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FESTIVAL GLOBE ROSKILDE FESTIVAL NEWSPAPER – WRITTEN AND EDITED BY

BARKING UP THE RIGHT TREE An inflatable Martian. A spotty plastic cow. A couple of dirty ho’s. And the Dogg Man himself. Cooler than cool, Snoop Dogg threw a party that had even the rows at the very back screaming for him to ‘rock dat shit’. DOGG RE VI E W PA PA G E 

BLESS YOU! • PAGE 2 FIGHTING WITH THE FOOS • PAGE 4 REVIEWS: BLACK SABBATH, AUDIOSLAVE, SONIC YOUTH AND MORE • PAGE 6-9 SURF’S UP FOR WILSON • PAGE 5

H S I L ENG ION EDIT

• SATURDAY • JULY 2, 2005 • PRICE: 10 KRONER


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F E S T I VA L G LO B E

SATURDAY, JULY , 

WHAT’S UP, ROSKILDE? THE ROSKILDE RUMOUR MILL

Aaaaa-tisch! A LITTLE SOMETHING else

has been added to the big festival cocktail. Beer, pot, dust, dirt – those are all old classics. The new kid on the block is large amounts of pollen, and the new combo is enough to make festival guests more than a little dizzy. »There’s lots of pollen in the air, so along with sunscreen lotion, allergy medication is our absolute bestseller at the moment,« says pharmacologist in the festival pharmacy Susanne Jensen. The two pharmacies in the

Pollen is all around at this time of the summer, and every fifth festival-goer is sneezing and sniffing while pharmacies are trying to keep up with the demand for allergy medication city of Roskilde recognise this trend, and Lars Rasmussen, from the samaritan tent on the festival site, is aware of the problem too. He explains that while most allergy sufferers know that sleeping in a grass field is trouble, city people often have no idea

BUSY DAYS The pharmacies’ biggest festival sellers: . Sunscreen lotion . Antihistamine . Morning-after pills

that they’re allergic. But at the festival they find out soon enough ...

get yourself down to a pharmacy right away, because those allergies can really ruin your festival. If your allergies are so bad they can’t be relieved with over-the-counter medication, festival medics can prescribe something stronger. CARSTEN NYMANN

Snot, itching and tears If your nose itches, snot runs faster than Carl Lewis and your eyes tear up without a single chick flick in sight,

BOXED WINE WHAT’S YOUR RECORD? F RA N K B. S C H M I D T

Metallica are playing instead of Duran Duran.’ ‘Michael Jackson’s doing a double concert with the Backstreet Boys at Orange.’ ‘If you bring your bracelets from the last 10 years, you get in for free.’ ‘It’s true! My mate was told by a mate!’ Rumours always crop up at ESBEN Roskilde. DANIELSEN There’s Spokesman, probably Roskilde Festival no other annual Danish event that is the source of as many rumours as Roskilde. From the first hesitant beginnings, when the first bands are announced, to the first Sunday in June when it’s all coming to an end. Daily rumours about changes in the programme spread with the speed of a chlamydia infection. (Duran Duran have not cancelled and Ikscheltaschel are playing as I write.)

THE HONOURABLE MR AND MRS ROSKILDE If your dream was to become this year’s Mr or Mrs Roskilde, Festival Globe is sorry to shatter it. Jakob and Simone were crowned king and queen of Roskilde on Wednesday – Jakob luring the judges with his guitar- playing in the buff and Simone impressing everyone by being able to make farts with a part of the female anatomy you don’t normally associate with this bodily function. FESTIVAL GLOBE

A

nd who hasn’t heard the story of the toilet truck driver who forgot to ease the pressure before he emptied the loos, which resulted in toiletgoers aplenty being flushed out of the toilet doors along with the whole content of the toilet tank? Rumours belong at Roskilde and they spread rapidly from camp to camp. But where do they come from? Are evil minds purposefully trying to lead us astray, or are they just a festival thing, popping up from out of nowhere. I think it’s the latter. Because what would a festival be, without all the funny, untrue, weird and just farout stories that are going around out there?

PLEASE SEN D YOUR COMMENTS TO FESTIVAL- GLOBE@METROXPRESS.DK

OOOPS If you should run into Chris Cornell or Jamie Cullum somewhere on the festival site today or tomorrow, be a sweetheart and share your food with them. Yesterday, the backstage restaurant – caterer to the stars – had a little visit from the food control authorities, whose measurements showed that all the food in the refrigerators had a temperature of between 15 and 18 degrees, which is too warm, especially for meat and dairy. Spokesman Esben Danielsen says the coolers must have broken down because of the heat. FESTIVAL GLOBE

A busy week in the emergency room ER With more than 500 accidents at Roskilde Festival since Sunday, it’s been quite a busy week for the emergency room at the Roskilde County Hospital. None of the injuries have been serious, though, says the head of the E.R., Poul Kristensen. The most common ones are small cuts on feet and sprains. FESTIVAL GLOBE/N EU

No bracelet means no music

T

his year the number one rumour was that Pink Floyd would be replacing Black Sabbath. I even heard that Roger Waters would be replacing Ozzy Osbourne. All I can say is: Ozzy and Black Sabbath played a kick-ass concert last night. We’ll be sure to inform you on the big screens, in Festival Globe, on the info screens and on the festival radio if any changes occur. Enjoy the music.

Authorities throw out stars’ food

STOP So far the police have

OKAY, LISTEN. It’s a tradition, right? So don’t you go passing any judgement on the guys from the ‘Boxed Wine Camp’. Every day of the festival the world championships in boxed wine take place right here, and the rules are simple: The fastest drinker of a litre of boxed wine wins – if he can keep from puking for at least  minutes after the feast. Peter (pictured right) says his record is an impressive , seconds, while his twin brother, Lasse, still has a lot to learn. He empties a box in  minutes and  seconds. FESTIVAL GLOBE

expelled six people from the festival area because they weren’t wearing any bracelets. One of the sinners told the police he had gotten into the festival by cutting a hole in the fence. FESTIVAL GLOBE/KK

Publisher: metroXpress, Wildersgade ,  Copenhagen K • Editor-in-chief: Ask Rostrup • Editors: Halldor Henriksen, Susanne Sayers • E-mail: festival-globe@metroxpress.dk or festival-globe@roskilde-festival.dk • Text:     (normal rate) • Print: Dansk Avistryk • Come meet us at the Pavilion Junior area and tell us, how we can make Festival Globe better

The beer race Roskilde Festival has changed the queuing system by the beer stalls. Now you pay at point A and pick up your beer at point B. This year you don’t have to know the bartender or be two metres tall to get a beer at Roskilde. The festival has changed the queuing system so that at 7 out of 16 beer stalls, thirsty guests first queue to pay for their beer and then move to another queue to pick up their drinks, the way you do in American coffee shop chains. »We’ve decided to do it this way, so that everybody is on even terms when it comes to buying beer. Nobody should have an advantage because they’re tall, for instance,« explains section leader Lars Orlamundt.

Slow beer? Festival Globe has been contacted by several guests who find the new system too slow, but Lars Orlamundt doesn’t agree: »Of course time’s a pretty subjective thing, but it’s meant to be an improvement of the service, and we think it is.« The new system has not only been introduced to benefit the guests. The festival management hopes that it’ll make it harder for guests to ‘forget’ paying for their beers. CARSTEN NYMANN ➔ New system by service center East and West, agora B, Arena, Orange by mixing desk, Orange West and Pavilion.


F E S T I VA L G LO B E

SATURDAY, JULY , 

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SIZE DOES MATTER The name at the top of the festival poster is not necessarily the biggest act to play the party. It’s the size of the letters that count. The bigger the letters, the bigger the star – in the eyes of the festival management. All the bands written in the same letter size are equally big – the one on top is merely the one that comes first alphabetically. FESTIVAL GLOBE

THE YEAR OF C

 was the year of the big C’s at Roskilde. Costello, Collins and Clapton played. Coincidence? I think not!

HOW FRAGILE WE ARE Festival spokesman Esben Danielsen looks back at the tragedy, which cost nine people their lives in 

Karaoke against AIDS FIGHT ‘I Will Survive’, ‘I’m So Excited’ and ‘New York, New York’. Immortal classics will be on the playlist when the Danish Aids Foundation pulls Red Stage, The Karaoke Truck, across the festival site offering you a chance to sing your heart out if you support the fight against AIDS. Or pay 20 kroner and make a solemn vow to have safe sex – and get a tattoo, which comes off with soap and water. Just follow the noise and the clapping and you’ll find the cart without problems. FESTIVAL GLOBE

disbelief. That was what rushed through Esben Danielsen that Friday in 2000, when the big screen showed images that made it clear that something was very wrong by Orange Stage. »Everybody had been saying that Roskilde Festval was the safest festival in the world. We just couldn’t believe that this could happen,« he says, screwing up his eyes against the sun. In front of him is the dark, polished memorial rock, which marks the memorial site. A silent testimony to the year when the party turned into a catastrophe and nine guests lost their lives. In 2000 Esben Danielsen was just a volunteer in the music office, but today he is festival spokesman and the one who takes the rap on behalf of the festival manage-

ment when something goes wrong. The catastrophe is still at the back of everybody’s minds, when decisions are made. »We certainly think about it. And it’s important that we do, because we must never allow it to happen again. That’s why the memorial site is important – because it reminds us that we must take care of each other,« says Esben Danielsen. He senses that Roskilde Festival five years on is a different kind of festival. »The atmosphere has definitely changed. It’s more relaxed and friendly, but still fun. We hope it’ll stay that way,« says Esben Danielsen. CARSTEN NYMANN

THE BIG ROCK in front of Orange Stage makes sure no one ever forgets the tragedy of .

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F E S T I VA L G LO B E

SATURDAY, JULY , 

Foo Fighters are ready to rock Roskilde’s Orange Stage tonight. Festival Globe met up with Dave Grohl and Chris Shiflett to talk about their new double album and that Gus van Sant movie ... THE FOO FIGHTERS just celebrated their 10th anniversary by releasing a double CD – one loud and one not-so-loud. »I wanted to do something different, something that would make it exciting to be a band again and that would really challenge us and become more than just a record,« singer Dave Grohl explains. »So instead of going into a studio for two months, recording 12 songs and making another album, playing another festival and making another video, I thought, ‘Let’s build a studio and make a double record’.« And so they did. Studio 606 was erected, and ‘In Your Honour’ was constructed – resulting in one rock and one acoustic CD. »I think we needed to prove to ourselves that we should still be a band

and that we had a future together. Also, with the other albums we’ve made, we’ve always had hard rock songs and softer, gentle acoustic melodies too. But it’s hard to put things on the same record sometimes without it sounding crazy and schizophrenic.« The Foo Fighters basically eliminated the middle ground and went to the extremes, yet keeping them apart on two CD’s. »You could feel it harder that way, or you could go more delicate that way. And if you split the two ,they make more sense together,« says Grohl, and guitarist Chris Shiflett adds: »It was like making two different albums.« The album features several honorary guests such as Josh Homme from Queens of

the Stone Age, Norah Jones who lends her voice to the bossa nova track ‘Virginia Moon’, and Led Zeppelin bass player John Paul Jones who plays the piano on the ballad ‘Miracle’. »He contacted us,« jokes Grohl. »Some people on the record, like Josh, I’ve known for 14 years,« he continues. »You pick up your cell phone and ask, ‘Hey, you wanna come and play on a song?’ But with John Paul Jones, you get your people to call his people, and then they give each other your phone numbers and then you call each other. But he was so cool.« And Dave Grohl admits he was nervous about meeting the master: »The thing about meeting legends and heroes is that they seem larger than life and you’re just afraid. I think he did his best to calm us down. I was shaking!«

The legacy And speaking of legends ... Is Dave Grohl getting sick of being considered a Nirvana rep, especially as he was the band’s sixth drummer? «Yeah! Sometimes I’ll get calls

FIVE FACTS OF FOO • The Foo Fighters are: Dave Grohl (guitar/vocal), Nate Mendel (bass), Taylor Hawkins (drums) and Chris Shiflett (guitar).

• The band was formed  years ago – in a slightly different constellation.

• They have released five albums. • The latest one is a double called ‘In Your Honor’. • The Foo Fighters have won four American Grammies. about making a box set.« His involvement in the last one was due to his brotherly love for former Nirvana bassist Kris Novoselic. »He’s like my big brother. He’s the sweetest, most gentle person in the world. I want to be there to support him, but it’s kind of weird sometimes, because I was the sixth drummer. There was a lot of history in that band before I even joined them. I was just there in the spotlight when everything blew up.« But there are limits, he says. »There’s no way I could go see that Gus van Sant movie.« ‘Last Days’, recently presented at the Cannes Film Festival,

is loosely based on Kurt Cobain. »So what is that?« asks Chris Shiflett. »It’s Gus van Sant’s interpretation of what he thinks was going through Kurt’s head in the last couple of days,« explains Grohl. »It’s total speculation. A lot of people will ask me questions like, ‘What do you think you would be doing right now, if Kurt were alive?’ It’s that kind of speculation ... I think of it differently than a lot of people, because it’s personal.« And what would Kurt Cobain himself think of ‘Last Days’? »He would be bummed,« concludes Grohl. »I can definitely speculate that!« TALIA SOGHOMONIAN

RAISING THE BAR The C nadian Wave Everybody’s talking about the Canadian music scene at the moment. A wealth of creative, melodious and wide-ranging music from the country that used to be known as the U.S.’s boring neighbour. These days, if you can’t come up with three Canadian favourites, you’re simply not on the ball. The sudden breakthrough for the Canadian scene is probably due to a combination of luck, the very good financial support for musical ex-

port and a veritable creative epidemic. »The only thing that’s changed is that now the music is released internationally. The scene has been thriving for years, so I think it’s more a matter of the right people having been hired to make sure that it gets out to the people who want to listen,« says Sebastien Granger from the duo Death From Above 1979.

Choose your genre Roskilde Festival is down with it and has booked four of Canada’s finest bands. Folk-trio The Be Good Tanyas, The Dears and Death From Above 1979 all played yesterday, but you still ha-

ve a chance of going Canadian: Toronto-based The Hidden Cameras (pictured) play tonight at 22 at Pavilion. This is a concert for those who want a serious party – previously the band has had strippers as well as go-go dancers on the stage with them. The homosexual band members sing delightfully informal – and slightly dirty – songs about their own sexual exploits. Expect charming, innovative indie-pop. NICOLAI TORP/SOUNDVENUE ➔ You can spend all summer listening to Canadian music, if that’s your pleasure. We recommend that you start with The Arcade Fire, Stars, The Stills, Wolf Parade, Kid Koala, Hot Hot Heat and Broken Social Scene.

CO N T R I B U T E D

This year at Roskilde you can get acquainted with four bands from the sparkling Canadian music scene.


F E S T I VA L G LO B E

1976

was the year Dr. Hook played completely in the nude. As they said: ‘You’re all naked, so we might as well be naked too.’ FESTIVAL GLOBE

FEW THEFTS THIS YEAR The police in Roskilde are reporting that they have recorded few thefts this year. So far 190 persons have notified the police of a theft. In comparison, two years ago 700 people contacted the police, because they had been robbed. FESTIVAL GLOBE/KK

SURF’S UP FOR BRIAN WILSON G E T T Y I M AG E S

Brian Wilson has transformed his traumatic childhood into good vibrations IN  BRIAN WILSON weig-

hed 155 kilos and was literally one of the big guys. Today he’s down to 92 kilos, but more than ever he belongs to the heavyweights. Last year he completed ‘Smile’, an album that the world had been waiting for for 37 years – and the reviewers gushed in unison. But many had written off the man who was The Beach Boys as a snivelling, drugged-out wreck sitting at home in his sandpit in Californ-I-A gazing at his own navel, completely controlled by his shrink, Dr. Landy. In 1966 he had a nervous breakdown and during the following years he attempted to hide from the world and himself behind huge amounts of body fat, LSD,

boy both physically and mentaly. Around the age of six Brian Wilson started playing around with the sitting room piano, and the fact that he was partly deaf on one ear didn’t stop him. He wasn’t born with the deafness – it may have been caused by the beatings.

Retired from Beach Boys

BRIAN WILSON is still going strong. It is no more than a week ago that he last performed – at Glastonbury.

amphetamines, cocaine, acid, marihuana, booze and sleeping pills. Brian Wilson grew up in a Californian suburb, the

oldest of three brothers. His mother was a drunk and his father a bitter would-be songwriter without the talent to make his dreams

come true. His oldest son, on the other hand, had talent aplenty, and that only made the father even more bitter, it seems, as he terrorised the

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RO C K P H OTO

THAT WAS THEN

SATURDAY, JULY , 

In 1961, before he was 20 years old, Brian Wilson had started The Beach Boys together with his brothers, Dennis and Carl, and his cousin Mike Love. After some fantastically successful years and a stream of hits he retired as a tour musician. He disappered from the group and became more and more selfabsorbed. But luckily he’s made his comeback, and in a way the tragedy of his childhood is inversely proportional to the friendly, forthcoming music he makes. KIRSTINE KREFELD

BRIAN WILSON • Brian Wilson was born in  in Hawthorne, California, USA. Singer, instrumentalist, producer, composer. Made his chief work ‘Pet Sounds’ in . For a short while Brian Wilson ran the health store The Radiant Radish. • In  he returned with his solo album ‘Brian Wilson’, and  years later ‘Imagination’ was released. He’s been touring since .

addLemon.com


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F E S T I VA L G LO B E

SATURDAY, JULY , 

T H O M A S A R N B O / RO C K P H OTO

STILL GOING STRONG REVIEW BLACK SABBATH Orange, Friday at  ,

THE HAIR is still long, the

soul is still young and the songs are still relevant. Black Sabbath proved once and for all that old men can indeed play music that’s not happy jazz. One might have feared that the concert would end up as a nostalgic trip down memory lane, a mediocre show – but thank god, the godfathers of metal played a hell of a concert, which made it clear that their talent and their joy of performing live are still intact. Drummer Bill Ward and bass player Geezer ‘God of Thunder’ Butler still make up an amazing and dead strong rhythm section, Tony Lommi is still the coolest of guitar maestros, and together they created a sound picture, which was both elaborate and heavier than ... well, something very heavy. Above it all Ozzy’s distinct vocals alternately flowed over and cut through the dusty festival air with a sharpness you would never have thought the snuffling TV-clown capable of. His neverending ‘I love you’s’, cute little dance skips and the rest of his showman’s repertory are cheap and not the

newest tricks in the book, but they worked and the audience was seduced. The concert lasted anhour and a half and showed off several sides of the extensive Black Sabbath song catalogue – from the ultra heavy to the psychedelic – and it was great to see that the old rockers didn’t play it safe, but also made room for semi-classics such as ‘Into the Void’ and an astonishing version of the bluesy ‘The Wizard’ – with Ozzy at his best playing the mouth organ. It seemed that no matter what Black Sabbath did, the reaction from the audience was immediate: Everybody was able to sing or hum along. You, that pissed Swede next to you, the woman who was old enough to be your mum and the guy with the moustache who looked an awful lot like a cop – you were all right there. Together.

They make people connect The crowd went ballistic when the band played ‘Ironman’ – they were so loud that Ozzy almost vanished in the noise. And that might be Black Sabbath’s greatest legacy. Today – 35 years after their first album – their holy riffs still make people connect, and I wouldn’t be surprised if this will still be the case in another 35 years. KRISTIAN SCHOU/SOUNDVENUE C A R S T E N S N E J B J E R G / RO C K P H OTO

A ROCK MONSTER ON REVIEW AUDIOSLAVE Orange, Friday at  ,

THEY’D ALL BEEN on that sta-

M on repeat.

THATS’ HEAVY, MAN

ge before. Chris Cornell with Soundgarden and Tim Commerford, Brad Wilk and Tom Morello with Rage Against the Machine – two of the biggest bands of the ‘90s. Now the guys have found a new life in Audioslave and have

just released their second album, the splendid ‘Out of Exile’. And let it be known: The new constellation lived up to the triumphs of the past. Relaxed and smiling the members of Audioslave entered Orange. But it was silence before the storm, of course, because with most of the rhythm section from Rage present, Audioslave can hardly be called a run of the mill band. That became obvious as they played hardhit-

ting songs such as ‘Cochise’, ‘Gasoline’ and ‘Out of Exile’. However, we were also treated to some astonishing ballads; with ‘Like a stone’ and ‘Be Yourself’ Audioslave moved Roskilde.

Cornell sounded rusty Chris Cornell is one of the best singers in rock. Most people know that, but the audience at Orange didn’t quite get him at his best. Despite his energetic effort, his voice seemed rusty and it

REVIEW M Pavilion, Friday at  ,

YOU KNOW that point in

every gloomy action film where the main character has to face the fact that there’s absolutely no way out? That exact moment of recognition is always accompanied by a certain kind of music. Hard and sombre, it rises like a god from the speakers and makes everything smell like burned bridges and final battles. That’s the kind of music M83 plays. And in such a fierce way that you’d think all of the band members had been there themselves: Facing that last chance of surviving – in the arms of a woman.

Enourmous sound picture That’s the dramatic extent to which the French sound enthusiasts go while creating their enormous sound picture. Frowning while playing their noise rock, electro scratch and sad synth, they stand before us as the holy trinity. In good – and unfortunately in bad, too. Yes, the visions are big, and they roar like an 80s metal band on acid. Yes, the eyes are focusing on the tips of the shoes – in a truly heartfelt fashion. But it’s just not enough, when the repeat button seems to be stuck, and the audience is forced to listen to the same sound bit over and over again.

On Orange Stage Audioslave showed that they still could perform like in the glorius past. The only disapp

PUTTING A HITMACHINE BACK TOGETHER REVIEW THE TEARS Arena, Friday at .

Monotous music

OZZY’S DISTINCT vocals alternately flowed over and cut through the dusty festival air with a sharpness you would never have thought the snuffling TV-clown capable of.

You get lost and you can’t even be bothered to tap your feet to the rhythm. There’s simply not enough variation in the material, and really, there’s got to be a boundary to how any heroic deeds your rusty festival brain can take in. The ideas disappear somewhere in the monotony and M83 do exactly what movie soundtracks are supposed to: Emphasise an emotional point without disturbing the mood. That’s too bad. ARKO HØJHOLT SOUNDVENUE

OK. MOST OF us were pro-

bably clutching at straws, hoping that one of the old Suede hits would be played and shake the dust from our eardrums. But The Tears showed no mercy. And when Brett Anderson let his shirt fall and bared a surprisingly shapely torso that showed no signs of the drugs it had to endure during Suede days, there was no doubt anymore: Suede is history. After the turbulent break-up of Suede, very few believed that a band could ever com-

prise two of Britain’s best poseur kings, guitarist Bernard Butler and singer Brett Anderson, and at the same time be a stable constellation. But against all odds The Tears are putting all our doubts to shame, and the convincing, coquettish, selfassured concert undeclined this in the best possible way. There were no easy ways out in the shape of old hits or other ways of currying favour with the audience – that is, if you don’t count Brett Anderson’s characteristic hip wriggles and his way with the tambourine, which still makes the female part of the audience sigh with longing. With the terrific debut ‘Here Come The Tears’ behind them The Tears play-

ed Arena fearlessly and showed no signs of being a fragile constellation. Even Bernard Butler’s playful kick in the direction of Anderson seemed very friendly and sowed no doubt about the stability of the band. Instead, the focus was on the existing, new songs, which are not weighed down by a plethora of worn stereotypes from the suburbs. The relieving change of perspective was well-received by the audience, who showed their enthusiasm by frequently bursting into cheers and generally being elated. A wonderful reunion with Brett and Bernard, who are seemingly putting a regular hit machine back together. NICOLAI BØLSTED/SOUNDVENUE


F E S T I VA L G LO B E T H O M A S A R N B O / RO C K P H OTO

REVIEW

the shoulders and sing along to a terrific aucoustic version of ‘Black Hole Sun’, before Cornell and Co. allowed the audience to go berserk to the old Rage-hit ‘Killing In The Name Of’ in an inferno that transformed Orange to a rocking, foaming monster. The dust has yet to settle.

SNOOP DOGG Orange, Friday at 

The Snoopadelics is no super group, but with the samples they worked well, and that’s acceptable at a hip hop concert.

,

‘Rock dat shit’ LOOKING AT an inflatable

martian making passionate love to an equally inflatable cow, the crowd excitedly awaited the arrival of Long Beach player number fucking one. The somewhat alternative stage decoration gave new meaning to the term ‘Doggy-style’. Then a film started on the big screen, and a gigantic roar rose up from the packed space in front of Orange. The air was so thick with Snoop that you could cut it with a knife.

ISIS didn’t blow the audience away.

FREDERIK WIESE SOUNDVENUE

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THE DOGG RULES

ORANGE drowned in the Orange sound barrier. Commerford, Wilk and Morello, on the other hand, were immensely in form. They played clearly, beautifully and tightly, and Morello particularly underllined his status as a master on the guitar. Of course the past was undeniable and the old classic were the trump of the concert. And so it came to pass that the audience at Roskilde could hold each other by

SATURDAY, JULY , 

THE EYE OF THE STORM

T H O M A S A R N B O / RO C K P H OTO

REVIEW ISIS Orange, Friday at 

The contact with the audience and the flow are what matters, and Snoop had both completely under control. The audience joined the booty girls on the big screen and on the stage in writhing and wriggling along to an abundance of hits, such as ‘P.I.M.P.’, ‘Gin &

Juice’ and ‘Beautiful’. Even at the very back people threw up their hands and loudly agreed that we should ‘rock dat shit, drop dat bitch’, before The Doggfather dealt the deathblow with ‘Drop It Like It’s Hot’. Snoop summed up the mutual feelings of love when he, almost surprised, stated that ‘These motherfuckers are ready to party!’ CASPAR TRIBLER SOUNDVENUE

K L AV S B O C H R I S T E N S E N / RO C K P H OTO

,

African romper suit WE EXPECTED the storm of

Then he made his entrance. The Snoop Doggy Djizzle. Who else can be cool in an African romper suit? With his ‘pimp-o-phone’ he kicked off with the classic ‘Murder Was The Case’, and then we all knew what we were in for. 12 years after his breakthrough, Calvin Broadus is still Mr Guns and Tits, but he also has so many old and new classics under his belt that he changed Roskilde into a veritable party battlefield.

the century, but we only got a hard wind. Isis did what they were supposed to do, but without frills and without smiles. It didn’t start too well when Isis, due to a very long concert by Sunn O))), really had to shift to get their gear onto the stage to start on time, and somehow the stress was carried into the concert itself. It was a few numbers before the band had found themselves and the right sound level, but then the Boston-based band really released the natural forces they are capable of unleashing on stage.

An incredible experience Isis’ mix of dynamic postrock and melodious playfulness as well as their grandiose psychedelic metal were at best an incredible experience. The tracks tend to be built up in waves of crescendos, like waves hitting the shore, and a good few times you could shut your eyes, hold your breath and let the sound wash over you. A musical nirvana was close.

T H O M A S A R N B O / RO C K P H OTO

BRETT ANDERSON’S hip wriggles still make the female part of the audience sigh with longing.

A SILVER BOX PUSHED AND TWISTED REVIEW MUGISON Pavilion, Friday at 

Not blown away But when you reopened your eyes, you saw a band which didn’t really seem to have the energy to do anything apart from simply playing the tunes. Between the songs the band members looked down at the ground or at their own hands on the instruments. And Isis were so busy putting Roskilde behind them that they had to be be told to get back onto the stage to play one more. And that put a damper on a concert that was incredibly beautiful soundwise. But we weren’t blown away. KRISTIAN SCHOU SOUNDVENUE

Festival Globe is publishing the reviews in cooperation with:

,

THE APPLAUSE was loud and warm before and during Mugison’s entrance. He sat down by his little silver box and informed us that he’d K L AV S B O C H R I S T E N S E N / RO C K P H OTO

pointment was the vocal of Chris Cornell, that seemed a bit rusty.

SNOOP DOGG appeared in his african romper suit, and he had the audience completely under control

sing firstly a difficult song, then a love song and then some rock’n’roll. It did look somewhat difficult what with that box, and all its buttons, pushed and twisted by Mugison. The audience made it clear in the loudest of ways that it wasn’t their first time at a concert with the oneman elctro-blues band.

The thing about being alone is just one of the things about Mugison. His ground rule is to do stuff. This idea is the basis for what he does with his home page, album covers and even the audience, whose yells of ‘one, two, three, four, fuck, yeah’ were pushed through the electronic twister and emerged as soundbites, which became a natural part of the show – just like the man’s own words. His girlfriend Rúna sang along in the love song, and the rock’n’roll part was provided by the audience, who sang ‘Wild Thing’ (which was the second and last encore) because Mugison didn’t know it. But he played it anyway. He did it. MORTEN JUST SOUNDVENUE

THE AUDIENCE made it clear in a loud way, that it wasn’t their first time at a concert with Mugison.


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SATURDAY, JULY ďœ˛, ďœ˛ďœ°ďœ°ďœľ

F E S T I VA L G LO B E

REBELS OF ALL KINDS UNITE REVIEW LE TIGRE Odeon, Thursday at ďœ˛ďœą.ďœłďœ° ,

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and sizes and bring along all sorts of things to celebrate the girly revolt. Long hair or short boyish cuts. Beer or boxed wine. The girls are here too ‌ somewhere – but there are definitely more men than women here at the last Odeon concert on Sunday. Perhaps all those guys are a sign that the rebellion has reached a turning point? Perhaps the mission is already accomplished? For Le Tigre anyway, who last year shocked their fans by letting Universal release their third album. ‘Can you believe it?’ those die-hard fans asked each other. ‘A mainstream record company of the exact same kind the rebel girls have taught us never to go near.’ For Le Tigre the Riot Grrl Movement is all about respecting women, and it is absolutely impossible not to have a lot of respect for the tigresses – no matter their record label and most certainly no matter their sex. As it is often the case with Le Tigre concerts, this one is a regular party extravaganza – the kind where you find yourself jumping up and down, yelling at your neighbour to ‘give you five’. And where you – if you can find the time – can look to the stage, at almost 37-year-old front woman Kathleen Hanna. Sure, she is no spring chicken, but she can still party like a sullen 17-yearold. Her soft little girl’s voice changes without warning into teenage-rebellious ‘yellsong’. When she’s not playing the keyboard, that is. Or the guitar. Or moving her feet to a kitsch-ironic choreography. The tigresses brought out all the guns celebrating the girls’ revolt, and the entire audience left with a new inner feminist screaming to get out. Both the boys and the girls.

NOT SUPRISINGLY it is a couple of classic songs from the past, that

VELVET GETS REVIEW VELVET REVOLVER Orange, Thurday at ďœ˛ďœ° ,

FOR A SHORT moment all

our body-hair relinquished. Respectfully they rose for the old legends, with Slash and Duff McKagan in front, wind in their hair and a solid wall of amplifiers behind them. Behind them drummer Matt Sorum with a huge smile on his face and oozing blisters on his hands. It’s 21.15, the sun is

REVIEW F RA N K B. S C H M I D T

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KATHLEEN HANNA is no spring chicken, but she can still party like a ďœąďœˇ-year-old.

setting over Roskilde and the old Guns N’Roses track ‘Mr. Brownstone’ has just been fired at the enormous cloud of dust hiding 50.000 people. And no, it’s NOT Guns up there on that stage, but American super group Velvet Revolver, consisting of Slash, Duff and Matt (formerly of Guns N’Roses), Scott Weiland (formerly of Stone Temple Pilots) and Dave Kushner (formerly of Wasted Youth), who now make up a hard-hitting rock’n’roll circus. Velvet Revolver have tou-

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ARMAND VAN HELDEN Metropol, Thursday at ďœ˛ďœ˛ ,

ARMAND VAN HELDEN is one of the biggest DJ’s and producers of our time. But why sit back and enjoy the fruits of your success and the money your name makes, when you can get up, get out and make a paaaaaaarty?! For two hours the American DJ held court in the castle of house. The rhythm was constantly held by an insistent bass drum, a hi-hat and a bass that vibrated through your feet and body.

It took half an hour before Armand van Helden really proved his talents. After a somewhat monotonous beginning he kicked off and invited us to dance with his own remixes of Technotronic and Nirvana tracks. Then he played tracks produced by himself, and played live they were truly invigorating and put the festival in a dance trance – happiness and good times prevailed throughout. In a state of great concentration he mixed his way through a twohour set. Van Helden let the music speak and the party never stopped, but we never saw the man himself. RASMUS STRĂ˜ER/SOUNDVEUE


F E S T I VA L G LO B E

SATURDAY, JULY ďœ˛, ďœ˛ďœ°ďœ°ďœľ

ďœ°ďœš

RAZOR-SHARP AND ECSTATIC T H O M A S A R N B O / RO C K P H OTO

REVIEW SONIC YOUTH Arena, Thursday at ďœ˛ďœ°.ďœłďœ° ,

SOMEBODY ONCE told me

that he’d been at a Sonic Youth gig and felt like a teenager at a Justin Timberlake concert. That he’d been ecstatic. On Thursday night 15.000 people witnessed Sonic Youth’s concert at Roskilde Festival, and many of them looked like they felt exactly the same – several of them were shaking even before the concert began. With an audience like that, things are unlikely to go wrong. And they didn’t. When legends go on stage, they are allow to take some liberties. When Sonic Youth showered the audience with white noise, we all knew who we were dealing with, and we never forgot it. But the band never sucked up to their audience either. Even though the band will be playing a concert solely with their experimental music, the concert on Thursday night was not simply a load of greatest hits. New songs were played as well as the biggest and most immortal ones.

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from songs from the latest album, ‘Du & Jag, DĂśden’, was replaced by redemptive songs from ‘Isola’ and ‘Hagnesta Hill’, which still stand as albums with uncompromising hymns without any frills. NICOLAI BĂ˜LSTAD

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possesses one of the unashamedly best back-catalogues in Scandinavia. And thanks to that the band emerged victorious after their meeting with Orange Stage and the expectations attached to playing there. Joakim Berg is Kent’s humble spearhead, who lays bare his soul and manifests the latent melancholy, which seems to be a basic part of the Scandie-soul.

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Festival Globe is publishing the reviews in cooperation with:

Stone Temple Pilots, Velvet Revolver finally get out the big guns. Weiland has found his energy, has dropped his shirt and thrown himself at the audience, while Duff and Slash buzz from one end of Orange to the other. When the encores take off with Pink Floyd’s ‘Wish You Were Here’ followed by ‘Mr. Brownstone’ from Guns’ N’Roses, rock’n’roll seems perfect. A strong finish to a concert, which didn’t really get going until midway through. FREDERIK WIESE

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when they go on stage 10 minutes late and attempt to kick off the show with ‘Sucker Train Blues’ from their 2004 debut ‘Contraband’. Four songs later Revolver’s motivation and grasp of the audience begin to kick in as the sound becomes perceptibly better during the ballad ‘Fall to Pieces’. Not surprisingly it’s a couple of songs from the past that finally get Velvet Revolver going. With the old Guns N’Roses song ‘It’s so Easy’, and ‘Sex Type Thing’ from

red the world for a year, and now they’re here in front of a Roskilde audience who, with respectfully clenched fists, painted faces and hard skin under their feet, welcome them with open arms. It doesn’t begin too well, though. Velvet Revolver far from convince the crowd

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

F E S T I VA L G LO B E

SATURDAY, JULY , 

T H O M A S A R N B O / RO C K P H OTO

IT LOOKS LIKE SUEDE and it sounds a lot like Suede, too. But The Tears are not Suede , say Brett Anderson and Bernard Butler. The picture is from last night’s concert.

Back to the future They fell out  years ago, but now they’re back together. Suede is history. The Tears want to look towards the future LIVERPOOL FC belong at Anfield Road. Batman belongs in Gotham City. Brett Anderson belongs at Roskilde. That’s the way it is and always will be, according to Brett Anderson, formerly of Suede, now of The Tears. »We return to Roskilde every time we have the chance. It’s an amazing event, and even though there are loads of festivals around Europe,

Glastonbury in England and Roskilde rise above all the others, I think. It’s just an incredible event; exciting music and a crazy audience,« says Brett Anderson. Although The Tears is a new band, Brett Anderson is returning to his roots, as he’s playing with his old partner-in-crime from Suede, guitarist Bernard Butler, who left the band

just as it was starting to break through the roof going towards the stars. After Butler’s exit, Suede became regulars at Roskilde. In 1999 they played three concerts at the same festival. »I’d already left the band when Suede and Roskilde began their love affair. But I hope the audience won’t boo me off the stage,« says Bernard Butler.

Kiss and make up Frictions between Anderson and Butler split up Suede more than 10 years ago. And there are certainly not many

immediate similarities between Anderson the showman and Butler the introvert, who seems more interested in picking at his fringe than being interviewed. But when he grabs his guitar it becomes clear where that particular Suede-sound came from – and why the expections of the combination of the two Brits will always be huge. »If people think that we’re Suede 2, they can forget about it. We won’t be playing a single Suede song. Wouldn’t it be too sad, if we did? I mean, if we claimed to

ONE OF THE most innovative bands right now stems from North Norway. Surprised? Tromsø is the name of the area that is home to Torbjørn Brundtland and Svein Berge who make up Röyksopp. In 2001 they released the album ‘Melody A.M.’ which signalled a complete renewal of electronic music. The whole world sat up and took notice – until now the album has been sold in one million copies worldwide. Their new album, ‘Understanding’, has just been released, and tonight at their Roskilde gig they’ll be playing both new and old songs.

»It is not the first time we play Roskilde. Last time nobody knew us and the concert was a bit screwed up technically. But it was still

We’d like to make it our trademark that we make music that nobody’s heard before. TORBJØRN BRUNDTLAND

great, and we look forward to playing here again. Sure, we’re not the biggest name on the poster – but now

we’re not the smallest one either.« Torbjørn Brundtland finds it hard to describe Röyksopp’s music: »I don’t really know what pop or electronic music is, so it’s kind of hard for me to define our music. But even if I could, I wouldn’t want to. I enjoy the fact that people can’t categorise our music – it tells me that there’s something in our music that makes it unique.« Keeping their feet on the ground after all the attention ‘Melody A.M.’ caused, hasn’t been that easy. »The pressure is there all

RÖYKSOPP is Svein Berge and Torbjørn Brundtland.

the time, but we don’t encourage it. We try to stop it getting on top of us. We have to ignore it, otherwise I don’t think we’d be able to continue,« says Torbjørn Brundtland. Pressure or not, the new album is very different from

the first one. It’s far more tuneful and the vocals play a much greater part. »We wanted to create something that was obviously different from our first album. We’d like to make it our trademark that we make music that nobody’s heard

LASSE RAVNØ ➔ The Tears played on Friday

CO N T R I B U T E D

Innorwaytion

everything else,« says Bernard Butler. When Suede, sans Butler, delivered one of the most memorable Roskilde experiences ever a decade ago, that mixture of steamy rock’n’roll and intimate moments dominated the experience. »If I were to point out a time and a place when Suede peaked, it has to at be our 1995 gig at Roskilde,« says Brett Anderson: »Everything fell into place that night.«

be a different band and that we’d moved on, but still tried to benefit from our previous triumphs. I think so,« says Butler, who looks forward to seeing the audience reaction to the songs from the debut album ‘Here Come The Tears’. »The quiet songs are the best ones. It’s easy making the place boil over when you kick a heavy guitar riff over the ramp, but when everybody is caught up in the same atmosphere and you can feel a kind of subdued silence vibrate towards you from the audience, that just beats all

before. We always look for new ways to make music. That’s why the new album contains more singing and more words than the first one,« says Torbjørn Brundtland. But what about that name? What does it mean? »Röyksopp is inspired by the Norwegian word for mushroom cloud and we just thought it was a funny word. But our name has gone from being just kind of funny to being a place of its own. A place where our music sets the frame for a fun and different experience. Hopefully that’s what’ll happen when we play here at Roskilde.« SØREN SPRINGBORG ➔ Check out Röyksopp tonight at  at Metropol.


F E S T I VA L G LO B E

SATURDAY, JULY  

SATURDAY, JULY 



SUNDAY, JULY  DURAN DURAN Orange Saturday .

Pavilion . Angu . Karen . Devendra Banhart . Tys Tys . The Dresden Dolls . The Hidden Cameras . Four Tet . Nordic By Nature : Fjärde Vårlden & Medina, Joe True, Gastas Parlament, Ataf

Pavilion . Joanna Newsom . The Faint .  & God . Rahzel & DJ JS- . Kaada/Patton

Metropol . Aroma Jockey Odo . Laid Back . Thievery Corporation . Djosos Krost . Chic

Metropol . Svartbag . Khonnor . Efterklang . Mylo . Röyksopp . Trentemøller feat. T.O.M . Alter Ego . Carl Cox

Ballroom . Faiz Ali Faiz . Konono N . Plena Libre . Macaco

Ballroom

Odeon

. Toumani Diabaté . Enzo Avitabile & Bottari . Michele Henderson . Desorden Publico . New Cool Collective Big Band . Yuri Buenaventura . Bnegao & Os Seletores de Frequencia

. Mercenary . The Futureheads . The Go! team . Bloc Party . Bright Eyes

Odeon

INTERPOL Arena Sunday .

Orange

. Peter Sommer . Bjørn Berge . Plantlife . Eskobar . Mikael Simpson . Patton/Rahzel . The Blue Van . Dungen

Festival programme – film, radio, music

Orange . Jimmy Eat World . Foo Fighters . Green Day . Duran Duran

Festival Radio

Arena . Bikstok Røgsystem . Fantomas . Roots Manuva . Outlandish . The Raveonettes . Skambankt

Cinema . Big Fish . Coffee and Cigarettes . Kongekabale, Danish political thriller . Kill Bill Vol.  . Kill Bill Vol.  . Tetsuo II: Body Hammer

Today is the big day. It is the day of the great annual competition of running in the nude and it takes place at . this afternoon in front of the radio studio in Agora K. For the last many years no women have participated, but the hope and speculation is that this is the year where equal rights will finally change that.

JUAN LUIS GUERRA Orange Sunday .

As usual you will find news in English every hour at ., frequency .

. Turbonegro . ...And you will know us by the trail of dead . Brian Wilson . Juan Luis Guerra

Arena . th Element feat. Anthony Cruz, Richie Spice, Turbulence . The Game . Jamie Cullum . Interpol . Addictive TV . Tokyo Ska Paradise Orchestra . Queens Of Noize

Cinema . Terkel i knibe, Danish animated movie . Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind . Metropolis

Festival Radio Roskilde Festival Radio will keep you up to date on frequency . every hour on ..

Gringo Bar is open until 04 tonight! We are so sorry if we gave you a hangover last night Come by and have a pain killer. Or do like ourselves – take a nacho and a fruit smoothie in the NACHOS BAR next to Gringobar to our stock and heads are severe. But we have been working on the repairs all morning and you bet we will be ready for another party!

7 drunken nights – ”no problemos”!




F E S T I VA L G LO B E

SATURDAY, JULY , 

ALL THAT YOU CAN LEAVE BEHIND If you’re not really the kind of person who gets attached to your earthly belongings, and you are considering just leaving behind your sleeping bag, tent or blankets once you go back to the real world on Monday, please take them to one of the dumpsters by the service towers or the festival entrances. Everything that is collected will be given to a Danish relief organisation for homeless people. FESTIVAL GLOBE/N EU

CINEMATIC SUCCESS The festival cinema is a huge success, selling out all of its screenings so far. There’s room for 700 people and the tent is full whether there’s action, drama or musicals on the menu. FESTIVAL GLOBE/KK

REVENGE OF THE NERD Whatever you do, don’t stop your friend if he’s wasting his time in front of his computer. He may be a musical genius IT WAS NEVER in the cards that Myles ‘Mylo’ MacInnes would end up as one of the hottest names on the international dance scene. He had an academic career going, and his youthful interest in music had been put on the shelf so that he could concentrate on his books. But then something happened. »It started when I bought a Mac and started just playing around with it. I had no clue about technology, so I ended up having this quite nerdy thing going where I spent enormous amounts of time on it, and I think my friends thought I was going a bit nuts,« says Mylo, when Festival Globe meets him before his gig at Roskilde.

I think most dance music has always been shit – but then again, so has most rock music, pop and hip hop. MYLO

G E T T Y I M AG E S

But Mylo was far from going nuts. Those late nights nerding off resulted in one of the most celebrated dance albums last year, ‘Destroy Rock’n’Roll’, which paved the way for a comet-like career. »I dj quite a lot now, which is crazy, actually, because before my album was released I’d never done it before. And that’s pretty obvious, I think – I’m not very good at it, compared to the guys who’ve played for years and who know all the ins and outs of the game, but I guess people like what I do anyway,« says the

26-year-old Scotsman with a shy smile. There’s this idea going around that dance music has hit a crisis, and that Mylo may be the saviour of the genre, but Mylo is not even convinced that that crisis is real: »So many people with no talent at all

try to sponge off electronic music, because it’s possible to make an album without being good at anything at all. I think most dance music has always been shit – but then again, so has most rock music, pop and hip hop, so a crisis – I don’t think so,« says Mylo, who comes to Roskilde

with an entire live band to back him up. »We spent all of last summer touring the European festivals in a beat-up old car. We had no idea what we were doing, we just buzzed down the motorway and jumped onto the stage after driving for 14 hours. It was a miracle that I didn’t just keel over up there,« says Mylo and adds: »It’s much more professional now. I have a band, we have a tourbus and some cool dudes who’ve got sound and lighting completely under control. So it really can’t go completely wrong.« Mylo also hopes to get out there with the rest of us and listen to some great music. »I love festivals. You get the chance to get acquainted with some names you would never otherwise go and listen to. But the most mindblowing thing is the urge people have to get together in big gatherings. I think many people enjoy being a part of the group as much as they enjoy the music, the beer and the drugs. And then it doesn’t matter if you have to shit into a hole in the ground,« says Mylo. LASSE RAVNØ

DON’T MISS Mylo at Metropol tonight at .

ROCK THIS WAY EVEN THOUGH practically all music genres are represented, there’s no doubt what takes first priority at Roskilde Festival: »Roskilde is and always has been a rock festival. The rock audience are our core audience and they are still the most important ones,« says festival music manager Rikke Øxner. »However, we believe that so much happens on the music scene that we’d cheat our audience if we only booked rock bands. That’s why we book hip hop, electronic music, world music – and rock,« says Rikke Øxner. The festival management had many serious considerations before letting electronic music into the festival in 1990. Since then it’s been a bit of a rollercoaster ride – with plenty of ups and downs – both for the scene and for its presence in the festival programme. But lately it’s found a home at Metropol, where the electronic beats fill the air every day from noon to four in the morning. »We think it’s important to have electronic music in the programme, because it creates very different feelings and moods in the listeners. It can be totally relaxing and it can be the basis for an enormous kick-ass dance party. And after a day with serious rock music, letting your head and feet go is just what you need,« says Rikke Øxner. LASSE RAVNØ

http://www.roskilde-festival.dk/fileadmin/user_upload/documents/aviser/2005-0702_uk  

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