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After decades of inspired growth and innovative post-war construction, Rotterdam has emerged as a top-notch travel destination. The city boasts cutting-edge architecture, a diverse and multicultural food scene, faithful nods to its maritime heritage and an adventurous artistic spirit.

Explore

ROTTERDAM

Produced by Lonely Planet for


Explore Rotterdam Published December 2015 Produced by Lonely Planet for Rotterdam Partners. All editorial views are those of Lonely Planet alone and reflect our policy of editorial independence and impartiality. http://www.lonelyplanet.com/partner Published by: Lonely Planet Publications Pty Ltd ABN 36 005 607 983 Lonely Planet offices: Australia Locked Bag 1, Footscray VIC 3011 tel +61 03 8379 8000, fax +61 03 8379 8111

Lonely Planet experts have trekked the globe to select the best countries, cities and regions to visit as part of its annual Best in Travel campaign. In 2016, we’ve named Rotterdam one of the 10 best cities in the world to visit.

USA 230 Franklin Rd, Building 2B, Franklin. TN 37064 150 Linden St, Oakland, CA 94607 tel +1 510 250 6400, toll-free (in US) 1 800 275 8555, fax +1 510 893 8572 UK 240 Blackfriars Rd, London SE1 8NW tel +44 020 8433 1333, fax +44 020 8702 0112 India 302 DLF City Court, Sikanderpur | Gurgaon 122002 tel 91 124 423 1645

www.rotterdam.info This book was commissioned in Lonely Planet’s Franklin office and produced by the following: Sales Manager David Read Project Manager Gail Luxton Commissioning Editor Matt Parish Designer Kali Hudson Contributing Writer Catherine Le Nevez Cartographer Anita Banh Proofreader Ali Lemer. With special thanks to Kate Morgan, Wayne Murphy and David Carroll. For sales enquiries contact csuk@lonelyplanet.com. Text © Lonely Planet Publications 2015; text on pages 29–32 supplied by Rotterdam Partners. Cover images: Overblaak Development (Cube Houses). Steven Swinnen / EyeEm / Getty Images © Printed in the UK.

Produced by Lonely Planet for Rotterdam Partners. All editorial views, including Best in Travel 2016 destination selections, are those of Lonely Planet alone and reflect our policy of editorial independence and impartiality.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, recording or otherwise, except brief extracts for the purpose of review, and no part of this publication may be sold or hired, without the written permission of the publisher. Lonely Planet and the Lonely Planet logo are trademarks of Lonely Planet and are registered in the US Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. Other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Lonely Planet does not allow its name or logo to be appropriated by commercial establishments, such as retailers, restaurants or hotels. Please let us know of any misuses: lonelyplanet.com/ip. Although the authors and Lonely Planet have taken all reasonable care in preparing this book, we make no warranty about the accuracy or completeness of its content and, to the maximum extent, disclaim all liability arising from its use.


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INTRODUCING ROTTERDAM

04

WHY VISIT ROTTERDAM IN 2016

08

WALKING TOUR

10

ARCHITECTURE

14

ARTS & CULTURE

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OUT-OF-THE-WAY ROTTERDAM

28

GETTING AROUND

CITY HALL PHOTO BY ROB VAN ESCH / SHUTTERSTOCK ©

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EATING


THE LUCHTSINGEL PHOTO BY IRIS VAN DEN BROEK / ROTTERDAM INFO Š. ARCHITECT: ZUS

INTRODUCING

ROTTERDAM

Rotterdam is making a splash as a uniquely modern destination, offering a constantly evolving selection of arts, architecture and culture. As the city continues to put its own spin on 21st-century living, take a peek at some of its most enticing attractions.


THE ERASMUS BRIDGE, PHOTO BY IRIS VAN DEN BROEK / ROTTERDAM INFO © ARCHITECT: BEN VAN BERKEL

Why Visit Rotterdam in 2016 This metropolitan jewel of the Netherlands is riding a wave of urban development, redevelopment and regeneration.

Futuristic architecture, inspired initiatives such as inner-city canal surfing, a proliferation of art, and a surge of drinking, dining and nightlife venues make Rotterdam one of Europe’s most exhilarating cities right now.

The Netherlands’ second-biggest metropolis, on the vast Nieuwe Maas river, is a veritable open-air gallery of modern, postmodern and contemporary construction. It’s a remarkable feat for a city largely razed to the ground by WWII bombers. Though a few notable buildings remain 4


from before the war – the stunning art nouveau–style Witte Huis, the stately City Hall – rebuilding has continued unabated with ingenuity and vision ever since.

transformed into cultural and creative spaces. Openings here have so far included cuttingedge restaurants, boutiques and a jazz club. Station Hofplein is connected to the city centre by the wooden Luchtsingel (‘air canal’) footbridge over the train tracks, which was propelled by crowdfunding (supporters could get their name inscribed on one of the structure’s planks). One section of the bridge skewers the office-building-turned-design-studio-hub Schieblock, topped by the pioneering DakAkker harvestable roof, which produces fruit, vegetables and honey.

Eye-popping recent openings include the Markthal Rotterdam, the country’s inaugural indoor food market. Its extraordinary inverted-Ushaped design incorporates glass-walled apartments arching over the food hall’s fantastical 40m-high fruit- and vegetable-muraled ceiling and scores of artisan stalls and eateries. Other striking skyline additions include the glitzy ‘vertical city’: De Rotterdam, the Netherlands’ largest building, designed by Pritzker-winning Rotterdam architect Rem Koolhaas. Dramatic views from its hotel, cocktail-bar terrace and restaurant take in the Erasmusbrug – the swooping white cablestayed bridge dubbed ‘De Zwaan’ (The Swan).

Early 2016 sees the Museum Rotterdam open inside the ‘cloud-like’ Rem Koolhaasdesigned Timmerhuis, showcasing Rotterdam’s past, present and future. And from late 2016, Europe’s busiest port – already on the Paris–Amsterdam high-speed rail line – will become more accessible than ever when direct Eurostar services linking London with Amsterdam stop at the stunning new skylit, stainless steel-encased Rotterdam Centraal train station.

Among Rotterdam’s innovative redevelopments is Station Hofplein – the former station of the disused Hofpleinlijn railway, whose viaduct arches are being 5


Life-changing experiences

Explore Rotterdam’s seafaring heritage at the Maritime Museum or on a harbour cruise past its shipyards’ colossal cranes and containers.

Current craze

Surf’s up! From 2016, surfers, bodyboarders, stand-up paddleboarders and kayakers can take a wild 14-second ride on a naturally purified, barrelling 1.5m-high wave in the central Steigersgracht canal (its water-level beach-house cafe provides up-close views of the action). Locals voted for it in a municipal ‘city initiative’ competition; profits are directed into similar projects.

Delve into historical neighbourhoods that escaped wartime destruction, such as charming gabled-andwindmilled Delfshaven (the America-bound Pilgrims prayed at the church next door to Delfshaven’s wonderful canal-side brewery, Stadsbrouwerij De Pelgrim). Encounter exceptional art at the masterpiece-filled Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen; the Kunsthal Rotterdam’s diverse exhibitions; and attentiongrabbing sculptures throughout the city’s streets and squares.

Trending topic

Staying dry. Efforts to make the city – 80% of which lies below sea level – fully climate-proof by 2035 include water plazas that double as playgrounds, 6


DELFSHAVEN PHOTO BY ALEKSANDAR VRZALSKI / GETTY IMAGES ©

car -park water storage tanks and environmentally sustainable floating houses.

options congregate on and around Meent. For made-inRotterdam fashion, homewares, books and more, browse concept shop Groos (revived local slang for ‘pride’).

Most bizarre sight

Mind-bending late 20th-century icons include the Overblaak Development (more popularly known as the ‘Cube Houses’), a surreal ‘forest’ of 45-degree-tilted, hexagonalpylon-mounted, cube-shaped apartments (one’s now a museum, another a Stayokay backpacker hostel).

Classic place to stay

It’s a photo finish between art nouveau showpiece Hotel New York (the Holland-America passenger ship line’s former HQ, with timber-panelled suites in its old boardrooms) and artist-designed King Kong Hostel (a vintage- and industrial-furniture-filled haven on Witte de Withstraat, the city’s coolest street). Both, in their own way, reflect Rotterdam’s irrepressible spirit.

Best shopping

Brand-name shops line the bustling, outdoor, semi-subterranean Beurstraverse (nicknamed ‘De Koopgoot’, or ‘buying trench’); alternative 7


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You can start at Rotterdam’s skylit, stainless steel-encased 1 Centraal Station, completed in 2014 – it’s an architectural stunner. From here, head south along the Westersingel canal to where-it’s-at Witte de Withstraat. On your right you’ll see 2 Sylvette, Picasso’s 1970 sculpture, designed with Norwegian artist Carl Nesjar. Turn left onto Witte de Withstraat and follow it to the 3 Witte de With Centre for Contemporary Art, a cornerstone of the local artistic community. Continue east past Witte de Withstraat’s hip bars and eateries to the harbour. The beautiful old boats moored here are part of the recently merged Haven Museum

Follow Blaak north past the Steigersgracht canal (soon to host inner-city canal surfing with a purified, barrelling wave). At the end is the extraordinary horseshoe-shaped 5 Markthal Rotterdam, the Netherlands’ inaugural indoor food market, which makes a great place to refuel. Across the vast Binnenrotte square, where the 6 Blaak Markt unfurls on Tuesdays and Saturdays, you can’t miss Rotterdam’s iconic 7 Overblaak Development’s pencil-shaped tower, De Kolk, and ‘forest’ of

and 4 Maritime Museum Rotterdam, where you can learn more about Rotterdam’s maritime history through fantastic interactive exhibits.

Follow Geldersekade southeast to the 11-storey, 45m-high 8 Witte Huis (White House), Europe’s first ‘skyscraper’, constructed in 1897–98 using loadbearing brick walls. Take the crimson-coloured 9 Willemsbrug bridge (opened in 1981) over the Nieuwe Maas shipping channel 9 Willemsbrug over the Maas shipping channel and cross the harbour-set island Noordereiland and the Koninginnebrug. Turn

45-degree-tilted, cubeshaped apartments on hexagonal pylons (one, the Kijk-Kubus MuseumHouse, is open to the public; the Stayokay Rotterdam hostel occupies the southern supersized cube).

right onto Stieltjesstraat and follow it southwest past the swooping white bridge 10 Erasmusbrug (dubbed ‘the Swan’). Wilhelminakade is dominated by the Netherlands’ largest building 11 De Rotterdam, a 2013opened residential/ commercial ‘vertical city’ designed by Pritzkerwinning Rotterdam architect Rem Koolhaas. Further southwest along Wilhelminakade is the outstanding 12 Nederlands Fotomuseum. Southwest again is the HollandAmerica passenger-ship line’s former HQ 13 Hotel New York, an art nouveau showpiece with superb drinking and dining options, and water taxis to ferry you back to the city centre.


MARKTHAL ROTTERDAM PHOTO BY OSSIP VAN DUIVENBODE / ROTTERDAM INFO ©. ARCHITECT: MVRDV

ARCHITECTURE


Amazing Architecture

Rotterdam is a vast open-air museum of modern and contemporary design. A few pre-war structures still stand , including the Laurenskerk church, the only remaining medieval structure in the city. But continued focus on construction like the new Museum Rotterdam, the famous Overblaak Development, and the eye-popping Markthal Rotterdam have ensured that the city is littered with fresh, must-see structures.

11


EUROMAST PHOTO BY OSSIP VAN DUIVENBODE / ROTTERDAM INFO ©. ARCHITECT HUGH MAASKANT

Het Nieuwe Instituut

With one side surrounded by a green moat and new garden and the other comprising a sweeping flow of brick along Rochussenstraat, the Het Nieuwe Instituut is striking. Included is Huis Sonneveld, a 1933 villa lovingly restored with furniture, wallpaper and fixtures present and correct.

MaasToren

The MaasToren (built in 2009) is the tallest building in the Netherlands at 165m. Its durable heating and cooling system uses water from the Nieuwe Maas and energy storage in the soil to reduce the building’s carbon footprint.

KPN Telecom Headquarters

Euromast

Dating from 1897–98, Europe’s first ‘skyscraper’, the 11-storey, 45m-high Witte Huis, was designed by Willem Molenbroek in art nouveau style using load-bearing brick walls rather than a steel skeleton.

Designed by celebrated architect Renzo Piano and opened in 2000, the KPN Telecom Headquarters building leans at a sharp angle, seemingly resting on a long pole.

Witte Huis

A 185m-high landmark built in 1960, the Euromast offers unparalleled 360-degree views of Rotterdam from its 100m-high observation deck, reached by elevator in 30 seconds. 12


DESIGNER DIGS King Kong Hostel Outdoor benches made from salvaged timbers and garden hoses by Sander Bokkinga sit outside King Kong, a design haven on Rotterdam’s coolest street. Artist-designed rooms and dorms are filled with vintage and industrial furniture. Mainport Mainport, spectacularly set on the harbour, has ultraplush rooms that reflect far-flung locations and Rotterdam’s role as a port. Many rooms have amenities such as saunas or hot tubs; the heavenly 8th-floor spa has a hammam, Turkish steam bath and gym.

MAINPORT. PHOTO PROVIDED BY ROTTERDAM INFO ©. ARCHITECT: MAS


PHOTO BY IRIS VAN DEN BROEK / ROTTERDAM INFO ©

ARTS & CULTURE


Museums, Street Art, Festivals and More

Rotterdam has feverishly pursued its status as an open-minded space for arts and cultures of all types to thrive. As a result, its cultural landscape has developed into a diverse and vibrant home to one-of-a-kind experiences. From world-class museums like Boijmans Van Beuningen to adventurous festivals like the city’s Zomercarnaval festival, there’s a wide world of arts and culture to explore here.

15


Station Hofplein A train stop transformed

A key example of the way Rotterdam has reinvented itself is Station Hofplein, a wildly successful project that took over an old train station on the Hofpleinlijn railway. Its open patios and industrial nooks and crannies have proven to be fertile ground for Rotterdam’s next generation of creatives.

while a compelling collection of restaurants, cafes, and even a jazz club. While the Schieblock is closed to the public, there are some great shops, cafes, bars and other initiatives (such as tour company Urban Guides) around its base. One of the most recent arrivals at Station Hofplein is the relocation of Dutch experimental/ underground electronic dance music record label and vinyl shop, Clone.

Visitors here will find a variety of design and music shops to help get a taste for the city’s diverse take on arts and culture,

16


PHOTO BY IRIS VAN DEN BROEK / ROTTERDAM INFO ©

more, browse groovy concept shop Groos (revived local slang for ‘pride’), situated in the Schieblock.

Meanwhile you can find a heap of jazz – along with soul, hip hop, funk and electronica – at Bird Jazz Club, named for American jazz saxophonist Charlie ‘Bird’ Parker. Its excellent restaurant serves woodfired pizzas and small plates.

Local Rotterdam products are also at the heart of Lokaal, (bread, cheese, beer…) but its speciality is brewing Rotterdamroasted espresso and filter blends from Giraffe Coffee Roasters.

For made-in-Rotterdam fashion, handmade jewellery, homewares, artworks, books, stationery, music and edibles such as chocolates, coffee and

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PHOTO BY BAS CZERWINSKI/ ROTTERDAM FESTIVALS ©

Festivals & Events

PHOTO PROVIDED BY NSJ©

Stay in unique locations such as art installations and take artist-guided expeditions during mid-April’s Motel Mozaïque music, art and performance festival. Around a thousand musicians perform at the renowned North Sea Jazz Festival, held in Rotterdam in mid-July since 2006.

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PHOTO BY BAS CZERWINSKI / ROTTERDAM FESTIVALS ©

Rotterdam’s multicultural makeup is a vital part of its lifeblood, with some 170 nationalities calling it home. A cacophonous ‘battle of drums’ and colourful street parade are highlights of Rotterdam Unlimited, which includes the Zomercarnaval, a vibrant Caribbean summer carnival celebration in late July.

Tours of normally off-limits industrial areas, as well as nautical displays and sea shanties, are part of early September’s fascinating Wereldhavendagen (World Port Days). Festival-goers don retro get-ups such as sailor outfits for the spin-off de Nacht van de Kaap (Night of the Cape), held on one crazy Wereldhavendagen night in Katendrecht, Rotterdam’s former red-light quarter.

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PHOTO BY IRIS VAN DEN BROEK / ROTTERDAM INFO ©

STREET ART Not only is Rotterdam a citywide architectural wonderland, its streets are also filled with art. Well over 60 sculptures are scattered all over town (with more appearing every year), including many by major artists, such as Paul McCarthy’s outsized 2001 Santa Claus, and Picasso’s sandblasted 1970 concrete sculpture Sylvette, which he designed with Norwegian artist Carl Nesjar. For a full list of sculptures and an interactive map of their locations, visit Sculpture International Rotterdam www.sculptureinternationalrotterdam.nl


Highlights

Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen

Among Europe’s finest museums, the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen has a permanent collection spanning all eras of Dutch and European art, including superb old masters. There are many Monets and other French Impressionists; Van Gogh and Gauguin are given space; and there are statues by Degas as well. The surrealist wing features Dalí, Duchamp, Man Ray and more. The whole place is nothing if not eclectic: a nude or an old master might be nestled next to a ’70s bubble TV, some kind of installation or a vibrating table. www.boijmans.nl

Kunsthal

At the southern end of Museumpark, the Kunsthal hosts around 20 wildly diverse temporary exhibitions each year, including art and design. Everything ‘from elitist to popular’ gets an airing. Recent high-profile exhibitions have included everything from the work of Keith Haring to the fashion of Jean Paul Gaultier and the design legacy of James Bond films. www.kunsthal.nl

Nederlands Fotomuseum

On the waterfront across the Nieuwe Maas, the Nederlands Fotomuseum mounts large temporary exhibitions, both historic and contemporary. Signs and commentary are in English. Allow at least a couple of hours here. www.nederlandsfotomuseum.nl

Witte de With Centre for Contemporary Art

Founded in 1990, the Witte de With, Centre for Contemporary Art offers experimental exhibitions, installations and events have a laser-sharp social and political focus, and it has a reputation as a launch pad for up-andcoming talent. www.wdw.nl 21


KINDERDIJK PHOTO BY PIDJOE / GETTY IMAGES ©

OUT-OF-THE-WAY ROTTERDAM


Off the Beaten Path

Venturing a bit beyond the well-travelled streets of the city centre, travellers can find a variety of surprising experiences.

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ss Rotterdam

between 1925 and 1931, is a 20th-century icon. It’s now filled with design studios and hosts Art Rotterdam, an annual international contemporary art festival.

The ocean liner ss Rotterdam was built in the city in the late 1950s and its 576 original cabins have been converted to 254 ’50sstyle hotel rooms in three very cool themes: Original, Manhattan and Bahamas. Parking’s not a problem (there are 580 spaces); bus 77 drops you at the door. Even if you’re not staying here, ship tours are available.

www.vannellefabriek.com

Fenix Food Factory

Explore the district known as de Kaap (the Cape) and you’ll find industrial Katendrecht, once Rotterdam’s red-light district but now the forefront of an emerging foodie scene. That’s thanks in large part to market collective of Fenix Food Factory. Everything in this vast former warehouse is made locally and sold by separate vendors

www.ssrotterdam.com

Van Nelle Fabriek

Unesco World Heritage status is a rarity for an industrial building, but this ‘glass palace’, a former coffee, tea and tobacco factory built

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SS ROTTERDAM PHOTO BY VINCENT VAN DORDRECHT / ROTTERDAM INFO ©

Le Nord

making their mark on the food scene – local cheese, cider, baked goods, roast coffee, craft beer and produce. There’s also a bar here that stays open until 11pm and the market is a hot spot for food trucks.

Hidden out in the open in the Provenierswijk neighbourhood, epicurean hub Le Nord looks like it might as easily be in a French village, with its sage-green walls, red-leather bar stools, mezzanine framed by wrought-iron balustrades, and above all its food: steak tartare topped with a quail’s egg, Normandy oysters with red-wine vinegar and shallots and more.

www.fenixfoodfactory.nl

Kinderdijk

In 1740 a series of windmills were built to drain a polder about 12km southeast of Rotterdam. Today 19 of the Dutch icons survive at Kinderdijk, a Unesco monument. You can wander the dikes for more than 3km amid the spinning sails and take a tour inside two of the windmills.

www.lenord.nl

Maassilo

This pumpin’ club is housed inside a century-old grain silo with a capacity of 6000. Check the agenda to see what party’s on when.

www.kinderdijk.nl

www.maassilo.com 25


PHOTO BY MARC HEEMAN / ROTTERDAM INFO ©

EATING

Dining Out in Rotterdam

Rotterdam’s evolving multicultural population continues to keep the food scene interesting throughout the city.

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Tante Nel

apple) at impressively reasonable prices. Afterwards, head to the terrace of the building's 7th-floor cocktail bar.

New-generation Tante Nel is as tiny as a traditional frites (fries) stand but decked out with a stunning Dutch-design painted brick interior and marqueestyle canopied terrace. Savour its organic, hand-cut fries (topped by nine different sauces), along with housespeciality milkshakes, beer, wine and 13 different gins.

www.hmb-restaurant.nl

‘t Ouwe Bruggetje

A Delfshaven jewel, 't Ouwe Bruggetje has a timberpanelled interior with hefty wooden beams, seating by the iron-framed drawbridge out front, and a floating terrace on the canal, where you can dine on dishes such as guinea fowl on sauerkraut with tarragon and mustard, or salmon roulade with cucumber horseradish. It imports more than 100 barrels of wine every year from across Europe.

www.tante-nel.com

Ter Marsch & Co

Butcher-shop-turnedburger-bar Ter Marsch & Co sizzles up monumental burgers (such as Scottish black Angus, pancetta and truffle mayo) that recently saw it awarded the coveted honour of ‘Best Burgers in the Netherlands’.

www.historisch-delshaven.nl

Bazar

www.termarschco.nl

Beneath the exotic Hotel Bazar, this dazzling, lantern-lit, souk-style stalwart dishes up dolmades, couscous, hummus, falafel, kebabs, Turkish pizza, baked feta with mint and parsley, Persian lamb and more. Tables spill onto the pavement terrace.

HMB

On the ground floor of De Rotterdam, with dazzling views of the Erasmusbrug, chic HMB serves artistically presented contemporary cuisine (veal meatballs with truffled potatoes; foie gras with eel and

www.bazarrotterdam.nl

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NEED TO KNOW MONEY

The Netherlands uses the euro (€). To check the latest exchange rates, visit www.xe.com.

WELCOME CARD

The Rotterdam Welcome Card (1/2/3 days per adult €11/16/20) offers great-value savings on museum admission and free public transport.

Getting to Rotterdam AIR

The Netherlands’ huge international airport, Schiphol is roughly equidistant by high-speed train to both Rotterdam and Amsterdam (around 20 to 30 minutes each). Rotterdam The Hague Airport serves over 40 European destinations and is less than 6km northwest of Rotterdam.

TRAIN

There are frequent high-speed Thalys trains running out of Rotterdam Centraal Station to/from Brussels (1¼ hours) and Paris (2½ hours). From late 2016, direct Eurostar trains linking Amsterdam with London will stop here, with a Rotterdam–London journey time of 3½ hours.

Getting around Rotterdam TRAMS

Trams are the best way to get around the city. They go virtually everywhere and allow you to sightsee along the way. The metro (subway) is geared more for trips to the suburbs.

BICYCLES

Bicycles are a great way to get around the city and are available for rent almost around the clock. 28


PHOTO BY MILAN BOONSTRA / ROTTERDAM INFO ©

LOCAL HOTSPOTS

DISCOVER ROTTERDAM WEST Shopping along the multicultural West-Kruiskade is like taking a trip around the world. Here you’ll find dim sum, swaying golden cats, Surinamese gilt, Afro wigs, Hindustani wedding gowns, exotic vegetables and Turkish baklava. Restaurant Soi3 is known for its affordable and tasty Thai food. Holy Smoke is the latest food bar on the West-Kruiskade, serving prime-quality beef, chicken and seafood straight from the grill. Don’t forget the Nieuwe Binnenweg, where you can sample some freshly baked cookies at Koekela (a local favourite), sample artisanal sourdough bread at Jordy’s Bakery or stop into Urban Espresso Bar West for a top-notch coffee.

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www.rotterdam.info


SHOP AT MAURITSKWARTIER The Mauritskwartier is where Parisian chic meets no-nonsense Rotterdam pragmatism. The Van Oldebarneveltstraat is a great place to find lots of extraordinary fashion stores. Nen Xavier, ANSH46, Van Dijk, SHPPR and Mostert & Van Leeuwen offer ample international brands and Rotterdam-based designers such as Monique van Heist. Bag designer Susan Bijl recently opened a flagship store at the Mauritsweg. She is known for her colourful nylon bag, ‘The New Shoppingbag’ (many Rotterdammers own more than one). The flamboyant shops in the Mauritskwartier are interspersed between popular gay bars like Strano and De Regenboog, making it a great nightlife spot as well.

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PHOTO BY IRIS VAN DEN BROEK / ROTTERDAM INFO Š

EXPLORE ROTTERDAM NORTH Working-class district becomes design Valhalla! Rotterdam North has come a long way to enjoy its current status as a scenic residential area with canals and hidden restaurants such as Gare du Nord, a vegan restaurant located in an old train car. Walk around the Zwaanshals and Noordplein for quaint speciality shops. At Olga Korstanje you’ll find beautiful leather bags, while Showroom 41 is known for its rare vintage furniture and Whiskybase carries hundreds of whiskies from all over the world. End your stroll at patisserie and lunchroom Lof der Zoetheid. Savour the incredible sweet treats and drink tea from a Russian samovar.

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www.rotterdam.info


PHOTO BY SANNE DONDERS / ROTTERDAM INFO ©

TASTE KATENDRECHT Once Rotterdam’s Chinatown, attracting homesick sailors looking for a good time, Katendrecht has become a destination for foodies. The old Fenixloodsen quayside warehouse accommodates the Fenix Food Factory, an alternative indoor market for fresh and local foods, and restaurant Posse, where the décor consists of enormous black and white photographs and extraordinary vintage bicycles. Cute little eateries, ice salons and bars are around every corner of the central Deliplein. At restaurant De Matroos en het Meisje (‘The Sailor and the Girl’) you’ll be surprised by a menu du chef while being mesmerized by audacious yet tasteful walls covered with Delfts Blue print.

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Explore Rotterdam Published December 2015 Produced by Lonely Planet for Rotterdam Partners. All editorial views are those of Lonely Planet alone and reflect our policy of editorial independence and impartiality. http://www.lonelyplanet.com/partner Published by: Lonely Planet Publications Pty Ltd ABN 36 005 607 983 Lonely Planet offices: Australia Locked Bag 1, Footscray VIC 3011 tel +61 03 8379 8000, fax +61 03 8379 8111

Lonely Planet experts have trekked the globe to select the best countries, cities and regions to visit as part of its annual Best in Travel campaign. In 2016, we’ve named Rotterdam one of the 10 best cities in the world to visit.

USA 230 Franklin Rd, Building 2B, Franklin. TN 37064 150 Linden St, Oakland, CA 94607 tel +1 510 250 6400, toll-free (in US) 1 800 275 8555, fax +1 510 893 8572 UK 240 Blackfriars Rd, London SE1 8NW tel +44 020 8433 1333, fax +44 020 8702 0112 India 302 DLF City Court, Sikanderpur | Gurgaon 122002 tel 91 124 423 1645

www.rotterdam.info This book was commissioned in Lonely Planet’s Franklin office and produced by the following: Sales Manager David Read Project Manager Gail Luxton Commissioning Editor Matt Parish Designer Kali Hudson Contributing Writer Catherine Le Nevez Cartographer Anita Banh Proofreader Ali Lemer. With special thanks to Kate Morgan, Wayne Murphy and David Carroll. For sales enquiries contact csuk@lonelyplanet.com. Text © Lonely Planet Publications 2015; text on pages 29–32 supplied by Rotterdam Partners. Cover images: Overblaak Development (Cube Houses). Steven Swinnen / EyeEm / Getty Images © Printed in the UK.

Produced by Lonely Planet for Rotterdam Partners. All editorial views, including Best in Travel 2016 destination selections, are those of Lonely Planet alone and reflect our policy of editorial independence and impartiality.

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After decades of inspired growth and innovative post-war construction, Rotterdam has emerged as a top-notch travel destination. The city boasts cutting-edge architecture, a diverse and multicultural food scene, faithful nods to its maritime heritage and an adventurous artistic spirit.

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Lonely Planet experts have trekked the globe to select the best countries, cities and regions to visit as part of its annual Best in Travel...

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