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FEEL THE BURN NEW HORIZONS LONDON CALLING T H E N E W F L AG S H I P S TO R E Q&A WITH BRANDON STEINER

M A G A Z I N E

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HUGO BOSS FASHIONS INC. Phone +1 212 940 0600 www.hugoboss.com


TEDBAKER-LONDON.COM


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Welcome to the Fall/Winter Rothmans Magazine. This is our 10th issue and the first since we moved to a bigger and better location just one block north at 18th and Park. We hope that you have had an opportunity to stop by our new flagship store, which we are happy to report has been met with glowing reviews in the press, and more importantly, from you, our valued clients. We truly believe that the new space has achieved our goal of making your shopping experience more efficient, exciting and rewarding. Our NYC location is now 11,000 square feet (compared to 7000 sq. Ft), and is certainly one of the largest independent men's specialty stores in the country. The new space, beautifully designed by Lalire March architects, preserves much of the industrial aesthetic of the building. Our inspiration came from old photographs of our grandfather's store on Bleecker St in 1926, and we were fortunate enough to have been able to re-use some of the actual fixtures from his shop. We also fabricated very similar ones locally from re-claimed industrial parts. While we are thrilled with the look of the new store, we were very careful to listen to your pre-construction feedback about ways to make the store better for you. (We thank those of you who were kind enough to fill out a monstrously long customer survey.) The result is a space that offers significantly more selection of clothing, bigger and better dressing rooms, a larger area devoted to formalwear and wedding parties, and a greatly enhanced shoe area. We also created a 1,000 square foot area for an oxymoronic "Permanent Pop-Up Shop," that has enabled short-term mini stores from vendors or products that we are especially excited about. When we opened this Spring, we featured a Pop-Up Shop of Mr. Brown by Duckie Brown. It is a new line created with the amazingly talented design team, Duckie Brown. Their very modern, fitted clothing had previously been sold only at the most fashion forward stores in the world, and we worked together with them to develop a more accessible and exclusive line of suits, sport coats, shirts and ties that is now the most sought after collection in the NYC store. GQ reviewed Mr. Brown and wrote "... We got our hands on one of the sport coats earlier this week, and the natural shoulders, elegant drape, and fun detailing (a given from Duckie) put the jacket in a class with those at twice the price." We did change our location and we did change our logo, but we are well aware that our most valued asset is still you, our friends and customers. This Magazine has always been our way to celebrate that bond, as we are able to find fascinating, amusing, and inspiring stories written by and about our clients. In this issue, we are happy to bring you an interview with Brandon Steiner, the man who redefined the sports memorabilia business, and just released his second book, You Gotta Have Balls, which tells the story of his journey from a hardscrabble childhood to creating Steiner Sports, a company that redefined the sports memorabilia business. We also hear from Richard Carey, a college friend who just rode a bicycle across America to rally support for gay marriage. A different kind of trip was taken by our friend Mike Rothman, who spent a week at Burning Man, the unique festival in the Nevada desert. We also are pleased to offer a spectator's report from the Summer Olympics by our friend Brent Silver who managed to channel his inner New Yorker to somehow appear, Forest Gump-like, at practically every newsworthy moment of the games. Of course, there is plenty more inside on fashion, a variety of other topics, and some valuable savings coupons. For additional ongoing offers, make sure to "like" us on Facebook, as we update that weekly with information,humor, events and special offers. We also encourage you to send us a note at info@rothmansny.com that will automatically add you to our email list. We hope that you enjoy the Magazine, and look forward to seeing you soon. With appreciation, Jim and Ken Giddon Jim@rothmansny.com Ken@rothmansny.com

N E W YO R K C I T Y : 1 8 T H S T R E E T & PA R K AV E N U E S O U T H • N E W YO R K , N y 1 0 0 0 3 • T E L 2 1 2 7 7 7 7 4 0 0 Scarsdale: 1 Boniface Circle • Scarsdale, New York, NY 10583 • Tel 914 713 0300 w w w. r o t h m a n s n y. c o m


issue 10 R O T H M A N ’ S

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Welcome

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The New Store

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Q&A with Brandon Steiner

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Feel the Burn

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New Horizons

18

London Calling

24

Cross Fit

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Going with the Growth

30

BMW Gran Coupe

34

Top 20 Movie Songs

38

Sole of a Rebel

42

One for the Road

Todd Tufts Editor in Chief, Publisher Leslie C. Smith Editorial Director Vence Vida Production Manager Rothman’s Magazine is published by Tufts Communications, 1201 E. 5th Street, Suite 1009 • Anderson, IN 46012 T: 765-608-3081 • E: todd@tuftscom.com © 2012, Tufts Communications. All rights reserved.

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Rothman’s New Flagship 18th Street and Park Avenue South

11,000 square feet of the finest menswear

Photography by Eric Laignel

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Q&A with BRANDON STEINER, CEO of Steiner Sports As a poor kid in Brooklyn, Brandon Steiner lived for the summer days when he could scrounge together enough change to make the subway trip to Yankee Stadium, buy the cheapest ticket available, and bask in the aura of his favorite baseball team for a couple of hours. On the train rides home from those escapes, little could Brandon have known that in a few decades, his own name would be indelibly linked with the team in an exclusive memorabilia partnership (Yankees-Steiner Collectibles) and that one day, he’d own the very stadium he had just been sitting in. Raised in Flatbush with his two brothers by a single mother, Brandon attended John Dewey High School in Coney Island, NY and from there went on to Syracuse University, graduating in 1981 with an accounting degree. Brandon then began an Odyssean career that saw many twists and turns, and many self-reinventions, but that always centered around his two sharpest skills: managing people and providing services. Brandon started out in food service and hospitality, managing a hospital cafeteria in Baltimore. From there, he moved to a brand new Hyatt in that city’s refurbished inner harbor. One of the youngest restaurant managers in the nationwide hotel chain, Brandon oversaw that location’s two most-trafficked restaurants, helping to ensure that the new hotel would be a success for years to come. After his time at the Hyatt, Brandon moved back to his native New York, where he served as manager at the Hard Rock Café in the late 80s, when it was easily one of the most popular restaurants in the city. It was there that Brandon began meeting many of the athletes he would later represent professionally; they were regulars at the iconic 57th Street bar and grill. Brandon met still more athletes at the next restaurant he managed — the Sporting Club — which was New York City’s first full-service sports bar. It was there that Brandon made his first foray into sports marketing — hiring athletes as “guest bartenders” for charity events, and to show up as guests of honor to “Fight Nights,” where the bar would air satellite broadcasts of big-time boxing matches. As he got to know the athletes, Brandon learned that they did not have anyone to represent them for speaking engagements and corporate appearances. To fill that void, Brandon started Steiner Associates (later renamed Steiner Sports) in 1987, with only $4,000, a one-room office, and an intern.

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Over the years, the business slowly but steadily grew, and by the late 90s, Steiner Sports comprised dozens of employees and represented most of the big-name athletes in the New York sports scene. It was also around this time that the company expanded its business focus to collectibles. Brandon had long asked each of the athletes he represented to sign memorabilia for corporate gifts and to accrue new business clients; in time, the companies he worked with started requesting these signed items almost as much as the appearances of the athlete themselves. In 2003, Brandon published his first book, The Business Playbook: Leadership Lessons from the World of Sports. The Business Playbook was supported by a national book tour which brought Brandon as a guest lecturer to some of the top business schools in the country, including The Harvard Business School, The Kellogg School of Business, Columbia and Yale. Brandon also began being hired as a motivational speaker, a role which brought him to Fortune 500 companies ranging from hotel chains, to real estate companies, to countless trade conventions. Perhaps Brandon’s biggest home run to date is Steiner Sports’ aforementioned deal with the New York Yankees. This unprecedented partnership was announced in 2004, as a way to provide Yankees fans with authentic Yankees memorabilia and one-of-akind fantasy experiences at Yankee Stadium. Steiner Sports followed this with similar partnerships with Notre Dame Football, Syracuse Athletics, and Madison Square Garden. Each of these partnerships bring fans closer to the games and athletes they love, through meet-and-greets, speaking appearances, signed memorabilia including game-used jerseys and equipment, and countless other products and services. In 2008, Steiner Sports created yet another unique market, by buying the exclusive rights to the disassembled Old Yankee Stadium. Steiner created an entire, authentic Stadium product line; fans now have the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to take home seats, signs, bricks from Monument Park, and hundreds of other unique pieces which give the old stadium new life. Today, Steiner Sports is a company that takes in $40 million per year in revenues, and employs 100 people.


ELI MANNING

MARK MESSIER

DEREK JETER

MAGIC JOHNSON

MARIANO RIVERA

BILL WALTON

2-Time Super Bowl MVP, New York Giants

6-Time Stanley Cup Champion, Hockey Hall of Famer

Captain and All-Star Shortstop, New York Yankees and 3000 Hit Club Member

NBA Legend, 2-Time Hall of Famer, Entrepreneur, Philanthropist and Motivational Speaker

All-Time Saves Leader, 5-time World Series Champion, New York Yankees

Basketball Legend, Hall of Famer, Professional Broadcaster

“Brandon is one of the true playmakers in this business.”

“Brandon thinks outside the box. He doesn’t wait for opportunity, he creates it!”

“It takes tremendous confidence and vision to start your own business and great leadership and execution to build it into a market leader. That’s exactly what Brandon has done..”

What’s the significance of the title of your book: You Gotta Have Balls? You Gotta Have Balls was something my mom impressed upon me at an early age. Be fearless, be aggressive — don’t be afraid, don’t be afraid to speak your mind. Don’t take crap from anybody. And impose your will. She would tell me: “You’re smart. You know what needs to be done, so do it.” You Gotta Have Balls is about believing in yourself, and then having the balls to go ahead and couple that belief with some action. And then, it’s about making sure that confidence shows through: doing things with a swagger and — more important — doing things with a commitment to quality. People often have passion, but not commitment. They want so much to build the foundation, to open up a business. But then they’re not willing to do the day-to-day dirty work, to apply the polish, to make sure everything is clean and sparkling enough so that initial belief, that confidence comes to life and wows the customer. It’s great to believe in yourself, but people need to believe in you. And if you own a business, people should be wowed by the place you work. What makes a great autograph? It’s a matter of matching a signature with a moment, and then matching the package with the fan. Obviously, autographs are so interesting to me: an athlete puts his pen to an inanimate object — a baseball for example — and all of a sudden the thing is worth 20 or 30 or 40 or 100 times what it was before. So it’s not a rational process — but it’s not an arbitrary one either. The perfect autograph brings you back to a specific memory or to a specific time in your life. It’s the ultimate totem. For me, I see a Mickey Mantle auto and I’m transported back to my childhood; I remember working with the Mick early on in my career, and how amazing that was. Everybody has their heroes; everybody has moments they wish they could relive. Giants fans see a David Tyree autograph and remember not just victory itself, but how it felt. I say this a lot: autographs have a unique ability to turn a middle-aged man into a ten-year old boy.

“Being a good entrepreneur is like being a good point guard. You have to be creative, to see into the future, and to execute the best play possible. In this book, Brandon shows you how to do all of it.”

“Brandon Steiner is the real closer when it comes to big business.”

“In the business ages of the ‘rat race,’ Brandon makes everything slow down.”


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What was the first autograph you ever got?

What was your toughest deal?

Over 25 years of business, Steiner Sports has bought and sold more than 20 million autographs. But I’ll never forget my first John Hancock. I was 14 and hanging with a couple of older boys on a street corner when one of them proposed heading to the Stadium for that day’s Yankees game. I ran home to my mother, asking for her permission — and financial backing. She relented and handed me five dollars, under the presumption I would return with change. My friends and I ended up buying four dollar seats right near the on-deck circle. It was an amazing experience, to be so close to the field, to be so close to my heroes. I came home with autographs from Tom Tresh and Joe Pepitone, ecstatic — but all my mother cared about was that I came home with no change. She was furious, but she got her money back. She chased down my friends. I’m sure they were terrified of her.

It’s always the stuff where we try to get something to the customer that they can’t get on their own. Like Our team projects. When you do a team project with football, you need 50 signatures on a helmet. And a few of the guys tend to hold out. We had a ten-year Super Bowl reunion piece with the Giants, where we tried to get everyone but couldn’t get Phil Simms. In 1998, we wanted to do some team stuff with the Yankees, and David Wells wouldn’t sign. And then there was this whole Jeremy Lin situation: that was tricky. That was just an insane time, and an insane story in itself. There’s two parts that make up the degree of difficulty here: tracking the guys down and locking them up, and then getting it expedited. With some guys, it’s easier to get them to sign their name on the dotted line than it is to have them come in and sign 1,000 balls.

What sort of memorabilia do you have in your house?

What was the most satisfying deal you ever made?

What sort of memorabilia do you have in your house? A lot of people ask me about my favorite collectibles. And it’s not what you would think — a lot of collectors live for these big-ticket, expensive items — priceless, one-of-a-kind stuff. Babe Ruth’s bat, the Honus Wagner card, etc. but for me, collecting has always been about matching memorabilia and moment. My favorite stuff is not the most expensive by any stretch — it’s all items signed by my favorite players, or guys I worked with and had great experiences with. In my house, you’ll find a pair of Mariano cleats, a pair of Jeter cleats. You’ll see some ‘86 Giants stuff, because that was the start of our company. You’ll see a photo of me with Phil Rizzuto and Jeter. Those guys have been so important to our brand. And you’ll find a photo of Mark Messier, grinning. I look at it, and I grin too.

Probably the Mark Messier deal. It was one of the first major collectibles deals we ever did. I think it was the first six-figure deal. He was a great partner, hands-on. A guy you want in a foxhole, when the chips are down. We had so much fun with him. It was right after the 1994 cup, when the Rangers won. I’m a huge Ranger fan, so I could have been sitting in the seats and I would have been immensely satisfied. But to get the pleasure of working with Mark, of commemorating the event in this special way, and then to see our company take off because of it -- that was especially gratifying.

Who has been your favorite athlete to work with? You’d be hard pressed to find an athlete who has accomplished something over the last half-century that we haven’t done business with; we’ve worked with so many athletes, so many great athletes, so many awesome people — these last 25 years have been such a great experience that it would be easier to say who my least favorite athletes were than to rattle off a list like this. But, let’s see if we can’t narrow this down by sport: it’s definitely been Clyde Frazier and Magic Johnson for basketball. Clyde was my idol growing up, and is just the coolest cat, and Magic is one of the greatest. He’s been an idol in adulthood. I love Eli Manning — he’s been consistent, generous, a great partner. And Joe Morris was awesome. He was one of the first football players I worked with. For baseball — it’s probably boring — but there’s nobody better than Derek Jeter. He is relevant, so steady, and we’ve been able to help out a lot both with collecting and charity with him. Mariano is the same way. Again, it’s hard to narrow it down.

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What’s your number one piece of advice for people trying to “make it big?” The broadest way to put is differentiate yourself, but I don’t like broad. I call it “What Else?” As in, “What Else can I do for this person?” Or “What Else can I do to grow my business?” Or even “What Else can I do for myself?” It’s in our nature to not be satisfied, but I’m a big believer in chasing dreams instead of being consumed by nightmares. If you have a big success, try and figure out how to have another one. If you’re trying to satisfy a client, or make a deal, figure out how you can reach or help this person is some special, unique way. Really, it’s this all-encompassing ideal that can help you realize your personal potential, which can help you grow your business, or even maintain and nurture a relationship. Brandon has been good to Rothmans for many years. Not only is he a valued customer, but he tends to send us some of his friends as well...and we know who they are. Outside of the office, Brandon resides in Scarsdale with his wife Mara and their two children. He is very involved with several charities, including Family Services of Westchester. Brandon was instrumental in opening two group homes for teenage boys and teenage girls with no place to call home.


coppley.com


burn

Editor’s Note: Our good friend Mike Rothman reports on his eye-opening trip to the annual Burning Man “Arts and Cultural Festival” in Nevada. Enjoy his account, and remember, despite being named Rothman, we are NOT related.

feel the burn One man’s journey to the arts and culture festival known as Burning Man

When you’re in the middle of the desert, naked above the waist, covered in glitter and dancing to soul-stirring ‘70’s funk with a girl in bikini bottoms and an Indian headdress, it’s quite possible that: a) you’re on drugs, b) you’ve discovered what is popularly known as “a Happy Place”, c) you’re at the “arts and cultural festival” known as Burning Man, or d) all of the above. For those who don’t know, here are the basic facts about Burning Man: it’s a pop-up community that congregates in the middle of the Nevada desert, two hours north of Reno, as it has every year for the last twenty years, in celebration of radical selfreliance, Dadaist self-expression and situational performance art. It’s equally known for what it doesn’t have: spectators, waste, commercial transactions or cell phone reception. Over 50,000 people attended this past year, making it the third largest city in Nevada overnight and the largest Leave No Trace event in the world (you bring it in, you bring it out). The Burn, as it’s also known, had always been positioned to me, rather cloyingly, as something that I couldn’t understand unless I went, man, like how do you describe color to the blind, you know? The sheer scale and spectacle of it all was something that needed to be seen to be believed. Judging from those I knew who attended, Burning Man seemed suspiciously like an elaborate cover for a bunch of smelly hippies to get together, strip naked, bonk a few bongos, eat a bunch of pills while reciting bad poetry. 12

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Well I decided to check it out for myself. I recently quit my job after nearly seven years of helping to build a digital start-up from pre-revenue to a nine-figure valuation, and thought The Burn would provide helpful time out of mind and a control-alt-delete on a New York routine that started to feel stale. A friend got access to an extra ticket, a spot in a friend of a friend’s RV and told me to meet him out there. I flew to San Francisco and then hitched a ride to Black Rock City, Nevada, as the Burning Man encampment is known, using a mobile app called RideJoy, a ridesharing service that linked me up with an EMT driving from Berkeley into the desert along with a twentysomething couple that sold T-shirts out of an old loft in the Haight. The ride took about 9 hours and when you first hit Black Rock City you’re struck with its sheer size and the level of activity at every line of site: explosions of fire in one distance, twinkling lights from a structure maybe 10 stories tall in another and what looks like a neon Ferris Wheel in another direction. We pulled our vehicle into one of the Phantom Tollbooth-style entrances, and a team of three people wearing fur, headlamps and goggles ask for Burning Man virgins to step out of the car. I was then promptly hugged, “welcomed home”, made to get down in the desert dust for “sand angels” and handed a mallet to bang a large gong announcing my arrival.


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The entire camp is arranged in a series of half-moon roads ringing an open desert that features dozens of wood and metal sculptures artists construct often weeks in advance of the festival. These include the eponymous Man -- shaped like a diamond head squeezing into two inverted parentheses, )*( , perched atop a 50foot cylindrical dome, among other works ranging from a life-size pirate ship sinking into the sand, a wooden rhinoceros, an honestto-God bowling alley and most magnificent of all, an elaborate, non-denominational temple that’s a bit like the Wailing Wall, a place where people come to leave notes of prayer, mementos and commune with spirits past and people all around them. At the end of the week, it all burns. This is partly out of a Buddhist tradition of creation for creation’s sake and also as a practical matter of waste disposal. Witness it or it was as if it never existed, another reason why you just need to go, man. I rolled past the welcome committee around midnight that first night and per my emailed instructions, managed to find a “tall, beautiful black man” named Michael Jackson wearing a Sergeant Peppers’ uniform – a Beatle in a stack of needles, the keeper of our camp. He assembled other members of our group, which included a hyper articulate professional strongman who works as a demolitions expert in the British special forces, several foxy leather-clad babes, my RV-mate Adam and a guy who resembled a curious mix of Alec Baldwin and The Dude.

I was told I “came in hot” that first night and every night thereafter, reveling in the sensory overload, charged with a feeling of awe that this actually exists, that people make this and people have the sense to leave it alone. I consistently danced until sunrise. I made friends easily and rode a tricked out desert bike from camp to camp, following “mutant vehicles” – conceptual Macy’s Thanksgiving parade-size floats as imagined by Hollywood set designers and experimental auto mechanics, draped in speakers and supporting dozens of writhing bodies. The day time was spent wandering the Playa, the open desert floor, taking in the art, contributing to spontaneous acts of theater, catching a show, listening to lectures from TEDx-hosted biologists, sharing jokes, accepting free massages, drinking beers, stumbling into any of the hundred scheduled events that included “Flaming Cricket (just like normal cricket, but on fire)”, “Compassionate Spank Workshop”, the “Mass Unicycle Ride” and even the “Third Annual Healthy Friction Circle Jerk (Artisanal Lube Provided)”. Black Rock City is a curious place and it rewards curiosity. There are hundreds of parties; there is absolute solitude. You dance the equivalent of 7 weddings every day, the ecstatic kind where you really think the couple is going to make it. There are kids, there are adults, gays, straights, the clothed, the naked and the beautiful, the naked and the wow-I-didn’t-know-it-could-look-like-that.


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You grow more confident in the outfits you wear each day, coming closer to what you would wear if you were completely unafraid. For me this meant a lot of sleeveless fur and polyester pants. You hear that The Playa provides, and over the course of a week people you’ve never met offer you, the insufficiently-packed, everything from bicycles to blister cream. The Playa also provided me with a wonderfully cloudy sake, an avocado salad and a perfectly grilled halibut, debunking the notion that one should not abide seafood in a landlocked state. The end comes too soon and has the ring of last day at summer camp with all of the goodbyes and promises to see each other next year. Email addresses are written in the dust and photos are snapped so they can’t be lost. There is a tendency to look for meaning in the experience. On one level The Burn represents a catharsis, a secular Rumspringa that clears your head while stuffing your sinuses with Playa dust. On another level it recalibrates your notion of community and reinforces your empathy towards strangers. At either level the idea of Burning Man stays with you long after you leave. You find yourself looking to recreate intense visual stimulation at even the smallest cocktail parties, fire codes be damned. You find yourself eager to connect with people at a deeper level than where they may work or where they live. It even carries over to how you dress in which no accessory is useless any longer, a development my friend characterizes as a slow, inexorable march towards eccentricity. Perhaps expectedly, I’ve found that friends greet my re-telling of Burning Man with the same degree of cynicism that I previously had. That sounds like fun. For you. This disconnect even led to breaking up with a girl -- Burning Man as a litmus test. The effect is that you end up becoming the ultimate New York summer travel agent. Black Rock City?: It’s amazing, it’s the best, but don’t even think about visiting – you’ll ruin it.

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With Teddy, two years ago on a biking trip we took together in Napa CA

The start, where the rear wheel is dipped into the Pacific

new horizons By Richard Carey

Editors Note: Richard Carey and I were friends in college and then each of us started jobs in banking. His banking career lasted quite a bit longer than mine. Richard’s recent work has been to champion the cause of Marriage Equality, in part by taking a bike trip across the country to help get the message out. Many observers believe the success of the cause on Election Day 2012, when residents of four US states approved ballot measures in support of Marriage Equality, was in large part due to impressive grassroots organizing and tireless efforts to connect with voters. –Ken Giddon

I recently completed a 51 day ride of 3,700 miles from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic. I did it on a bicycle. I joined with a group of riders, from all walks of life, from all over the US. For some it was vacation, for others a test, and for me a journey. I had put such a ride on my “bucket list” of things I wanted to do for a while. But I felt a certain amount of guilt about the time, training and expense necessary to complete such an adventure. 16

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What made me pull the trigger was the realization that I could complete two journeys at once: That I could combine my passion for riding and at the same time, bring awareness across the heartland of America, to my cause, Freedom To Marry. It was ultimately a physical and emotional test, but also a cathartic ride to put my past behind me, and roll into my future. You see, I have been through some big life changes over the past 6 years--my wife and I divorced after 18 years of marriage, and I no longer wanted to hide that if I were to ever be married again, it would not be to a woman, but rather to a man. The best part of my life is being a father to my son Teddy, (although at 21 years old, he is preferring “Ted” these days). I am very proud of my college senior, and while parenting has some frustrating moments, I have never for one second regretted being a dad. I think I am pretty good at it, and it makes me want to stay healthy as long as possible to share my life with him, and hopefully his kids. While my lifestyle is outside the social norms, I feel that honesty and love are the two best examples that I can live by. I simply believe that anybody who wants to pursue a loving partnership and raise a family with the blessing that society grants to a married couple, should be able to do so, regardless of being straight or gay.


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Victory shot in Atlantic Ocean

I think most Americans agree with Lady Gaga that gay people are “Born That Way,” but many still struggle with treating us as equal. I have watched the country “evolve” on this issue, and the recent gains are dramatic. I figured my role was to take my message across this country, and talk about it, face to face, with the many Americans that have not dealt with the issue on a personal level. The route I followed was across the northern US: Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ontario (Canada), New York, Vermont, New Hampshire. On average, we rode about 85 miles a day. There were 7 days of over 100 miles and over 100,000 feet of vertical climbing. The biggest challenge: wind. A day that could look easy on paper would turn out to be much harder when those miles were ridden into a headwind. The toughest day, the one that is etched in my memory, was 120 miles in 100 degree heat, into a headwind into Casper, Wyoming. My other big challenge was a fear of steep descents, for which I had no real practice, as most of my training was on the flat shores on Long Island. The climbs I could train for by building stamina, but 40-50 mph on downhill on a bike takes some getting used to. I am still not sure if trying to overcome a fear of something that could kill you makes much sense. I loved the western landscapes, rolling through mountain desert, scrub plains with hills in the distance, like in Idaho and Wyoming. We saw sweeping farm fields on nearly every single day of the ride. I saw epic landmarks: Mt. Hood, Mount Rushmore, Grand Teton National Park, The Snake River, the Missouri River, the mighty Mississippi, Lake Michigan and Niagara Falls. All those iconic images of America that I had long wanted to see, I got to view from a bike. It was fantastic. My mother, fretted about my safety on and off the bike (as she was sure I might become a victim of some hate crime as well). Fortunately, I had no problems either way. We did “lose” 3 people: a crash at 53 mph coming down the Teton Pass into Jackson Hole (guy broke his pelvis in 3 places), another who had quadruple bypass surgery to save his life after a massive heart attack, and another guy who crashed taking a picture while riding. We had a few other crashes that caused some injuries but didn’t take people off the ride. It’s hard, though, to convince people back home that it isn’t dangerous when your group has a few less riders every week. The human side of the trip had many touching moments. Some of the conversations I had with people in the group, and in the towns I visited, were very moving, and confirmed that there is no reason for this to be an issue dividing Americans. My experience was that when people have this “issue” brought into their lives, for the most part they react like caring human beings. Like a young woman in a gritty western town in Wyoming who promised to raise her kid “the right way,” i.e. being tolerant, in honor of her husband’s brother who is gay. Like a fellow rider from Texas who I was unsure how he felt until he asked for my picture to be taken with him so that he could give it to his sister who is getting married (to a woman) this fall. Like another fellow rider whose 21 year old son just came out to him this spring, to which he wisely responded “I’m happy that you know who you are, and can now pursue being happy.” I feel good knowing that the 50 people I rode with at least understood my story and might help others be more open minded in their home towns. I was written up in a bunch of small town newspapers along the way, and it even brought some TV coverage. The ride changed my relationships with many friends who rose up to support me, especially those from my “old life,” many of whom were willing to donate to Freedom to Marry (www.freedomtomarry.org/richardcarey). Ultimately, this ride was very positive for my relationship with my son Ted. As a fellow rider, he understood the physical effort, and respected the passion I showed for the cause, which indirectly, relates back to him. Even my ex wife made a donation and sent a care package along the way. Yup, the family unit, while not together, still functions in all of our lives. I enjoy riding a bike, but in the end “It’s not about the bike.” The bike was the facilitator that allowed me to see this beautiful country, and tell my story, one town at a time.


the dream

Editors Note: We are never particularly happy to see our friends move overseas, but they usually return with great perspectives, fond memories and some silly new words in their vocabulary. With the Olympics in London this year, we asked our foreign correspondent Brent Silver (ok, that is a stretch, he is just a friend with an iPhone) to report on his Olympic experience and share his pics. –Ken Giddon

London Calling It’s been an exciting two years for our family to be in London – a Royal Wedding, the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee, and now the XXX Summer Olympics. As the Olympics approached, and with it, prognostications of the chaos that was about to envelop the city, all London-based expats had a binary decision – get the hell out of Dodge…or dive in. We dove in. Like our entire experience abroad, there were bound to be positive and negative extremes, but taking it all in is why we are here, and we were going to embrace it. We had close to a dozen friends and family come in to town to stay with us over the 17 days of competition. Ultimately we attended over 20 events, including the US Gold Medals in men’s hoops and diving, women’s soccer and beach volleyball, and individual golds by Serena and Venus, Michael Phelps, Missy Franklin and 15-year-old Katie Ledecky. If you haven’t been to the Olympics, it is hard to describe the sheer enormity of it all. Every single event is sold out, with fans from all over the world proudly wearing and waving their flags. There are dozens of competitions going on at once – each of those as tense as any major sports championship – crowning an individual or team the very best in the world at something, be it a 26mile 385-yard footrace or throwing a ball into a net in a pool. These athletes have dedicated their entire lives to THIS MOMENT. (Imagine if your career came down to your performance on one day. I guess you might order the double at Starbucks on the way in to work.).

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By Brent Silver

As an example, I skeptically attended the Men’s 10m Diving Finals – who cares about diving, right? Wouldn’t you rather watch a meaningless preseason football game, where you know the players and understand the rules? It was so foreign to me that I stopped snapping pictures of the athletes, out of fear that digital photos of ripped teenagers in tiny speedos could somehow be considered felonious should they be found on my hard drive! But there I was at the edge of my seat, sweating profusely, as the athletes prepared for the 6th and final dive, with only 3/100 of a percent separating the overwhelming Chinese favorite, the underdog American, and the local British hopeful. Adding to the drama is the risk of genuine injury – the crowd audibly gasps each time a diver’s head comes just inches of the platform. The American, David Boudia, pulled it out with an almost perfect dive, executed in a dead-silent Aquatics Centre that literally had the air sucked out of it from all the pressure. The Brit, Tom Daley, medaled, and everyone went home happy (well, except the Chinese). As I made my way down to get a better view of the medal ceremony, I passed a young woman with a “Go Boudia” shirt. Tears were streaming down her cheeks. Obviously congratulations were in order, and the woman who turned out to be the shocked fiancé of the American gold medalist could hardly string together a sentence. How would you process what you just witnessed? One dedicates the majority of their life to a single discipline, with an expiration date that could be as early as today, and with no expectation of medaling, they win it all. Seeing that unfold in person, I can tell you that no Super Bowl story will match it.


So after diving in to the Olympics head first, here are my winners and losers of the 30th Summer Games, or shall I say, medalists and disqualifiers: MEDALISTS Great Britain. Typically cynical Brits spent much of the past 7 years wondering what would most likely ruin their Olympics – terrorism, a two-week rainsoaked washout, another shutdown of the un-air-conditioned Tube system, paparazzi discovering Prince Harry leaving Lolo Jones’ Olympic Village room at 6am…….the fears were unending. But then a funny thing happened – nothing went wrong. No security issues, more sun than we’ve had in years, silky smooth commutes, and Prince Harry got caught with his pants down in Vegas instead. British athletes. Deserves its own mention. Finished 3rd in golds, despite ranking 22nd in world population (less than 1/5 of US). Dominated rowing, cycling and equestrian – as a British friend of mine explained, “we excel at any event that requires sitting on our bums.” BBC Television coverage (vs NBC) – BBC coverage was far broader (25 HD channels showing EVERYTHING live) and surprisingly casual and fun, overtly rooting for British athletes (“Go get em Mo!!……yeah Mo!!......oh dear fahhhhthers!!!!!” – just search for "mo farah bbc team" on youtube). On the other hand, NBC chose what their audience would see, often tape-delayed when the vast majority already knew the result, and announced with stoic, impartial professionalism. Just when exactly did America and Britain swap stereotypes?

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Raucous Wimbledon crowd. Genuinely deserve a medal for helping Brit Andy Murray upset Roger Federer in a rematch from the previous month’s Wimbledon final. Federer was visibly perturbed by the extended cheering into the following points, and the man who excels in indoor, sterile environments clearly deteriorated throughout the match. On that note, why is it that professionals hitting tennis balls demand absolute silence while teenage girls hurtling off uneven bars in a triple reverse axle perform to blaring pop music? Me. Gold Medal in Seating. Somebody had to be the aggressive American, occupying those unused VIP seats that caused so much hand-wringing. Hey, I was trained in “seat upgrades” at Shea Stadium and the Garden, and if the bigwigs from all the corporate sponsors chose not to attend, then somebody had to protect the IOC from embarrassing TV clips of empty swaths of front-row seats! Remember, the Brits are unfailingly polite, and they honor the sanctity of waiting in “queues” and sitting in their assigned seats. The highlight of my “upgrade performance” was snagging courtside seats for the Men’s Basketball Gold Medal game. I was close enough to witness the amusing huddle dynamics of Coach K intently drawing plays at crunch time while only 19 year old rookie Anthony Davis seemed to be listening (check out my pic of the moment below). Roaming beer guys. Wandering around Olympic Park with supersize coolers strapped to their backs and flags announcing their allegiance to BEER. They probably should have been in the Opening Ceremony with the Parade of Nations.


the dream

The Royals. These guys have finally figured it out. After generations of exhibiting a distant, elitist attitude towards the general populace, Will, Kate and Harry are always around, conveying a casual “everyman” vibe that pacifies a public that could easily resent a largely symbolic royalty. Did you know Prince Charles gets paid over $30 million a year? But they are revered more than ever despite the terrible economic environment. Why? Because unlike the US, the British have bifurcated the patriotic role of the “throne” from their despised politicians, allowing the Royals to be the face of unbridled patriotism and tradition. Well done, Your Majesty. DISQUALIFIERS Opening Ceremony. Don’t tell the Brits – they universally loved it. Every foreigner I spoke to had a reaction similar to mine – Danny Boyle’s production was beautiful and elaborate, but like most British stage shows, I had no idea what was going on. To the best I could tell - a giant Voldemort was casting spells on children getting spun around in hospital beds by nurses, while an army of flying Mary Poppins’ attacked him with their super nanny powers. Now I’m sure there was some profound philosophical meaning to all of this (or perhaps it was intended to be a 12-year-old’s acid trip), but it was way beyond my pea-headed American brain. Thanks for making us feel intellectually inferior, Britain. Again.

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Cumulative scoring tabulations. During the Gymnastics and Diving events, the scoreboard leaders are sorted by cumulative scores. This means that whoever has performed one more event will show up as the current “leader”, when in fact the best athletes tend to go last in each round. My brain was fried from trying to constantly calculate what the current performer needed to score to reach top places. People, please, it’s 2012 – we have calculators now - rank them with AVERAGE scores! Americans trying to use the ubiquitous British greeting “Cheers” around Olympics Park. My advice to all Americans visiting England – just don’t do it. It’s as fraud-exposing as a Brit trying to pull off a “Take it easy brotha”. “Cheers” could mean “thank you”, “you’re welcome”, “excuse me”, “goodbye” and about 178 other expressions depending on the intonation. I’ve been living here for two years and finally stopped trying after a cabbie laughed in my face for butchering a Cheers. Just trust me on this. Thanks for reading and I hope to report from Brazil in 4 years. Cheers!


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living

Cross Fit

By Jeff Corbin

Editors Note: Our friend Jeff Corbin, has been shopping at Rothmans for about a decade. Jeff is the CEO of KCSA Strategic Communications, an investor relations, business-to-business public relations and creative marketing services firm located in New York City. We noticed last year that Jeff’s clothes did not fit quite as well as they should. Something had changed. We asked Jeff what was going on, and he told us he had taken up Cross Fit, an exercise program that emphasizes Olympic weightlifting, metabolic conditioning and gymnastics. Cross Fit has a cult-like following. In fact, we noticed that when you ask one of these Cross Fit disciples about the program, it is hard to get them to stop talking about it. So we figured the solution was to let Jeff write about his experience, in the hope that when we see him, we can talk about something else. –Ken Giddon

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Ever since college, there’s been a hyper side of me that requires me to break a sweat before getting started with my day. For the past 20 years, whether as a young practicing attorney or now as the head of a communications consulting firm, getting to the gym has been part of my daily routine. It is there that I have met some of my closest friends and business acquaintances (including Ken Giddon). However, after years of running on a treadmill, thinking that climbing a stair machine was tough or doing dumbbell curls, boredom settled in. One day I was flipping through the remote control of my TV and came across a crazy competition on ESPN. Guys and girls were jumping up and down on wooden boxes; throwing barbells with hundreds of pounds on them over their heads and doing what seemed like endless numbers of pull-ups – all in a matter of minutes. I came to learn that what I was watching was not American Ninja Warrior, but the national Cross Fit championship and that Cross Fit as an exercise regimen was sweeping not only the U.S., but the World.


living

At first I didn’t think to pursue Cross Fit because I didn’t think I could physically do what these athletes were doing. Then I learned that a local affiliate, Empire State Cross Fit, was right around the corner from my house in Larchmont. I contacted, the owner, Dan Stearns, who explained to me that people of all ages were members. He encouraged me to stop by and check it out. Cross-fit gyms are called “boxes” and are minimalistic – no mirrors on the walls, no fancy cardiovascular machines and no stateof-the-art spas. Our box at Empire State Cross Fit just moved to an awesome 5,000 square foot location. When you walk in, you see a big open space with dozens of barbells, pull-up bars, rings and ropes suspended from the ceiling (remember back in elementary school?), kettle bells, rowers and a white board where the daily workout of the day (the WOD) is posted along with everyone’s score or time for completing the WOD. Every day is something new which keeps us coming back for more. There are hourly classes that start exactly on the hour and end exactly 60 minutes later. You want an efficient workout, this is it. I’m in by 6 AM, out by 7 and on the 8 AM express to Grand Central. There is a warm-up period, we work on a specific technique and then do the daily WOD. Today was a 20-minute AMRAP (as many rounds as possible) consisting of 5 handstand

pushups, 10-185 pound deadlifts and 15 burpees (if you don’t know what a burpee is, you should check it out on Google or YouTube); yesterday was 21-18-15-12-9-6-3 reps of “push jerks” with 30 double-under jump ropes in between each set (scored for time); the day before was a workout named “Helen”. Helen is a brute – a 400 meter run, followed by 21-53 pound kettle bell swings, followed by 12 pull ups – do this three times around (scored for time). I think you get the idea. Ken is right when he says that those who do Cross Fit only talk about one thing – Cross Fit. Not sure why this is but it’s true. At this point, no one in my office is interested in talking to me, nor are my wife and kids. But that’s ok, I have my posse, a great group of friends that I have made at Cross Fit. Since the day I started at Empire State Cross Fit, I am a new guy and have a new approach to exercise, the way I purport myself professionally (particularly in a competitive sense) and to life in general. Cross Fit and the great training coaches at Empire State have pushed me to want to go out of my comfort zone both physically and mentally. As a result, at the age of 46, I am in the best shape of my life. The only problem now is that I need a new wardrobe – not a problem for Rothmans.”

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style

Tempted to try out today’s stubble look? Here are some bristly pros and cons to ponder.

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One might say that those who do not remember the original Miami Vice television show (1984–1990) are doomed to repeat it. That marked the previous time stubble trimmers — an appliance calibrated midway between a beard trimmer and a regular electric razor — appeared on the market. Then, stalwart Don Johnson’s roughly textured jaw was all the rage; now we have His Royal Scruffiness, Hugh Laurie of House (2004–2012) to thank for reanimating the trend towards facial hirsutism.


WWW.ORIGINALPENGUIN.COM


style

It seems not an award show goes by these days without the majority of male celebs sporting a threeday growth. A recent university study has indicated that most women find the look sexy — at least on male celebs. So, should you or shouldn’t you? Allow us to pose the arguments for and against:

You don’t have to shave so often. In fact, one of the best ways of doing designer stubble is to only shave every three to five days. You do have to shave as often — and maybe even more. Those prone to five o’clock shadow will just find themselves shaving the night before, as opposed to the morning of. Then there’s the tricky business of shaving away stray cheek hairs and carefully fading out the neck hairs so they don’t meet up with the chest hairs in one big, awkward, Chia Pet moment.

Like we just said, most women said they find the look sexy.’Nuff said. Most women don’t appear to be thinking about the unsexy, disfiguring effects of morning-after beard burn on themselves.

Slight stubble, especially if it’s dark, tends to accentuate the attractive planes and angles of the male face. If your normal growth is patchy, your beard is a weird color, or you’ve a moon face without any planes and angles, then you cannot — repeat, cannot — rock this look.

All the guys are doing it. Remember big sideburns? Mullets? Goatees? If all the guys were jumping off a bridge… 28

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b y V E N C E V I DA

automobiles

4-door sport — It’s the new hot category of automobile design, and BMW has finally jumped in with both feet. Although technically a sedan by strict definition, the new Gran Coupe is BMW’s entry into the new market sector, eyed suspiciously at first by many in the industry, but now coming into undeniable popularity — the “quad-coupe.” Mercedes-Benz originally took the plunge with the CLS, followed by the Porsche Panamera, the Audi A7, and even the Volkswagen CC. Although a bit of a holdout at first, BMW has just released their offering of a 4-door pseudo-coupe as their newest 6 series model. Compared to the 2-door 6 series, the Gran Coupe is about 4.4 inches longer — most of which is given to back seat space — and 4.5 inches wider. The expressive front end is dominated by the large and slightly forward-slanting BMW kidney grill with slats angled slightly at the top, lending emphasis to the shark-nose character of the face. The Gran Coupe’s distinctive profile is dominated by its four-door, elegantly stretched roof line, which flows smoothly into the rear end. The long, powerfully contoured hood, short front overhang, and set-back passenger compart-

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automobiles

ment gives the auto a sort of athletic elegance. This helps answer

BMW fashion, the Gran Coupe delivers that familiar autobahn-

the question, “If you’ve already got the 3 series and the 5 series,

tuned exhilarating experience as the 2-door 6s.

why a 4-door 6?” It truly is a different animal. You almost have to

The two available engines, specially tuned for this size and

look twice to be sure the Gran Coupe actually has 4 doors. It’s a

shape, deliver on that familiar promise of the ultimate driving

sporty “coupy” (coopish?) look that is unique and stylistically

machine. The 3-liter inline six will impress performance-minded

appealing in a way that the more standard sedan is not. It’s per-

drivers with its effortless power as it launches from 0 to 60 in 5.4

fect for the driver who has begrudgingly admitted that he needs

seconds while still remaining capable of delivering up to 30 mpg

the convenience and room of a 4-door but wishes he didn’t.

on the highway. And if you opt for the V-8 version, you can shave

And staying in that same vein of duality — size plus perform-

a full second off that acceleration time, for those days when 5 1/2

ance — once you’re in the cockpit of the Gran Coupe, as long as

seconds is just too long to wait before you can set that cruise con-

you don’t turn around and see the extra leg-room and door han-

trol. In case you’re wondering, both versions are electronically

dles, you’re free to pretend your still driving that sexy 6 series 2-

governed to a top speed of 155mph. If that’s going to be a prob-

door coupe. Nothing about the performance of this slightly

lem, perhaps you need to look into finding a house a little closer

stretched version is going to interfere with the daydream. In true

to the office.

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automobiles

The BMW Gran Coupe joins the Audi A7, Porsche Panamera, and Mercedes CLS in the Quad-Coupe market

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4-door sport — It’s the new hot category of automobile design, and

top, lending emphasis to the shark-nose character of the face. The

BMW has finally jumped in with both feet. Although technically a

Gran Coupe’s distinctive profile is dominated by its four-door, ele-

sedan by strict definition, the new Gran Coupe is BMW’s entry

gantly stretched roof line, which flows smoothly into the rear end.

into the new market sector, eyed suspiciously at first by many in

The long, powerfully contoured hood, short front overhang, and

the industry, but now coming into undeniable popularity — the

set-back passenger compartment gives the auto a sort of athletic

“quad-coupe.”

elegance. This helps answer the question, “If you’ve already got the

Mercedes-Benz originally took the plunge with the CLS, fol-

3 series and the 5 series, why a

lowed by the Porsche Panamera, the Audi A7, and even the

4-door 6?” It truly is a different

Volkswagen CC. Although a bit of a hold-out at first, BMW has

animal. You almost have to

just released their offering of a 4-door pseudo-coupe as their

look twice to be sure the Gran

newest 6 series model. Compared to the 2-door 6 series, the Gran

Coupe actually has 4 doors. It’s

Coupe is about 4.4 inches longer — most of which is given to back

a sporty “coupy” (coopish?)

seat space — and 4.5 inches wider.

look that is unique and stylisti-

The expressive front end is dominated by the large and slightly

cally appealing in a way that

forward-slanting BMW kidney grill with slats angled slightly at the

the more standard sedan is

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Atelier Gardeur… Creating great trousers and jeans.

It’s an art.


the

best songs

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Waits as himself, so it should be no surprise that Waits wrote a song for the film, which probably would’ve gone completely unnoticed if it hadn’t been for the release of Orphans: Brawlers, Bawlers & Bastards’ the following year.

20. “I’ve Seen It All” Thom Yorke and Bjork Dancer in the Dark While we’ve mostly left musicals off this list, we’d be remiss if we failed to mention this excellent track from Lars von Trier’s Dancer in the Dark. Just be sure to listen to the version with Thom Yorke singing, rather than the version actually featured in the film.

16. “Porpoise Song” The Monkees Head While much of Head’s music was actually written by The Monkees for the first time in their career, like the movie they wrote it for, the soundtrack flopped (although not quite as badly). That isn’t to say it’s bad, though, and this track written by Carole King and Gerry Goffin captures a more psychedellic sound for the group than their more popular singles and functions as the main theme in the film.

18. “You Can Never Hold Back Spring” Tom Waits The Tiger and the Snow Roberto Benigni’s 2005 feature was barely released in America. But it features Tom

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movies

The release of the hit film The Hunger Games and its accompanying soundtrack, including original tracks from artists as diverse as The Arcade Fire and Taylor Swift, had us thinking about the long history of pop music written specifically for movies. While Easy Rider and Scorpio Rising popularized the use of found music, some directors have desired to work with the artists they love without all of the context and baggage that found music carries with it.

19. “Danger Zone” Kenny Loggins Top Gun No list of movie songs is complete without mentioning Kenny Loggins’s so-badits-good work for Top Gun. You might not like it, but now that we’ve mentioned it, you almost certainly can’t get it out of your head.

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17. “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head” B.J. Thomas Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid One of those songs that feels like it’s been around forever, “Raindrops” fit strangely into Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, but it helped set the picture’s goofy, buddy heist-flick tone.

15. “Moon River” Audrey Hepburn Breakfast at Tiffany’s “Moon River” remains an oddity in that it was written particularly for a movie, with Johnny Mercer and Henry Mancini making sure it worked with Hepburn’s vocal range, but it’s been so overshadowed by Andy Williams’s cover that the original version is often forgotten. Strangely enough, Hepburn’s version wasn’t even included on the film’s soundtrack.

14. “Lose Yourself” Eminem 8 Mile Written largely from the point of view of Eminem’s character in the loosely semiautobiographical 8 Mile, “Lose Yourself” was the first rap song to win an Academy Award. It also stayed at Billboard’s #1 spot for 16 weeks, making it the most successful single of his career. 13. “Theme from Shaft” Isaac Hayes Shaft Perhaps the most famous title song for any movie, it was written on condition that Hayes receive an audition for the title role, which never happened. It was still released as a single, though, and it’s one of the few songs written for a picture to head to the top of Billboard’s charts. 12. “Cat People (Putting Out Fire)” David Bowie Cat People Paul Schrader’s Cat People remake was largely overlooked, but its title song went on to be a huge success, not to mention living a second life in film when it was featured in Quentin Tarantino’s Inglorious Basterds. 11. “Exit Music (For a Film)” Radiohead Romeo + Juliet While this song was written for Romeo + Juliet and refered to its status in the title, Thom Yorke specifically asked that the song be left off the film’s soundtrack. Instead Radiohead brought it in as another classic track on OK Computer.


bensherman.com


spotlight

10. “Fight the Power” Public Enemy Do the Right Thing Even after its release on Fear of a Black Planet, “Fight the Power” has remained indelibly linked with the movie that spawned it. Spike Lee not only commissioned the song, he directed its music video — in two different versions. 9. “We Are Sex” Sex Bob-Omb and Beck Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World While it’s not uncommon for songwriters to have actors perform their works in movies, that’s usually left to musicals. But Edgar Wright hired Beck and Nigel Godrich to score his entire picture, including songs played by the band Sex BobOmb. Beck also released the fantastic Odelay outtake “Deadweight” on the feature A Life Less Ordinary, though it wasn’t written for the picture. 8. “Can’t Help Falling in Love” Elvis Presley Blue Hawaii Elvis Presley played numerous songs for his various pictures, most of which were far better than the movies they were featured in. While nearly all of the films are for Elvis diehards only, the songs have had much longer lifespans, and many of his classics, such as “Can’t Help Falling in Love,” only came about because of them.

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7. “If You Want to Sing Out, Sing Out” Cat Stevens Harold and Maude Although Harold and Maude is filled with Cat Stevens tracks, only a handful were written specifically for the film. Unfortunately, Harold and Maude’s lack of box office success meant that this classic was long unavailable, since no soundtrack was released, until a limited edition vinyl a few years ago. In some ways that’s fitting, though, since the song feels inseparable from Maude. 6. “I’m Easy” Keith Carradine Nashville Robert Altman was extremely concerned with authenticity when he filmed Nashville, so he asked his actors and actresses to write the songs they would be performing in the film. Keith Carradine was the only cast member, though, who managed to ride his song into the Top 40 and a record contract. 5. “Save Me” Aimee Mann Magnolia Magnolia’s soundtrack was almost entirely written and performed by Aimee Mann, and “Save Me” was written just for the feature. Paul Thomas Anderson also directed its video, although it’s not one of his better works and pales in comparison to Lee’s.

4. “Miss Misery” Elliott Smith Good Will Hunting While the rest of Good Will Hunting hasn’t aged well, its legacy of launching a then-unknown Elliott Smith’s career still makes it a worthwhile film. The song is everything the film isn’t: subtle, intelligent and honest. 3. “Don’t You (Forget About Me)” Simple Minds The Breakfast Club Conversely, the success of “Don’t You (Forget About Me)” seems impossible to imagine without its placement in John Hughes’s The Breakfast Club. 2. “Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door” Bob Dylan Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid The always tumultuous relationship between Sam Peckinpah and his producers led to Pat Garrett’s getting re-edited and then buried at the box office, and as a result Dylan’s contribution to the soundtrack was the most successful part of the picture. Dylan actually wrote every song for the film, and Peckinpah liked his score so much that he offered the musician a role in the picture. 1. Simon & Garfunkel “Mrs. Robinson” The Graduate This may be the first song that comes to mind when people think about pop songs in films. It was famously altered at the behest of director Mike Nichols to be about Mrs. Robinson rather than Mrs. Roosevelt so as to fit better with the movie, a small change that completely transforms its meaning.


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footwear

the

sole of a rebel

The Lace-up

It is most fitting in these revolutionary times that our number

across the arch. The fad for “Oxfords,” as this shoe came to be

one dress shoe remains the Oxford. To us, the Oxford is a simple

called, spread across UK campuses and even made its way into

shoe — plain in styling (unlike its descendent, the brogue, with its

some gentlemen’s wardrobes, although it would take another hun-

fancy-shmancy perforated medallion designs) and, therefore, our

dred-odd years and a world war before the style was finally

most business-like footwear option. But to Oxonians, as students at

deemed to be a shoe-in.

the British university are known, this shoe represented a sartorial Arab Spring.

A century after that point, we now consider the Oxford the grand-old-daddy of all dress shoes, appropriate for use even with

At the turn of the 18th century, students rebelled against the

formalwear. So how could it not be the choice of the world’s top

concept of having to don knee-length or ankle-high boots on a

designers, during this season of elegant suitings and classic accou-

daily basis and took to wearing low-cut shoes that laced straight

trements?

Two out of three of this season’s top shoes were originally popularized by rebellious students

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footwear

The Strap-over From time to time, you might want to stuff your tootsies into something a little different — but no less acceptable than an Oxford. Consider the monk-strap, a plain-toed shoe with a single strap-and-buckle closure that crosses over the vamp and does up on the outside of the arch. Developed in Europe in the 1930s, this shoe still carries with it a whiff of Continental elegance. It also has the advantage over other footwear in appearing at once dressy and casual. Just as today’s designers have done, choose either a black or brown calfskin model, or one in chocolate brown suede. And do try to avoid any of the clunkier double-buckled models you might run across.

The Slip-on Hands down, this fall’s most popular footwear is the loafer. It comes a bit thicker of sole than usual — the better to balance today’s slim suits. Although it might come decorated as well with a tassel or kiltie fringe, may we suggest you stick to the classic penny loafer style? First developed in Norway in the mid-1930s, the casual slip-on shoe built along moccasin lines was quickly adopted by both the Spaulding and the G. H. Bass companies of New England. To Spaulding goes the honor of nicknaming the look “loafers,” after Esquire magazine ran a picture of Norwegian farmers wearing the shoes while standing next to a cow-loafing shed, a pasture shelter built to protect livestock in harsh weather. But G. H. Bass, who named their version “Weejuns” — a mash-up of “Norwegian” and “Injun” — took the prize by adding a strip of leather with a decorative cut-out in its center. In the mid-1950s, American youth, most notably Rebel without a Cause’s James Dean, discovered that loafers looked way cool when worn with jeans. By that time too, the Ivy League look was raging, and students in the North-east literally made these shoes their own by inserting a copper penny into the cut-out slit. Thus, the penny loafer was born. Not perhaps as revolutionary an act as that perpetrated by their confreres at Oxford, but still a part of footwear history that we can proudly put on today.

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b y

P E T E R

M A N D E L

cocktails

Robert Louis Stevenson once explained that he traveled “not to get anywhere, but to go. The great affair,” he said, “was to move.” “Sure,” I would have replied, had I been there in the 19th-century novelist and travel writer’s study, listening closely, single malt in hand. “Movement is just fine. But for me, the whole thing is, well, more liquid. I sail and get on planes, and pilot my car in quest of interesting drinks.’’ This is the point where Stevenson would have either refilled my glass or sent me packing. But let me explain. It isn’t daylight I like, but dusk. And similar to a ship at sunset, reaching a new port lets me moor for at least a night and taste (I should say sip) what it has in store. I find out more from the snap of a country’s signature liqueur than by visiting sights or taking guided tours. France, of course, has its Kir (a blend of créme de cassis and white wine), and England enjoys its Pimm’s Cup (a gin drink using quinine and herbs). But for a traveler, these are only two of the world’s top cocktail-hour pours. In Iceland recently for the first time, I ran smack into a juggernaut in a bottle called Brennivin, known to locals as the black death. Similar to the Aquavit of Scandinavia, Brennivin is a schnapps that’s made from potatoes and jazzed up with the scent of caraway seeds. Much like a looming volcano — like the Icelandic landscape itself — this national drink is a raw and mysterious thing. The scary-looking jet-black Brennivin label depicts Iceland’s coastline, as if it were a tipple just for fishermen. In fact, while trying to get a glass of black death down, I learned that it is excellent for chasing away the taste of hakarl, an Icelandic delicacy derived from rotting shark meat. (No one had any hakarl handy.) And I didn’t die from drinking my shot, but my throat and stomach felt like molten lava and my brain like a just-extinguished blaze.

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36400CK_Rothmans_Nov.indd 1

10/17/12 3:50 PM


cocktails

During a rain forest cruise on Brazil’s Rio Negro, I was handed

maged cheerfully in

my first Caipirinha, a concoction that tastes as fresh as jungle fruits

back and flashing a

or flowers (that’s the lime in there) but coils inside you like a cobra

grin, presented us

waiting to strike. I started asking deckhands and discovered that

with

Caipirinha comes from caipira, meaning a person from the coun-

Country Time brand

tryside. But after a second glass, the name of this national drink

Burmese gin. We

started to sound to me like samba.

bought it on the

“Caipirinha, Caipirinha,” I sang out loud on the windswept

fifth

of

spot.

deck. “Copacabana, Ipanema.” (This was the work of cachaca, a

An opposite universe, in many ways, is urban China. The busy

local sugar-cane-based rum.) The cries of parrots overhead blend-

Beijing restaurants I ate in pulsated with energy, with a zest for

ed in, along with splashes of fish and fat drops from a tropical

consumption that matched the frenetic streets. Unlike Myanmar,

storm. For the first time, I understood why Brazilians seem never

the carts here transported Peking duck, ready for slicing, and jin-

far from a guitar.

gling bottles of baijiu, the country’s ubiquitous white liquor, which

Sometimes, a drink evokes what has been going on in a coun-

is distilled from sorghum and can be as strong as 120 proof.

try’s work life. For reasons I have never understood, alcohol has an

After a cup of the stuff was passed my way and I took a few sips,

eerie sense of economics and often reflects the pace of the place

I began to feel that baijiu was more than just a drink; it was Beijing

where it is mixed and poured. An extreme example of this is in

in a bottle. It reminded me of riding in Chinese buses, of touring

Myanmar (formerly Burma), which has been isolated for decades

around a car-choked downtown. “What is this taste?” I asked aloud,

because of its repressive military regime.

“It tastes like diesel fuel!” a Chinese man at my table was quick to

Myanmar’s rural roads are clogged with herds of gentle cattle. Churning by on bikes and donkey carts, everyone smiles. When my

44

a

reply, clapping his hands and laughing delightedly beside four baijiu-drinking friends.

wife and I asked about spirits in a shop, the owner dredged up a dusty

He was correct. I was slowly learning.

bottle about three-quarters full. Noticing our hesitation, he rum-

Time for another cup.

]

R O T H M A N ’ S

M AG A Z I N E


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Rothmans Magazine - Issue 10