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Rotary District 5340

Monthly Newsletter Volume 2, Issue 10 – April 2013

April is Magazine Month 1. Magazine Month

2. Governor’s Letter 3. Membership Matters 4. Notables 5. Polio This Week 6. Rotary & UN and Camp Enterprise 7. Leadership Academy April is Magazine Month, a time to celebrate the global network of Rotary’s official magazines, which provide valuable information to 1.2 million Rotarians. The Rotary World Magazine Press consists of 32 magazines from Africa, the Americas, Asia, Australia, and Europe that inform, inspire, and entertain in 23 languages. In addition to The Rotarian, Rotary’s English-language flagship publication, it offers magazines such as Vida Rotaria (Argentina), Rotary in Bulgaria, and The Rotary-no-Tomo (Japan). The RI Bylaws require all club members to subscribe to The Rotarian or a Rotary regional magazine. Rotary leaders, district governors, and club presidents are encouraged to support magazine editors in their country or region by submitting story ideas, promoting readership, encouraging timely subscription payments, and assisting with other communication efforts.


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Governor’s Message “There are 31 regionally written magazines in 25 different languages.” Dick Stevens, District Governor

Greetings Fellow Rotarians, Every Rotarian in our District receives the Rotarian magazine. I have no idea how many of you read it, but over the years, I’ve seen a big content improvement. The magazine is printed only in English and has circulation of 448,000, of which 380,000 copies are distributed in North America. The magazine has two printing sites, one in New York and the other in India.

There are 31 regionally written magazines in 25 different languages. I’m told the content is uniform for the English version we receive, and it is not tailored to any specific region. The magazine’s staff is composed of 12 full time employees not including many freelance writers. Last month’s issue had several excellent articles written by freelancers. Many of these writers are frequent contributors to the Rotarian along with other national publications.

I would encourage you to think about submitting your own article about projects that your club is doing. Your submission needs to be unique and newsworthy. Some years ago I wrote an article about our Encinitas Rotary Cup Soccer Tournament. It took about six months from the time of submission to publication. It was gratifying for our club members to see that it was considered exciting enough to be published. As the writer, I had several inquiries about how clubs could produce a similar event. I know of three programs in our District that are exclusive to us and newsworthy. The three are Music Camp, Camp Enterprise and Model UN. I believe a well written article about any one of these fine programs complete with photos has a good chance of being published. By the way, all three of these programs will be featured at our April 2nd District Council at Market Creek. These activities are just the tip of the iceberg of all we do in the District: we have beach runs, bocce ball, and beer fests and that’s just the B’s that come to mind.

If you’re not a regular reader, I encourage you to take another look. There are lots of good ideas that will make you and maybe your club stronger. Have a great month. Sincerely,

Dick Stevens District Governor, 5340


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Membership Matters Julio Sorjus Trustee, Rotary International, 2012-2016 It was our founder, Paul Harris, who stated that “The promise of Rotary lays in its future, not in its past.” He added: “this is a changing world; we must be prepared to change with it. The story of Rotary will have to be written again and again.” When we gaze into the future, across the horizon, and explore the possibilities open right in front of us in two, five, or ten years, we are forced to admit that there is a mixed picture ahead. My friends, the average age of Rotarians thirty years ago was 47. It is now 61 years of age and it is unfortunate that this number continues to climb. Evidently, our presence among the young is very limited. If we go on like this, our organization will experience a serious contraction in a few years. To put it simply: unless we act and change today, we risk becoming a relic of the past. As President Kalyan Banerjee has wisely stated, we need to curb the greying of Rotary and then encourage its greening. We cannot afford to ignore that only 11 percent of today’s Rotarians are younger than 40%, while 68 percent are over 50 and 39 percent are over 60. How, then, can we make Rotary more attractive for the young? How can we motivate and attract young people to join us - and then stay with us? How will we make sure that Rotary retains its magic and charm in the eyes of the future generations? Specifically: How can we make sure that the young people of Brazil, India, Egypt, Taiwan, Japan, Australia and Spain continue to heed the call to service? How will Rotary develop and send an inspiring, loud and clear message, a long-term vision about where it needs to be heading? If somehow we came to be in possession of many books, or medicines, or wheelchairs, or simply much cash, what would we do with those resources, if we didn’t have a plan, a vision or a direction? There is only one answer to the plight of modern organizations. Without a doubt, the only tool available to us to fully bring the organization to a position where it can match its current challenges is leadership. Rotary needs committed leaders of high ethical standards, with the capacity to clearly articulate a passionately shared vision. We are seeking men and women who are able to communicate our ideas in simple, yet compelling ways. We need to identify the young men and women who have a fierce passion for excellence, who can move others to join in the struggle of shared aspirations of service to human beings in dire need. Moreover, than ever, leadership in Rotary is everybody’s business. We have a moral commitment to make sure the changes taking place are effected in a manner consistent with our core values, aspirations, priorities and dreams. It’s time for up to lead…….it is time to turn the page.


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Notables Oldies but goodies will be on display at "Celebrate Rotary". You won't want to miss the classic car show at the District Picnic on May 18 at San Diego's Liberty Station. Remember that Corvette to die for? Or the 55 Chevy you learned to drive with? See cars like this & many more on display on Saturday, May 18, 12 noon to 6 p.m.


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Polio This Week  

March 27, 2013

Key expert advisory groups are meeting to review both global and national progress towards polio eradication. In Nigeria, the Expert Review Committee on Polio Eradication and Routine Immunization (ERC) convened last week in Abuja. In Chad, the national Technical Advisory Group (TAG) will meet in early April. And at the global level, the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on immunization (SAGE) is expected to meet in Geneva, Switzerland, on 9-11 April. Among other immunization topics, the SAGE will review the global polio situation.

Wild Poliovirus (WPV) cases Total cases

Year-to-date 2013

Year-to-date 2012

Total in 2012

Globally

11

31

223

- in endemic countries

11

29

217

0

2

6

- in non-endemic countries

Case breakdown by country Year-to-date 2013

Countries

Year-to-date 2012

Total in WPV WPV3 W1W3 Total WPV1 WPV3 W1W3 Total 2012

Pakistan

5

5

12

Afghanistan

1

1

5

Nigeria

5

5

7

Chad

1

1

3

1

14

58

12-Feb-13

5

37

31-Jan-13

10

122

13-Feb-13

1

5

14-Jun-12

1

15-Nov-12

Niger Total

11

0

0

11

26

4

1

31

223

Total in endemic countries

11

0

0

11

24

4

1

29

217

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

2

6

Total outbreak

Data in WHO as of 21 March 2012 for 2012 data and 19 March 2013 for 2013 data.

Date of most recent case


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Rotary and the UN Rotary International appoints representatives each year to UN bodies and nongovernmental organizations worldwide. These representatives increase awareness and recognition of Rotary's programs, policies, and activities within the global community. They meet regularly with officers and staff from international agencies to: Discuss parallel concerns and potential areas for cooperation Inform organizations about Rotary’s programs Gather information about other groups’ developments and programs Rotary and the United Nations have a long history of working together and sharing similar visions for a more peaceful world. In 1942, Rotary clubs from 21 nations organized a conference in London to develop a vision for advancing education, science, and culture after World War II. That event was a precursor to UNESCO. In 1945, 49 Rotarians went to San Francisco to help draft the UN Charter. Rotary and the UN have been close partners ever since, a relationship that’s apparent through PolioPlus and work with UN agencies.

Camp Enterprise Rotary Camp Enterprise is an activity-packed, three-day workshop sponsored by the San Diego Rotary Club. Based on a program developed by the American Management Association, this all expenses paid, experience provides a select group of outstanding eleventh-grade students with a series of panels, presentations, and group discussions that present a broad view and an exploration of the free enterprise system. Since 1976, Rotary Camp Enterprise has offered students the opportunity to learn from some of San Diego's top business leaders in a fun and educational environment. The event was held March 14-16 his year at Camp Cedar Glen in Julian.


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Leadership Academy Completed The Leadership Development Academy's final session was held March 26 at the Braille Institute. LDA is held annually for all Rotarians interested in learning more about Rotary. A full story along with pictures will be forthcoming after graduation in April.

Ole Prham, Rancho Bernardo

John Goodrich, Rancho Bernardo & Dale Bailey, La Mesa

Michelle Candland, San Diego

Diana Roger, Mission Valley Sunset


Rotary District 5340 Newsletter - April 2013  

This is the District Newsletter for April 2013

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