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PRESIDENTSELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE

243-EN—(306)


This is the 2006 edition of the Presidents-elect Training Seminar Leaders’ Guide (243-EN). It is intended for 2007, 2008, and 2009 presidents-elect training seminars. The information contained in this publication is based on the Standard Rotary Club Constitution, the Recommended Rotary Club Bylaws, the Constitution of Rotary International, the Bylaws of Rotary International, and the Rotary Code of Policies. Changes to these documents by the 2007 Council on Legislation or the RI Board of Directors override policy as stated in this publication. This leaders’ guide is produced by the Leadership Education and Training Division of Rotary International. If you have questions or comments, please submit them to: Leadership Education and Training Division Rotary International One Rotary Center 1560 Sherman Avenue Evanston, IL 60201-3698 USA E-mail: leadership.training@rotary.org Phone: 847-866-3000 Fax: 847-866-0974


Contents

Planning and Organizing Purpose of the Presidents-elect Training Seminar Board-recommended Topics PETS Logistics Sample Agenda Multidistrict PETS Preparing Training Leaders How to Use This Leaders’ Guide How to Use the Session Guides Evaluation Sessions Opening Plenary Session Session 1: Role and Responsibilities Session 2: Goal Setting Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders Session 4: Club Administration Session 5: Membership Session 6: Service Projects Session 7: The Rotary Foundation Session 8: Public Relations Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning Closing Plenary Session

1 1 1 2 4 5 6 7 8 10 15 15 19 33 47 61 77 97 115 131 143 157

The Planning and Organizing section of this leaders’ guide is intended for the district trainer. In addition to logistical information, it includes directions on how to use the session guides, which should be copied and distributed to every training leader. The Sessions section includes session guides that should be distributed to the training leaders responsible for each session.


Planning and Organizing

The Presidents-elect Training Seminar Leaders’ Guide (243-EN) provides the information necessary to convene a presidents-elect training seminar according to RI Board-recommended guidelines and topics. In addition to this printed version, the guide is available on CD-ROM. Electronic versions of the supporting slides provided on the disc may be customized to your district and used with an LCD projector or printed as color transparencies. Electronic materials can also be easily distributed to training leaders. This leaders’ guide is produced in nine languages and is sent to all districts throughout the Rotary world. It should be considered an outline for a presidents-elect training seminar rather than a script to be followed exactly. District governors-elect and district trainers are encouraged to adapt the guide to meet the needs of their participants.

Purpose of the Presidents-elect Training Seminar The purpose of the presidents-elect training seminar (PETS) is • To prepare incoming club presidents for their year as president • To give district governors-elect and incoming assistant governors the opportunity to motivate incoming presidents and build their working relationship

Board-recommended Topics The RI Board has recommended that the PETS agenda consist of plenary sessions and group discussion sessions with clearly defined Rotary content, including the following topics: • Presentation of the RI theme (Opening plenary session) • Role and responsibilities of club president (session 1) • Goal setting (sessions 2 and 9) • Selecting and preparing club leaders (session 3) PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 1


• • • • • • •

Club administration (session 4) Membership (session 5) Service projects (session 6) The Rotary Foundation (session 7) Public relations (session 8) Annual and long-range planning (session 9) Resources (covered in each session)

PETS Logistics Presidents-elect are required to attend PETS as preparation for their year of service. PETS should be held, preferably in March for one and a half days, after the International Assembly and the district team training seminar. The following members of the district leadership team should be involved: • Governor-elect, who has overall responsibility for the seminar • District governor, who assists the governor-elect with the seminar • District trainer, who plans and conducts the seminar under the supervision of the governor-elect • Assistant governors, who assist the governor-elect with team building and goal setting during the seminar • Members of the district Rotary Foundation committee, who serve as a resource for Foundation topics • PETS training leaders (qualified past district governors and district committee chairs) Materials

District governors-elect should send the Club Officers’ Kit (225-EN) to presidents-elect before PETS. The Club President’s Manual (222-EN) is an integral part of the presidents-elect training seminar, and presidents-elect are expected to read it to prepare for PETS. Because each chapter in the manual corresponds to a session in the Presidents-elect Training Seminar Leaders’ Guide and includes appendixes that will be used during the sessions, participants should bring their copies of the manual with them to PETS. Make additional copies of the appendixes to provide to presidents-elect who do not bring their manual to PETS. Promotion

Although the presidents-elect training seminar is required for presidents-elect to assume office, promoting the importance and value of the seminar is essential. The governor-elect, district trainer, and PETS training leaders should coordinate to ensure that training is inspirational and efficient. Creativity, innovation, and local expertise will inspire participants and enhance the training.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 2


The district governor should include promotional material and information on PETS in the governor’s monthly letter and on the district Web site. Provide a contact person and online information for those who would like to know more. Assistant governors, or others who help with promotion, should • Organize the seminar at a convenient date and location for all participants • Remind presidents-elect to review the Club President’s Manual (222-EN) and bring their manual with them to PETS • Send a letter of invitation with registration materials to presidents-elect, at least two months in advance. Reminders should be sent as the seminar approaches. • Follow up with a personal telephone call or e-mail Recognition

Recognizing all participants for their contributions to the success of the seminar will encourage them to continue to prepare for their year in office. Consider recognizing participants at the end of the seminar in a culturally appropriate manner (a certificate or banner, for example) to thank them for the extra time and effort they have given to attend the seminar.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 3


Sample Agenda This leaders’ guide has been created to support the sessions included in this sample one-and-a-half-day agenda. DAY 1 Start

Finish

Suggested Duration

60 min. 30 min.

5 min. 60 min. 15 min. 60 min. 60 min. 60 min.

60 min. 15 min. 60 min. 60 min.

Program Activity

Meal and Registration Opening Plenary Session: Opening remarks Presentation of annual RI theme Adjourn to discussion rooms Session 1: Role and Responsibilities Break Session 2: Goal Setting Meal Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders Session 4: Club Administration Break Session 5: Membership Session 6: Service Projects

DAY 2 Start

Finish

Suggested Duration

60 min. 60 min. 60 min. 15 min. 60 min. 45 min.

Program Activity

Meal Session 7: The Rotary Foundation Session 8: Public Relations Break Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning Closing Plenary Session: Final remarks Question-and-answer session PETS Evaluation

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 4


Modifying the agenda

Modify this agenda to meet the needs of your district and to include transitions, breaks and a meal, if appropriate. If topics are added, develop session guides to help the training leader(s) conduct the session. When implementing your training agenda, consider the following suggestions: • Make topics more relevant to participants by using club- and districtspecific examples to illustrate points. • Apply culturally appropriate training techniques based on the needs of the district. • Add interest to the program by using a variety of formats, including panel discussions, audiovisual presentations, and group activities (see “Alternate Activities,” page 8).

Multidistrict PETS Some districts have found that their combined efforts result in a more effective PETS. These multidistrict PETS, which operate independently, offer presidents-elect the opportunity to interact with Rotarians beyond their district and often feature prominent Rotary speakers. Presidents-elect are often grouped together based on club size for more effective group discussion. Establishing a multidistrict PETS

Districts that are interested in switching from a single-district to a multidistrict PETS are encouraged to attend, at no cost to RI, one or more multidistrict PETS. In addition, single-district PETS may wish to coordinate with a multidistrict PETS in order to convene both seminars at the same location so that the single-district PETS participants and organizers will have the opportunity to observe a multidistrict PETS in action. This also allows single-district PETS participants to join multidistrict PETS participants for meals and benefit from the inspirational and motivational speakers often featured at multidistrict PETS. In order to switch to a multidistrict PETS format, two-thirds of clubs in the district must support the change before the district can participate in a multidistrict PETS. District governors must jointly get advance approval from the RI general secretary. Multidistrict PETS should establish operating procedures and appoint an organizing committee that focuses on logistics and training content to ensure continuity. For information on switching from single- to multidistrict PETS, contact your Club and District Support representative. Current multidistrict PETS

For districts participating in a multidistrict PETS, governors-elect are responsible for • Developing and approving the final PETS agenda • Ensuring that policies and procedures exist to administer all funds collected for the multidistrict PETS

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 5


• Preparing an audited financial statement of multidistrict PETS finances • Selecting an individual to develop and conduct training • Selecting training leaders and plenary speakers The district trainer, or a designee selected or approved by the governor-elect, is responsible for planning and conducting the training at the seminar. At least three hours of the multidistrict PETS agenda must be allocated to district meetings of the governors-elect, club presidents-elect, and assistant governors. Contact your RI Club and District Support representative if your multidistrict PETS plans to incorporate (or is incorporated), to ensure you are in compliance with RI policy. How multidistrict PETS can use this leaders’ guide

This leaders’ guide can be used to lead facilitated discussions at multidistrict PETS. The PETS Board-recommended topics can be divided into two groups: those best addressed by individual districts and those better addressed in multidistrict discussion sessions. The governor-elect may wish to have the district trainer use session guides from this leaders’ guide to develop content for the district meetings. Because governors-elect have recently attended the International Assembly and because different districts have different needs, the following session topics may be more suited to the individual district meetings: • Opening plenary session, including the annual RI theme • Goal Setting (session 2) • Working with Your Club and District Leaders (session 3) • The Rotary Foundation (session 7) • Annual and Long-Range Planning (session 9)

Preparing Training Leaders Training leaders selected to facilitate discussions will likely have a variety of experience. Preparing training leaders to facilitate sessions will ensure uniformity and consistency in the training and information they deliver. The district trainer should plan and conduct this training at least two weeks before PETS, if possible. It should address facilitation skills and allow training leaders to practice facilitating one of the sessions; see chapter 2 of the District Trainer’s Manual (246-EN) for more information. Provide training leaders with the following: Before the seminar • “How to Use the Session Guides” (pages 8-9) • Guides for sessions they are facilitating • Copy of the seminar’s agenda

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 6


During the seminar • Slides and handouts for sessions they are facilitating • Flip chart and markers, if applicable

How to Use This Leaders’ Guide This leaders’ guide provides training leaders with an instructional framework to address the Board-recommended topics. It does not address regional issues and cannot replace the local Rotary knowledge and experience that each individual training leader offers participants. Training leaders are encouraged to customize their sessions with their own knowledge and expertise in order to provide a program relevant to the clubs in their district. The electronic versions of this leaders’ guide and the slides are provided to help you adapt the content. Before using the slides, insert your district number and customize them for your district as appropriate. Consider adding photos of district activities and projects. This leader’s guide contains two types of session guides: plenary and facilitated discussion. Plenary session guides

The opening and closing plenary session guides provide suggested speech topics and audiovisual presentations for the governor-elect. These should be customized to clubs in the district. Facilitated discussion session guides

Facilitated group sessions provide training leaders a framework to lead participants’ discussion. This method encourages participants to share their own knowledge and experience and to learn from their peers. Training leaders should remain flexible, allowing group discussions to flow while ensuring that the topic is covered. For more information on facilitated discussion, consult the District Trainer’s Manual (246-EN). Presidents-elect should have prepared for PETS by reading their Club President’s Manual (222-EN) and completing a draft of their goals using the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs (appendix 39). This preparation makes facilitated discussion possible, because participants are able to discuss information on a higher level as opposed to learning material for the first time. Participants should bring their manuals with them to PETS.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 7


How to Use the Session Guides All session guides present a standard format that includes the following components. Discussion questions

Discussion questions are sample questions that PETS training leaders can pose to participants to encourage discussion about a key concept. Some discussion questions have been pulled from this leaders’ guide and are included in the Club President’s Manual (222-EN) to encourage participants to prepare before attending PETS. If the Club President’s Manual has been distributed before PETS, participants should have already considered these questions. The Club President’s Manual and PETS discussion questions are also available for download at www.rotary.org. Key points

Key points are concise statements to help training leaders emphasize important concepts. These points should be shared with the group. Training leaders are encouraged to restate key points in their own words. Training leader’s notes

Training leader’s notes contain information, suggestions, and directions to help training leaders facilitate sessions. Slide prompts

Slide prompts indicate when a slide should be displayed to introduce a session or list key points. The slides for this leaders’ guide are provided on CD-ROM (and are also available for download at www.rotary.org) so they can be modified to meet district needs. Insert graphics or photos to personalize the slides to your district. Appendix prompts

Appendix prompts signal the training leader to refer to an appendix for the session. Sample appendixes are located at the end of the appropriate session guide. Training leaders should direct participants to turn to the appropriate appendix in their manual. Alternate activities

Facilitated discussion is a proven method for training adult learners. However, occasionally varying the training technique can help maintain participants’ attention and increase retention. Training leaders may wish to incorporate the following alternate activities into their sessions: 1. Think, pair, share In this activity, participants independently consider a question, discuss it with a partner, and then share ideas with the entire group, if appropriate. This ensures that everyone has an opportunity to speak and encourages participants to share their own ideas.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 8


2. Peer review If there is time remaining at the end of a session, the training leader asks participants to develop one or two review questions on their own. Then a participant poses one of these questions to another member of the group; after responding, that participant then poses one of his or her questions to another participant. Alternately, the review questions can be posed to the entire group for discussion. 3. Idea collector At the end of a session, each participant takes a moment to write down on a slip of paper a key concept from the session along with a practical application of the concept. The training leader collects all the ideas and then redistributes them to different participants to read aloud to the group. Each president-elect has now received a new idea to try. 4. Self-review Periodically throughout the sessions, training leaders allow pairs of participants to spend a moment orally summarizing the content that has been covered. The training leader should encourage each participant to contribute information not mentioned by his or her partner. 5. Flip charts For important discussion questions, the training leader can ask a volunteer to write participant responses on a flip chart. This allows the group to review the session’s highlights and provides a summary of the content discussed. Flip charts can also be used to note a question or topic that would be better discussed at the end of the session. 6. Voting Participants can indicate their preference among a list of topics by placing a mark next to the one or two they are most interested in. This activity allows participants to silently read information and evaluate it for better retention. It also incorporates movement. This activity is a quick needs assessment for the training leader. 7. New groups Have participants find a group for discussion based on a common interest, such as a hobby, to answer a question or work on a case study. This activity incorporates movement and can help energize participants.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 9


Evaluation Evaluation allows meeting organizers to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the seminar and to use that information to improve future training seminars. The governor-elect, with input from the district trainer, is responsible for developing, distributing, collecting, and summarizing evaluations. Evaluation results should be shared with the district governor. The governor-nominee and succeeding district trainer should also receive a copy. The information collected is for district use only. Club presidents-elect

The RI Board recommends that all presidents-elect complete an evaluation of PETS immediately after the seminar. Be sure to allow adequate time in the agenda for participants to complete evaluations. A sample evaluation form is provided on pages 11-12. Please adapt it as needed to reflect your presidentselect training seminar. PETS training leaders

PETS training leaders should evaluate the content and logistics of the training they received as well as its effectiveness in preparing them for their role at the presidents-elect training seminar. The sample evaluation form on page 13 is for use after training leaders have conducted the seminar sessions and are able to evaluate both their own training session and the presidents-elect training seminar. Adapt the sample evaluation form as needed.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 10


Sample PETS Evaluation We appreciate your time and thoughtful answers to the following questions. Your feedback is vital to assessing the success of our training methods and will help improve future presidents-elect training seminars. Program Content

Please rate your level of knowledge about the following Board-recommended topics using the scale below. 1 = Not knowledgeable

2 = Somewhat knowledgeable

3 = Knowledgeable

Topic 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

4 = Highly knowledgeable

Before PETS

RI Theme Role and Responsibilities Goal Setting Working with Your Club and District Leaders Club Administration Membership Service Projects The Rotary Foundation Public Relations Annual and Long-Range Planning

After PETS

Not Applicable 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Please rate the following statements using the scale below. 1 = Strongly Disagree

2 = Disagree

3 = Agree

4 = Strongly Agree

11. Topics discussed during group discussions were relevant to me as a leader. 12. I feel prepared for my year as club president. 13. The group came up with practical ideas I want to use. 14. The Presidential Citation was clearly explained. 15. The Club Leadership Plan was clearly explained. 16. Strategies and ideas generated during the membership session will help my club. 17. I understand my role in helping my club develop successful service projects. 18. I am aware of the variety of recognition programs that exist to help me recognize Rotarians in my club. 19. I know how and where to find the tools necessary to lead an effective club. 20. How can the topics discussed be improved for future presidents-elect training seminars?

N/A = Not Applicable 1 1 1 1 1

2 2 2 2 2

3 3 3 3 3

4 4 4 4 4

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

1

2

3

4

N/A

1

2

3

4

N/A

1

2

3

4

N/A

1

2

3

4

N/A

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 11

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4


Program Presentation

Please rate the following statements using the scale below. 1 = Strongly Disagree

2 = Disagree

3 = Agree

4 = Strongly Agree

21. The plenary session speakers were motivational. 22. The training leaders facilitated group discussions. 23. The variety of teaching methods employed during the training was sufficient. 24. The slides enhanced the overall learning experience. 25. The Club President’s Manual was a useful resource.

N/A = Not Applicable 1 2 3 4 N/A 1 2 3 4 N/A 1 2 3 4 N/A 1 2 3 4 N/A 1 2 3 4 N/A

District Knowledge

Please rate the following statements using the scale below. 1 = Strongly Disagree

2 = Disagree

3 = Agree

4 = Strongly Agree

26. I had sufficient time to interact with the district governor-elect. 27. I had sufficient time to interact with the assistant governor assigned to my club. 28. I was able to meet and plan with other club presidents-elect. 29. My assistant governor is aware of my club’s basic goals. 30. I understand my club’s role in achieving district goals. 31. My assistant governor is a resource for information. 32. After PETS, I better understand my district’s leadership structure.

N/A = Not Applicable 1

2

3

4

N/A

1 1 1 1 1 1

2 2 2 2 2 2

3 3 3 3 3 3

4 4 4 4 4 4

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Logistics

Please rate the following statements using the scale below. 1 = Strongly Disagree 33. 34. 35. 36.

2 = Disagree

3 = Agree

I received timely notice of the seminar. The registration process functioned smoothly. The date was convenient. The location was convenient.

4 = Strongly Agree

N/A = Not Applicable 1 2 3 4 N/A 1 2 3 4 N/A 1 2 3 4 N/A 1 2 3 4 N/A

Additional comments or suggestions:

I would like additional information about:

Name (optional) Club name (optional) Contact information (optional) Thank you for completing this evaluation. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 12


PETS Training Leader Training Evaluation As a PETS training leader, your perspective on both the preparation you received and PETS is invaluable. Your input will help shape preparations for next year. Your responses are confidential, so please be candid. Training Leader Preparation

Please rate the following statements using the scale below. 1 = Strongly Disagree

2 = Disagree

3 = Agree

4 = Strongly Agree

N/A = Not Applicable

1. The Presidents-elect Training Seminar Leaders’ Guide was clear and easy to use. 1 2 3 4 N/A 2. The Club President’s Manual was clear and easy to use. 1 2 3 4 N/A 3. The time allocated for covering each of the designated training topics was sufficient. 1 2 3 4 N/A If insufficient time was allowed for any specific topic(s), please list the topic(s):

4. I had enough time to prepare between the training leaders’ training and PETS. 1 2 3 4 N/A 5. Training prepared me for my role as a training leader at PETS. 1 2 3 4 N/A 6. I was able to use what I learned at the training leaders’ training session. 1 2 3 4 N/A How can the training session for PETS training leaders be improved?

PETS Group Discussion Sessions

Please rate the following statements using the scale below. 1 = Strongly Disagree

2 = Disagree

3 = Agree

4 = Strongly Agree

N/A = Not Applicable

1. Overall, the presidents-elect in the session(s) I facilitated were well prepared to discuss the designated topic(s). 2. The subject matter was sufficiently covered during the session(s). 3. The session guide(s) was/were effective in my group discussion(s). 4. Overall, the presidents-elect in the session(s) I facilitated understood the material presented. 5. Presidents-elect asked questions that weren’t covered in the session guide(s). How can PETS be improved?

Additional comments:

Thank you for completing this evaluation. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE 13

1 2 3 4 N/A 1 2 3 4 N/A 1 2 3 4 N/A 1 2 3 4 N/A 1 2 3 4 N/A


Opening Plenary Session (30 minutes)

The opening plenary session of the presidents-elect training seminar is presented by the governor-elect. It is an opportunity for the governor-elect to address the club presidents-elect for the first time. These opening remarks will set the tone for the seminar and serve as a framework to inform, motivate, and inspire the participants. MATERIALS Slides

1. Introduction 2. Annual RI Theme 3. District Goals 4. Effective Clubs 5. Club Leadership Plan 6. Avenues of Service 7. Purpose of PETS Opening Plenary Session

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

1

SHOW SLIDE 1 Introduction

Presentation of the RI Theme SHOW SLIDE 2 Annual RI Theme

Annual RI Theme Insert the RI theme HERE

Remarks should address

• What the theme represents for all Rotarians 2

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

• How the theme applies to your vision for your district for the coming year • How clubs can apply the theme to their projects and activities

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Opening Plenary Session 15


District Goals SHOW SLIDE 3 District Goals

District Goals • Insert the district goals HERE

Remarks should address

• What goals your district has established for the coming year District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

3

• How club goals align with district goals • How club presidents will work with their clubs to help achieve these goals • How district leaders will work with clubs to achieve district goals

Effective Clubs SHOW SLIDE 4 Effective Clubs Remarks should address

• Elements of an effective club District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

4

• Role that club presidents play in improving the effectiveness of their clubs • How district leaders will support club presidents to help them increase club effectiveness

Club Leadership Plan Club Leadership Plan The purpose of the Club Leadership Plan is to strengthen Rotary at the club level by providing the administrative framework of an effective club.

SHOW SLIDE 5 Club Leadership Plan Remarks should address

• Objective of the Club Leadership Plan District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

5

• What clubs have implemented the Club Leadership Plan in your district • How the club leadership plan can strengthen Rotary clubs

Avenues of Service SHOW SLIDE 6 Avenues of Service

Avenues of Service Club Service

Remarks should address

Vocational Service Community Service

• How the four Avenues of Service apply to the district goals

International Service 6

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

• How district leaders will support clubs in a balanced service program that addresses the Avenues of Service

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Opening Plenary Session 16


Review of the Purpose of PETS and the Agenda for the Seminar SHOW SLIDE 7 Purpose of PETS

Purpose of PETS The purpose of the presidents-elect training seminar is • To prepare presidents-elect for their year as president • To give presidents-elect and district leaders the opportunity to work together

7

Remarks should address

• Role that PETS plays in preparing presidents-elect for their year as president

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

• How PETS is an opportunity for the presidents-elect and district leaders to work together • Highlights of the seminar agenda (including any logistical information)

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Opening Plenary Session 17


NOTES SESSION 1

Role and Responsibilities (60 minutes)

Learning Objectives At the end of this session, the participant will be able to 1. Understand the role of club president 2. Identify how to prepare as president-elect 3. Implement the Club Leadership Plan

Materials Slides 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Appendixes

Introduction Learning Objectives Effective Rotary Clubs Your Year as Club President Preparing for Office Club Leadership Plan Implementing the Club Leadership Plan

2. Summary of Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 3. RI Board Policy for the Club Leadership Plan

Session Outline Introduction Responsibilities Club Leadership Plan Review

10 minutes 25 minutes 20 minutes 5 minutes

• For current Rotary information, go to www.rotary.org. • For additional information on various features of this session, refer to “How to Use the Session Guides,” available from your district trainer. • Before you begin, prepare a flip chart to record participant responses as needed. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 19


NOTES

INTRODUCTION

(10 MINUTES)

TO

SHOW SLIDE 8 Introduction Training leader’s notes — Immediately before this session, the district governor-elect will have addressed assembled participants, presenting the RI theme, providing an overview of the presidents-elect training seminar, introducing the Club Leadership Plan, and outlining district goals for the coming year.

Session 1: Role and Responsibilities

8

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

— Introduce yourself to participants and explain your role as training leader in facilitating discussion among the group and assisting participants in finding answers to questions they may have. — State group guidelines to ensure the discussions are effective, such as providing ground rules for taking turns speaking, stating that all comments are welcomed and accepted, and limiting use of cellular phones. — Ask the participants to amend or add to the list of group guidelines. — Review this session’s learning objectives with participants.

SHOW SLIDE 9 Learning Objectives REFER TO APPENDIX 2 Summary of Session 1: Role and Responsibilities

Learning Objectives 1. Understand the role of club president. 2. Identify how to prepare as president-elect. 3. Implement the Club Leadership Plan.

9

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 20

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES Training leader’s notes — Highlight the sections of the appendix: a list of resources and spaces for writing additional resources, ideas to implement, contacts, and action steps for follow-up after the seminar. — Encourage participants to use this sheet throughout the session. — Gauge participants’ knowledge and experience using the questions below, and adjust the facilitated discussion accordingly.

How many members are in your club? Have you already served as your club’s president?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 21


NOTES

RESPONSIBILITIES

(25 MINUTES)

TO

How is your club effective? SHOW SLIDE 10 Effective Rotary Clubs Key points •

The primary role of the club president is that of club leader, one who ensures that the club is functioning effectively.

Effective Rotary Clubs • Sustain or increase their membership base • Implement successful projects that address the needs of their community and communities in other countries • Support The Rotary Foundation through both program participation and financial contributions • Develop leaders capable of serving in Rotary beyond the club level 10

To be effective, clubs must be able to — Sustain or increase their membership base — Implement successful projects that address the needs of their community and communities in other countries — Support The Rotary Foundation through both program participation and financial contributions — Develop leaders capable of serving in Rotary beyond the club level

Training leader’s note — Throughout the seminar, the elements of an effective club will be discussed in greater detail.

Does your club use any other criteria to evaluate its successes?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 22

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES Training leader’s notes — Refer participants to the Manual of Procedure or chapter 1 of the Club President’s Manual for a detailed summary of responsibilities. — Record participants’ responses to the following questions on a flip chart.

What are some of your responsibilities for your year as president? SHOW SLIDE 11 Your Year as Club President Key points •

Implement and continuously evaluate your club’s goals.

Ensure each committee has defined objectives.

Preside at all meetings of your club.

Prepare for and encourage participation at club and district meetings.

Work with your club and district, assuring key relationships.

Foster continuity by working closely with past and incoming club leaders.

Your Year as Club President • Continually evaluate club goals. • Ensure each committee has defined objectives. • Preside at all meetings of your club. • Prepare for and encourage participation at club and district meetings. • Work with your club and district leaders. 11

Are there any other responsibilities you would add? How will you prepare to take office?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 23

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES SHOW SLIDE 12 Preparing for Office Preparing for Office

Key points •

Review your club’s long-range goals, using the elements of an effective Rotary club as a guide.

Set club annual goals that support long-range goals, using the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs (appendix 39, which will be used in session 9).

Work with your club and district, developing key relationships.

Ensure regular, consistent training by preparing for and encouraging participation at club and district meetings.

Ensure continuity in leadership and service projects.

• Review your club’s long-range goals. • Set club annual goals that support longrange goals. • Work with your club and district, developing key relationships. • Ensure regular, consistent training. • Ensure continuity in leadership and service projects. 12

How will you ensure continuity with the current president and your successor? Training leader’s note — Refer participants to the presidents-elect training seminar agenda, pointing out that their responsibilities for specific topics will be discussed in other sessions.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 24

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES

CLUB LEADERSHIP PLAN

(20 MINUTES)

TO

Training leader’s notes — The RI Board approved the Club Leadership Plan in November 2004 as the recommended administrative framework for all Rotary clubs. — The Club Leadership Plan is not mandatory. — The Club Leadership Plan should be implemented in consultation with district leaders and reviewed annually. — Refer participants to chapter 1 of the Club President’s Manual for a detailed summary of the Club Leadership Plan. The club president’s responsibilities for implementing the Club Leadership Plan are integrated throughout the Club President’s Manual. — Additional resources on the Club Leadership Plan can also be found at www.rotary.org. — Throughout the seminar, the Club Leadership Plan will be discussed in greater detail. — Gauge participants’ knowledge and experience with the Club Leadership Plan using the questions below, and adjust the facilitated discussion accordingly.

SHOW SLIDE 13 Club Leadership Plan Key points • •

The Club Leadership Plan is the recommended administrative structure for Rotary clubs.

Club Leadership Plan • The Club Leadership Plan is the recommended administrative structure for Rotary clubs. • The RI Board encourages Rotary clubs to use it to develop a leadership plan that will provide – – – –

Continuity in projects and decision making Consensus for decision making and goal setting A larger supply of well-trained leaders Succession planning for club leadership

13

Clubs can use it to develop a leadership plan that will provide — Continuity in projects and decision making — Consensus for decision making and goal setting — A larger supply of well-trained leaders in the club — Succession planning for club leadership

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 25

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES REFER TO APPENDIX 3 RI Board Policy for the Club Leadership Plan

How many of your clubs have implemented the Club Leadership Plan? What were/will be your greatest challenges in implementing the plan? How did/could your club benefit from the Club Leadership Plan? If you have not implemented the plan, how will you begin to implement it? Who can support you in implementing the Club Leadership Plan? SHOW SLIDE 14 Implementing the Club Leadership Plan Key points • •

The Club Leadership Plan is based on the best practices of effective Rotary clubs.

Implementing the Club Leadership Plan • To implement the plan, current, incoming, and past club leaders should – – – – – – – – –

Make sure all club members feel involved and informed Develop long-range goals Set annual goals that support long-range goals Communicate with the club and district Ensure continuity in leadership Customize the bylaws to reflect club operations Provide regular fellowship opportunities Actively involve all club members Offer regular, consistent training District XXXX 14

To implement the Club Leadership Plan, current, incoming, and past club leaders should — Make sure that all club members feel involved and informed — Develop long-range goals that address the elements of an effective club — Set annual goals that support long-range goals

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 26

Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES — Keep lines of communication open, both in the club and with the district — Ensure continuity in leadership from year to year — Customize club bylaws to reflect club operations — Provide regular fellowship opportunities — Actively involve all club members in service projects or club activities — Offer regular, consistent training for new and current members

Which of these best practices does your club already do? Which of these best practices would benefit or strengthen your club?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 27


NOTES

REVIEW

(5 MINUTES)

REFER TO APPENDIX 2 Summary of Session 1: Role and Responsibilities

What action steps will you take as a result of this session? Training leader’s notes — Review the learning objectives to ensure that all topics were covered sufficiently. — Answer questions that participants may have. — Encourage participants to write down ideas on the appendix. — Thank participants.

Adjourn

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 28

TO


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 2 Summary of Session 1: Role and Responsibilities Resources Informational Resources

www.rotary.org

Manual of Procedure (035-EN) Official Directory (007-EN) RI Catalog (019-EN) Rotary Code of Policies Rotary World (050-EN) RVM: The Rotarian Video Magazine (510-DVD) The Rotarian

Keyword search: Club Leadership Plan Click on: Member Access

Additional Resources

• •

Ideas to Implement

Contact

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Action Steps • • • •

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 29


NOTES

APPENDIX 3 RI Board Policy for the Club Leadership Plan The purpose of the Club Leadership Plan is to strengthen the Rotary club by providing the administrative framework of an effective club. The elements of an effective club are to • Sustain or increase its membership base • Implement successful projects that address the needs of its community and communities in other countries • Support The Rotary Foundation through both financial contributions and program participation • Develop leaders capable of serving in Rotary beyond the club level To implement a Club Leadership Plan, current, incoming, and past club leaders should: 1. Develop a long-range plan that addresses the elements of an effective club. 2. Set annual goals using the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs in harmony with a club’s long-range plan. 3. Conduct club assemblies that involve members in the planning process and keep them informed of the activities of Rotary. 4. Ensure clear communication between the club president, board, committee chairs, club members, district governor, assistant governors, and district committees. 5. Provide for continuity in leadership, including the concept of succession planning to ensure development of future leaders. 6. Amend bylaws to reflect the club committee structure and roles and responsibilities of club leaders. 7. Provide opportunities to increase fellowship among members of the club. 8. Ensure that every member is active in a club project or function. 9. Develop a comprehensive training plan that ensures • Club leaders attend district training meetings • Orientation is consistently and regularly provided for new members • Ongoing educational opportunities are available for current members Club leaders should implement the Club Leadership Plan in consultation with district leaders as described by the District Leadership Plan. The plan should be reviewed annually. Club Committees

Club committees are charged with carrying out the annual and long-range goals of the club based on the four Avenues of Service. The president-elect, president, and immediate past president should work together to ensure continuity of leadership and succession planning. When feasible, committee members should be appointed to the same committee for three years to ensure consistency. The president-elect is responsible for appointing committee members to fill vacancies, appointing committee chairs, and conducting planning meetings before the start of the year in office. It is recommended that the chair have previous experience as a member of the committee. Standing committees should be appointed as follows:

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 30


NOTES • Membership This committee should develop and implement a comprehensive plan for the recruitment and retention of members. • Club Public Relations This committee should develop and implement plans to provide the public with information about Rotary and to promote the club’s service projects and activities. • Club Administration This committee should conduct activities associated with the effective operation of the club. • Service Projects This committee should develop and implement educational, humanitarian, and vocational projects that address the needs of its community and communities in other countries. • The Rotary Foundation This committee should develop and implement plans to support The Rotary Foundation through both financial contributions and program participation. Additional committees may be appointed as needed. Training Requirements

Club committee chairs should attend the district assembly before serving as chair. Relation to the District Leadership Team

Club committees should work with assistant governors and relevant district committees. Reporting Requirements

Club committees should report to the club board on the status of their activities on a regular basis and at club assemblies, as appropriate.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 1: Role and Responsibilities 31


NOTES SESSION 2

Goal Setting (60 minutes)

Learning Objectives At the end of this session, presidents-elect will be able to 1. Understand effective annual and long-range goal setting 2. Lead club members in establishing goals 3. Understand the importance of motivating club members to accomplish their goals

Materials Slides 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23.

Appendixes

Introduction Learning Objectives Annual and Long-Range Goals Effective Rotary Clubs Determining Goals Effective Goals Strategies for Achieving Goals Motivators for Club Members Successful Motivational Strategies

6. Summary of Session 2: Goal Setting 7. Goals Worksheet 8. Action Plan Worksheet

Session Outline Introduction Goal Setting Motivation Review

5 minutes 30 minutes 20 minutes 5 minutes

• For current Rotary information, go to www.rotary.org. • For additional information on various features of this session, refer to “How to Use the Session Guides,” available from your district trainer. • Before you begin, prepare a flip chart to record participant responses as needed. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 33


NOTES

INTRODUCTION

(5 MINUTES)

TO

SHOW SLIDE 15 Introduction Session 2:

SHOW SLIDE 16 Learning Objectives

Goal Setting

15

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

Training leader’s notes — Review this session’s learning objectives with participants. — Inform participants that the aim of this session is to provide an overview of goal setting, preparing participants for Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning.

Learning Objectives 1. Understand effective annual and longrange goal setting. 2. Lead club members in establishing goals. 3. Understand the importance of motivating club members to accomplish their goals.

— Refer participants to the PETS agenda, pointing out that they will complete the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs (appendix 39) with their assistant governor in session 9.

REFER TO APPENDIX 6 Summary of Session 2: Goal Setting Training leader’s notes — Highlight the features of the appendix. — Encourage participants to use this sheet throughout the session. — Gauge participants’ knowledge and experience using the questions below, and adjust the facilitated discussion accordingly.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 34

16

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES

GOAL SETTING

(30 MINUTES)

TO

Have you already set goals for your club? Why is it important to set club goals? SHOW SLIDE 17 Annual and Long-Range Goals Key points •

Your club should set annual and long-range goals.

Annual and Long-Range Goals • Long-range goals should – Cover the next three to five Rotary years – Address the elements of an effective club and each Avenue of service to pursue the Object of Rotary – Include action steps for achieving them

• Annual goals should support the long-range goals. 17

Long-range goals should — Cover the next three to five Rotary years — Address the elements of an effective club and each Avenue of Service to pursue the Object of Rotary — Include action steps for achieving them

Annual goals should be in harmony with your club’s long-range goals.

As your Rotary club evolves, so should your goals.

SHOW SLIDE 18 Effective Rotary Clubs

Effective Rotary Clubs • Sustain or increase their membership base • Implement successful projects that address the needs of their community and communities in other countries • Support The Rotary Foundation through both program participation and financial contributions • Develop leaders capable of serving in Rotary beyond the club level 18

How can the elements of an effective club help you establish goals? Key points •

The elements of an effective club provide a framework for the continual improvement of your Rotary club.

The elements of an effective club help determine which areas your club performs well in and which areas need improvement.

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 35

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES

What else will you consider when setting goals? SHOW SLIDE 19 Determining Goals Key points •

Assess your club’s current conditions.

Brainstorm ideas with club members and past and current club leaders.

Speak with members of the community.

Contact district leadership for guidance.

Consult with leaders in other clubs.

Review the requirements of the Presidential Citation.

Determining Goals • • • • • •

Assess the club’s current conditions. Brainstorm ideas. Speak with community members. Contact district leadership. Consult with other clubs. Review the Presidential Citation. 19

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

Training leader’s note — Review the current Presidential Citation with participants, using the Presidential Citation Brochure, a copy of which is provided for each president-elect in the PETS materials sent to the governor-elect.

What are the characteristics of an effective goal? SHOW SLIDE 20 Effective Goals

Effective Goals • • • • •

Shared Measurable Challenging Achievable Time specific

20

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 36

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES Key points Effective goals are •

Shared. Those who participate in setting a goal and developing strategies to achieve that goal are committed to implementing it.

Measurable. A goal should provide a tangible point to pursue.

Challenging. A goal should be ambitious enough to go beyond what your club has accomplished in the past.

Achievable. Rotarians should be able to accomplish the goal with the resources available.

Time specific. A goal should have a deadline or a timeline.

Training leader’s note — Record a few participants’ responses to the following question on a flip chart.

What specific goals do you have for your club? REFER TO APPENDIX 7 Goals Worksheet Training leader’s notes — Ask participants to write down a goal they have already set or develop a new one using the appendix. — Appendix 7 complements the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs that will be completed in PETS session 9. — Allow five minutes for participants to work on this exercise independently or in pairs.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 37


NOTES

How will you ensure that your club’s goals are achieved? SHOW SLIDE 21 Strategies for Achieving Goals Key points •

Communicate with club leaders and the appropriate district chair or assistant governor during the goalsetting process.

Develop action steps for achieving the goal.

Assign club members to each step of the action plan.

Establish a timeline.

Determine specific criteria for measuring your club’s progress.

Use the resources and tools available from your club, district, and RI.

Evaluate your progress.

Strategies for Achieving Goals • Communicate with club and district leaders. • Develop action steps. • Assign club members to each step of the action plan. • Establish a timeline. • Determine criteria for measuring progress. • Use resources available from your club, district, and RI. • Evaluate your progress.

REFER TO APPENDIX 8 Action Plan Worksheet

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 38

21

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES Training leader’s notes — Ask participants if a goal from the Goals Worksheet (appendix 7) meets the characteristics of an effective goal. — Ask participants to analyze their goal and start creating an action plan using the steps in the Action Plan Worksheet (appendix 8). — Refer participants to chapter 2 of the Club President’s Manual for additional guidance on completing this worksheet. — The Action Plan Worksheet (appendix 8) complements the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs that will be completed in session 9. — Allow 10 minutes for participants to work on this exercise independently or in pairs.

Why would you create an action plan for your club’s goals?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 39


NOTES

MOTIVATION

(20 MINUTES)

TO

Key points •

Once your club’s goals are established, it is important to motivate and inspire your fellow Rotarians to achieve them.

Motivated members will work together to make your club successful.

What motivates the members of your club to be involved? SHOW SLIDE 22 Motivators for Club Members Key points • •

Motivators for Club Members • • • •

Fellowship Networking Recognition Belief that their goal will benefit the community

Because Rotarians are volunteers, what motivates them in their profession may not motivate them in Rotary. Volunteers are motivated by fellowship and networking opportunities, recognition, and the belief that their goal will benefit the community.

How can you use fellowship to motivate your club members? How can you use recognition to motivate your club members? How does your club recognize the outstanding work or participation of its members?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 40

22

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES Key points •

Recognition programs can be an outstanding way to motivate members of your club.

Benefits of recognition: — Encourages Rotarians to continue serving and contributing — Thanks members for their work — Motivates others to serve and contribute — Serves as a sign of appreciation for commitment to a cause greater than personal gain — Provides positive feedback to Rotarians devoted to serving their community and communities around the world

Training leader’s note — Refer participants to chapter 2 of the Club President’s Manual for a detailed summary of awards and recognition.

SHOW SLIDE 23 Successful Motivational Strategies

What motivational strategies have been successful in your club?

Successful Motivational Strategies What motivational strategies have been successful in your club?

23

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 41

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES

REVIEW

(5 MINUTES)

REFER TO APPENDIX 6 Summary of Session 2: Goal Setting

What action steps will you take as a result of this session? Training leader’s notes — Review the learning objectives to ensure that all topics were covered sufficiently. — Answer questions that participants may have. — Encourage participants to write down ideas on the appendix. — Thank participants.

Adjourn

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 42

TO


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 6 Summary of Session 2: Goal Setting Resources Informational Resources

Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs (appendix 39) Presidential Citation Brochure (900A-EN) Additional Resources

• •

Ideas to Implement

Contact

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Action Steps • • • •

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 43


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 7 Goals Worksheet Use the following worksheet to draft goals to support effective club operations. Ensure that your goals are • Shared. Those who participate in setting a goal and developing strategies to achieve that goal are committed to implementing it. • Measurable. A goal should provide a tangible point to pursue. • Challenging. A goal should be ambitious enough to go beyond what your club has accomplished in the past. • Achievable. Rotarians should be able to accomplish the goal with the resources available. • Time specific. A goal should have a deadline or timeline. You will continue working on these preliminary goals with your assistant governor in the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs (appendix 39) in PETS Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning.

Club name

Goals for Rotary year 20

Membership Goal

Service Projects Goal

Rotary Foundation Goal

Leadership Development Goal

Additional Goals

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 44

-


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 8 Action Plan Worksheet Goal:

Result:

Criteria for Measuring Progress

Action Step

Person Responsible

Time Frame for Completion

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

Resources needed:

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 2: Goal Setting 45


NOTES SESSION 3

Working with Your Club and District Leaders (60 minutes)

Learning Objectives At the end of this session, presidents-elect will be able to 1. Identify skills needed by Rotarians to serve as effective club leaders 2. Prepare club leaders for the coming year 3. Understand the role of the district in supporting the club

Materials Slides

Appendix

24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32.

10. Summary of Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders

Introduction Learning Objectives Leading Your Club Club Leadership Team Club Committees Effective Committees Purpose of the District Your District District Leadership Team

Session Outline Introduction Working with Your Club District Support Review

5 minutes 30 minutes 20 minutes 5 minutes

• For current Rotary information, go to www.rotary.org. • For additional information on various features of this session, refer to “How to Use the Session Guides,” available from your district trainer. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 47


NOTES

INTRODUCTION

(5 MINUTES)

TO

SHOW SLIDE 24 Introduction Session 3:

SHOW SLIDE 25 Learning Objectives

Working with Your Club and District Leaders

24

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

Training leader’s notes — Review this session’s learning objectives with participants. — Refer participants to the PETS agenda, and explain that specific club and district administrative requirements will be discussed in Session 4: Club Administration.

Learning Objectives 1. Identify skills needed by Rotarians to serve as effective club leaders. 2. Prepare club leaders for the coming year. 3. Understand the role of the district in supporting the club.

25

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

REFER TO APPENDIX 10 Summary of Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders Training leader’s notes — Highlight the features of the appendix. — Encourage participants to use this sheet throughout the session.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 48


NOTES

WORKING WITH YOUR CLUB

(30 MINUTES)

TO

What skills will you use to lead your club? SHOW SLIDE 26 Leading Your Club Key points •

Effective leadership depends on management skills, team building, enthusiasm, and integrity.

Under the Club Leadership Plan, club presidents should — Promote the spirit of fellowship and collaboration among club members — Lead problem-solving initiatives — Build on past successes — Be accessible to members by promoting direct and honest communication — Embody the fundamental principles and values of Rotary and encourage others to do the same — Ensure that every club member is active

Leading Your Club • • • •

Promote fellowship. Lead problem-solving initiatives. Build on past successes. Be accessible to members, and promote communication. • Embody the principles and values of Rotary and encourage others to do the same. • Ensure that every club member is active. 26

Who will you work with to carry out the goals of your club? SHOW SLIDE 27 Club Leadership Team

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

Club Leadership Team • • • • • • • • •

President Directors Club secretary Club treasurer Sergeant-at-arms Committee chairs and/or members Vice president Immediate past president President-elect 27

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 49


NOTES Key points •

You should work closely with your club leadership team to implement and achieve your club’s goals.

Your club leadership team includes: — President — Directors — Club secretary — Club treasurer — Sergeant-at-arms — Committee chairs and/or members — Vice president — Immediate past president — President-elect

How will you prepare your club leadership team? Key points •

Ensure clear communication between club leaders, club members, and district leaders

Develop a comprehensive training plan that ensures club leaders attend district training meetings

Provide for continuity in leadership by making appointments for multiple years and having a current, incoming, and past chair on all committees

Strongly encourage all incoming club leaders to attend the district assembly

Involve the leadership team in the goal-setting process

Work with the current club leadership team to prepare future club leaders and ensure a smooth transition to the new Rotary year

What is the role of your club’s board of directors? PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 50


NOTES

How will you work with your board of directors? Key points •

A club’s board of directors is considered its governing body. It is ultimately responsible for all committee and club decisions.

The board of directors is made up of the president, president-elect, and one or more vice presidents. The secretary, treasurer, sergeant-at-arms, and directors as elected by your club may also be board members.

While not chosen by the president, the board of directors will work closely with you to implement your club’s annual and long-range goals.

Who is on your club’s board of directors? Training leader’s notes — Club presidents-elect are responsible for appointing committee chairs, training, and conducting planning meetings with incoming committees before the next Rotary year begins. — Refer participants to chapter 3 of the Club President’s Manual or the Club Committee Manual for a detailed summary of club committee responsibilities. — Gauge participants’ knowledge and experience with club committees using the questions below and adjust the facilitated discussion accordingly.

What committees does your club have?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 51


NOTES

Do you assign all members of your club to a committee? SHOW SLIDE 28 Club Committees Key point •

The Club Leadership Plan recommends appointing the following five committees to carry out your club’s annual goals: — Membership — Club public relations — Club administration — Service projects — The Rotary Foundation

Club Committees The Club Leadership Plan recommends appointing five committees to carry out your club’s annual goals: • • • • •

Membership Club public relations Club administration Service projects The Rotary Foundation 28

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

Will you appoint any additional club committees or subcommittees as president? What will you consider when determining your club’s committee structure? Does your club’s current committee structure meet the needs and goals of your club? Will you eliminate or consolidate any of your club’s current committees?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 52


NOTES Key points •

Review your club’s bylaws to determine whether the current club committee structure will meet your club’s goals for the coming year.

Amend your club’s bylaws to accurately reflect your club’s organization, if necessary.

Have you started appointing new committee chairs? What are some qualities to consider when appointing committee chairs? Key point •

Committee chairs should have the following qualities: — Good judgment — Imagination — Leadership ability — Interest in the work of the committee — Knowledge of the job — Knowledge of Rotary — Enthusiasm

What are some other qualities you will look for when appointing committee chairs? How will you ensure that your club’s committees are effective? SHOW SLIDE 29 Effective Committees

Effective Committees • • • • • • • • •

Appoint committee chairs who have experience. Appoint committee members based on abilities. Appoint members to three-year terms. Add subcommittees as necessary. Define their purpose and help set goals. Encourage committees to keep records. Encourage committees to communicate. Participate in committee meetings, as appropriate. Solicit feedback. 29

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 53


NOTES Key points •

Appoint committee chairs who have previous experience on that committee, selecting leaders based on qualifications, not personal preferences.

Appoint committee members based on their professional abilities, personal interests, and talents.

Appoint members to the same committee for three-year terms to ensure continuity.

Add subcommittees as necessary.

Set goals for each committee in support of your club’s annual and long-range goals.

Encourage committees to keep records of meetings, plans, decisions, and results, reporting to your club’s board about the progress of their activities.

Encourage committees to communicate regularly with your club’s assistant governor and appropriate district committees.

Participate in committee meetings when requested or when the situation requires, sharing responsibility with other club officers and members.

Solicit feedback from committees.

Why are some club committees effective while others are not?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 54


NOTES

DISTRICT SUPPORT

(20 MINUTES)

TO

How will you work with your district? What is the role of the district? SHOW SLIDE 30 Purpose of the District Key points

Purpose of the District “The activities and organization of a Rotary district shall exist solely to help the individual Rotary club advance the Object of Rotary.” Manual of Procedure

Rotary districts exist to support Rotary clubs.

The Manual of Procedure states that “the activities and organization of a Rotary district shall exist solely to help the individual Rotary club advance the Object of Rotary.”

30

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

How does your district support your club? SHOW SLIDE 31 Your District Key points •

Provides guidance on various issues, such as membership or service projects

Connects clubs that have similar issues or projects

Serves as an information resource

Provides an opportunity for Rotarians to serve on district-level committees

Conveys detailed Rotary information to club committees and members

Coordinates Rotary Foundation programs

Your District • • • •

Provides guidance Connects clubs that have similar interests Serves as an information resource Provides an opportunity to serve on districtlevel committees • Conveys Rotary information to clubs • Coordinates Rotary Foundation programs 31

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 55


NOTES

What is the role of the district governor with respect to your club? Key points •

Acts as a resource

Inspires and motivates members to help clubs become more effective

Keeps clubs and their officers informed of district activities and opportunities

Who else at the district level can help you? SHOW SLIDE 32 District Leadership Team Key points •

The district leadership team consists of — District governor — Assistant governors — District committees — District trainer — District secretary — Past district governors

District Leadership Team • • • • • •

District governor Assistant governors District committees District trainer District secretary Past district governors 32

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

All members of this team exist to support Rotary clubs.

How can your assistant governor support you in running an effective club?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 56


NOTES Key points •

Assists in identifying goals using the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs

Periodically reviews progress made toward goals established on the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs

Encourages your club to follow through with suggestions from the governor

Visits your club at least once every quarter to meet with the president and secretary to discuss club business and related issues

Schedules and plans for the governor’s visit to your club

Represents the governor at club assemblies related to the official visit

Acts as a liaison between the governor and your club

Assists your club with service projects

Identifies and encourages the development of future district leaders

Training leader’s note — Refer participants to the presidents-elect training seminar agenda, pointing out that they will be meeting with their assistant governor in session 9.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 57


NOTES

REVIEW

(5 MINUTES)

TO

REFER TO APPENDIX 10 Summary of Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders

What action steps will you take as a result of this session? Training leader’s notes — Review the learning objectives to ensure that all topics were covered sufficiently. — Answer questions that participants may have. — Encourage participants to write down ideas on the appendix. — Thank participants.

Adjourn

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 58


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 10 Summary of Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders Resources Informational Resources

www.rotary.org

Manual of Procedure (035-EN) Official Directory (007-EN)

Click on: Club-District Support

Additional Resources

• •

Ideas to Implement

Contact

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Action Steps • • • •

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 3: Working with Your Club and District Leaders 59


NOTES SESSION 4

Club Administration (60 minutes)

Learning Objectives At the end of this session, presidents-elect will be able to 1. Understand the policies and procedures that serve as the framework for operation of the Rotary club 2. Understand the club’s administrative requirements 3. Develop new ideas for weekly club programs

Materials Slides

Appendix

33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43.

16. Summary of Session 4: Club Administration

Introduction Learning Objectives Standard Rotary Club Constitution Club Reporting Requirements Club Administration Committee Financial Responsibilities Samples of Rotary Marks Meetings Effective Meeting Programs Club Assemblies The Official Visit

Session Outline Introduction Rotary Club Constitution and Bylaws Club Administration Meetings Review

5 minutes 15 minutes 20 minutes 15 minutes 5 minutes

• For current Rotary information, go to www.rotary.org. • For additional information on various features of this session, refer to “How to Use the Session Guides,” available from your district trainer. • Before you begin, prepare a flip chart to record participant responses as needed. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 4: Club Administration 61


NOTES

INTRODUCTION

(5 MINUTES)

TO

SHOW SLIDE 33 Introduction Session 4:

SHOW SLIDE 34 Learning Objectives

Club Administration

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Training leader’s notes — Review this session’s learning objectives with participants. — Remind participants that they will use what they learn in this session as they draft club administration goals during session 9. — Refer participants to chapter 4 of the Club President’s Manual and the Manual of Procedure for a detailed summary of club administration responsibilities.

Learning Objectives 1. Understand the policies and procedures that serve as the framework for operation of the Rotary club. 2. Understand the club’s administrative requirements. 3. Develop new ideas for weekly club programs. 34

REFER TO APPENDIX 16 Summary of Session 4: Club Administration Training leader’s notes — Highlight the features of the appendix. — Encourage participants to use this sheet throughout the session. — Gauge participants’ knowledge and experience using the questions below, and adjust the facilitated discussion accordingly.

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NOTES

ROTARY CLUB CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS

(15 MINUTES)

TO

Have you reviewed your club’s constitution? Have you reviewed your club’s bylaws? SHOW SLIDE 35 Standard Rotary Club Constitution

Standard Rotary Club Constitution • Required by RI Bylaws for adoption by all clubs admitted to membership in Rotary International • Provides guidelines for the operation of a Rotary club

Training leader’s note — The Standard Rotary Club Constitution and Recommended Rotary Club Bylaws are included in the Club President’s Manual.

35

Key points •

The Standard Rotary Club Constitution must be adopted by all clubs admitted to membership in Rotary International.

The Standard Rotary Club Constitution provides guidelines for the operation of a Rotary club, such as — Name, locality, and meetings of the club — Membership qualifications — Directors and officers — Admission fees and dues — Bylaws — Amendments

Following the Council on Legislation, the Standard Rotary Club Constitution is updated to include council decisions.

Check that your club is using the most recent version of the Standard Rotary Club Constitution. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 4: Club Administration 63

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NOTES

How does your club use its constitution? Key points •

The Recommended Rotary Club Bylaws are additional guidelines for the governance of the club that are not included in the club constitution, such as: — Election of directors and officers — Duties of officers — Method of voting — Duties of committees — Leave of absence — Finances — Method of electing members — Order of business — Amendments

Each Rotary club should amend the Recommended Rotary Club Bylaws to reflect its current practices, such as the committee structure.

If changes are necessary, bylaws may be amended at any regular meeting where one-third of club members are present.

Proposed amendments should be approved by twothirds of the club members present.

All members should be notified of the proposed amendment at least 10 days before such a meeting.

Training leader’s note — Refer participants to Article 5, Section 3 and Article 16 of the Recommended Rotary Club Bylaws for more information on amendments.

How will you use your club’s bylaws to prepare for office? PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 4: Club Administration 64


NOTES

CLUB ADMINISTRATION

(20 MINUTES)

TO

Key points •

Be familiar with the administrative policies and procedures that serve as a framework for operation of a Rotary club.

Fulfill the administrative requirements to the district and RI.

Oversee the responsible management of club finances.

Convene training for incoming officers.

Develop weekly club programs that will interest club members.

What reporting requirements do all clubs have to Rotary International, The Rotary Foundation, and the district? SHOW SLIDE 36 Club Reporting Requirements Key points •

Semiannual reports (due 1 July and 1 January), which are used to submit RI per capita dues

Changes in membership

Changes in officer or meeting information

Information for the Official Directory

Use of Rotary Foundation funds

The Rotary Foundation Fund Development Club Goal Report Form

Monthly attendance figures, due to the district governor within 15 days of the last meeting of the month

Club Reporting Requirements To RI: • Semiannual reports to pay RI per capita dues • Changes in membership or in officer or meeting information • Information for the Official Directory To The Rotary Foundation: • Use of Rotary Foundation funds The Rotary Foundation Fund Development Club Goal Report Form To District: • Monthly attendance report

36

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NOTES

What may happen if your club fails to meet these reporting requirements? Key points •

Failure to remit RI dues will result in termination of your club’s charter.

Incorrect or outdated contact information for club officers can prevent clubs from receiving mailings, including semiannual reports.

Not having the current club officers listed in the Official Directory inhibits communication with the club.

Improper stewardship of funds will be promptly investigated by the Trustees and may result in your club and district not receiving funds from The Rotary Foundation.

Who will you work with to carry out club administration activities? SHOW SLIDE 37 Club Administration Committee Key points •

The club administration committee is responsible for your club’s administrative activities.

Both the club secretary and club treasurer should be members of this committee.

The club secretary should help fulfill the reporting requirements.

Club Administration Committee • This committee is responsible for all the club’s administrative activities. • Both the club secretary and club treasurer should be members of this committee. • The club secretary should help fulfill the reporting requirements.

37

How will you work with your club administration committee?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 4: Club Administration 66

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NOTES Key point •

Meet with your club administration committee chair at the beginning of your term to delegate club administration responsibilities.

How will you ensure that your club’s finances are managed responsibly? SHOW SLIDE 38 Financial Responsibilities Key points •

Work closely with your club’s treasurer to ensure your club’s financial affairs operate smoothly.

Ensure club dues are sent to RI (clearly identified with your club number and invoice number) in a timely manner to avoid termination.

Develop a budget and use it to authorize expenditures.

Keep member costs reasonable.

Perform an annual audit.

Prepare a financial report to members.

Financial Responsibilities • • • • • •

Work closely with the club treasurer. Ensure club dues are sent to RI. Develop a budget and use it. Keep member costs reasonable. Perform annual audit. Prepare financial report to members. 38

What is your role in your club’s budget? How can you use Member Access at www.rotary.org?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 4: Club Administration 67

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NOTES Key point •

With Member Access, club presidents and secretaries can perform the following club administrative functions: — View and change club membership data — Pay per capita dues and other fees — Update club data — View reports for club contributions to The Rotary Foundation — Search club and district data worldwide

Does your club have an insurance policy? Key points •

Each club should have liability insurance for its activities and operations, as appropriate for its geographic area.

It’s recommended that you contact a local insurance agent or broker for assistance with insurance appropriate for your club.

Clubs in the United States and its territories and possessions are provided general liability insurance through a program arranged by RI and paid for by participating clubs through the July semiannual dues report.

Training leader’s note — Refer participants to the Club President’s Manual, Manual of Procedure, or Rotary Code of Policies for detailed information on the use of Rotary Marks. Samples of Rotary Marks

SHOW SLIDE 39 Samples of Rotary Marks

39

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 4: Club Administration 68

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NOTES

What is your role in protecting the Rotary Marks? Key points •

Rotary Marks include the emblem; the names Rotary, Rotary International, and The Rotary Foundation; and other emblems, logos, and trademarks associated with them.

You should ensure that the Rotary Marks are used properly.

Rotary Marks may not be altered, modified, or obstructed in any way.

When using any of the Rotary Marks, your club name must appear with the marks.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 4: Club Administration 69


NOTES

MEETINGS

(15 MINUTES)

TO

What meetings will you attend as club president? Key points •

Club, district, and international meetings develop future leaders and provide opportunities for fellowship.

Attending these district and international meetings helps Rotarians understand the internationality of Rotary.

Which meetings are important to your club? Why? Which meetings will you promote to your club? Why? SHOW SLIDE 40 Meetings Key points •

It is your responsibility to plan and conduct — Weekly club meetings — Club assemblies — Board meetings — Assistant governor visits — District governor’s official visit

Meetings Promote: Plan and Conduct: • Weekly club meetings • RI Convention • District-level meetings • Club assemblies – District assembly – District conference – District Rotary Foundation seminar – District membership seminar – District leadership seminar

• Board meetings • Assistant governor visits • District governor’s official visit 40

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NOTES •

It is your responsibility to promote — RI Convention — District-level meetings – District assembly – District conference – District Rotary Foundation seminar – District membership seminar – District leadership seminar

What will you consider when planning your weekly meeting programs? How can you maximize the impact of your club’s weekly meeting? Effective Meeting Programs

SHOW SLIDE 41 Effective Meeting Programs Key points •

Determine programs in advance.

Rotate the responsibility of arranging programs.

Relate programs to current club projects and activities.

Use the Rotary calendar as a guide.

Include programs that update members on Rotary information.

Ensure that an interesting, relevant club meeting program is planned.

Begin and end the meeting punctually.

Have a contingency plan in case the scheduled program is canceled.

• Determine programs in advance. • Rotate the planning responsibility. • Relate programs to current club projects and activities. • Use the Rotary calendar as a guide. • Include programs that update members on Rotary information. • Begin and end the meeting punctually. • Have a contingency plan. 41

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NOTES

What creative strategies does your club use to develop interesting, relevant, and informative club programs? Why are club assemblies important? SHOW SLIDE 42 Club Assemblies Key points •

A club assembly is a meeting of all club members, officers, directors, and committee chairs either to discuss club activities or for membership education.

It is recommended that clubs hold four to six club assemblies each year.

New members are encouraged to attend club assemblies.

Club Assemblies • Meeting of all club members, officers, directors, and committee chairs either to discuss club activities or for membership education • Four to six club assemblies recommended per year • New members encouraged to attend 42

What will you discuss at your club assembly? Key points •

An opportunity for open discussion of service projects, and committee and club activities

Annual and long-range goal setting

Membership growth and retention

Attendance at district and RI meetings

Programs of Rotary

What is the official visit?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 4: Club Administration 72

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NOTES SHOW SLIDE 43 The Official Visit Key points •

The official visit is the personal visit of the district governor to each Rotary club in the district.

Official visits can be done with individual or multiple clubs.

Purpose of the official visit: — Focus attention on important Rotary issues — Provide needed attention to weak or struggling clubs — Motivate Rotarians to participate in service activities — Recognize the outstanding contributions of Rotarians in the district

The Official Visit • Focuses attention on important Rotary issues • Provides needed attention to weak or struggling clubs • Motivates Rotarians to participate in service activities • Recognizes outstanding Rotarian contributions 43

How will you prepare for the official visit? Key points •

Announce the upcoming visit at weekly club meetings and in the club bulletin.

Review the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs, and be prepared to discuss it during the visit.

Make a list of questions, problems, and concerns that can be addressed during the visit.

Arrange for awards or recognition to be presented by the governor or assistant governor (for example, Paul Harris Fellow Recognition).

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 4: Club Administration 73

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NOTES

REVIEW

(5 MINUTES)

REFER TO APPENDIX 16 Summary of Session 4: Club Administration

What action steps will you take as a result of this session? Training leader’s notes — Review the learning objectives to ensure that all topics were covered sufficiently. — Answer questions that participants may have. — Encourage participants to write down ideas on the appendix. — Thank participants.

Adjourn

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 4: Club Administration 74

TO


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 16 Summary of Session 4: Club Administration Resources Informational Resources

www.rotary.org

Manual of Procedure (035-EN) Official Directory (007-EN) Recommended Rotary Club Bylaws (appendix 38) Rotary Code of Policies Standard Rotary Club Constitution (appendix 37)

Keyword searches: Club Leadership Plan Insurance Licensed Suppliers of RI Merchandise Click on: Member Access

Human Resources

RI Club and District Support representative Additional Resources

• •

Ideas to Implement

Contact

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Action Steps • • • •

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 4: Club Administration 75


NOTES SESSION 5

Membership (60 minutes)

Learning Objectives At the end of the session, presidents-elect will be able to 1. Lead the club in establishing progressive yet realistic membership goals for the upcoming Rotary year 2. Understand the components of effective membership development 3. Develop strategies for membership recruitment, retention, and education

Materials Slides

Appendixes

44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49.

19. Summary of Session 5: Membership 20. Strategies for Membership Recruitment Worksheet 21. Strategies for Membership Retention Worksheet

Introduction Learning Objectives Membership Committee Recruiting Members Retaining Members Membership Education

Session Outline Introduction Membership Development Membership Recruitment Membership Retention Membership Education Review

5 minutes 10 minutes 15 minutes 15 minutes 10 minutes 5 minutes

• For current Rotary information, go to www.rotary.org. • For additional information on various features of this session, refer to “How to Use the Session Guides,” available from your district trainer. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 77


NOTES

INTRODUCTION

(5 MINUTES)

TO

SHOW SLIDE 44 Introduction Session 5:

SHOW SLIDE 45 Learning Objectives

Membership

44

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

Training leader’s notes — Review this session’s learning objectives with participants. — Remind participants that they will use what they learn in this session as they draft membership goals during session 9.

Learning Objectives 1. Lead the club in establishing progressive yet realistic membership goals for the upcoming Rotary year. 2. Understand the components of effective membership development. 3. Develop strategies for membership recruitment, retention, and education. 45

REFER TO APPENDIX 19 Summary of Session 5: Membership Training leader’s notes — Highlight the features of the appendix. — Encourage participants to use this sheet throughout the session.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 78

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NOTES

MEMBERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

(10 MINUTES)

TO

Why is membership development important? How does your club view membership development? Key points •

Your club cannot exist and thrive without a solid membership base.

A solid membership base ensures that your club can increase its service potential and fellowship.

Membership development includes: — Recruitment — Retention — Organizing new clubs

What is your role in your club’s membership development? What membership development goals does your club have? SHOW SLIDE 46 Membership Committee

Membership Committee • Resource for helping to achieve club membership goals • Develops and implements a plan for recruiting and retaining club members

Key points •

Your membership committee is your primary resource for helping to achieve your club’s membership goals

The committee develops and implements a plan for recruiting and retaining members

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 79

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NOTES

Who else is responsible for achieving your club’s membership goals? How will you work with the membership committee? Key points •

Meet with your club’s membership chair at the beginning of your term to assess current annual and longrange membership goals.

Help manage the programs of the membership development committee to ensure its effective operation.

Help manage the orientation of new members and the continuing education of current members.

How will you assess your club’s current membership situation? Training leader’s note — Inform participants that their five-year membership history should be available through their district governor or governor-elect.

Key points •

Use the membership section of the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs (appendix 39) to assess your club and plan membership goals.

Review the five-year membership profile of your club.

Consult with your district governor or assistant governor as appropriate.

Determine a realistic membership development goal and plan for growth.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 80


NOTES •

Complete a classification survey as early in the year as possible to identify unfilled professions represented in the community.

Visit the Membership Best Practices Exchange at www.rotary.org for ideas that have worked in other clubs.

Go to www.rotary.org for club assessment resources.

Once your club has established membership goals, what other club committees will you work with? Key points •

Club public relations committee: to help develop and maintain a positive image of your club within the community as well as improve retention of existing members

Club service projects committee: to plan interesting projects and activities that engage and satisfy members and attract new members

Club administration committee: to plan weekly meetings in observance of Membership and Extension Month (August)

District membership development committee: for resources and strategies to recruit and retain members

District extension committee: to seek new clubs organizing in your area that meet at a different time or day

If a new club is organized in your area and you are the sponsor club, how can you help the new club?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 81


NOTES Key points •

Ensure admission documents are completed.

Help recruit prospective charter members.

Support the new club during its first two years.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 82


NOTES

MEMBERSHIP RECRUITMENT

(15 MINUTES)

TO

Why is recruiting new members important for your Rotary club? Recruiting Members

SHOW SLIDE 47 Recruiting Members Key points •

New members become future leaders.

Club membership that reflects the diversity of the community makes the club more representative.

New Rotarians bring fresh ideas, new interests, and increased energy.

Having more Rotary club members increases the capacity for service.

Greater membership brings increased participation in the programs of The Rotary Foundation and contributions to the Foundation.

Younger members provide for the long-term continuity of clubs and the organization.

• New members become future leaders. • Diversity of the professional community makes the club more representative. • New Rotarians bring fresh ideas. • More Rotarians means greater service outreach. • Greater membership brings increased participation and contributions to The Rotary Foundation. • Younger members are the future of the organization.

Is your club working to achieve diverse membership?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 83

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NOTES Key points •

Membership that reflects the diversity of the community can be characterized by — Profession — Age — Gender — Ethnicity

With membership representative of the professional community, your club will be better able to identify and meet local service needs.

What are some of the successes and challenges of attracting new members? Key points •

Competing priorities

Lack of diversity among members

High cost of membership

Misconceptions about benefits and responsibilities of membership

Lack of awareness of Rotary in the community

How can you address these challenges? What membership recruitment ideas have worked in your club?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 84


NOTES Key points •

New members must be invited to join.

Emphasize each club member’s responsibility to identify, invite, and propose new members.

REFER TO APPENDIX 20 Strategies for Membership Recruitment Worksheet Training leader’s notes — Review with participants the list of ideas that clubs can use to increase their membership. — Ask participants to comment on their experiences related to these ideas. — Ask participants to share any additional ideas that have worked in their own club. — Allow five minutes for this activity.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 85


NOTES

MEMBERSHIP RETENTION

(15 MINUTES)

TO

Is retention a challenge in your club? SHOW SLIDE 48 Retaining Members Key points •

Retention is a key component to membership growth.

Rotarians who are involved and committed are less likely to leave Rotary.

The active involvement and enthusiasm of current members helps to retain new members.

In order to grow as an organization, the needs of current and future members must be addressed.

Retaining Members • Retention is a key component of membership growth. • Rotarians who are involved and committed are less likely to leave Rotary. • Involvement and enthusiasm of current members helps retain new members. • In order to grow as a organization, the needs of current and future members must be addressed.

Why do existing members leave Rotary clubs? Key points •

Competing time commitments with family and work

Expenses associated with Rotary membership

Lack of fellowship

Poorly structured meetings

Lack of service projects and programs that interest members

Lack of service projects and programs relevant to community needs

Unavoidable circumstances, such as relocation

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 86

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NOTES

What actions can you encourage club members to take to address these issues? Key points •

New members should immediately get involved in club activities and committees.

Encourage family participation at more Rotary events, such as the district conference.

Develop activities and service projects that meet community needs.

Develop a recruitment strategy to prepare for unexpected loss in membership.

Why have you remained a member in your club? What are some ways to increase membership retention? REFER TO APPENDIX 21 Strategies for Membership Retention Worksheet

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 87


NOTES Training leader’s notes — Review with participants the list of ideas that clubs can use to retain their current members. — Ask participants to comment on their experiences related to these ideas. — Ask participants to share any additional ideas that have worked in their own club. — Allow five minutes for this activity. — Inform participants of the Resigning Member Questionnaire available at www.rotary.org. This tool helps clubs identify why a member is leaving the club.

Key points •

Some clubs conduct exit interviews to find out why members leave.

The results can be used to identify areas the club should improve to retain members.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 88


NOTES

MEMBERSHIP EDUCATION

(10 MINUTES)

TO

Why is it important to make Rotary education a priority within your club? Key point •

Education is fundamental to retaining current members.

What types of Rotary education does your club provide its members? Does your club have a plan for education of new members? Does your club have a plan for continuing education for current members? SHOW SLIDE 49 Membership Education

Membership Education • Prospective member education • New member orientation and education • Continuing education for current members

Key point 49

Education is important for all stages of Rotary membership, including: — Prospective member education — New member orientation and education — Continuing education for current members

How can you educate or inform prospective members about Rotary? PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 89

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NOTES Key points •

Inform prospective members of the basics of Rotary and club membership.

Provide potential members with realistic expectations about the benefits and obligations of membership.

Why is it important to educate new members? Key points •

Knowledgeable members can become immediately involved in club activities.

Members who are well informed about Rotary will be more successful at recruiting new members.

In order for Rotary to grow, we need to retain the members that we bring into our organization.

Who in your club can educate new members? Key points •

Every member of your club can play an active role in the education of new members.

Educating members about Rotary and giving them active roles to play is an excellent strategy for retaining current members.

Educated members can help new members develop the knowledge base necessary to function as effective club members and help the entire club succeed.

Why is it important to continue the Rotary education of existing members? PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 90


NOTES Key points •

Rotary is a dynamic organization. Informing members of changes and opportunities will ensure that they remain challenged, motivated, and enthusiastic.

A high turnover rate in existing clubs is one of the most pressing membership issues that Rotary faces today.

What RI resources can you use to educate members? REFER TO APPENDIX 19 Summary of Session 5: Membership Training leaders’ notes — Review with participants the list of resources that the club can use to implement membership development initiatives. — Ask participants to share any additional resources that they have used.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 91


NOTES

REVIEW

(5 MINUTES)

REFER TO APPENDIX 19 Summary of Session 5: Membership

What action steps will you take as a result of this session? Training leader’s notes — Review the learning objectives to ensure that all topics were covered sufficiently. — Answer questions that participants may have. — Encourage participants to write down ideas on the appendix. — Thank participants.

Adjourn

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 92

TO


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 19 Summary of Session 5: Membership Resources Informational Resources

Human Resources

Membership Development Resource Guide (417-EN) New Member Orientation (414-EN) Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs (appendix 39) Rotary Basics (595-EN) This Is Rotary (001-EN)

Assistant governors District governor District membership development committee District public relations committee Regional Rotary International membership coordinators (RRIMCs) Rotary International membership zone coordinators (RIMZCs) RI Membership Development Staff

www.rotary.org

Keyword searches: Membership Membership Development Best Practices Exchange Additional Resources

• •

Ideas to Implement

Contact

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Action Steps • • • PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 93


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 20 Strategies for Membership Recruitment Worksheet Have a clear club membership goal and a plan for achieving it that can be communicated to each club member. Hold a club assembly to discuss sources of new members. Conduct information sessions in which club members explain the benefits and responsibilities of membership to potential members. Bring in Rotarians who represent the diversity of your community (e.g., different professions, ages, gender, ethnicities). Establish a peer group for these new members by inviting them to join the club in groups of three. Click on Membership at www.rotary.org to find successful strategies that other clubs have used. Use your community service projects to identify and involve potential members. (Such projects are also essential in developing effective public relations and enhancing the image of Rotary in your community.) Become acquainted with new business and community leaders. Make it a point of honor to present a new member. Recognize the presenter in your club’s bulletin or at the weekly meeting. Lead by example. Encourage club leaders, particularly those responsible for membership, to bring in one new member during the first month of the Rotary year. Waive some or all membership fees for new members under the age of 40 for the first two years of membership. Change club meeting time to accommodate professionals who commute to work. Invite spouses, partners, and family members of Rotarians in your club to be members. Additional Recruitment Strategies

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 94


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 21 Strategies for Membership Retention Worksheet Invite every Rotarian to become personally involved in club projects and activities. Encourage clubwide participation in community service and Rotary Foundation programs. Conduct weekly programs that are relevant and meaningful to members. Explain to members how projects are relevant and effective. Use surveys such as the Membership Satisfaction Questionnaire to identify what is important to your membership and give a voice to every Rotarian in your club. Conduct a minimum of four club programs per year that address issues related to continuing education. Take part in multiclub meetings for the purpose of addressing continuing education. Participate in district meetings and events. Encourage Rotarians to read items related to continuing education, such as the governor’s monthly letter and Rotary magazines. Offer to temporarily waive fees of members who have encountered financial difficulties. Include membership items in your club bulletin. Additional Retention Strategies

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 5: Membership 95


NOTES SESSION 6

Service Projects (60 minutes)

Learning Objectives At the end of the session, presidents-elect will be able to 1. Identify the steps of a successful service project 2. Determine a balanced program of service for the club

Materials Slides

Appendixes

50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56.

24. Summary of Session 6: Service Projects 25. Characteristics of Successful Service Projects 26. A Balanced Program of Service Worksheet 27. RI and Rotary Foundation Programs Worksheet

Introduction Learning Objectives Rotary’s Motto Four Steps of a Successful Service Project Service Projects Committee Questions to Consider RI and Rotary Foundation Programs

Session Outline Introduction 5 minutes Successful Service Projects 30 minutes A Balanced Program of Service 20 minutes Review 5 minutes

• For current Rotary information, go to www.rotary.org. • For additional information on various features of this session, refer to “How to Use the Session Guides,” available from your district trainer. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 6: Service Projects 97


NOTES

INTRODUCTION

(5 MINUTES)

TO

SHOW SLIDE 50 Introduction Session 6:

SHOW SLIDE 51 Learning Objectives

Service Projects

50

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Training leader’s notes — Review this session’s learning objectives with participants. — Remind participants that they will use what they learn in this session as they draft service project goals during session 9.

Learning Objectives 1. Identify the steps of a successful service project. 2. Determine a balanced program of service for the club.

51

REFER TO APPENDIX 24 Summary of Session 6: Service Projects Training leader’s notes — Highlight the features of the appendix. — Encourage participants to use this sheet throughout the session.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 6: Service Projects 98

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NOTES

SUCCESSFUL SERVICE PROJECTS

(30 MINUTES)

SHOW SLIDE 52 Rotary’s Motto

Rotary’s Motto

Service Above Self

Key points •

Service Above Self is the official Rotary motto.

Every Rotarian is responsible for finding ways to improve the quality of life in his or her community and around the world through service projects.

SHOW SLIDE 53 Four Steps of a Successful Service Project Key points •

Conduct a needs assessment to determine the most pressing needs and concerns of the community.

Develop a plan to ensure the project will be successful.

Implement the project to provide the service.

Evaluate current projects to plan for future projects, learning from the successes and failures.

TO

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52

Four Steps of a Successful Service Project 1. 2. 3. 4.

Needs assessment Planning Implementation Evaluation

53

Think of a service project that went well in your club. What made it a success? REFER TO APPENDIX 25 Characteristics of Successful Service Projects

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NOTES Training leader’s notes — Review with participants the list of characteristics that make a successful service project. — Ask participants to comment on their experiences related to any of the items listed. — Ask participants to share any additional characteristics of a successful service project that aren’t on the list. — Allow five minutes for this activity.

What is your role in supporting your club’s service efforts? Who will you work with to carry out your club’s service projects? SHOW SLIDE 54 Service Projects Committee

Service Projects Committee • Resource for helping you conduct successful service projects • Plans and carries out educational, humanitarian, and vocational projects that address the needs of your club’s community and communities in other countries

Key points 54

Your service projects committee is your primary resource for helping your club conduct successful service projects.

The committee plans and carries out educational, humanitarian, and vocational projects that address the needs of your club’s community and communities in other countries.

How will you support your club’s service projects committee?

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NOTES Key points •

Meet with the service projects chair at the beginning of your term to help evaluate your club’s annual and longrange service project goals.

Encourage conducting a needs assessment to understand the needs of the community.

Encourage the development of service projects that address each Avenue of Service.

Help manage the initiatives of the service projects committee to ensure its effective operation.

What other committees will you work with to develop successful service projects? Key points •

Club public relations committee: to create recognition of community service efforts

Club membership committee: to promote participation among all club members

District programs committee

Other district-level committees

What service project has your club undertaken based on the needs of the community? Key points •

Determine the needs of your community by looking at its economic situation and demographic profile.

Talk with community leaders, such as educators, social service agencies, local government officials, and religious leaders, to get their input on the needs of the community. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 6: Service Projects 101


NOTES

What is the role of club members in service projects? Key points •

Club members should be involved in all phases of a service project.

Identify the skills of your club members so that members can be matched to service projects where they’re most needed.

Service projects provide an opportunity for fellowship.

Have you evaluated your club’s current service projects? Why is it important to evaluate every club project? Key points •

Performing an evaluation will help your club determine the effectiveness of a project.

The lessons learned from an evaluation can help guide your club for future projects.

Evaluation should be a part of all stages, from project planning to implementation.

What questions should you consider when evaluating the effectiveness of club projects?

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NOTES SHOW SLIDE 55 Questions to Consider Key points •

Did the project meet the needs of the community as envisioned?

Did all club members have an opportunity to participate?

Was there a balance between financial assistance and hands-on assistance?

Was there adequate media coverage of the project?

Was your club able to meet the financial demands of the project?

Questions to Consider • Did the project meet the needs of the community as envisioned? • Did all club members have an opportunity to participate? • Was there a balance between financial assistance and hands-on assistance? • Was there adequate media coverage of the project? • Was the club able to meet the financial demands of the project? 55

Training leader’s note — Refer participants to chapter 6 of the Club President’s Manual for detailed information on conducting evaluation and needs assessments.

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NOTES

A BALANCED PROGRAM OF SERVICE

(20 MINUTES)

How can you plan service projects that support the Object of Rotary? Key points •

Planning projects that address the Avenues of Service will ensure your club is pursuing the Object of Rotary.

Often, one service project falls under more than one Avenue of Service.

REFER TO APPENDIX 26 A Balanced Program of Service Worksheet Training leader’s notes — Ask participants to complete A Balanced Program of Service Worksheet (appendix 26) in the Club President’s Manual. — Participants should determine which of the example club activities relate to which Avenues of Service. — Allow five minutes for participants to work on this exercise independently or in pairs.

What is an example of a service project that addresses more than one Avenue of Service? Have you been involved with an international service project?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 6: Service Projects 104

TO


NOTES Key points •

Basic strategies for international service projects are the same as for local service projects.

Communication is critical to the success of international service projects.

What types of service projects does RI encourage clubs to undertake? Key points •

The RI Menu of Service Opportunities outlines issues and concerns that RI has identified as recommended service project priorities.

The Menu of Service Opportunities includes: — Children at risk — Disabled persons — Health care — International understanding and goodwill — Literacy and numeracy — Population issues — Poverty and hunger — Preserve Planet Earth — Urban concerns

Training leader’s note — Refer participants to A Menu of Service Opportunities for more information on each of these issues.

What emphases does the RI president-elect have for the upcoming Rotary year?

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NOTES

What RI and Rotary Foundation programs can clubs use to support their service projects? SHOW SLIDE 56 RI and Rotary Foundation Programs Key points •

Interact

Rotaract

Rotary Community Corps (RCC)

Global Networking Groups

Rotary Friendship Exchange

Rotary Volunteers

Rotary Youth Exchange

Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA)

World Community Service (WCS)

Humanitarian Grants Program

Educational Programs

PolioPlus and PolioPlus Partners

RI and Rotary Foundation Programs • Interact • Rotaract • Rotary Community Corps (RCC) • Global Networking Groups • Rotary Friendship Exchange • Rotary Volunteers • Rotary Youth Exchange

56

REFER TO APPENDIX 27 RI and Rotary Foundation Programs Worksheet Training leader’s notes — Ask participants to review the RI and Rotary Foundation programs listed and to indicate if their club currently participates in each program and if they’re interested in getting involved in the program next year. — Allow five minutes for this activity.

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• Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) • World Community Service (WCS) • Humanitarian Grants Program • Educational Programs • PolioPlus and PolioPlus Partners District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES

What resources are available to learn more about these programs and groups? What resources are available to help your club plan, implement, and evaluate service projects? Key points •

Accessing resources can significantly improve service projects.

To ensure the effectiveness of a service project, a club needs financial, human, and informational resources.

REFER TO APPENDIX 24 Summary of Session 6: Service Projects Training leader’s notes — Review with participants the list of resources that clubs can use to implement successful service projects. — Ask participants to share any additional resources that they have used.

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NOTES

REVIEW

(5 MINUTES)

REFER TO APPENDIX 24 Summary of Session 6: Service Projects

What action steps will you take as a result of this session? Training leader’s notes — Review the learning objectives to ensure that all topics were covered sufficiently. — Answer questions that participants may have. — Encourage participants to write down ideas on the appendix. — Thank participants.

Adjourn

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 6: Service Projects 108

TO


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 24 Summary of Session 6: Service Projects Resources Informational Resources

www.rotary.org

A Menu of Service Opportunities (605B-EN) Communities in Action: A Guide to Effective Projects (605A-EN) Official Directory (007-EN) RI Catalog (019-EN) Rotary Community Corps Handbook (770-EN) The Rotary Foundation Quick Reference Guide (219-EN) World Community Service Handbook: A Guide to Action (742-EN)

Keyword searches: PolioPlus Open Projects List Rotary Volunteers Database WCS Projects Exchange Click on: RI Programs The Rotary Foundation

Human Resources

Financial Resources

Community members District committees (particularly World Community Service and Rotary Foundation committees) Foundation alumni Interactors Other Rotary clubs Presidential Resource Groups/Task Forces Rotaractors Rotarians and their families Rotary Community Corps Rotary Volunteers Rotary Youth Exchange students

Funds from individual donors or local businesses Grants from other foundations Rotary Foundation grants

Additional Resources

• •

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 6: Service Projects 109


NOTES Ideas to Implement

Contact

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Action Steps • • • •

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 6: Service Projects 110


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 25 Characteristics of Successful Service Projects • Clearly defined and measurable goals • Realistic and manageable scope (determine what can be achieved, and divide project into smaller segments, if necessary) • Reasonable time frame to plan and complete the project (projects may extend beyond a single Rotary year) • Response to identified needs • Planned budget • Responsive, organized project coordinator • Effective use of available resources to help plan and implement the project • Step-by-step strategy • Solid working relationship between your club and the community being served • Positive promotion • Shared information (passing along relevant information, contacts, and material to your club and the community you are helping) • Postproject analysis to determine successes and failures Additional Successful Service Ideas

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 6: Service Projects 111


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 26 A Balanced Program of Service Worksheet An effective club pursues the Object of Rotary, carrying out activities along each Avenue of Service. The chart below lists three example club activities. Check the boxes below to show which Avenues of Service are represented in each of the example club activities. OBJECT OF ROTARY

AVENUES OF SERVICE

The Object of Rotary is to The Avenues of Service were encourage and foster the ideal developed in the 1920s to clarify of service as a basis of worthy the Object of Rotary. enterprise and, in particular, to encourage and foster: FIRST. The development of acquaintance as an opportunity for service;

Club Service focuses on strengthening fellowship and ensuring the effective functioning of the club.

SECOND. High ethical standards in business and professions; the recognition of the worthiness of all useful occupations; and the dignifying of each Rotarian’s occupation as an opportunity to serve society;

Vocational Service encourages Rotarians to serve others through their vocations and practice high ethical standards.

THIRD. The application of the ideal of service in each Rotarian’s personal, business, and community life;

Community Service covers the projects and activities the club undertakes to improve life in its community.

FOURTH. The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace through a world fellowship of business and professional persons united in the ideal of service

International Service encompasses actions taken to expand Rotary’s humanitarian reach around the globe and promote world understanding and peace.

EXAMPLE CLUB ACTIVITIES Paint the outside of the local library with high school students.

Hold a fundraiser for an overseas disaster relief project.

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Participate in career day at the local high school.


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 27 RI and Rotary Foundation Programs Worksheet

PROGRAM Interact – service club for young people ages 14-18 Rotaract – service club for young men and women ages 18-30 sponsored by their local Rotary club Rotary Community Corps (RCC) – service group of non-Rotarian adults sponsored by their local Rotary club Global Networking Groups – support groups of individual Rotarians focusing on shared topics of interest on an international basis, including Rotarian Action Groups and Rotary Fellowships Rotary Friendship Exchange – program that promotes building international relationships that can evolve into international partnerships for service projects Rotary Volunteers – program that provides opportunities for Rotarians and other skilled professionals to offer their services and expertise to projects in need of assistance Rotary Youth Exchange – program that promotes international understanding and peace among students ages 15-19 Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) – training program for young people, emphasizing leadership, citizenship, and personal growth World Community Service (WCS) – joint community service project of Rotary clubs from two or more countries Humanitarian Grants Program – support clubs and districts as they undertake humanitarian and service projects Educational Programs – foster peace by building understanding through person-to-person contact, friendship, study, and cross-cultural exchange PolioPlus and PolioPlus Partners – support global polio eradication efforts

CLUB CURRENTLY PARTICIPATES

CLUB INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING

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NOTES SESSION 7

The Rotary Foundation (60 minutes)

Learning Objectives At the end of the session, presidents-elect will be able to 1. Identify the principal programs and activities of The Rotary Foundation 2. Understand how contributions to the Annual Programs Fund support Foundation programs 3. Lead the club in establishing the Foundation contribution goal for the upcoming year

Materials Slides

Appendix

57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68.

30. Summary of Session 7: The Rotary Foundation

Introduction Learning Objectives The Mission of The Rotary Foundation The Rotary Foundation Programs Educational Programs Humanitarian Grants Program Standards for Humanitarian Grants PolioPlus Accomplishments The Rotary Foundation Committee Rotary Foundation Alumni Rotary Foundation Funding Two Needs, Two Ways of Giving

Session Outline Introduction 5 minutes Programs of The Rotary Foundation 25 minutes Supporting Foundation Programs 25 minutes Review 5 minutes

• For current Rotary information, go to www.rotary.org. • For additional information on various features of this session, refer to “How to Use the Session Guides,” available from your district trainer. • Before you begin, prepare a flip chart to record participant responses as needed. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 7: The Rotary Foundation 115


NOTES

INTRODUCTION

(5 MINUTES)

TO

SHOW SLIDE 57 Introduction SHOW SLIDE 58 Learning Objectives

Session 7: The Rotary Foundation

57

Training leader’s notes — Review this session’s learning objectives with participants. — Remind participants that they will use what they learn in this session as they draft Foundation goals during session 9.

REFER TO APPENDIX 30 Summary of Session 7: The Rotary Foundation

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

Learning Objectives 1. Identify the principal programs and activities of The Rotary Foundation. 2. Understand how contributions to the Annual Programs Fund support Foundation programs. 3. Lead the club in establishing the Foundation contribution goal for the upcoming year. 58

Training leader’s notes — Highlight the features of the appendix. — Encourage participants to use this sheet throughout the session.

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NOTES

PROGRAMS OF THE ROTARY FOUNDATION SHOW SLIDE 59 The Mission of The Rotary Foundation Key points •

The mission of The Rotary Foundation is to support the efforts of Rotary International in the fulfillment of the Object of Rotary, Rotary’s mission, and the achievement of world understanding and peace through local, national, and international humanitarian, educational, and cultural programs.

(25 MINUTES)

TO

The Mission of The Rotary Foundation To support the efforts of Rotary International in the fulfillment of the Object of Rotary, Rotary’s mission, and the achievement of world understanding and peace through local, national, and international humanitarian, educational, and cultural programs

59

Foundation programs are supported solely by voluntary contributions from Rotarians and friends of the Foundation who share its vision of a better world.

Who can share a personal story about your experience with a Rotary Foundation program? How does the Foundation change lives? When did you first realize the power of Rotary for a better future? Training leader’s note — If a president-elect does not volunteer to share a personal story, be prepared to share your own personal story, answering the questions – How does the Foundation change lives? – When did you first realize the power of Rotary for a better future?

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NOTES SHOW SLIDE 60 The Rotary Foundation Programs Key point •

The Rotary Foundation Programs

PolioPlus

Educational Programs

The Rotary Foundation has three main program areas: — Educational Programs — Humanitarian Grants Program — PolioPlus

Humanitarian Grants Program

60

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Training leader’s notes — More information on Foundation programs is available in chapter 7 of the Club President’s Manual. — Record participants’ responses to the following question on a flip chart.

What are some of the educational programs your club has participated in? SHOW SLIDE 61 Educational Programs Key points •

Ambassadorial Scholarships

Educational Programs • • • •

Ambassadorial Scholarships Rotary Grants for University Teachers Group Study Exchange (GSE) Rotary Centers for International Studies in peace and conflict resolution • Rotary Peace and Conflict Studies (Chulalongkorn University) 61

Rotary Grants for University Teachers

Group Study Exchange (GSE)

Rotary Centers for International Studies in peace and conflict resolution

Rotary Peace and Conflict Studies (Chulalongkorn University)

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NOTES

How can your club get involved in the Foundation’s Educational Programs? Key points •

Invite scholars and GSE team members to share their experiences with your club.

Nominate scholars or GSE team members.

Encourage qualified individuals to submit applications.

Publicize the exchange opportunity.

To participate in the Foundation’s Educational Programs, contact your district Rotary Foundation chair for information and application forms.

Training leader’s note — Record participants’ responses to the following question on a flip chart.

Can you give an example of a Humanitarian Grants Program project in which your club participated?

Humanitarian Grants Program • Matching Grants

SHOW SLIDE 62 Humanitarian Grants Program Key points

– Minor – Major – Competitive

• District Simplified Grants • Health, Hunger and Humanity (3-H) Grants • Volunteer Service Grants 62

Matching Grants – minor, major, competitive

District Simplified Grants

Health, Hunger and Humanity (3-H) Grants

Volunteer Service Grants

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NOTES

How did this project meet the standards for a Humanitarian Grants project? SHOW SLIDE 63 Standards for Humanitarian Grants Key points •

Involve active participation of Rotarians

Assist in the development of stronger Rotary networks

Demonstrate commitment to stewardship of Rotary Foundation funds

Address a humanitarian need

Standards for Humanitarian Grants • Involve active participation of Rotarians • Assist in the development of stronger Rotary networks • Demonstrate commitment to stewardship of Rotary Foundation funds • Address a humanitarian need

63

Training leader’s note — Each grant has specific eligibility criteria and application forms, which are available through the RI Catalog, at www.rotary.org, or from your district Rotary Foundation committee.

What does a commitment to stewardship mean? Key point •

Humanitarian Grant project participants must manage the funds received from The Rotary Foundation responsibly and with full disclosure.

Why is this commitment important?

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NOTES Key points •

The funds that support Rotary Foundation grants were donated by your fellow Rotarians.

Transparency and proper use of Foundation funds help build confidence in The Rotary Foundation as a worthy and effective charitable organization.

What has your club done to support PolioPlus? Is your club involved in a PolioPlus Partners project? SHOW SLIDE 64 PolioPlus Accomplishments Key points •

By 2005, five million people (mainly in the developing world) who would otherwise have been paralyzed were walking because they were immunized against polio.

Rotary’s early commitment to the eradication of polio encouraged other international organizations to take up the cause.

In partnering with World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to eradicate polio, Rotary serves as a model for other public-private cooperative efforts.

More than one million Rotarians worldwide have contributed to PolioPlus.

PolioPlus Accomplishments • By 2005, five million people who would otherwise have been paralyzed were walking because they were immunized against polio. • Rotary’s commitment to the eradication of polio encouraged other international organizations to take up the cause. • Rotary developed a new model for public-private cooperative efforts in working with its world partners for PolioPlus. • More than one million Rotarians worldwide have contributed to PolioPlus. District XXXX 64

Who will you work with to carry out your club’s Foundation goals?

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NOTES SHOW SLIDE 65 The Rotary Foundation Committee Key points •

Your club Rotary Foundation committee is your primary resource for helping your club achieve Foundation goals.

The committee helps educate Rotarians about The Rotary Foundation.

The committee develops and carries out plans to support The Rotary Foundation through financial contributions and club participation in Foundation programs.

The Rotary Foundation Committee • Resource for helping you achieve Foundation goals • Educates Rotarians about The Rotary Foundation • Develops and carries out plans to support the Foundation through financial contributions and club participation in Foundation programs 65

How will you support your club’s Rotary Foundation committee? Key points •

Meet with your club’s Foundation committee chair at the beginning of your term to help assess current annual and long-range Foundation goals.

Help encourage club participation in Foundation programs.

Support Rotary Foundation programs that offer opportunities for involvement and membership retention.

Promote contributions from club members.

Identify what resources are available to help your club participate in Foundation programs.

How can you work with Rotary Foundation alumni?

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NOTES SHOW SLIDE 66 Rotary Foundation Alumni Key points •

Use Rotary Foundation alumni as a club resource, such as presenting to your club, to show the value of Foundation programs.

Foundation alumni are advocates for The Rotary Foundation, based on their experiences as program participants.

Encourage alumni to become Rotarians and potential donors to The Rotary Foundation.

Rotary Foundation Alumni • • • •

Club-level Foundation resource Advocates for The Rotary Foundation Potential Rotarians Potential donors

66

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NOTES

SUPPORTING FOUNDATION PROGRAMS SHOW SLIDE 67 Rotary Foundation Funding Key points •

(25 MINUTES)

Rotary Foundation Funding District Designated Fund (DDF)

The Annual Programs Fund and the Permanent Fund are the source of funding for the programs of The Rotary Foundation.

Each district’s donations for a Rotary year are equally split into the District Designated Fund (50 percent) and the World Fund (50 percent).

Districts use their District Designated Fund to participate in Foundation programs of their choice.

The World Fund pays for programs for which every district may apply, such as Group Study Exchange and Matching Grants.

Why should your club support both the Annual Programs Fund and the Permanent Fund? SHOW SLIDE 68 Two Needs, Two Ways of Giving

World Fund

Rotarian Donations

Contributions from individual Rotarians around the world support the participation of clubs and districts in Foundation programs.

TO

Interest

67

For support today

To secure tomorrow

68

The Annual Programs Fund addresses the need to support the day-to-day functioning of the wide range of programs.

The Permanent Fund ensures that The Rotary Foundation programs continue well into the future.

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

Two Needs, Two Ways of Giving

Key points •

TRF Program Funding

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NOTES •

Two Needs, Two Ways of Giving expresses the need to support Foundation programs today and in the future.

What does Every Rotarian, Every Year mean to your club? Key point •

Every Rotarian makes a donation to the Foundation’s Annual Programs Fund every year.

What is your role in Every Rotarian, Every Year? Key points •

Lead by example and make your gift to the Foundation early in the Rotary year.

Encourage every club member to make a gift every year.

Inform members of how their contributions to the Annual Programs Fund support Foundation programs that achieve good in the world.

Recognize Rotarians Foundation.

who

support

The

Rotary

Have you set an Annual Programs Fund goal for your club? Key points •

Goal setting is essential in supporting The Rotary Foundation.

The worldwide Annual Programs Fund goal is an accumulation of club goals.

To establish an Annual Programs Fund goal, examine your club’s previous giving to the Foundation and determine a challenging goal. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 7: The Rotary Foundation 125


NOTES Training leader’s notes — Review The Rotary Foundation Fund Development Club Goal Report Form, a copy of which is provided for each president-elect in the PETS materials sent to the governorelect. — Club presidents-elect report their Annual Programs Fund goal to the governor-elect by completing The Rotary Foundation Fund Development Club Goal Report Form. — The forms should be submitted during this meeting or at a time set by the governor-elect. — Encourage presidents-elect to set a minimum goal of US$100 per capita.

How does your district support The Rotary Foundation? How can the district Rotary Foundation seminar help your club achieve its Foundation goal? Key point •

The district Rotary Foundation seminar provides an opportunity to — Share goals for the coming year — Learn about resources and tools to motivate individual Rotarians in your clubs to support The Rotary Foundation — Understand the importance of establishing a club Rotary Foundation committee — Understand the importance of financial support of Foundation programs

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 7: The Rotary Foundation 126


NOTES

What resources are available to help your club support The Rotary Foundation? REFER TO APPENDIX 30 Summary of Session 7: The Rotary Foundation Training leader’s notes — Review with participants the list of resources that clubs can use to implement Foundation goals. — Ask participants to share any additional resources they have used.

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NOTES

REVIEW

(5 MINUTES)

REFER TO APPENDIX 30 Summary of Session 7: The Rotary Foundation

What action steps will you take as a result of this session? Training leader’s notes — Review the learning objectives to ensure that all topics were covered sufficiently. — Answer questions that participants may have. — Encourage participants to write down ideas on the appendix. — Thank participants.

Adjourn

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 7: The Rotary Foundation 128

TO


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 30 Summary of Session 7: The Rotary Foundation Resources Informational Resources

www.rotary.org

District Rotary Foundation seminar Official Directory (007-EN) RI Catalog (019-EN) The Rotary Foundation Quick Reference Guide (219-EN)

Keyword searches: PolioPlus Partners Open Projects List WCS Projects Exchange Database Click on: Member Access The Rotary Foundation

Human Resources

Financial Resources

Assistant governor District Rotary Foundation committee members Foundation alumni Rotarians and their families

Funds from individual donors or local businesses Grants from other foundations Rotary Foundation grants

Additional Resources

• •

Ideas to Implement

Contact

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Action Steps • • •

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 7: The Rotary Foundation 129


NOTES SESSION 8

Public Relations (60 minutes)

Learning Objectives At the end of the session, presidents-elect will be able to 1. Develop and implement a public relations plan for the club 2. Select strategies to raise the image of Rotary in the community

Materials Slides

Appendixes

69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74.

33. Summary of Session 8: Public Relations 34. Club Public Relations: Case Study

Introduction Learning Objectives Club President Responsibilities Public Relations Committee Types of Media Newsworthy Activities

Session Outline Introduction 5 minutes Club Public Relations 30 minutes Club Public Relations: Case Study 20 minutes Review 5 minutes

• For current Rotary information, go to www.rotary.org. • For additional information on various features of this session, refer to “How to Use the Session Guides,” available from your district trainer. • Before you begin, prepare a flip chart to record participant responses as needed. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 8: Public Relations 131


NOTES

INTRODUCTION

(5 MINUTES)

TO

SHOW SLIDE 69 Introduction Session 8:

SHOW SLIDE 70 Learning Objectives

Public Relations

69

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Training leader’s notes — Review this session’s learning objectives with participants. — Remind participants that they will apply the lessons learned in this session to formulate goals related to public relations during session 9.

Learning Objectives 1. Develop and implement a public relations plan for the club. 2. Develop strategies to raise the image of Rotary in the community.

70

REFER TO APPENDIX 33 Summary of Session 8: Public Relations Training leader’s notes — Highlight the features of the appendix. — Encourage participants to use this sheet throughout the session.

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NOTES

CLUB PUBLIC RELATIONS

(30 MINUTES)

TO

Why are public relations important for your Rotary club? What can every club member do to promote positive public relations? What should club members know about public relations? Key points •

All club members are responsible for promoting your club and Rotary.

Members should be fully informed about the Object of Rotary and Rotary programs and activities.

What is your role in club public relations? SHOW SLIDE 71 Club President Responsibilities Key points •

Appoint a club public relations committee that will work with the media and build relationships with other local organizations.

Ensure that club projects and activities will attract positive media attention.

Seek publicity for successful service projects or other activities that illustrate Rotary’s mission.

Club President Responsibilities • Appoint a club public relations committee. • Ensure that club projects and activities will attract positive media attention. • Seek publicity for successful service projects. • Serve as club spokesperson or identify a fellow club member to do so. • Inspire club members to promote Rotary or participate in club public relations. 71

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NOTES •

Serve as your club’s spokesperson, or identify a fellow club member to do so.

Inspire club members to promote Rotary or participate in club public relations.

Who will you work with to improve your club’s public relations? SHOW SLIDE 72 Public Relations Committee Key point •

Your public relations committee develops and executes a plan to provide the public with information about Rotary and promote your club’s service projects and activities.

Public Relations Committee • Develops and executes a plan to provide the public with information about Rotary and promotes the club’s service projects and activities

72

Who else can you work with to develop successful public relations? Key points •

District public relations committee: for resources and strategies that have succeeded for other clubs in your district

Public relations professional(s): to seek public relations expertise in your club, district, or community

Rotary International: for materials and tools to raise awareness of Rotary in the community

What types of media are in your area?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 8: Public Relations 134

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NOTES SHOW SLIDE 73 Types of Media Key points •

Local newspapers and magazines

Local radio stations

Types of Media • Local newspapers and magazines • Local radio stations • Local TV stations • Online publications • Trade publications • Public access cable stations 73

Local television stations

Online publications

Trade publications

Public access cable stations

Radio public affairs shows and talk radio

Newsletters of corporate or community organizations

Nontraditional media, such as billboards

Has your club had success with one of these media sources? How does your club use news releases and fact sheets? Key points •

News releases are the most widely used means of sending information to the media.

Fact sheets, which provide basic information about an organization, are used to supply the media with background information.

Fact sheets can also be used to educate new and prospective members.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 8: Public Relations 135

• Radio public affairs and talk shows • Corporate newsletters • Newsletters of other community organizations • Billboards

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES

What activities can attract positive media attention to the activities of your club? SHOW SLIDE 74 Newsworthy Activities Key points •

Service projects that meet a community need or larger news trend

An international service project supported by your club or a local club volunteer

Projects that involve local youth or prominent community members

A notable or prominent speaker at a club meeting

An account of life in another culture by a Rotary or Foundation program participant

Stories with a strong visual element

Newsworthy Activities • Projects that address community needs or a larger news trend • International service projects • Projects that involve local youth or prominent community members • A notable or prominent speaker at a club meeting • An account of life in another culture • Stories with a strong visual element 74

What successes has your club had in promoting one of these activities? How can you prepare to serve as your club’s spokesperson?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 8: Public Relations 136

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES Key points •

Work with your club public relations committee to develop concise statements to explain Rotary and your club to the media.

Access public relations resources at www.rotary.org for media outreach ideas, press release templates, key Rotary messages, and public relations tips.

Know your main points and present them simply and directly.

Concentrate on facts; avoid personal opinion.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 8: Public Relations 137


NOTES

CLUB PUBLIC RELATIONS: CASE STUDY

(20 MINUTES)

REFER TO APPENDIX 34 Club Public Relations: Case Study Training leader’s notes — Divide participants into groups of five or six people. — Tell the groups that they should outline a public relations plan for the case study in the appendix. — Have each group appoint a secretary to record the main ideas discussed within the group. — After 10 minutes, ask each group to report the plans they created. — Answer any questions participants may have. — Ask participants to take a few minutes to write down any pertinent ideas or notes in the appendix.

REFER TO APPENDIX 33 Summary of Session 8: Public Relations Training leader’s notes — Review with participants the list of resources that clubs can use to implement public relations plans. — Ask participants to share any additional resources that they have used.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 8: Public Relations 138

TO


NOTES

REVIEW

(5 MINUTES)

REFER TO APPENDIX 33 Summary of Session 8: Public Relations

What action steps will you take as a result of this session? Training leader’s notes — Review the learning objectives to ensure that all topics were covered sufficiently. — Answer questions that participants may have. — Encourage participants to write down ideas on the appendix. — Thank participants.

Adjourn

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 8: Public Relations 139

TO


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 33 Summary of Session 8: Public Relations Resources Informational Resources

www.rotary.org

Effective Public Relations: A Guide for Rotary Clubs (257-EN) Public Relations: Make It Work for You (269-EN), videotape RI Catalog (019-EN) This Is Rotary (001-EN) What’s Rotary? (419-EN)

Keyword searches: Public Relations PR Tips, a twice-monthly e-mail newsletter RI public service announcements (PSAs)

Human Resources

Assistant governor District public relations committee RI Public Relations staff Additional Resources

• •

Ideas to Implement

Contact

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Action Steps • • • PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 8: Public Relations 140


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 34 Club Public Relations: Case Study Read the following case study and create a step-by-step public relations plan for the Rotary Club of Royal Gardens. Focus on three or four ways the club can reach out to the media and to the community directly to share the story of their Rotary projects. The Rotary Club of Royal Gardens is located in a prosperous town of 35,000. The club’s 40 members are a cross-section of Royal Gardens’ professional community. The club has conducted a number of service projects to support the community needs. The most successful and longest-running project provides support for the community’s growing elderly population. Through this ongoing project, club members prepare and deliver meals, arrange for home repairs, and visit hospitals. The club also worked with local schools to identify a candidate who was selected by the district to receive an Ambassadorial Scholarship. The scholar, who is studying the effects of global warming on ocean water levels, has been corresponding regularly with the club to inform them of her experiences. The club’s weekly program often attracts prominent local speakers who talk about important issues facing the community. Attendance is high and members are enthusiastic. An informal survey conducted by the club revealed that few people in the community are aware of the club’s efforts. Some respondents reported they perceive Rotary as a social club for older men. Several members have complained about the difficulty of attracting new members, as well as the lack of recognition the club receives for its service to the community. The club’s activities have received no media coverage for the past five years. The town has two radio stations. One station features popular music, the other news and several talk shows. The daily newspaper has a circulation of 15,000, and the weekly newspaper has a circulation of 9,000; both can create supplements for their issues. Royal Gardens also has a local cable television station that routinely runs public service announcements. The new movie theater in town also runs ads from local businesses and organizations before the movie previews begin. Consider the following questions as you develop your plan:

How can the club provide basic information about Rotary International and the club to the media?

What aspects of the club’s current activities might interest the media? Which type of media is most appropriate for each aspect? Why?

How might club programs interest local media?

What steps should the club take to keep the media informed of its activities?

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 8: Public Relations 141


NOTES SESSION 9

Annual and Long-Range Planning (60 minutes)

Learning Objectives At the end of the session, presidents-elect will be able to 1. Work with club leaders and members to develop or update club long-range goals that address the elements of an effective club and pursue the Object of Rotary 2. Use the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs as a tool to work with club members to establish membership, service, club administration, leadership development, public relations, and Rotary Foundation goals for the coming year

Materials Slides

Appendixes

75. Introduction 76. Learning Objectives

36. Summary of Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 39. Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs

Session Outline Introduction Long-Range Goals Setting Club Goals Review

5 minutes 10 minutes 40 minutes 5 minutes

• For current Rotary information, go to www.rotary.org. • For additional information on various features of this session, refer to “How to Use the Session Guides,” available from your district trainer. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 143


NOTES

INTRODUCTION

(5 MINUTES)

TO

SHOW SLIDE 75 Introduction Session 9:

Training leader’s notes — This session should be set up as roundtable discussions between assistant governors matched with club presidents from their area.

Annual and Long-Range Planning

75

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

— In this format, you will serve more as a resource than a guide.

SHOW SLIDE 76 Learning Objectives Training leader’s notes — Review this session’s learning objectives with participants. — Remind participants to refer to the summary sheets that they have been completing throughout PETS to help draft goals using the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs.

Learning Objectives 1. Work with club leaders and members to develop or update club long-range goals that address the elements of an effective club and pursue the Object of Rotary. 2. Use the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs as a tool to work with club members to establish membership, service, club administration, leadership development, public relations, and Rotary Foundation goals for the coming year. 76

— Presidents-elect may have already drafted long-range goals to prepare for PETS using the Long-Range Goals Worksheet (appendix 35) in the Club President’s Manual.

REFER TO APPENDIX 36 Summary of Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning Training leader’s notes — Highlight the features of the appendix. — Encourage participants to use this sheet throughout the session. PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 144

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar


NOTES

LONG-RANGE GOALS

(10 MINUTES)

TO

Have any of your clubs set long-range goals? Why are long-range goals important? Key points •

Long-range goals reflect the vision your club has for its future.

Your long-range goals should cover the next three to five Rotary years.

Long-range goals should support the pursuit of the Object of Rotary and the elements of an effective club: membership, service projects, The Rotary Foundation, and leadership development.

Long-range goals should include strategies for promoting your club’s successes in each element.

As your club evolves, these goals should be updated.

A club retreat or club assembly provides an opportunity for members to collaborate and envision the long-term goals for your club.

Once your long-range goals are in place, use the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs to set annual goals that are in harmony with your club’s long-range goals.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 145


NOTES

SETTING CLUB GOALS

(40 MINUTES)

TO

REFER TO APPENDIX 39 Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs Training leader’s notes — Seat assistant governors with the presidents-elect they will be working with. — Together, assistant governors and presidents-elect will review the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs and discuss how to formulate provisional club goals. — Club goals should support district goals. — The Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs contains goal-setting sections for each of the following areas: – Membership – Leadership Development – Service projects – Public relations – The Rotary Foundation – Club administration — Each goal-setting area contains space for statements of specific goals and also provides examples of activities that help a club achieve its goals. — Assistant governors should review each goal-setting area with their presidents-elect and emphasize developing action steps for each established goal. — Assistant governors should note any subjects the presidentselect wish to discuss (as listed at the end of the guide). They should also mention that the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs will be a working document that will be reviewed at each club visit. — Assistant governors should remind presidents-elect that they can use the provisional goals established during this session as guidelines to be discussed and expanded on when they return to their club and during their district assembly. — Remind presidents-elect that final goals developed by their club should be incorporated into the Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs and submitted to the district governor or assistant governor by 1 July.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 146


NOTES

REVIEW

(5 MINUTES)

TO

REFER TO APPENDIX 36 Summary of Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning Training leader’s notes — Answer questions that participants may have. — Encourage participants to write down ideas on the appendix. — Thank participants.

Adjourn

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 147


For your presidents-elect training seminar. NOTES

APPENDIX 36 Summary of Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning Resources Informational Resources

Club President’s Manual (222-EN) Planning Guide for Effective Rotary Clubs (appendix 39) RI Catalog (019-EN) Human Resources

Assistant governor Additional Resources

• •

Ideas to Implement

Contact

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Action Steps • • • •

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 148


APPENDIX 39 ȱ

PLANNINGȱGUIDEȱFORȱ EFFECTIVEȱROTARYȱCLUBSȱ

ȱ

ȱ

NOTES

ȱ RotaryȱInternational

TheȱPlanningȱGuideȱforȱEffectiveȱRotaryȱClubsȱisȱaȱtoolȱtoȱhelpȱclubsȱassessȱtheirȱcurrentȱstateȱandȱestablishȱ goalsȱforȱtheȱcomingȱyear.ȱItȱisȱbasedȱonȱtheȱClubȱLeadershipȱPlan.ȱTheȱstrategiesȱlistedȱinȱeachȱsectionȱareȱ commonȱwaysȱclubsȱmightȱchooseȱtoȱpursueȱgoals.ȱClubsȱareȱencouragedȱtoȱdevelopȱalternativeȱstrategiesȱ toȱachieveȱtheirȱgoalsȱwhenȱappropriate.ȱPresidentsȬelectȱshouldȱcompleteȱthisȱformȱinȱcooperationȱwithȱ theirȱclubȱandȱsubmitȱaȱcopyȱofȱitȱtoȱtheirȱassistantȱgovernorȱbyȱ1ȱJuly.ȱ DownloadȱaȱMicrosoftȱWordȱversionȱatȱwww.rotary.org.ȱ ȱ

RotaryȱClubȱofȱ

ȱȱȱȱȱȱ

Rotaryȱyearȱofȱoffice:ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

Nameȱofȱpresident:ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Mailingȱaddress:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Telephone:ȱȱ

ȱȱȱȱȱȱ

Fax:ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

EȬmail:ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

ȱ MEMBERSHIPȱ CurrentȱStateȱ Currentȱnumberȱofȱmembers:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Numberȱofȱmembersȱasȱofȱ30ȱJuneȱlastȱyear:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ

30ȱJuneȱfiveȱyearsȱago:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ

Numberȱofȱmaleȱmembers:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ

Numberȱofȱfemaleȱmembers:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ

Averageȱageȱofȱmembers:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ.ȱ NumberȱofȱRotariansȱwhoȱhaveȱbeenȱmembersȱforȱ1Ȭ3ȱyears:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱ3Ȭ5ȱyears:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱ5Ȭ10ȱyears:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Numberȱofȱmembersȱwhoȱhaveȱproposedȱaȱnewȱmemberȱinȱtheȱpreviousȱtwoȱyears:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ Checkȱtheȱaspectsȱofȱyourȱcommunity’sȱdiversityȱthatȱyourȱclubȱmembershipȱreflects:ȱ ȱ

ȱProfessionȱ

ȱAgeȱ

ȱGenderȱ

ȱEthnicityȱ ȱ

Ourȱclassificationȱsurveyȱwasȱupdatedȱonȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱandȱcontainsȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱclassifications,ȱofȱ whichȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱareȱunfilled.ȱ (date)ȱȱ (number)ȱ ȱ

(number)ȱ

Describeȱclub’sȱcurrentȱnewȱmemberȱorientationȱprogram:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ Describeȱclub’sȱcontinuingȱeducationȱprogramsȱforȱbothȱnewȱandȱestablishedȱmembers:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ Ourȱclubȱhasȱsponsoredȱaȱnewȱclubȱwithinȱtheȱlastȱ24ȱmonths.ȱȱ

ȱYesȱȱ

ȱNoȱ

NumberȱofȱRotaryȱFellowshipsȱandȱRotarianȱActionȱGroupsȱmembersȱparticipateȱin:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ Whatȱmakesȱthisȱclubȱattractiveȱtoȱnewȱmembers?ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ Whatȱaspectsȱofȱthisȱclubȱcouldȱposeȱaȱbarrierȱtoȱattractingȱnewȱmembers?ȱ PlanningȱGuideȱforȱEffectiveȱRotaryȱClubsȱȱ

1

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 149

ȱ


ȱȱȱȱȱȱ

NOTES

FutureȱStateȱ MembershipȱgoalȱforȱtheȱupcomingȱRotaryȱyear:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱmembersȱbyȱ30ȱJuneȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ ȱ

(number)ȱ

ȱ

(year)ȱ

Ourȱclubȱhasȱidentifiedȱtheȱfollowingȱsourcesȱofȱpotentialȱmembersȱwithinȱtheȱcommunity:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ Howȱdoesȱtheȱclubȱplanȱtoȱachieveȱitsȱmembershipȱgoals?ȱ(checkȱallȱthatȱapply)ȱ ȱ Developȱaȱretentionȱplanȱthatȱfocusesȱonȱmaintainingȱhighȱlevelsȱofȱenthusiasmȱthroughȱparticipationȱ inȱinterestingȱprograms,ȱprojects,ȱcontinuingȱeducation,ȱandȱfellowshipȱactivitiesȱ ȱ Ensureȱthatȱtheȱmembershipȱcommitteeȱisȱawareȱofȱeffectiveȱrecruitmentȱtechniquesȱ ȱ Developȱaȱrecruitmentȱplanȱtoȱhaveȱtheȱclubȱreflectȱtheȱdiversityȱofȱtheȱcommunityȱ ȱ ExplainȱtheȱexpectationsȱofȱmembershipȱtoȱpotentialȱRotariansȱ ȱ Implementȱanȱorientationȱprogramȱforȱnewȱmembersȱ ȱ CreateȱaȱbrochureȱthatȱprovidesȱgeneralȱinformationȱaboutȱRotaryȱasȱwellȱasȱspecificȱinformationȱ aboutȱtheȱclubȱforȱprospectiveȱmembersȱ ȱ AssignȱanȱexperiencedȱRotarianȱmentorȱforȱeveryȱnewȱclubȱmemberȱ ȱ RecognizeȱthoseȱRotariansȱwhoȱsponsorȱnewȱmembersȱ ȱ EncourageȱmembersȱtoȱjoinȱaȱRotaryȱFellowshipȱorȱRotarianȱActionȱGroupȱ ȱ ParticipateȱinȱtheȱRIȱmembershipȱdevelopmentȱawardȱprogramsȱ ȱ Sponsorȱaȱnewȱclubȱ ȱ Otherȱ(pleaseȱdescribe):ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Actionȱsteps:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ SERVICEȱPROJECTSȱ CurrentȱStateȱ NumberȱofȱRotaryȱYouthȱExchangeȱstudents:ȱ

Hostedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Sponsoredȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

NumberȱofȱsponsoredȱInteractȱclubs:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱRotaractȱclubs:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱRotaryȱCommunityȱCorps:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ NumberȱofȱRYLAȱ(RotaryȱYouthȱLeadershipȱAwards)ȱactivities:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ NumberȱofȱRotaryȱFriendshipȱExchanges:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ NumberȱofȱregisteredȱRotaryȱVolunteers:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ NumberȱofȱWorldȱCommunityȱServiceȱ(WCS)ȱprojects:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Numberȱofȱotherȱcurrentȱclubȱserviceȱprojects:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ

PlanningȱGuideȱforȱEffectiveȱRotaryȱClubsȱȱ

2

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 150


FutureȱStateȱ

NOTES

OurȱclubȱhasȱestablishedȱtheȱfollowingȱserviceȱgoalsȱforȱtheȱupcomingȱRotaryȱyear:ȱ Forȱourȱlocalȱcommunity:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ Forȱcommunitiesȱinȱotherȱcountries:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ Howȱdoesȱtheȱclubȱplanȱtoȱachieveȱitsȱserviceȱgoals?ȱ(checkȱallȱthatȱapply)ȱ ȱ Ensureȱtheȱserviceȱprojectsȱcommitteeȱisȱawareȱofȱhowȱtoȱplanȱandȱconductȱaȱserviceȱprojectȱ

ȱ Reviewȱtheȱclub’sȱcurrentȱandȱongoingȱserviceȱprojectsȱtoȱconfirmȱthatȱtheyȱmeetȱaȱneedȱandȱareȱofȱ interestȱtoȱclubȱmembersȱ ȱ Identifyȱtheȱsocialȱissuesȱinȱtheȱcommunityȱthatȱtheȱclubȱwantsȱtoȱaddressȱthroughȱitsȱserviceȱgoalsȱ ȱ Assessȱtheȱclub’sȱfundraisingȱactivitiesȱtoȱdetermineȱifȱtheyȱmeetȱprojectȱfundingȱneedsȱ ȱ Involveȱallȱmembersȱinȱtheȱclub’sȱserviceȱprojectsȱ ȱ Conductȱorȱobtainȱaȱneedsȱassessmentȱofȱtheȱcommunityȱorȱcommunitiesȱinȱotherȱcountriesȱ ȱ Recognizeȱclubȱmembersȱwhoȱparticipateȱinȱandȱprovideȱleadershipȱtoȱtheȱclub’sȱserviceȱprojectsȱ ȱ Identifyȱaȱpartnerȱclubȱwithȱwhichȱtoȱcarryȱoutȱanȱinternationalȱserviceȱprojectȱ ȱ Participateȱin:ȱ ȱInteractȱȱ

ȱRotaryȱFriendshipȱExchangeȱȱ

ȱWorldȱCommunityȱServiceȱ

ȱRotaractȱȱ

ȱRotaryȱVolunteersȱȱ

ȱRotaryȱYouthȱExchangeȱ

ȱRotaryȱCommunityȱCorpsȱȱ

ȱRYLAȱ(RotaryȱYouthȱLeadershipȱAwards)ȱ

ȱ UseȱaȱgrantȱfromȱTheȱRotaryȱFoundationȱtoȱsupportȱaȱclubȱprojectȱ ȱ Otherȱ(pleaseȱdescribe):ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Actionȱsteps:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ THEȱROTARYȱFOUNDATIONȱ CurrentȱStateȱ Numberȱofȱgrantsȱawarded:ȱȱ ȱ

DistrictȱSimplifiedȱGrants:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

VolunteerȱServiceȱGrants:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

ȱ

MatchingȱGrants:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

HealthȱHungerȱandȱHumanityȱ(3ȬH)ȱGrants:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

NumberȱofȱAmbassadorialȱScholars:ȱ

Nominatedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Selectedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

Hostedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

NumberȱofȱGSEȱteamȱmembers:ȱ

Nominatedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Selectedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

Hostedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

NumberȱofȱRotaryȱGrantsȱforȱUniversityȱTeachers:ȱ Nominatedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Selectedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ NumberȱofȱRotaryȱWorldȱPeaceȱFellows:ȱ

Nominatedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Selectedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

NumberȱofȱRotaryȱConflictȱStudiesȱFellows:ȱ

Nominatedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Selectedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

Hostedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

NumberȱofȱPolioPlusȱorȱPolioPlusȱPartnersȱactivities:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ PlanningȱGuideȱforȱEffectiveȱRotaryȱClubsȱȱ

3

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 151


Currentȱyear’sȱcontributionsȱtoȱAnnualȱProgramsȱFund:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

NOTES

Currentȱyear’sȱcontributionsȱtoȱPermanentȱFund:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Numberȱofȱclubȱmembersȱwhoȱareȱȱ

ȱ

ȱ

PaulȱHarrisȱFellows:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

Benefactors:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ MajorȱDonors:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

ȱ

RotaryȱFoundationȱSustainingȱMembers:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

BequestȱSocietyȱMembers:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

NumberȱofȱFoundationȱalumniȱtrackedȱbyȱyourȱclub:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ FutureȱStateȱ OurȱclubȱhasȱestablishedȱtheȱfollowingȱRotaryȱFoundationȱgoalsȱforȱtheȱupcomingȱRotaryȱyear:ȱ Ourȱclub’sȱAnnualȱProgramsȱFundȱcontributionȱgoalȱisȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ .ȱ Ourȱclub’sȱPermanentȱFundȱcontributionȱgoalȱisȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ .ȱ OurȱclubȱwillȱparticipateȱinȱtheȱfollowingȱRotaryȱFoundationȱprograms:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ HowȱdoesȱtheȱclubȱplanȱtoȱachieveȱitsȱRotaryȱFoundationȱgoals?ȱ(checkȱallȱthatȱapply)ȱ ȱ Ensureȱtheȱclub’sȱRotaryȱFoundationȱcommitteeȱunderstandsȱtheȱprogramsȱofȱTheȱRotaryȱFoundationȱ andȱisȱcommittedȱtoȱpromotingȱfinancialȱsupportȱofȱtheȱFoundationȱ ȱ HelpȱclubȱmembersȱunderstandȱtheȱrelationshipȱbetweenȱFoundationȱgivingȱandȱFoundationȱ programsȱ ȱ PlanȱaȱclubȱprogramȱaboutȱTheȱRotaryȱFoundationȱeveryȱquarter,ȱespeciallyȱinȱNovember,ȱRotaryȱ FoundationȱMonthȱ ȱ IncludeȱaȱbriefȱstoryȱaboutȱTheȱRotaryȱFoundationȱinȱeveryȱclubȱprogramȱ ȱ ScheduleȱpresentationsȱthatȱinformȱclubȱmembersȱaboutȱTheȱRotaryȱFoundationȱ ȱ Ensureȱclub’sȱRotaryȱFoundationȱcommitteeȱchairȱattendsȱtheȱdistrictȱRotaryȱFoundationȱseminarȱ ȱ UseȱRotaryȱFoundationȱgrantsȱtoȱsupportȱtheȱclub’sȱinternationalȱprojectsȱ ȱ Recognizeȱclubȱmembers’ȱfinancialȱcontributionsȱtoȱTheȱRotaryȱFoundationȱandȱtheirȱparticipationȱinȱ Foundationȱprogramsȱ ȱ EncourageȱeachȱclubȱmemberȱtoȱcontributeȱtoȱtheȱFoundationȱeveryȱyearȱ ȱ Participateȱin:ȱ ȱGroupȱStudyȱExchangeȱȱ

ȱPolioPlus/PolioPlusȱPartnersȱ

ȱMatchingȱGrantsȱ

ȱHost/SponsorȱAmbassadorialȱScholar(s)ȱ

ȱDistrictȱSimplifiedȱGrantsȱȱ

ȱSponsorȱaȱRotaryȱWorldȱPeaceȱFellowȱ

ȱ3ȬHȱGrantsȱ

ȱSponsorȱaȱUniversityȱTeacherȱȱ

ȱVolunteerȱServiceȱGrantsȱȱ

ȱSponsorȱaȱRotaryȱConflictȱStudiesȱFellowȱȱ

ȱ InviteȱFoundationȱprogramȱparticipantsȱandȱalumniȱtoȱbeȱpartȱofȱclubȱprogramsȱandȱactivitiesȱ ȱ Otherȱ(pleaseȱdescribe):ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Actionȱsteps:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ

PlanningȱGuideȱforȱEffectiveȱRotaryȱClubsȱȱ

4

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 152


LEADERSHIPȱDEVELOPMENTȱ

NOTES

CurrentȱStateȱ Numberȱofȱclubȱleadersȱwhoȱattendedȱ ȱ

Districtȱassembly:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ

DistrictȱRotaryȱFoundationȱseminar:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

ȱ

Districtȱmembershipȱseminar:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱ

Districtȱleadershipȱseminar:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

ȱ

Districtȱconference:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

Numberȱofȱclubȱmembersȱinvolvedȱatȱtheȱdistrictȱlevel:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ NumberȱofȱvisitsȱfromȱtheȱassistantȱgovernorȱthisȱpastȱRotaryȱyear:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ FutureȱStateȱ OurȱclubȱhasȱestablishedȱtheȱfollowingȱgoalsȱforȱdevelopingȱRotaryȱleadersȱforȱtheȱupcomingȱRotaryȱyear:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ HowȱdoesȱtheȱclubȱplanȱtoȱdevelopȱRotaryȱleaders?ȱ(checkȱallȱthatȱapply)ȱ ȱ HaveȱtheȱpresidentȬelectȱattendȱPETSȱandȱtheȱdistrictȱassemblyȱ ȱ Haveȱallȱcommitteeȱchairsȱattendȱtheȱdistrictȱassemblyȱ ȱ Encourageȱinterestedȱpastȱpresidentsȱtoȱattendȱtheȱdistrictȱleadershipȱseminarȱ ȱ Useȱtheȱexpertiseȱofȱtheȱclub’sȱassistantȱgovernorȱ ȱ Encourageȱnewȱmembersȱtoȱassumeȱpositionsȱofȱleadershipȱthroughȱparticipationȱinȱclubȱcommitteesȱ ȱ Askȱclubȱmembersȱtoȱvisitȱotherȱclubsȱtoȱexchangeȱideasȱandȱshareȱwhatȱtheyȱlearnȱwithȱtheȱclubȱ ȱ Otherȱ(pleaseȱdescribe):ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Actionȱsteps:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ PUBLICȱRELATIONSȱ CurrentȱStateȱ Listȱclubȱactivitiesȱcoveredȱbyȱtheȱmediaȱandȱtheȱtypeȱofȱmediaȱ(radio,ȱnewspaper,ȱtelevision,ȱetc.):ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ FutureȱStateȱ OurȱclubȱhasȱestablishedȱtheȱfollowingȱpublicȱrelationsȱgoalsȱforȱtheȱupcomingȱRotaryȱyear:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ Howȱdoesȱtheȱclubȱplanȱtoȱachieveȱitsȱpublicȱrelationsȱgoals?ȱ(checkȱallȱthatȱapply)ȱ ȱ Ensureȱthatȱtheȱpublicȱrelationsȱcommitteeȱisȱtrainedȱinȱhowȱtoȱconductȱmediaȱcampaignsȱ ȱ Conductȱpublicȱrelationsȱeffortsȱforȱallȱserviceȱprojectsȱ ȱ Conductȱaȱpublicȱawarenessȱprogramȱtargetedȱatȱtheȱbusinessȱandȱprofessionalȱcommunityȱaboutȱ whatȱRotaryȱisȱandȱwhatȱitȱdoesȱ ȱ Arrangeȱforȱaȱpublicȱserviceȱannouncementȱtoȱbeȱbroadcastȱonȱaȱlocalȱtelevisionȱchannelȱ PlanningȱGuideȱforȱEffectiveȱRotaryȱClubsȱȱ

5

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 153


ȱ Otherȱ(pleaseȱdescribe):ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

NOTES

ȱ Actionȱsteps:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ CLUBȱADMINISTRATIONȱ CurrentȱStateȱ Howȱoftenȱandȱwhenȱdoesȱtheȱclubȱboardȱmeet?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Whenȱareȱclubȱassembliesȱheld?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

Howȱisȱtheȱclubȱbudgetȱprepared?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱȱIsȱitȱindependentlyȱreviewedȱbyȱaȱqualifiedȱaccountant?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ DoesȱtheȱclubȱhaveȱaȱlongȬrangeȱplanȱinȱplace?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Hasȱtheȱclubȱdevelopedȱaȱsystemȱforȱcontinuityȱofȱleadershipȱonȱitsȱboard,ȱcommittees,ȱetc.?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Hasȱtheȱclubȱdevelopedȱaȱsystemȱforȱkeepingȱallȱmembersȱinvolvedȱinȱtheȱclub?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ DoesȱtheȱclubȱuseȱMemberȱAccessȱonȱwww.rotary.orgȱtoȱupdateȱitsȱmembershipȱlist?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Howȱoftenȱisȱtheȱclub’sȱbulletinȱpublished?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Describeȱhowȱweeklyȱclubȱprogramsȱareȱorganized:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Howȱoftenȱisȱtheȱclub’sȱWebȱsiteȱupdated?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ DoesȱyourȱclubȱobserveȱtheȱspecialȱmonthsȱofȱtheȱRotaryȱcalendar,ȱsuchȱasȱRotaryȱFoundationȱMonthȱandȱ MagazineȱMonth?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Howȱoftenȱdoesȱyourȱclubȱconductȱfellowshipȱactivities?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ HowȱdoesȱtheȱclubȱinvolveȱtheȱfamiliesȱofȱRotarians?ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ FutureȱStateȱ Whatȱplansȱhaveȱyouȱmadeȱtoȱcarryȱoutȱtheȱadministrativeȱtasksȱofȱtheȱclub?ȱ(checkȱallȱthatȱapply)ȱ ȱ Regularȱboardȱmeetingsȱhaveȱbeenȱscheduled.ȱ ȱ Theȱclub’sȱlongȬrangeȱandȱcommunicationȱplansȱwillȱbeȱupdated.ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱclubȱassembliesȱhaveȱbeenȱscheduledȱonȱtheȱfollowingȱdates:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

(number)ȱ

ȱ ȱ TheȱclubȱhasȱeitherȱadoptedȱtheȱlatestȱversionȱofȱtheȱRecommendedȱRotaryȱClubȱBylawsȱorȱrevisedȱitsȱ ownȱbylawsȱ(recommendedȱafterȱeachȱCouncilȱonȱLegislation).ȱ ȱ Clubȱelectionsȱwillȱbeȱheldȱonȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ .ȱ ȱ

ȱ

(date)ȱ

ȱ Atȱleastȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱdelegatesȱwillȱbeȱsentȱtoȱtheȱdistrictȱconference.ȱ ȱ

ȱ

(number)ȱ

ȱ Aȱclubȱbulletinȱwillȱbeȱproducedȱtoȱprovideȱinformationȱtoȱclubȱmembers.ȱ ȱ PlanningȱGuideȱforȱEffectiveȱRotaryȱClubsȱȱ

6

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 154


ȱ Theȱclub’sȱWebȱsiteȱwillȱbeȱupdatedȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱtimesȱperȱyear.ȱ ȱ

ȱ

(number)ȱ

ȱ Aȱplanȱhasȱbeenȱdevelopedȱtoȱhaveȱinterestingȱandȱrelevantȱweeklyȱclubȱprograms.ȱ

NOTES

ȱ RIȱClubȱAdministrationȱSoftwareȱ(RIȬCAS)ȱorȱsimilarȱsoftwareȱwillȱbeȱusedȱtoȱassistȱwithȱ administrationȱactivities.ȱ ȱ Monthlyȱattendanceȱfiguresȱwillȱbeȱreportedȱtoȱtheȱdistrictȱleadershipȱbyȱtheȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱdayȱofȱtheȱfollowingȱ month.ȱ ȱ (number)ȱ ȱ MemberȱAccessȱwillȱbeȱusedȱtoȱmaintainȱclubȱrecordsȱ(byȱ1ȱJuneȱandȱ1ȱDecemberȱtoȱensureȱaccurateȱ semiannualȱreports).ȱ ȱ MembershipȱchangesȱwillȱbeȱreportedȱtoȱRIȱwithinȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱdays.ȱ ȱ

ȱ

(number)ȱ

ȱ ReportsȱtoȱRI,ȱincludingȱtheȱsemiannualȱreport,ȱwillȱbeȱcompletedȱonȱaȱtimelyȱbasis.ȱȱ ȱ Theȱfollowingȱfellowshipȱactivitiesȱforȱallȱclubȱmembersȱareȱplannedȱforȱtheȱyear:ȱ ȱ

ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ Otherȱ(pleaseȱdescribe):ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

ȱ Actionȱsteps:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ Ourȱclubȱwouldȱlikeȱassistanceȱfromȱtheȱassistantȱgovernorȱorȱgovernorȱwithȱtheȱfollowing:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ Ourȱclubȱwouldȱlikeȱtoȱdiscussȱtheȱfollowingȱissuesȱwithȱtheȱgovernorȱorȱassistantȱgovernorȱduringȱaȱ visitȱtoȱourȱclub:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ

ȱȱȱȱȱȱ

ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱȱ

ClubȱPresidentȱSignatureȱ

RotaryȱYearȱȱ

AssistantȱGovernorȱSignatureȱ

ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱDateȱ

ȱȱȱ

ȱȱȱȱȱȱ Dateȱ

PlanningȱGuideȱforȱEffectiveȱRotaryȱClubsȱȱ

7

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 155


SUMMARYȱOFȱGOALSȱFORȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ _________ROTARYȱYEARȱ

NOTES

Internationalȱ Serviceȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

Vocationalȱ Serviceȱ

ȱ

ClubȱServiceȱ

Communityȱ Serviceȱ

ForȱeachȱgoalȱyourȱclubȱhasȱidentifiedȱforȱtheȱupcomingȱRotaryȱyear,ȱindicateȱwhichȱAvenueȱofȱServiceȱitȱ addresses.ȱToȱensureȱaȱbalancedȱserviceȱeffort,ȱyouȱshouldȱhaveȱatȱleastȱoneȱgoalȱthatȱaddressȱeachȱAvenueȱ ofȱService.ȱMostȱgoalsȱwillȱaddressȱmoreȱthanȱoneȱavenue.ȱ

Membershipȱgoalȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱmembersȱbyȱ30ȱJuneȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ (number)ȱ (year)ȱ Serviceȱgoalsȱ Forȱourȱlocalȱcommunity:ȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ Forȱcommunitiesȱinȱotherȱcountries:ȱ

ȱ

ȱȱȱȱȱȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ TheȱRotaryȱFoundationȱgoalsȱȱ Ourȱclub’sȱAnnualȱProgramsȱFundȱcontributionȱgoalȱisȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ .ȱ Ourȱclub’sȱPermanentȱFundȱcontributionȱgoalȱisȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ .ȱ OurȱclubȱwillȱparticipateȱinȱtheȱfollowingȱRotaryȱFoundationȱ programs:ȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ

ȱ Leadershipȱdevelopmentȱgoalsȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ Publicȱrelationsȱgoalsȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ Clubȱadministrationȱgoalsȱ ȱȱȱȱȱȱ ȱ Otherȱgoalȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ Otherȱgoalȱȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ ȱ

(506)ȱ PlanningȱGuideȱforȱEffectiveȱRotaryȱClubsȱȱ

8

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Session 9: Annual and Long-Range Planning 156


NOTES

Closing Plenary Session (45 minutes)

The closing plenary session is presented by the governor-elect and should wrap up the learning and discussions that presidents-elect have taken part in during this seminar. It’s a final opportunity for the governor-elect to summarize important points for the upcoming Rotary year and take care of any district business. This plenary session should strive to bring the meeting to an inspirational finish. MATERIALS Slide

77. Introduction Handout

Evaluation (see sample on pages 11-12) SHOW SLIDE 77 Introduction Closing Plenary Session

Summary of Accomplishments and Future Action 77

District XXXX Presidents-elect Training Seminar

Remarks should address

• Significant areas of discussion and key points. • What presidents-elect have learned and how this knowledge will help them during their year in office by – Encouraging presidents-elect to continue exchanging ideas with one another both before and throughout their year in office – Recognizing the importance of their role as the club leader, who ensures that the club functions effectively – Reminding them of the importance of setting annual and long-range goals and utilizing all available resources, especially the club’s assistant governor and district committees

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Closing Plenary Session 157


NOTES – Emphasizing that the district assembly, which presidents-elect will attend with their committee chairs or other club leaders, will build upon what they have learned at PETS and allow them to finalize plans for their year – Encouraging them to distribute the materials in the Club Officers’ Kit (225-EN) before the district assembly to allow club leaders to prepare for the meeting

Recognition Remarks should thank and acknowledge presidents-elect for their participation and outstanding job during PETS.

Questions and Answers Allow participants to pose questions to the district governor-elect, other district leaders, and their fellow club presidents-elect.

Evaluation Remarks should address the importance of evaluation for improving future training seminars and asking for additional support from the district.

PRESIDENTS-ELECT TRAINING SEMINAR LEADERS’ GUIDE — Closing Plenary Session 158


THE

DISTRICT TRAINER’S

MANUAL

Find support for all your training meetings ROOM ARRANGEMENT TRAINING EQUIPMENT NEEDS EVALUATING YOUR AUDIENCE’S KNOWLEDGE QUESTIONING TECHNIQUES PREPARING TRAINERS

The District Trainer’s Manual (246-EN): Your resource to an effective training meeting Available online at www.rotary.org or from your district governor-elect.

One Rotary Center 1560 Sherman Avenue Evanston, IL 60201-3698 USA www.rotary.org

243-EN—(306)

Presitdent-elect Training Seminar Leaders' Guide243en  

L E A D E R S ’ G U I D E 243-EN—(306) Planning and Organizing 1 Purpose of the Presidents-elect Training Seminar 1 Board-recommended Topics...

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