Weadick managed it from then until 1932 when he was fired over a dispute with the Stampede Board. In 1920 he bought a ranch in Eden Valley west of High River. He turned the Stampede Ranch into a dude (guest) ranch in the 1930s and entertained many famous people including Edward, Prince of Wales. In 1950 the Weadicks moved to Arizona for his wife’s health. She died in 1951, and in 1952 Weadick married Dorothy “Dolly” Mullins (1890-1985) who had also competed in the first Stampede. Guy Weadick died the following year (1953) and was laid to rest in High River beside his wife Flores LaDue Weadick was inducted into the Canadian Rodeo Hall of Fame in 1982. Guy Weadick School in Calgary was named in his honour in 1979. (source: Glenbow Museum)

the high river agricultural society The High River Agricultural Society was incorporated in 1907 to promote agriculture in the foothills of southern Alberta. What began as a horse racing society is now complete with racetrack, fair grounds, an indoor arena and conference centre on the outskirts of High River. The mandate of the Society is to promote agriculture as a business and way of life while providing events that celebrate its western roots, from horse and chuckwagon racing to professional rodeos and the Little Britches Rodeo. In 1920, master showman Guy Weadick introduced chuckwagon racing and rodeo events to HRAS. His association with the Society lasted only one year but by 1989 the Guy Weadick Memorial Rodeo was a tradition at High River and Districts Agricultural Fair Grounds. In 2011, the Society adopted the name Guy Weadick Days.

High River Agricultural Society www.hragsociety.ca Photos by Allen Gimblett A Routes Media Special Publication www.routesmedia.ca

Guy Weadick Days Event Guide  

Guy Weadick event guide

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