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Club of Salisbury (SA) Inc

THE ENCOURAGER

RI President 2016 -17 John Germ District Governor 2016-17 RI District 9500 John Pohl Assistant Governor Group 4 Rick Henke

President Christopher Moore Vice President Roger Dennis President Elect Celian Kidega Immediate Past President Graham Purbrick

Meeting 2638 – July 11 th 2016 July is Changeover Month with the spotlight on the new Rotary Year under new club leaders becoming established, with new duties being assigned, new roles being learned and new relationships developed.

CONTACT PO Box 931 Salisbury SA 5108 www.salisburyrotary.com.au Meet Mondays (except public holidays) 6.00pm for 6.30pm Old Spot Hotel Main North Rd Salisbury Heights

Who as present for Meeting # 2637? As it was the first meeting of our newly formed teams it was appropriate that the table arrangements reflected the smaller sizes of planning team and so it was comfortable to welcome Donna Holloway with daughter Sarah as visitors and accommodated with the Youth Committee.

‘In recognition of Bastille Day we were provided with colourful and tasty macaroons (in Fr. macaron and in It. macaroni) thanks to Kerrie for the thought and effort.’

Formed: 13th June 1963 Chartered: 4th November 1963

We said goodbye to our India container last Thursday, 7 th of July. It’s heading to Harvest Ministries International in Trivandrum in the south, to help out their Rose of Sharon orphanage there as well as the local clinic and school. Looking forward to hear news of its journey once it reaches India! Please follow our Facebook page for updates: www.facebook.com/ContainerOfHope.Adelaide

THEME FOR 2016/2017

Secretary Cathy Perry Membership & Development Mary Purbrick

The 4 Way Test Of the things we think, say or do

The Rotary Foundation Kerri Moore 1. 2.

Club Admin. Officer Ellinor Caruso

3.

Public Image Director Rick Henke Service Director Colin Willington

4.

Treasurer Anthea Walker Bulletin is produced after each meeting. Due date for bulletin inclusions: 6.30pm on the night of the meeting (emailed to bulletin@salisburyrotary.co m.au preferred or clear concise handwritten information on the night).

George, as Chief Tosser, quite cleverly won the H&T.

Is it the TRUTH? Is It FAIR to all concerned? Will it promote build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS? Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?


Apologies, Make-ups and Guests to Peter Salamon, PLEASE

WHAT’S COMING UP IN CLUB MEETINGS? 18/07/2016 #2639

25/07/2016 #2640

1/08/2016 #2641

8/08/2016 #2642

6.30 for 7 start

6 for 6.30 start

6 for 6.30 start

6 for 6.30 start

Partners Night

Ron Hann

Christopher Moore

Visit from District Governor John Pohl

Caroline Letchford

WHO HAS A REASON TO CELEBRATE IN

JULY

Chairman

Team Meeting

BIRTHDAYS

2nd Roger Dennis 8th Julie Stanley 20th Mignon Clark’s Paul 27th Jan Hann 30th Anthea Walker

Speaker

Topic

State Volunteers

Club Forum

ANNIVERSARIES

1st 1969 Norm & Gabi Waldowski 8th 1967 Graham & Mary Purbrick 10th 1971 Christopher & Kerri Moore 17th 1982 Mignon & Paul Clark

Furniture

Jeff

Jeff

Jeff

Jeff

Attendance Desk

Eric

Eric

Eric

Eric

Sergeant

George

George

George

George

INDUCTIONS

4th 2009 Rick Henke 10th 1985 Ron Hann

ALLSORTS ROSTER

Team Leaders Community Norm Waldowski

Thursday Sales

International Peter Salamon Youth Services Rick Henke Vocational Mignon Clark Australia Day Toni Anne Smallman

Saturday Sales

14th July

21st July

28th July

4th August

Keith, Dennis, Ian & Roslyn

Alun, Roger M & Betty

Roger, Gloria & Rick T

Alun, Roger M & Betty

16th July

23rd July

30th July

6th August

Graham, Mary & Julie

Colin, George & Donna

Rick H, Gabby, Richard, Norm & Jeff & Julie Cathy

Allsorts Pick-up and Deliveries roster – please be advised that when goods have been sold and delivery is arranged we ask that someone from the team of the day advise the following teams for delivery and for any known collections. July: Rick T and Roger, August: Ron and Norm, September: Keith and Gerry, October: Graham and Richard


OTHER STUFF YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT If you would like an event included in this schedule, advise bulletin@salisburyrotary.com.au When

Event

Where

Additional Information

EVERY Thursday 9am-4pm Saturday 9.30am-3pm

Container of Hope

Donations in Kind, off Taranaki Rd, Edinburgh Parks

Any help will be appreciated. Free BBQ for all those that come to help, or visit

Business Breakfast

Grand Central 0r The Club at Parafield Gardens

Fourth Wednesday each month, 7.00am—8.45am FIRST Tuesday of the Month

Partners Meetings

Goodall Room

$18 for a cooked breakfast

Monday

Friday 5th

Everyone and anyone Everyone and anyone

CLUB CONTACTS

Official meeting with DG John Pohl visiting

CLUB CONTACTS

August Monday 1st

Jess Cornish admin@containerofhope.com. au or 0458 036 832 Bookings at http://e.mybookingmanager.com/NBB june2016

Who should attend?

$2.00 + bring a plate to share

July 18th

Contact

Changeover Meeting

CLUB CONTACTS

Rotary Club of Salisbury

Closing date for District 9500 grant applications 22-23 October D9500 Rotary Leadership Institute at St Michaels 2017 D9500 Conference in Geelong

Container heading to Harvest Ministries International in Trivandrum in the south, to help out their Rose of Sharon orphanage there as well as the local clinic and school.


and have the goods available to be able to pack and send a

CLUB ANNOUNCEMENTS Bulletin Roger Dennis 0403313927 Donna Holloway 0457 861 794 bulletin@salisburyrotary.com.au Catering, Make-ups, Apologies, Guests Peter Salamon Phone: 8287 0532 by midday Sunday for catering purposes

There were no announcements called for or delivered from the floor as we dined in our team places and discussed the team issues however President Christopher presented the following to add to our discussions 10 BIG IDEAS CREATIVE BRAIN AND LIGHT BULB

Business Breakfast Colin/Rick breakfast@salisburyrotary.com.au AllSorts Roger Dennis Phone: 0403 313 927 allsorts@salisburyrotary.com.au BBQ Trailer Richard Pailthorpe Phone: 0409 093 360 bbq@salisburyrotary.com.au Child Safety Peter Salamon Programs Peter Salamon Phone: 8287 0532 Public Officer/Asst Treasurer Roger Dennis Phone: 0403 313 927 Meeting cashier Eric Chippett Welcome and greetings Kerrie Moore Family of Rotary Roger Dennis Friends of Rotary Mary Purbrick Web Master Damien Walker webmaster@salisburyrotary.com.au

Bank account details BSB 035-047 a/c 384347

Oh well, it’s still something i do every day. It reminds me to stay focused. It shows me where to take action. And it’s brought many of my dreams to life, both personally and professionally. It’s a great tip from James Altucher, and it’s called the 10 big idea exercise. Here’s how to do it… according to James: How do i start exercising the idea muscle? Take a note pad. Go to a local i. Then start writing down ideas. What ideas? Hold on a second. The key here is, write ten ideas. Why ten ideas? If i say, “write down ten ideas for books you can write” i bet you can easily write down four or five. I can write down four or five right now. But at six it starts to get hard. “hmmm,” you think, “what else can i come up with?” This is when the brain is sweating. Note that when you exercise in the gym, your muscles don’t start to build until you break a sweat. Your metabolism doesn’t improve when you run until you sweat. Your body doesn’t break down the old and build the new until it is sweating. The poisons and toxins in your body don’t leave until you sweat. The same thing happens with the idea muscle. Somewhere around idea number six, your brain starts to sweat. This means its building up. Break through this. Come up with ten ideas. What if i just can’t come up with ten ideas? Here’s the magic trick: if you can’t come up with ten ideas, come up with 20 ideas. But if i can’t come up with ten, how am i supposed to come up with 20? For the obvious reason. You are putting too much pressure on yourself. Perfectionism is the enemy of the idea muscle. Perfectionism is your brain trying to protect you from harm. From coming up with an idea that is embarrassing and stupid and could cause you to suffer pain. We like the brain. But you have to shut the brain off to come up with ideas. The way you shut the brain off is by forcing it to come up with bad ideas. That’s it. Do this every day. It works to help you get more clients, come up with a new headline for your sales copy, or simply to plan out your big goals and dreams for your life… perhaps attracting a new life partner or figuring out how you can make that great escape to the vacation of your dreams. All it takes is a pen and paper. No silly iPhone apps required. Take action today. Think big… and then think even bigger. To your wild ideas, Craig Ballantyne

The Rotary Club of Salisbury acknowledges the support of the Plush Group in providing the venue for our meetings ~ Friendly Staff ~ ~ Great Atmosphere ~ ~ Modern gaming lounge ~ ~ Meals and functions ~ Phone 82582096 or http://www.oldspothotel.com.au


MOVING OUT OF COMFORT ZONE Comfort – Do you remember? Do you remember sitting in your father’s lap, safe, his arms around you, holding you as the most precious person in all the world? Do you remember what it felt like to know deep down inside that you were loved, right to the core? I hope you do. HOW TO STEP OUT OF YOUR COMFORT http://www.wikihow.com/Step-Out-of-Your-Comfort-Zone Zone 1: Make a fool of yourself. One of the biggest things that holds many of us back is our fear of what people think. After all, you don’t want people to think you’re weird or rude or creepy or obnoxious or annoying, do you? But wait — think about the most lovable, magnetic people you’ve come across in your life. Odds are, they weren’t the meek, agreeable people who are reliably pleasant to be around. They were the people who were crazy and charming. People who blurted out silly, maybe inappropriate things, or who made huge, slap-your-forehead mistakes, or who were over the top most of the time, but others forgave them for being less than perfect and in fact, liked them for it. So shatter your concern for what people think of you. You’re allowed to be less than perfect, and you may find that people like you more for it, because it makes you a more exciting person to be around. Get laughed at, laugh with ‘em. Do something you normally wouldn’t do for fear of looking like an idiot. Be that idiot. You’ll be fine. Zone 2: Know that worst thing that can happen when you try something new is that you might fail. At least you tried and probably learned that it wasn’t as scary as you imagined. Knowing that you tried is an accomplishment and realizing that even a failed attempt at something new is a measure of success in that you had the courage to take a risk and made the effort to act and take a leap of faith. Zone 3: Face your fears. There are the big fears, such as heights, spiders, tight spaces, and germs, but there are also hundreds of subtle fears we bow to every day. Like the fear of breaking a bone, or falling down, or getting caught in the rain. What are the precautions you take every day to circumvent “negative” circumstances? And are those circumstances really worth stepping around? Those steps add up! It’s good to be proactive, but it’s bad to let a significant portion of your life be devoted to averting things that never happen—little things that could turn into adventures or funny stories if you allow yourself to deal with a little discomfort. Zone 4: Become comfortable with taking risks. Your comfort zone is comfortable because it’s where you know what to expect. Going out on a limb can be scary because you might fail. You might lose something. But you might also gain something, huh? In order to become comfortable with that uncertainty, you’ll need to practice the following:  Non-attachment. When you decide to do something, do it for its own sake, not so that you can get a particular result. If you gamble, gamble with money you’re ready and willing to lose; gamble for the fun and exhilaration of gambling. If you win, that’s icing on the cake! But if you lose, no big deal. In other words, let go of your attachment to a certain outcome; instead, focus on the joy of doing whatever you’re doing. Live in the moment.  Acceptance. When things don’t go your way, and they won’t, shrug it off. If you’re clinging to your comfort zone, you’re hanging on to an idea that the world is supposed to be a safe, predictable place, and that’s an illusion. You’re setting yourself up for frustration and disappointment. Open your eyes. The world is a dynamic place where things go right and wrong. That’s just the way it is! Zone 5: Most of the greatest lessons in life are learned by taking risks and living outside of your comfort zone. Knowing that you can’t change people, places, or things, but can change the way you respond to these things gives you the confidence and power to accept and engage in this diverse world we live in. Zone 6: Enjoy the unknown. When is the last time you felt excited about not knowing what was going to happen next? If you’re deep in your comfort zone, it’s probably been a while. Don’t you miss it? Don’t you miss the mixture of anticipation and anxiety that makes your heart flutter and stomach turn at the same time? Bring that feeling back into your life.


WEEKLY BULLETIN WEEKLY BULLTIN 10 WAYS TO STEP OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE AND ENJOY TAKING RISKS http://www.lifehack.org/articles/communication/10-ways-step-out-your-comfort-zone-and-enjoy-taking-risks.html 1. BECOME AWARE OF WHAT’S OUTSIDE OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE In other words: What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure? Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle. 2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear. How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific. Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks? Or, are you afraid of being ignored? 3. Get comfortable with discomfort one way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort. Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable. 4. See failure as a teacher - many of us are so afraid of failure, that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams. Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success? 5. Take baby steps – don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in. take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends. 6. Hang out with risk takers: there is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behaviour. 7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses. Don’t say “oh, i just don’t have the time for this right now.” instead, be honest and say “i am afraid to do this.” don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward. 8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you what will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear. 9. Don’t take yourself too seriously learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun. 10. Focus on the fun enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously”.

rotary newsletter 2638 July 2016  
rotary newsletter 2638 July 2016  

Rotary club of Salisbury bulletin July 2016

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