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R NS ST LE TIO O L ES H O QU MR TV IS YOU

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WHAT’S HOT?

50+

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TREND REPORT Wallpapers, fabrics and delicate hues

TV SHOW EXCLUSIVES

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GRAN D DE S I GN S / / C O N T E N T S

31

CONTENTS ISSUE 3.3 REGULARS 23 25 26 28

Editor’s Letter Editor-at-Large Credits Social

TREND REPORT 30 32 36 38 42 46 50 60

On the Wall Colour Your World A Life of Luxury Walking on a Dream Architecture Shorts Book Club Switch Your Style Up What’s Hotw

56

33

IN PROFILE 68 70 72 74

Utopia Goods Dessein Furniture Armadillo & Co Daniel Emma

50 114

SOURCEBOOK 219 223 227

63

Flooring Roofing & Cladding Cladd ding als Building Materia Materials

EXPERT ADVICE E 234 236 238 240

Architecture Real Estate Building Landscaping

14 149

138

GRAND DESIGNS

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GRAN D DE S I GN S / / C O N T E N T S

232 “To witness the realisation of someone’s dream is wonderfully inspiring. Each home has something unique or special to offer” – Chris Moller HOUSES 80

92 104 116 128

TV OCEAN SHORES CHIPBOARD HOUSE Chip Off the Old Block NZ TV STILT HOUSE Simplicity by the Sea MOUNT ALBERT HOUSE Cubist Thinking MOERAKI HOUSE Small House, Big Impact PADDINGTON TERRACE Transformer 116

INTERIORS 142

152

ROCKY MOUNTAIN RETREAT Twin Peaks BLACK ROCK TOWNHOUSE Starting from Scratch

92

KITCHENS & BATHROOMS 178 182 186 191 196 200 204

NO LIMITS Nothing Short of Amazing TEXTURAL VIBES Beach Living NEON WAVES As Deep as the Ocean LUXURY OASIS A Private Escape BACK TO BASICS Style Addict MODERN OBSERVATORY Luxurious Functionality PEACE & QUIET The Inner Sanctuary

55

OUTDOORS 209 213

Best in Show Native with a Twist

67

38

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GRAND DESIGNS


“People often ask what inspires me when designing a home for them, and how do I go about developing a design to suit their family? The answer to this always gets back to a few core principles which I have implemented into our design philosophy over the past twenty years of design practice: Put simply, what inspires me is what inspires the client – I like to get an understanding of who they are as people and how they like to live, what elements and materials do they respond to and how they like to imagine themselves living, as their families grow and needs change over time. Similarly, designing a building that is adapted to its locality and context is paramount in my mind, whether the location is urban, rural or coastal by nature, in developing the built form it must be responsive to its setting, topography and climate, and to ultimately allow the occupants to positively connect with this environment. These core design principles form the foundation to our design responses and always ensure that what we design is all about you, and your story. We feel that the building we form around that story is there to enhance your life experience and how we engage in that process will dictate the success of the architecture in which it results.”

“Designing a home which enriches our clients life experience and then surpasses all their expectations, is what truly inspires us.”

James Cooper, Director - Sanctum Design

(02) 9909 8844 | www.sanctumdesign.com.au

|


GRAN D D ES I GN S // E D I T OR’S LE T T E R

The Ocean Shores Chipboard House from Grand Designs Australia Series Seven

FROM THE EDITORIN-CHIEF

I

love the expression ‘across the ditch’ when it comes to talking about the stretch of ocean that separates Australia and New Zealand. I’m not sure when I first heard it, and it could be my imagination, but it seems to be more prevalent in people’s vocabulary now that we are publishing projects from both Grand Designs Australia and Grand Designs New Zealand. It amazes me that while not that far apart geographically, the two countries are very different in so many ways. I’m constantly amazed by the beauty of both, but also the diversity of the landscapes and terrain. Working across the ditch seems to be the new normal, too. We have wonderful designers, including internationally acclaimed Australian Mal Corboy, living and working in New Zealand but also making regular trips back to Australia for projects (see Mal’s amazing kitchen design on page 186). This issue, we also feature one of Australia’s most in-demand designers, Noosa-based Di Henshall, whose work features in a spectacular Queenstown home with an incredible backdrop of snowcapped mountains (page 142) — a far cry from her Sunshine Coast base. I still haven’t managed to get across to New Zealand — well not since 1973, when I sailed into Wellington Harbour on a ship heading back to England after six years in Australia and spent a full day driving around what I thought was Wellington, but was assured it was probably most of the North Island! I made myself a promise that I would definitely get there this year, and as it’s now approaching the middle of the year, I’d better get a move on.

The Tuck stool is another favourite on page 38 from designbythem.com

Other projects this issue include homes, interiors, kitchens and bathrooms in many stunning locations, including one close to where I now live, the Ocean Shores Chipboard House. When I watched this episode, it brought back memories of when my parents lived in Ocean Shores and our family used to visit them from Brisbane and the UK. We spent many wonderful years with our young family at the beaches and locations you’ll see in this episode. Described by presenter Peter Maddison as “alarmingly small”, the house makes up for its modest size and honest materials with ocean views and a rainforest backdrop. It’s certainly a home out of the brick-and-tile box. The Stilt House in New Zealand’s Pukerua Bay is another example of a simple, costeffective build in the spirit of a traditional Kiwi bach. This modest family home, with its equally modest build price, is a collaboration between families, including architect and lecturer, Guy Marriage, to create a holiday home they could all share. Not having built a home of his own before, Guy believes “it’s the birthright and the want of every architect to build their own place”. Whether you’ve built before or are about to build for the first time, I’m sure you will agree there’s something special about creating your own home, whatever your budget. I hope you find inspiration in this issue.

KATE ST JAMES, FDIA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

I AM LOVING THE PANTONE GREENERY COLOUR INFLUENCING OUR WHAT'S HOT SECTION. SO FRESH AND VIBRANT! CHECK OUT THIS PRINT ON PAGE 64 FROM DESIGNERBOYSCOLLECTIONS.COM

KEEP IN TOUCH FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM & FACEBOOK @granddesignsau facebook.com/ granddesignsaustraliamagazine facebook.com/ grand-designs-new-zealand-magazine SUBSCRIBE or RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION at universalshop.com.au

GRAND DESIGNS

23


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GRAN D DE S I GN S // E D I T OR-AT - LA RGE

The Rusty House from Grand Designs New Zealand Series Two

The Rusty House from Grand Designs New Zealand Series Two

Photography Mediaworks

T

oday’s world is full of challenges, including climate change, access to jobs, increasing densification, shifting demographics, rising construction costs and scarcity of skilled labour. I could go on for a very long time. But perhaps the most critical for many is access to good, affordable housing. It is for this reason that prefabrication makes so much sense and is finally coming of age. In the first half of the 20th century, most things were still made by hand, but in the second half, everything changed. Everything we buy now, including clothes, appliances, cars and computers, are all manufactured in factories. Factory fabrication enabled massproduction of quality goods at affordable prices for millions of people. Well, almost everything. The construction of buildings remained the obvious stubborn exception. The messy complexity of hugely different site conditions, complex building regulations and council requirements — together with a construction industry that focused primarily on profit —meant no one was really interested in low-cost, high-quality rapid construction. But things are changing, so it is very exciting that this transformation is beginning to be felt in New Zealand, too. Many of these new off-site prefabricated materials and systems are finally being showcased in some of Grand Designs New Zealand’s episodes. For example, Andy Macbeth and Jo Denton’s Modern Day Castle in Queenstown, designed

by architects Pete Ritchie and Bronwen Kerr with the Climate House team, used prefabricated structurally insulated panels to achieve a house that doesn’t need heating even when it’s well below zero. A different example is Steve Wilson and Wendy Grell’s Rusty House in Northland. Both the weathering steel and the interior plywood panels were precisely prefabricated off-site and assembled on-site with millimetre tolerances. Not bad for such a complex design! Building using digital prefabrication brings its own challenges, though. A lot more preparation has to be done at the beginning; the traditional process of decision-making

is turned on its head. Much more design development and detailed documentation is required very early on in the process, which means higher investment in design fees at the start. The thing to remember is that creativity and whimsy can still be very much a part of the process, evidenced by Andy and Jo’s wonderful topographic pattern cut into their stair balustrade. Until next time,

CHRIS MOLLER EDITOR-AT-LARGE

GRAND DESIGNS

25


GRAN D D ES I GN S / / C R E D I T S EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kate St James, FDIA

FLOOR PLANS Ian Cleland

EDITOR-AT-LARGE Chris Moller

SUB-EDITOR Michelle Segal

DEPUTY EDITOR Annabelle Cloros

ART DIRECTOR Kate Podger

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT/WRITER Stephanie Russo

PHOTOGRAPHERS Jamie Cobel, Nick Wilson

ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES AND BOOKINGS: NEW ZEALAND Barbara-Anne Kerr P: 09 521 6009 M: 021 155 4638 E: barbskerr@xtra.co.nz NSW National Business Development Manager Abigail Fletcher P: (02) 9887 0338 E: afletcher@ universalmagazines.com.au Anthea Hamilton P: 9887 0311 M: 0410 689 098 E: ahamilton@universalmagazines.com.au NSW Kitchens & Bathrooms Bev Hackett P: (02) 9887 0363 M: 0411 424 194 E: bhackett@universalmagazines.com.au VIC Brad Johnson M: 0401 759 363 E: bjohnson@universalmagazines.com.au QLD Products Amy Frank M: 0488 424 232 E: afrank@universalmagazines.com.au Builders Stephanie Meehan M: 0411 424 356 E: smeehan@universalmagazines.com.au WA Advertising Manager Licia Salomone M: 0412 080 600 E: licia@okm.com.au Gloria Karageorge M: 0410 505 063 E: gloria@dimandglo.com.au SA Advertising Manager Sandy Shaw M: 0418 806 696 E: sandyshaw@internode.net.au

ADVERTISING PRODUCTION Patricia Petratos

CONTRIBUTORS Marcelle Candy James Cleland Peter Colquhoun Chris Knierim Tina Stephen John Williams Andrew Winter

ADVERTISING ART DIRECTOR Martha Rubazewicz

S

R N ST LE TIO O L ES H O QU MR TV IS YOU R RS CHSWE

AN

NATURAL SELECTION Our guide to choosing the best taps and sinks

THE GREEN ISSUE SUSTAINABLE DESIGN Creating liveable spaces in an ecofriendly age

DREAM TIME

50+

bedroom ideas to soothe your soul

Issue 3.1

Island Life

TREND REPORT WALLPAPER, RUGS & CONCRETE

AN AUCKLAND COUPLE BUILD AN OFF-THE-GRID ISLAND GETAWAY IN THE COROMANDEL

S

R N ST LE TIO O L ES H O QU MR TV IS YOU R RS CHSWE

AN

COLOUR CHART

PANTONE’S COLOURS FOR

2016

LIVING ROOM OPTIONS How to get the Grand Designs look

WELLINGTON’S

80

MUSEUM ART HOTEL pushes the boundaries of interior design

great, affordable design ideas EXPERT ADVICE

RACHEL HIGGS ON WHAT’S HOT IN THE BATHROOM

MAL CORBOY'S

Issue 2.2

KITCHEN DESIGN SOLUTIONS

CHRIS MOLLER

TALKS TEAM WORK

Gentleman's Retreat

A BUSINESSMAN’S GORGEOUS HOME BUILT FOR A KING

Grand Designs® is a trademark of, and is licensed by FremantleMedia Australia. All rights reserved. ©2017 FremantleMedia Australia Pty Ltd. Licensed by FremantleMedia Australia. All rights reserved. TV3 is a trademark of MediaWorks TV Limited. All rights reserved.

26

GRAND DESIGNS

CHAIRMAN/CEO Prema Perera PUBLISHER Janice Williams CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Vicky Mahadeva ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Emma Perera FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION MANAGER James Perera CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Mark Darton CREATIVE DIRECTOR Kate Podger EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION MANAGER Anastasia Casey MARKETING & ACQUISITIONS MANAGER Chelsea Peters EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES homedesign@ universalmagazines.com.au CIRCULATION ENQUIRIES Sydney head office (02) 9805 0399

This magazine is printed on paper produced in a mill that meets Environmental Management System ISO14001. Grand Designs New Zealand issue 3.3 is published by Universal Magazines, Unit 5, 6–8 Byfield Street, North Ryde NSW 2113. Phone: (02) 9805 0399, Fax: (02) 9805 0714. Melbourne office, Level 1, 150 Albert Street, South Melbourne Vic 3205. Phone: (03) 9694 6444, Fax: (03) 9699 7890. Printed in Singapore by Times Printers, timesprinters. com. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch, Australia. Distributed in Singapore and Malaysia by CARKIT (FE), Singapore, Phone: 65 62821 960. This book is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission. Enquiries should be addressed to the publishers. The publishers believe all the information supplied in this book to be correct at the time of printing. They are not, however, in a position to make a guarantee to this effect and accept no liability in the event of any information proving inaccurate. Prices, addresses and phone numbers were, after investigation, and to the best of our knowledge and belief, up to date at the time of printing, but the shifting sands of time may change them in some cases. It is not possible for the publishers to ensure that advertisements which appear in this publication comply with the Trade Practices Act, 1974. The responsibility must therefore be on the person, company or advertising agency submitting the advertisements for publication. While every endeavour has been made to ensure complete accuracy, the publishers cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions. * Recommended retail price ISSN 2205 – 4839 Copyright © Universal Magazines MMXVII ACN 003 026 944 www.universalmagazines.com.au Please pass on or recycle this magazine.


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S O CI AL // DE SIGN FORUM

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GET SOCIAL

Click to explore the wonders of our architectural environment

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INSTAGRAM B’HOUSE Grammers fanned out over the B’House in Gangwon-do, South Korea, designed by 100 A Associates. It’s all about the clean lines and never-ending windows. Photography by Yadah.

INSTAGRAM BRAE Not just a place to enjoy food from chef Dan Hunter, Brae is also home to six guest suites and boasts a contemporary aesthetic. We could stay on this Birregurra property for days.

FACEBOOK COLOUR ME HAPPY Hilton Melbourne South Wharf and DoubleTree by Hilton Melbourne Flinders Street teamed up with Sage x Clare to create two signature rooms that embody the essence of summer. If you missed out on staying in these hubs of colour, let’s hope they come back for good.

INSTAGRAM CULT STATUS Fritz Hansen’s Choice 2017 is a limited-edition run of Arne Jacobsen’s Series 7 chair, taking notes from cherry blossoms and feminine hues. Run, don’t walk, to get your hands on these iconic pieces from Cult Design.

FACEBOOK A KILLER COMBO

The Thimble stool is Dowel Jones’ first release for 2017 and we just can’t get enough. Adam Lynch and Dale Hardiman collaborated with New York artist and designer Tom Hancocks, who photographed the stools in surreal 3D environments. 28

GRAND DESIGNS


32: COLOUR YOUR WORLD 36: A LIFE OF LUXURY 38: WALKING ON A DREAM 42: ARCHITECTURE SHORTS 46: BOOK CLUB 50: SWITCH YOUR STYLE UP

Glass vessels Amanda Dziedzic

60: WHAT’S HOT

TREND REPORT

30: ON THE WALL

GRAND DESIGNS

29


TREND REPORT 01

ON THE WALL

02

Plain walls are out! Get creative and add some excitement to your interiors with patterns, colours and textures EDITED BY // KATE ST JA ME S, F D I A

01: DEEP BLUE Oceania explores raw textures tamed by ancient handcrafts. 02: PURPLE RAIN Four designs of Controvento evoke images of the Italian Riviera. 03: FRESHLY BAKED Les baguettes de Masako from the Washi collection features a small tartan pattern which highlights its metabolised paper background. 04: SHADY LADY Terra Promessa represents serenity in the shade of palm leaves.

05: GO FOR VINYL From the Talamone collection comes Seta embossed vinyl wallpapers with a natural silk effect in a delicate palette of solid colours. 06: SWEET HOME INDIANA Indiana from the Talamone collection depicts the preciousness of plain silk in an array of contrasting and coloured silk threads. 07: FLOWER POWER PortoďŹ no represents palazzos lit up at night and dressed in embroidered owers. Wallpaper available from elitis.fr; senecatextiles.com.au; seneca.co.nz

30

GRAND DESIGNS


TREND REPORT

05

03

04

06

07

Get Inked

Koubalane from the Oceania collection features a handmade paper-cut pattern layout and raffia strips, dyed and assembled with care GRAND DESIGNS

31


TREND REPORT 01

COLOUR YOUR WORLD

This stunning collection of textiles celebrates the exotic use of colour from across the globe E DI TE D BY // K ATE ST JAME S, FD IA

D

iscover the colours of the sun-kissed Mediterranean, stroll through Asian gardens to uncover a luscious plant world, experience ornamental motifs in palace visits, or take an excursion to Istanbul to immerse yourself in its vibrancy. These experiences are reinterpreted in rich and vibrant coloured fabrics from French textile house Manuel Canovas, and will add a splash of colour and texture to your home — inside or out. 01: ANIMAL INSTINCTS Take a walk on the wild side with the Delos jungle print, Rhodes Caraibes print, large Japanese trout print, Gita Coral print and Naxos Lagoon print, all on cotton base cloth.

02: GOING TO IBIZA The Ibiza Corail presents exotic plants printed on a 100-per-cent cotton poplin.

03

32

GRAND DESIGNS


TREND REPORT

04

05

06 03: PATCHED UP The Divani Pivoine curtain is patchwork embroidered with a multi-coloured weave effect on cotton and linen. 04: CANDY COLOURED Made up of a cotton warp and linen ďŹ lling, Divani Pivoine will steal the spotlight in any room. 05: JUNGLE BOOGIE The Tara turquoise curtain boasts tropical embroidery on a basket weave ground. The Kala, Marroquin, Devani and Mansa cushions complement the serene look. 06: SWEPT AWAY The Daya fuchsia curtain is inspired by an Uzbek grand Ikat coat embroidered with shiny viscose threads on a ground of matt unbleached cotton fabric. 07: VIVA ITALIA! Designed in Italy, the Palladio Ciel is a classic design inspired by an 18th-century Indienne document from India that’s printed on a canvas ground.

07

Fabrics available from colefax. co.uk; domustextiles.com.au; atelier.co.nz

Citrus Delight

Tanvi Orange features jewel-effect embroidery with loop-pile on a linen ground. The silk Dina cushions add the finishing touch to the look GRAND DESIGNS

33


Alfresco LIVING


Dowell

BI-FOLD SERVERY WINDOW

Dowell has taken Alfresco Living one-step better, with the introduction of its beautifully designed Dowell bi-fold servery window. The Dowell bi-fold servery window is the perfect ‘entertainer’ window. When open - the large open space forms a seamless connection between your kitchen and your alfresco living area, providing easy access for food and drinks, clear views and uninhibited flow of conversation. Designed and manufactured in Australia, the Dowell bi-fold servery window is a high quality product that is well suited to the Australian climate. When closed - the Dowell bi-fold servery window can improve the comfort of your home with strong thermal and acoustic insulation performance, and provides strong security with double latch locks and a solid frame construction. Contact a Dowell representative or visit any of our Dowell showrooms today.

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TREND REPORT

01

02

A LIFE OF LUXURY

03

Give your space new life with pieces that will enrich the living room 04

ED I TED BY // MO RGAN WALK E R

01: TICKLED PINK Discover peak luxury with the Gus Aubrey velvet sofa in Blush. It’s the pink piece we never knew we needed! globewest.com.au

05: COFFEE, ANYONE? The coffee table of your dreams, the Athena is made from oak and features a subtle herringbone print. satara.com.au

02: HOLY CREDENZA! The Hastings credenza by Green Cathedral is simple, stylish, and won’t date in your living room. greencathedral.com.au

06: TIED UP IN KNOTS This cute Knot cushion from g Cush & Co is the perfect layering ture. accessory to glam up your furniture. cushandco.com.au

03: IN THE NAVY The gorgeous Copper Night throw is cosy and stylish all at once. squeakdesign.com

07: BLUSHING BEAUTY Soft pastels are the perfect companion for rich fabrics, and our the Bogart armchair will give your guests something to talk about. globewest.com.au

04: FLOOR IT Lighting is key when creating a sophisticated living area, so brighten up your space with the Magnus floor lamp. ozdesignfurniture.com.au

07

08: BOOK ME IN fect The Denon bookshelf is the perfect st piece to unleash your inner stylist es. when filling those display shelves. satara.com.au

06

05

36

GRAND DESIGNS


TREND REPORT

15

14

09: SIDE TO SIDE The Bondi Waves side table is the ultimate in style meets practicality. domu.com.au 10: GOLDEN RULE A little luxe, a little Art Deco and a whole lot of cute — you can’t go past the Flux vase. zanui.com.au 11: BOW DOWN This Cinchwaist mirror tray with delicate gold finishes is the queen of coffee table centrepieces. boydblue.com.au

08

T OUT THERE 12: THROWING IT Tassels for days — what more do we ottie throw adds need to say! The Lottie an element of fun to the living room. .com.au mintinteriordesign.com.au

13

USION 13: OPTICAL ILLUSION The Kass mirror is the perfect o draw the eye statement piece to and add a point of interest. boydblue.com 14: SWING IT If you’re not brave enough to er, channel those take on a chandelier, tnik pendant. vibes with the Sputnik vavoom.com.au T 15: DON’T HIDE IT Indulge your living room with a little ding a glamorous bit of luxury by adding m.au hide rug. zanui.com.au

12

11

09

Furry Friend

Use this faux fur cushion to play around with different textures and create a luxe tone in your living space. lorrainelea.com 10 GRAND DESIGNS

37


TREND REPORT

01

02

03

04

07: I NEED AN EXTENSION Designed by Nicholas Karlovasitis and Sarah Gibson, the Baker table is crafted from oak timber and features powder-coated steel brackets. Not just a pretty face, the table can be extended to cater for any occasion. designbythem.com 08: PURPLE RAIN Rest your head in style with Kip & Co’s linen pillowcase in the calming colourway of lavender. kipandco.com.au

05

WALKING ON A DREAM

01

Tip-toe the line between subtlety and sophistication E D I TE D BY / / A N NA B E L L E C L O RO S 01: SO FRENCHY, SO CHIC Part of Designer Rugs’ recent collection with Romance Was Born, Paisley Dream has a stylised Marie Antoinette vibe. Made from New Zealand wool and bamboo, the rug can be custom shaped, sized and coloured. designerrugs.com.au 02: TUCK IT TO ME Equally cute inside and out, the Tuck stool is made from zinc-plated steel and FSC-certified timber. Pictured in blue, the stool also comes in white, grey, yellow and black powder coat. designbythem.com 03: I SEE THE LIGHT LT04 Colour by Norwegian designers Daniel Rybakken and Andreas Engesvik blurs the boundaries between sculpture and

38

GRAND DESIGNS

light. Emitting a soft glow, LT04 is the ultimate ambience creator. livingedge.com.au 04: IT’S ONLY NATURAL Ultra-soft and ultra-cool — who said you can’t have it all? The leather ottoman in Natural is 80cm in diameter and features a squishy filling to rest your feet or take a seat. fentonandfenton.com.au 05: THE PARTRIDGE FAMILY Stylish and kind to the environment, the Partridge chair in Dusty Pink is made from FSC-certified ash timber and features powder-coated aluminium brackets, a galvanised steel backrest and hard-wearing paint finish. designbythem.com

06: CUDDLY CRITTER The Cipria sofa from the Campana Brothers features nine cushions fixed to an invisible metal tube and comes in varying hair lengths to tickle anyone’s fancy. spacefurniture.com.au

09: THRICE AS NICE Neutral, pastel and moody hues come together in the Tilgate cushion, combining the best of all three worlds. frenchbedroomcompany.co.uk 10: IN FULL BLOOM Boasting subtle angles and complex joinery, the Harper armchair in Acre Wool Blossom is crafted from American oak and made to order. jardan.com.au 11: IN THE ROUND Created by Danish designer Thomas Bentzen for Muuto, the Around coffee table is crafted from oak and quintessentially Scandinavian. livingedge.com.au 12: EAT YOUR OATMEAL Made from organic jersey cotton, the

06


TREND REPORT

14

15 16

Dehei duvet cover in Oatmeal is the ideal foundation for a cool, calm and collected bedroom. fatherrabbit.com 13

13: ALL STACKED UP The Mini Stacked shelving system by JDS Architects for Muuto offers versatility and style all in one. Hang the cubes together or by themselves — the choice is yours. livingedge.com.au

12

11

14: TICKLED PINK A collaboration between Klaylife and stylist Jacqui Moore, the L.I.M Blush Pink pendant features hand-rolled clay beads that are kiln-fired and dip-dyed before being strung onto a wrought-iron frame. klaylife.com 15: WE ARE FAMILY If you like to see your coffee while you’re drinking it, the Jellies Family coffee set by Patricia Urquiola is your new best friend. spacefurniture.com.au 16: COCKTAIL O’CLOCK The Whiskey Sour print by Billie Justice Thomson will always remind you it’s five o’clock somewhere. Framed in white-painted timber, the piece comprises acrylic paint on acrylic sheet. fentonandfenton.com.au 10

07

08

Just Peachy

09

Subtle but sweet, Peachy is hand-woven and comprises a mix of hand-spun yarns, high-quality wool blends, vintage thread and unspun merino wool hung on a Tasmanian oak dowel rod. warpedthread.com.au GRAND DESIGNS

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TREND REPORT

ARCHITECTURE SHORTS Standout architecture that goes above and beyond ED I TED BY / / A N NA B E L L E C L O RO S

01

01: TOREA STUDIO Small but mighty, the awardwinning Torea Studio from Tennent Brown Architects is a study and a meeting space that also offers guest accommodation — basically it’s a jack of all trades. Composed of folded CLT panels clad in zinc, the structure is inspired by the metaphor of two Torea (oystercatchers) walking down the site to the Waimea estuary. tennentbrown.co.nz 02: BRAMASOLE While it’s hard to imagine anything but Bramasole sitting on this site in Waimauku, Auckland, it was once home to a market garden with shelter belts and a humble barn. Herbst Architects seized the opportunity to establish order on the land and create a division between the private dwelling and the public dressage space. The project secured a Housing Award at the 2016 Auckland Architecture Awards and the residence slots right into its rugged landscape. Photography by Brett Boardman. herbstarchitects.co.nz

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02


TREND REPORT

03: BROUGHAM PLACE Another gem from Smart Design Studio, Broughham Place is part-office and part-home. Located in Sydney’s Potts Point, the project consists of two concrete boxes perched on a salvaged sandstone wall. Louvre blades in myriad colours add a pop of colour to the industrial façade of both structures, which conceal a Zen secret courtyard in the middle. Photography by Ross Honeywell. smartdesignstudio.com 04: Y RESIDENCE Deceptively simple, there’s far more to the Elwood Residence than meets the eye. Designed by SJB, the cantilevered upper floor, clad in aluminium slats, sits above an unassuming lower floor, which holds up the storey above loud and proud. Taking cues from a contemporary Japanese ethos, the home’s appearance transitions into that of a floating lantern when lit up at night — certainly a thing of beauty. Photography by Aaron Puls. sjb.com.au 04

03

St Andrews House

St Andrews House is a not-for-profit residential care facility designed by Candalepas. With a focus on community, it was developed to provide accommodation and care for young adults with a physical or intellectual disability. The bedrooms are located on the first and second levels, with the ground floor housing the communal living and dining spaces. The project secured the National Award for Public Architecture at the Australian 2016 National Architecture Awards. Photography by Brett Boardman. candalepas.com.au GRAND DESIGNS

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www.ideasforliving.com.au


IDEAS FOR LIVING. With Darren Palmer There are a few things that light me up in my work and in design generally. Obviously aesthetics are a huge attraction but ever since designing my first kitchen I have been enamoured with anything that surprises with its functionality. Real ‘James Bond’ stuff where televisions are revealed out of cabinets or doors seamlessly glide over the face of their neighbouring panels. Anything that adds functionality but in a really considered and surprising way was what I have always wanted to know about. Now to be working with the world leader in this type of technology for the home, from kitchens to cupboards, robes to entertainment areas I feel grateful that I now have the inside info on all of the latest and coolest fittings for designers and home owners alike, and I can share them, now, with you. For more information visit our website. www.ideasforliving.com.au www.ideasforliving

Darren n Palmer Interior Designer, TV Presenter & Author Au


REVIEWS

BOOK CLUB Expand your horizons with … E D I TE D BY // K ATE ST JAME S, F DIA

HOME EMMA BLOMFIELD HARDIE GRANT BOOKS | $35

A BEEKEEPER’S YEAR JANET LUKE NEW HOLLAND PUBLISHERS | $35 Around the world, beekeeping is increasing in popularity as concern grows that bees and their environments are threatened by global warming and climate change. A Beekeeper’s Year is a beginner’s guide for backyard hobbyists and includes everything you need to know during the first crucial year. This book follows three new beekeepers on their journey setting up and managing three popular beehive designs: Top Bar, Warre and Flow. Author Janet Luke interviews the keepers and carries out inspections of their management, varroa control, disease inspections, feeding, requeening, harvest and preparation for winter.

COASTAL HOMES OF THE WORLD MONIQUE BUTTERWORTH NEW HOLLAND PUBLISHERS | $49.99 Many of us dream of living by the sea and this is coastal living at its very best. This book is a collection of the world’s most stunning waterfront properties. This design and lifestyle book evokes the sound of the surf and the feel of sand between your toes. You will be drawn to these coastal homes and the lifestyle they embody. Whether it’s award-winning architecture, lavish interiors or just the spectacular views, the collection of homes will inspire the reader to create their own coastal abode in their own personal style. Each location comes with a signature dish or recipe typical of the region so you can be immersed in the culture that surrounds these architectural masterpieces.

VERTICAL GARDENS LEIGH CLAPP & HATTIE KLOTZ | NEW HOLLAND PUBLISHERS | $49.99 With more than 100 projects, Vertical Gardens is the perfect companion to help transform compact living spaces such as balcony gardens, rooftops, outdoor dining areas and courtyards. The gardens also make great privacy screens and are low maintenance. Providing inspiration from some of the most creative minds in landscape design, Vertical Gardens offers simple ideas for you to try in your own garden at home. It explains the various systems available for creating green walls and offers practical advice on which plants work where. It will show you how to create an edible garden when you think you just don’t have space — you do! — and it will fill you with easy, more traditional ideas to add vertical elements to your garden.

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Interior decorator Emma Blomfield guides you from room to room in Home, empowering you to create a look you love and a space you are proud to show off — without breaking the bank. Emma demystifies the five elements of decorating — needs and wants, colour and pattern, shape and size, placement and lighting — and shows how easy it can be to apply them. Whether you’re refreshing your look, moving in, organising your home office or creating an outdoor oasis, Emma’s advice will inspire and guide you. Including original illustrations, clever floor plans, practical decorator’s tips and styling 101s, Home is a timeless handbook for anyone who has craved a helping hand.

THE WONDROUS WORLD OF WEEDS PAT COLLINS NEW HOLLAND PUBLISHERS | $29.99

What in the world is a weed? The dictionary will tell you it is a plant out of place. In The Wondrous World of Weeds you will discover that the perceived weeds that grow around us hold special significance and wonderful medicinal values. Their culinary and holistic potential can be used as teas, decoctions, poultices, compresses, ointments and creams along with syrups and lozenges. As well as their use as treatments, weeds can also make good companions for your garden and are also good indicators of the quality of your soil. With 100 common world-wide weeds, Pat Collins and her book gives a full description of the plants, their photographs, distribution, common names, uses and medicinal value.


Bream Unique Lighting

A room is like a stage. Without lighting, it can be the coldest place in the world.

breamuniquelighting.com.au Handcrafted in Australia


ALUMINIUM

D O O R S & W I N D O WS

With the look of custom-made joinery, the Alumiere window

making it ideal for projects with an emphasis on light and open

and door suite is perfect for prestige residential and multi-

plan living. So when selecting doors and windows, your choice

residential homes.

is clear. It has to be Alumiere.

The Alumiere Series accommodates larger spans of glass,

To ďŹ nd out more, visit stegbar.com.au or phone 1800 681 168.


F•S• • •A/ST STEG01 EG0159 59

WHEN YOU WANT NOTHING STANDING BETWEEN YOU AND YOUR VIEW, IT HAS TO BE ALUMIERE.


TREND REPORT

Bree Leech and Heather Nette King for Dulux Colour Trends 2017 — Sentience palette. Photography by Lisa Cohen

SWITCH YOUR STYLE UP

01: SHORT TUFT Made from soft, tufted wool, the Cayo cushion in Neutral ups the cosiness level in any room. linenhouse.com.au 02: POT LUCK Crafted from polystone, this flower pot by Hay is the perfect vessel for succulents or blooms of your choosing. cultdesign.com.au

Four rooms, four different vibes — mix and match to create a style that’s all about you E D I TED BY / / A N NA B E L L E C L O RO S

03: TAKE FIVE Featuring rows of tailored strips across a pentagon shape, the Five pouf by Anderssen & Voll for Muuto is hard and soft all at once. livingedge.com.au

02

01

04: WHAT ARE YOU GHAN DO? Combining soumak weaving and the Berber knot, the wool and cotton Ghan rug in Ecru boasts a high pile and flat weave. armadillo-co.com.au

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GRAND DESIGNS

05 & 06: COSY UP The Ecru and Charcoal cushions are the right balance of sweet meets subtle. countryroad.com.au


TREND REPORT

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SENTIMENTAL TIMEN

Values

Flesh tones and vegetal g hues create a soothing living room palette that’s all about textures and tactility

07: UNDER THE DOME The Dome pendant in Tea is blown and shaped by hand in Auckland, ensuring each piece is completely unique. monmouthglassstudio.com 08: FROM THE SAME MOULD Originally designed to pair with Charles and Ray Eames’ moulded plywood chairs, the accompanying coffee table stands in its own right. livingedge.com.au

10

09: BRABO! From Herman Miller, the Brabo three-seat sofa combines age-old craftsmanship with clean lines and a rigorous form. livingedge.com.au 10: GET CORKED The Cork Family is designed by Jasper Morrison for Vitra and comprises three pieces that double as side tables or stools. spacefurniture.com.au 11: THROW IT ON The Sophia throw is part of Mr Jason Grant’s MJG collection and is made from lightweight cotton with a navy blue contrasting stitch. scouthouse.com.au

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Between Two Ferns

My Deer’s Fern print is part of a limited-edition collection of 500 — so don’t think about it for too long if you want to get your hands on one. fatherrabbit.com GRAND DESIGNS

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TREND REPORT

02 01 01: RUG UP From Halcyon Lake, this handmade rug is perfect as a subtle addition to the bedroom. halcyonlake.com 02: COOL COLLAB A joint effort between Jacqui Moore and Klaylife, the L.I.M pendant is handmade by women in Kwazulu Natal, South Africa, with love. klaylife.com 03: TAKE A SEAT The J110 seat is designed by Poul M. Volther and comprises tall slender wooden rods that make up the backrest. cultdesign.com.au

03

04: BRING IT TO THE TABLE Boasting a timeless aesthetic, the classical white turned table has three drawers and features intricate carvings and a white-painted ďŹ nish. sweetpeaandwillow.com 05: BLUE JEAN BABY The Light Denim pillowcase set is the perfect accessory for denim lovers. kipandco.com.au

04

06: NORDIC VIBES A natural by-product, Icelandic sheepskins look great draped over a chair or as a feature rug. societyofwanderers.com 07: BEDTIME Effortlessly on-trend, the Finley queen bed is crafted from timber with a leather sling headboard in Nude. jardan.com.au

05

COOL

Runnings

Create a cocoon of style in the bedroom with icy hues and layers of textiles

Lucky Dip

06

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GRAND DESIGNS

07

Pop & Scott’s Dips series of pots are made from lightweight fibreglass and plaster, hand-painted and made in Melbourne. popandscott.com


12: SNOW WHITE Use this rustic ceramic in your bathroom to store your toothbrush, or pop in a few blooms for a simple arrangement. countryroad.com.au

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TREND REPORT

Styling by Jacqui Moore. Photography by Armelle Habib

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08: POMS AWAY! The Shake Your Pom Poms linen cushion is handmade in India, and is sure to add a bit of fun to the bedroom. frenchbedroomcompany.co.uk

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09: BLUSHING BEAUTY There’s nothing like falling asleep ensconced in pure linen sheets, pictured in Blush. cultiver.com.au 10: LES CHIC Les Minis cushions are made from 100 per cent flax and come in a range of colours to suit any taste. cultiver.com.au 11: WALK THE PLANK A classic that will never date, the Plank chair by Hans Wegner is modernised with a pale blue colourway. greatdanefurniture.com GRAND DESIGNS

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TREND REPORT

01 01: KEEP ON WEAVING The Nest Weave rug offers a slightly rustic aesthetic and is crafted from hemp. armadillo-co.com 02: ANIMAL INSTINCTS Hang these faux skulls on your wall for a unique look that’s sure to turn heads. Available in black or white — the choice is yours. miafleur.com 03: GIRL INTERRUPTED Sally Nixon is an illustrator living in Little Rock, Arkansas, whose illustrations depict what women do when no one is looking. Pictured are two pieces named Untitled, 2016 pen and marker, 4 x 4 inch. sally-nixon.squarespace.com

02

04: PUT IT TO THE SIDE Keep it clean with the Simple circular table, which features distressed gold framing and a clear glass top. frenchbedroomcompany.co.uk

03

05: THE HUX OF THE ISSUE Boasting exposed legs and a minimal undercarriage, the Huxley table comes in a variety of timbers and finishes. jardan.com.au

04

06: HANDS OFF Made by hand in Delhi, India, these cotton napkins come in four pastel shades and are Fair Trade, too. iansnow.com

PALM SPRINGS

101

07: NIGHTCAP Sculpted from crystal and made in Germany, the Retro tumbler comes in a set of six. zanui.com.au

Establish a relaxed ambience for a cool, calm and collected dining room

08: ROYALTY Add a dash of class to a dining setting with the seven-piece Kensington Palace cutlery set made from stainless steel for durability. zanui.com.au 05

06

09: I FEEL REAL GOOD The Real Good chair is a classic in its own right. Crafted from powdercoated steel, the piece comes in a variety of colours. bludot.com.au 10: MINTY FRESH Invigorate the dining room and add some fresh blooms to the Mint Rice Runde vase, made from glass. takatomo.de

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11: WINE NOT? It’s not a party without wine, and these Calla White wine glasses from Royal Doulton are a must. zanui.com.au 12: WHO’S COMING TO DINNER? The Olio Duck Egg Green 16-piece dinner set features all the essentials with a handmade look. zanui.com.au

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TREND REPORT

Interior design by Orlando Soria, Homepolish LA. Photography by Tessa Neustadt

09

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Strapping

The perfect balance between comfort and design, a teak dining chair is a must in the dining room. fentonandfenton.com.au

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TREND REPORT

03

01

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WORKER

Bee

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If you have to take your work home, you may as well do it in style

08

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GRAND DESIGNS

01: FROSTBITE A neutral addition to the study, the silk-banded Ikat cushion in Frost Grey is made of silk and cotton. westelm.com.au

04: YOU’RE HEXED! The Hex boxes are a must when it comes to storage with style. Available in a variety of sizes and colours. eviegroup.com

02: RUGGED UP The Chroma Overdyed rug in pink boasts a faded, vintage wash that doesn’t quit when it comes to colour. urbanoutfitters.com

05: STUDY HARD The Stationers Trestle desk is made from pine, MDF and cotton rope and holds up to 100kg for all those books. freedom.com.au

03: MIDAS TOUCH The Milas 1 table lamp in brass adds an instant element of glamour to a space. beaconlighting.com.au

06: ROLL ON IN The Bentwood office chair features a walnut finish frame with a leather or upholstered seat. westelm.com.au

Tape It Up

Cute and functional, this analogue tape dispenser from Hay holds up to five rolls of your favourite tapes. cultdesign.com.au


TREND REPORT

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Styling by HomePolish. Photography by Tessa Neustadt

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07: TUCK ME IN Put your feet up on the Tucker square ottoman in brown leather. freedom.com.au 08: MO-MENTO-US The Mento side table comes in a set of two, so you can put one in the study and another in the living room. zanui.com.au 09: CARTING AROUND Use the Regan cart to store all your workplace necessities. It’s available in three colourways but we can’t go past Peach. urbanoutfitters.com 10 THROWING HOOPS Crafted from natural rattan, the Javari Hoop chair is perfect

to help you work harder. urbanoutfitters.com 11: YOU MAKE ME BLUSH This ornate wooden threedrawer cabinet is handmade in Jodhpur, India, using traditional and artisan techniques. iansnow.com 12: SECOND SKIN The sheepskin animal hide can be used as a floor rug for added texture. zanui.com.au 13: FEELING FRUITY Add a pop of metallic to your desk with the Gold Pineapple tray, which is perfect for holding bits and bobs. miafleur.com

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GRAND DESIGNS

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FSA FS SA S A /C //CO COR R02 0 02 254 54

THE MODA COLLECTION A door is a statement of what to expect as you enter a room. That’s why Sally Klopper of Sally Caroline Interior Design starts with Corinthian’s Moda Collection. With 24 timeless designs to choose from, a Moda door will be right at home in your home. To watch Sally talk about her timeless design principles, visit Corinthian.com.au


PMOD9

STARTS WITH CORINTHIAN


WHAT’S HOT

01

02

JAMES CLELAND

ECO ELEMENTS

03

Add a touch of eco elegance with one or more pieces for a layered look ED I T E D BY / / JAME S C L E LAN D

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GRAND DESIGNS

01: Produced in Mexico using faceted brass, recycled glass and antique mirrors, the Roza pendant offers a unique geometric design. ecochic.com.au 02: Old housing timber has been upcycled and melded together to create this little table. vastinterior.com.au 03: The Lexicon wall art features a penny farthing bicycle and entwines elements of a bygone era with a touch of whimsy. ecochic.com.au 04: Another piece from the Lexicon wall art collection, Jungle Telegraph showcases a resplendent gathering of exotic rainforest birds juxtaposed with natural and man-made jungles, with a hint of the unexpected. ecochic.com.au 05: The Pascal features a sturdy hardwood frame that reveals the natural timber grains which add texture to the sleek profile. vastinterior.com.au 06: An acacia veneer gives the Bruno a hint of British colonial style. vastinterior.com.au 07: The Alberobello pouf is made from recycled jute and sari silk, which ticks all the eco-friendly boxes. vastinterior.com.au 08: Well-worn, weathered and industrial, the Artist buffet features timber panelling with steel legs. vas vastinterior.com.au 09 09: The Hex stool is a tactile piece tha that showcases one of the most du durable structures in nature, the he hexagonal cell. ecochic.com.au 10 10: The Caribbean mirror reflects a bo bohemian lifestyle and lends a touch of exotic flair. It’s ethically sourced an and handmade. ecochic.com.au 11: The steel base and ceramic finish n of the Londolozi lamp strike the perfect balance between du durability and design. ec ecochic.com.au


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WHAT’S HOT

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oak and stainless steel, it features a unique form that allows it to be freestanding. top3.com.au 15: The mango hardwood-framed four-poster bed creates a sensual cocoon of comfort and relaxation. vastinterior.com.au

09

12: This beautiful piece uses recycled wood and ethically sourced capiz to create a unique bowl. ecochic.com.au 13: Sturdy mango hardwood provides a warm, natural base for the hand-painted patterns on this buffet/sideboard. vastinterior.com.au 14: The B desk is designed for Universo Positivo by Peter Hertel and Sebastian Klarhoefer. Crafted from

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05

WHAT’S HOT

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TINA STEPHEN roomie.co.nz

GREENERY Pantone’s announcement of its colour of 2017 catapulted Greenery into our homes, embracing a grass roots resurgence of interior planting and jungle motif fabrics

0 7 07

08

ED I T E D BY / / T INA STE P H E N

09 10

11

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GRAND DESIGNS

01: This sweet mint green side table is the perfect pop of colour in a neutral living room. theaxe.co.nz 02: Dulux’s Chatto Creek is a vibrant and elegant green. dulux.co.nz 03: Dulux’s Heaphy Track is a soft, mossy green. dulux.co.nz 04: Dulux’s Kurow is a punchy and bright green. dulux.co.nz 05: Pillowcases from Bianca Lorenne portray verdant cascading foliage and bird life set on soft pastel cotton. biancalorenne.co.nz 06: Mondrian-esque shapes deliver multiple shades of green. designdenmark.co.nz 07: This handcrafted ceramic bowl with its scalloped edges and faceted planes is available in a vibrant retro green. rachelcarleyceramics.com 08: Moody forest greens are also on the modern palette; this salt and pepper grinder set from Menu is available at Let Liv. letliv.co.nz 09: This highly collectable mosaic plate from John Crichton references the Pan Pacific Modernist Movement and features a vibrant teal green background. mrbigglesworthy.co.nz 10: Evergreen peeks into botanicalinspired homes, rooftop gardens and edible patches of the urban landscape. paperplanestore.com 11: Emerald green and velvet combine in the elegant Akaroa sofa. theaxe.co.nz


WHAT’S HOT

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17 12: Auckland-based artist Flox delivers a motif of local native greenery in the form of a light box. flox.co.nz 13: The Andros pendant is modelled on traditional lampshade shapes but in a fun and eco-friendly version with cardboard. Available in bright primary colours including Kelly Green. afdstore.co.nz 14: Bonnie and Neil never fail to deliver the perfect linen cushion. This one features mossy-coloured floral motifs. bonnieandneil.com.au 15: Deep olive green bowls handthrown in recycled clay give a tactile matt exterior and supersmooth interior. reneeboyd.co.nz 16: The Zig Zag pouf is a playful response to the need for extra seating in a home, in vibrant handdyed wool with distinct circular pattern. bobandfriends.co.nz 17: The multicoloured lamellas on the Click sunlounger can be removed and replaced on the frame for a mixand-match option. danishfurniture.nz 18: Jungle foliage is everywhere in interiors, and this offering from Kico is a fresh take on a modern classic. kico.co.nz 19: The Ceropegia print by Studio Joop is one of a series which mixes different botanical prints that are perfect for those who like to be surrounded by plants, but somehow can’t seem to keep them alive. paperplanestore.com 20: This wide Contrast pendant in sage green powder-coated aluminium is the perfect contemporary addition to a modern dining room. cittadesign.com

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“Greenery bursts forth in 2017 to provide us with the reassurance we yearn for amid a tumultuous social and political environment,” says Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Colour Institute. “Satisfying our growing desire to rejuvenate and revitalise, Greenery symbolises the reconnection we seek with nature, one another and a larger purpose.”

12 GRAND DESIGNS

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WHAT’S HOT

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MARCELLE CANDY designerscandy.co.nz

JUST RELAX

Organic elements add a hint of restrained luxury and blur the boundary between indoors and out, creating a casual coastal sanctuary at home E D I TE D BY // MARCELLE CANDY 05

07

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GRAND DESIGNS

01: Ulysses Drum pendant. arteriorshome.com 02: Evergreen Foliage II giclée framed print. designerboyscollections.com 03: Evergreen Foliage I giclée framed print. designerboyscollections.com 04: Set of seven Ebony and Walnut geometric sculptures. arteriorshome.com 05: Lennon Slipper chair in Oatmeal and Ocean linen. boydblue.com 0 06: Herst marble lamp. a arteriorshome.com 0 07: Bombay Hurricane lamp with ttextured metal sleeve and polished n nickel finish. arteriorshome.com 0 08: Skyline Design Calyxto wing c chair and side table. boydblue.com 0 09: Charles tray in Antique Brass w with mirrored surface. a arteriorshome.com 110: Jali hand-carved mango wood m mirror with distressed white finish. b boydblue.com 111: Talo rug in hand-knotted bamboo ssilk. boydblue.com 112: Watercolour Sea Bird II giclée framed print. d designerboyscollections.com 113: Kathmandu ribbed and plain ssheesham wood picture frames with b bone edging. boydblue.com


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14: Taos pendant made from abaca rope on a painted metal frame. boydblue.com 15: Plantation dresser and bed in solid mahogany with close cane and rattan detail. boydblue.com 16: Talomie chair in solid mahogany and woven leather with English walnut ďŹ nish by Box Living. boydblue.com 11 13

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WHAT’S HOT

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LINDA DELANEY nsinteriors.com.au

THE GREEN Pantone’s 2017 Colour of the Year is all about new beginnings ED I T E D BY / / L IN DA D E L AN EY

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GRAND DESIGNS

07

01: The yellow-green hue of Pond Moss by Haymes Paint. haymespaint.com.au 02: Line cushion in green. top3bydesign.com.au 03: Cushion. ksl-living.fr 04: Lazer bar stool. satara.com.au 05: Artichoke ceramic tea light holder. tch.net 06: Take a Line for a Walk chair by Moroso. hubfurniture.com.au 07: Brilliant range of glass boxes with lids in colours inspired by gems and precious stones. top3.com.au 08: Scholten & Baijings for Moroso chair. hubfurniture.com.au 09: Bohème is a must-have modern furniture piece that brings cosiness and elegance to a contemporary living room. jetclassgroup.com 10: Satin bed linen. tom-tailor.com 11: Indoor bean bags. lujo.com.au 12: Paint Spot table lamp. beaconlighting.com.au 13: Apple Green rug by Little P. thepalmerstudio.com 14: Kitchen board in sustainable Tasmanian oak. downthatlittlelane.com.au 15: Gorgeous glass vases in three sizes. satara.com.au 16: Original Turkish towel. knotty.com.au 17: Gold-lined lampshade in Olive. lovefrankie.com


WHAT’S HOT

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PANTONE

15-0343 TCX Greenery 11 10

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The yellow–green hue of Greenery depicts the concept of the environment. While not a revolutionary idea, it does seem to have peaked this year. There is a growing desire to reconnect with nature and what is real. Greenery also taps into minimalism — buy less, choose well and make it last. GRAND DESIGNS

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IN PROFILE

Utopia Goods Australian flora and fauna bursting with life and colour WOR DS / / L AU RE N MC GARRY

T

PRODUCT DESIGNERS

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he creative duo behind Utopia Goods, Sophie Tatlow and Bruce Slorach, have made sure Australiana is front and centre in the design scene. Bringing the style back to life in the best way possible, we just can’t get enough. Sophie refers to her early years as a “career student”, and she has quite the collection of education merits to her name. Having studied at some of the best universities in Australia — in a diverse range of fields — Sophie has an education most people would love to have. From a Bachelor of Arts and Design Diploma through to a Masters of Arts and Writing, Sophie is armed with knowledge and style. Bruce is the visual creative behind the company. Having studied Fine Arts at the Victorian College of the Arts, he provides all the hand-drawn illustrations for Utopia Goods’ designs. Sophie refers to their style as “a whimsical mix of tradition and modern, imagined by Bruce in an illustrative form”. The pair, in both life and design, has been

working together since 2000. Their strong relationship and support of each other’s ideas has allowed their business to grow and develop. Along with working with some of the most renowned architects, designers and photographers in Australia, Sophie and Bruce have been able to use their creative time and space to develop Utopia Goods. The company pays homage to Australia’s native flora and fauna. Design inspiration comes solely from the Australian landscape, nature, flora, fauna and colours. “We reference different periods and styles and put them into a contemporary context of lots of kaleidoscope prints and textures to layer up,” says Sophie. Their desire to create something out of the box that will last and stand out from the crowd has resulted in the eclectic and unique pieces that make up their collections. So often, Australiana-style design makes you think of the dessert and baron lands, but this range brings all the elements of Australia into an extraordinary array of design products. utopiagoods.com


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IN PROFILE

Dessein Furniture Michele Chow brings new meaning to the notion of home-grown design WOR DS / / A N NA B E L L E C L O RO S PHOTOGRA PHY // HAYDN CAT TACH & CHRIS CRERAR

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INTERIOR DESIGNER

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hen a gap appears in the market, you’ve got to be quick to fi ll it or someone else will. With creativity strongly entrenched in her family, it’s no surprise Michele Chow decided to take a chance and launch Dessein Furniture. Michele grew up in Malaysia and was surrounded by makers, with an architect as a father and a dressmaker for a mother. “My passion for design stemmed from an early age,” she says. “When I was a young girl I knew I wanted to work in a creative field.” Inspired by the sketches and scaled models at her father’s studio and the dress patterns and fabrics in her family home, Michele went on to study interior architecture at the Curtin University in Western Australia. After completing her studies, Michele decided to hone her design skills abroad. “I took the opportunity to develop my passion in various practices in the UK, where my interest in furniture design flourished thanks to its easy access to Europe’s design hubs,” she says. After travelling back and forth across the globe between Malaysia, Australia and the

UK, Michele put down roots in Melbourne and established Dessein Furniture in 2013, with the goal to design and produce original pieces. Dessein’s collections are all about affordability, accessibility and sustainability with a contemporary core. Michele takes her design cues from the local scene as well as her travels. “I take inspiration and guidance from the values that are instilled in Scandinavian design as well as my own life experiences,” she says. “Functionalism, innovation, the simplification of forms and the use of natural materials are all important to me. The sole purpose of this approach is to improve our daily lives.” Already kicking goals, Dessein has collaborated with a range of designers and produced collections that have gone off with a bang. Of note is the Parawood range and the newly released Pieman Collection, which represent a transition in Dessein’s voice as a brand. It’s clear that Michele is just getting started, but if the past is anything to go by, Dessein is definitely a winner. desseinfurniture.com


IN PROFILE

“I take inspiration and guidance from the values that are instilled in Scandinavian design as well as my own life experiences” – Michele Chow

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IN PROFILE

Armadillo & Co The perfect mix of ethics and aesthetics WOR DS / / KAT E WAGN E R

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TEXTILE DESIGNERS

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ight years ago, Sally Pottharst and Jodie Fried were frustrated that they couldn’t find products on the market which combined ethics and aesthetics. Unable to source simple handmade, highquality and timeless designs, they decided to create their own — without compromising sustainability or social responsibility in the process — and Armadillo & Co was born. Jodie holds a Bachelor of Design from NIDA and Sally has extensive experience teaching art and design, however their process is far from calculated. “Sally and I rely heavily on working from instinct,” explains Jodie. “We draw inspiration from travel, textures and uncommonly beautiful details that speak to us. Our vision is global and we are inspired by all sorts of cultures and crafts, which we then manage to thread back into our work.” The combination of Sally’s education in South Africa and Jodie’s background in designing costumes for Bollywood films has undeniably culminated in an obsession with traditional cultures and exotic textures. “Every year we travel to India to gain inspiration and create new ideas for our products, always finding the best ideas when we are immersed in

Indian culture,” reveals Jodie. This annual pilgrimage has refined their design and material knowledge. Their recent Latitude collection welcomed products handknotted in pure wool, including the new customisable incarnation of Origami, which has a palette of up to seven colours. By taking inspiration from the craft of weaving itself, Sally and Jodie have perfected the art of unique design. Rather than catering specifically for consumers, Sally and Jodie use the collaboration between weaver and materials to create incredible designs, textures and colours. “More often than not, our most popular rugs are those that we loved and most wanted in our own homes,” says Jodie, and that’s because they put quality above profit. As the company has grown, and despite their commitment to design, Sally and Jodie have stated that reducing their resources and energy consumption is paramount. “We strive for our products and processes to leave as little impact on the earth as possible and use a ‘reuse, reduce and recycle’ philosophy,” assures Jodie. An organic, grass-roots product that’s as sustainable as it is beautiful? Now that’s something we can support.


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IN PROFILE

Daniel Emma Designs that are more than “just nice” WOR DS / / A N NA B E L L E C L O RO S

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PRODUCT DESIGNERS

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aniel Emma — formally known as Daniel To and Emma Aiston — established their namesake design studio in 2008. After a “series of serendipitous events” and completing their studies at the University of South Australia, the duo decided to set up their own practice as a vehicle to express their thoughts through design. Now residents at the JamFactory, a not-forprofit creative hub in Seppeltsfield, Adelaide, Daniel and Emma have been hard at work doing what they do best — creating. Along with producing their own pieces, the pair have worked with a melange of like-minded people and brands, including COS, Svbscription, Petite Furniture, Hay and Tait. They’ve also designed one-off pieces and limited runs for cultural institutions including the National Gallery of Victoria and Cooper Hewitt in New York. From furniture and lighting to accessories and textiles, Daniel Emma are all about working to a style they describe as “just nice”. “We look to create the unexpected from objects using simple forms and drawing influence and insight from the diverse culture

that Australia presents us with,” says Daniel. “For us, it is about longevity and creating honest work that is well crafted and will stay with their owners forever,” says Emma. With such an impressive range on offer, it’s hard to pick favourites. But when push comes to shove, there are a few pieces that take the cake. “Our Cork Cone and Magnetic Tower for Hay, Cherry light for Petite Furniture, Pick n Mix table and bench for Tait, as well as our self-produced D.E Desk pieces and soft chair [are our most popular designs],” says Daniel. The design studio recently celebrated eight years since its conception, and the brand is fast gaining momentum. We can’t wait to see what’s next. daniel-emma.com


IN PROFILE

“For us, it is about longevity and creating honest work that is well crafted and will stay with their owners forever” – Emma Aiston

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Horizon 1100 Double Sided with Gas Coals

TRUST JETMASTER TO MAKE A GRAND IMPRESSION


Kemlan Wood Burning Celestial 900 Inbuilt Slow Combustion

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92: TV STILT HOUSE 104: MOUNT ALBERT HOUSE 116: MOERAKI HOUSE

Project Moeraki House

128: PADDINGTON TERRACE

HOUSES

80: TV OCEAN SHORES CHIPBOARD HOUSE

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IF YOU ROLL WITH THE PUNCHES, YOU MIGHT END UP WITH SOMETHING GROUND-BREAKING, AND THAT’S EXACTLY WHAT HAPPENED WITH THIS INCREDIBLE HOUSE

GRAND DESIGNS

T V H O US E / / O C E A N S H O R E S C H I P B OA R D H O U S E

CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK

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DETAILS

HOUSE OCEAN SHORES CHIPBOARD HOUSE LOCATION OCEAN SHORES, NSW DATE COMMENCED MAY 2015 DATE COMPLETED MAY 2016 COST $570,000

LEFT The wedge shape of the home moves with the landscape BELOW Host Peter Maddison with homeowners Zewlan and Tom OPPOSITE Timber and chipboard combine to create a contemporary, fuss-free aesthetic

ED’S FAVE THE COMMON LIVING SPACE, WHICH IS BATHED IN NATURAL LIGHT AND REVEALS THE TRUE HEIGHT OF THE HOME WORDS / / A N NA B E L L E C L O RO S PHOTOG RAPHY / / N I C K W I L S O N

S

mall, simple and straightforward: you only need three words to define the Chipboard House. A craving for frugality paired with a difficult site and a tight budget fuelled the fire for this residence, which is home to Doctor Zewlan Moor, her sparky husband Tom Naulty and their two children Ramona and Reuben. After becoming consumed by the notion of living a fuss-free life in their chosen suburb of Ocean Shores, Zewlan stumbled across A-CH Architects during a research session. “I got obsessed by it all and read this book about small houses and thought, ‘That’s what we want to do — it’s affordable and suits our lifestyle’,” she says. The award-winning Keperra House caught her eye, so she called on architects Melody Chen and James Hung to turn her dream house into a reality. “It was refreshing to see a client who wanted a compact house and something that was designed to suit their lifestyle,” says Melody.

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A communal living space is ooded with natural light

Exposed chipboard forms much of the minimalist interior palette

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“FROM HUMBLE BEGINNINGS COMES A RICH SPACE — AN ELONGATED CORRIDOR THAT STRETCHES THE ENTIRE LENGTH OF THE BUILDING WITH A BACKBONE THAT’S DRENCHED WITH LIGHT” – PETER MADDISON GRAND DESIGNS

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With the odds stacked against it — think the sloping 140 square metre site (which is half the size of the typical Aussie home), proximity to the M1 motorway, and miniscule budget of $450,000 — the design is nothing short of remarkable. Described by Peter Maddison as “alarmingly small”, the home makes up for its compact nature with ocean views and a rainforest backdrop, — proudly marking itself as a “tiny footprint in paradise”, says Peter. An internal deck runs along the length of the wedge-shaped house, with all the amenities located along the back wall — a budget-and builder-friendly design consideration. Three bedrooms and a kitchen made of OSB (chipboard) peer north and the living area opens to a lounge, with the mezzanine/office/Zewlan’s hideaway suspended above. Sliding glass doors seal the lounge and mezzanine and a massive skylight stretches across the roof, flooding the home with natural light and encouraging an indoor–outdoor feel. The exterior is clad with concrete sheet, encasing the tiny home with a protective shell. A relatively smooth build, the home was done and dusted in just one year. With Tom project managing the site, with baby Reuben

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in tow, there were a few hiccups along the way, including the OSB being exposed to water damage and a few bumps with the bank — but other than that, progress was fast. The build began in May, the frames quickly went up and the second-level mezzanine was completed. By July, the Ampelite sheets — dubbed by Peter as “fibreglass with edge” — were on the roof, the chipboard was making its way onto the walls and the glaziers were on-site. Rising to a double height at one end, the home starts at the tail end of a crescendo before rising to the peak. “From humble beginnings comes a rich space — an elongated corridor that stretches the entire length of the building with a backbone that’s drenched with light,” says Peter. A complex space that’s humble in appearance, the radical design of the home has never been seen before, making it one of a kind — for now. “What they’ve achieved is a credit to them,” says Peter. “They’ve invested heavily in design to the point where they’ve reinvented how a house comes together. There’s a blurring of what is fabric and what is interior. I get this house. I understand it. And I think this is one of my favourites because of that legibility and the way it answers the homeowners’ lifestyle. It may be small, but boy does it pack a punch.”

DESCRIBED BY PETER MADDISON AS “ALARMINGLY SMALL”, THE HOME MAKES UP FOR ITS COMPACT NATURE WITH OCEAN VIEWS AND A RAINFOREST BACKDROP, — PROUDLY MARKING ITSELF AS A “TINY FOOTPRINT IN PARADISE”

TOP The study/library offers a quiet place to unwind and relax OPPOSITE TOP Bunkbeds are a space-saver in the kids’ bedroom OPPOSITE BOTTOM Blue bedding adds a calming ambience


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PROJECT TEAM

Architect A-CH (a-ch.com.au) Builder SJ Reynolds Constructions (sjrconstruct.com) Landscape architect Plummer & Smith (plummerandsmith.com.au)

A neutral bathroom ensures a classic look

Pops of greenery bring instant freshness to the bathroom

SERVICES Blocklayer Karl Steenson Blocklaying (0412 740 119) Electrics Haymans Electrical, Byron (02 6685 8728) Fasteners Magoos Fasteners (02 6680 8764) Fencing Online Fencing, Geoff Nichol (0404 484 018) Landscaper Gecko Landscape Solutions (geckolandscapesolutions.com.au) Steel fabrication Laurie Lang (0412 301 970) Roof Byron Coast Roofing, Adam Spires (0422 248 936) Painting Nathan Saunders Painting (0438 634 119) Plumbing Reece (reece.com.au); Jarrah Davidson Plumbing (0438 668 025) Structural engineer Northrop (northrop.com.au) Surveyors Canty’s Surveyors (02 6684 3400) Tiling Coastline Tiling, Karl Udale (0432 995 599) MATERIALS Building supplies Byron Bay Building Materials (02 6685 6399) Concrete Wayne Whelan Concreting (0418 771 653) Tiles Byron Bay Tiles (02 6685 7784) Timber Sarwood Timbers (sarwood.com.au) Power inverter Solax Hybrid Inverter (solaxpower.com.au) FIXTURES & FITTINGS Cabinets and joinery Workshop Joinery — Byron Bay (0412 283 446) Cladding JH Williams & Sons (wgau.com.au) Floors CM Timber Flooring (0402 298 008) Hot water system Apricus (apricus.com.au) Solar and battery Force Energy (forceenergy.com.au) FURNITURE & FURNISHINGS Flowers Beautiflora (beautiflora.com) Interior furnishings Cactus Hill Project (02 6684 6110) Upholstery Byron Upholstery (0421 990 785)

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1

ENTRY COURTYARD

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COURTYARD

3

DECK

4

LIVING ROOM

5

STORAGE

6

KITCHEN

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BEDROOM

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WALKWAY DECK

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10 11

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WC

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VANITY

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BATHROOM

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CARPORT

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MEZZANINE

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LEGEND

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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Colour Palette

Tranquillity is created using soft grey, olive green and the chipboard throughout the interior. Black behaves as an accent and the timber cannot be ignored. The greenery is brought into the home through the vast open spaces, windows and pot plants

WE LOVE THE WEDGE SHAPE OF THE HOME, WHICH PETER SAYS IS THE COOLEST WEDGE HE’S EVER SEEN

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Get the Look

01: Zulu rug. armadillo-co.com 02: Neel Indigo patchwork block-printed Kantha quilt. peacocksandpaisleys.com.au 03: Sinnerlig stool. ikea.com.au 04: Denon dining table. satara.com.au 05: PS 2017 side table. ikea.com.au 06: Parsley Porridge soap. lush.com.au 07: Dennis Marquart Rama chair. oxdenmarq.com 08: Meraki hand towels. designstuff.com.au 09: PS 2017 cushion. ikea.com.au 10: Davis & Waddell Acacia wood platter. petersofkensington.com.au

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N Z T V H O US E // STILT HOUSE

SimplicityBY THE SEA A MODEST FAMILY HOLIDAY HOME IS CONCEIVED AND BUILT IN THE SPIRIT OF A TRADITIONAL KIWI BACH FROM YESTERYEAR

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N Z T V H O US E // STILT HOUSE WOR DS // JOHN WILLIAMS

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uy Marriage is a lecturer in construction methodology at the Victoria University School of Architecture in Wellington, teaching his students how to design buildings that will “stand up”, as he puts it. Having never actually built a house himself, he was to put his knowledge and experience to test. “I think it’s the birthright and the want of every architect to build their own place,” says Guy. “I love the process of building and it’s a pity that so few architects participate in it.” Unable to finance his holiday home project independently, Guy pooled his resources with members of his extended Wellington-based family — cousin Briony Ellis and her husband Roger Wood — to design a modern-day Kiwi bach at Pukerua Bay, a half-hour drive north of the capital. The site itself was challenging for a number of reasons, not least the fact it sits right on the high water mark in an area renowned for ferocious storms and surging tides that are forever changing the shape of the coastline. But that’s only the half of it, explains Guy. “It’s got just about everything you could throw at a site. It’s in a tsunami zone, it’s a little bit

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unstable, and it’s susceptible to the odd shake or two, so it’s totally in the hazard zone.” “But that’s the price of the dream,” adds Briony. “I don’t see these as issues — they’re just parameters. “For me, it was the perfect chance to put my skills to the test,” says Guy. “In theory, I knew what to do.” To mitigate the effects of the unpredictable coastal conditions, Guy decided to build the house on a platform, supported by dozens of piles 5 metres above the current sea level. It comprises two distinct forms separated by a deck. “One half of the building, the ‘cottage’, has lines and proportions that refer back to the historic Maori Whare Whakairo form and the early settler’s cottage that was on the site,” says Guy. “The chimney breast outside references back to the DoC tramping huts found throughout New Zealand. The other side is taller, like a tower, and directly faces Kapiti, with its back against the hill of Pukerua. It aims to honour the landscape and the sea as well as make the most of the view. Overall, the building has been designed to fit into the context of the site, and not look out of place.”

DETAILS

HOUSE STILT HOUSE LOCATION PUKERUA BAY, NORTH ISLAND COST $160,000

ABOVE Located right on the high water mark, this was an extremely challenging site to build on OPPOSITE Simple construction methods using honest materials kept costs to an absolute minimum

“I THINK IT’S THE BIRTHRIGHT AND THE WANT OF EVERY ARCHITECT TO BUILD THEIR OWN PLACE” – GUY MARRIAGE


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“OVERALL, THE BUILDING HAS BEEN DESIGNED TO FIT INTO THE CONTEXT OF THE SITE AND NOT LOOK OUT OF PLACE” – GUY MARRIAGE

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WE LOVE THE CONTRAST OF THE DAVID TRUBRIDGE PENDANT WITH THE TIMBER PANELS ON THE WALL

Built-in furniture is not only a money saver, it also adds character and individuality

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The harsh coastal environment was also taken into account in the choice of interior and exterior materials. The cladding is corrugated aluminium, rather than corrugated steel, and the interior is all plywood. The budget for all this was a very lean $165,000. “We had to do it entirely on our savings, so we knew exactly how much we had to spend,” reveals Briony. Roger says they simply couldn’t afford to pay anyone to build the house, so part of the deal was that they had to be prepared to do it themselves, paired with the generosity of others. It was a plan that captured the true spirit of old-school New Zealand bach building, where you could cobble together a cheap holiday home in your downtime without much building experience or know-how. These days, however, it’s a little more complex because of modern building codes. And that’s where Guy’s expertise came in. With the piles in place — thanks to the help of some of Guy’s architecture students and Briony’s local cousins wheel-barrowing four tonnes of concrete from the end of the road to the site — and the plywood floor laid, the layout of the house began to take shape. The lack of direct road access also meant that craning in prefabricated framing was not an option, so the entire superstructure of the house had to be built piece by piece on-site. And because the site is in a high wind zone, the timber had to be thicker and heavier than normal, making the task even harder. It was at this point the trio’s neighbour, carpenter Jonny Clark, began taking an interest in the proceedings. “I’ve known the family for a long time,” says Jonny. “I just started checking on their progress every day after work, offering help and advice — it’s what you do for your mates. “I was raised to believe that if you have the capability to help someone, then you have a responsibility to do so,” he adds. From that point on, Jonny became the fourth member of the building team. “For me, it was a rare opportunity to be the primary builder on an out-of-the-ground build from start to finish and leave my signature on this landscape,” he says. According to Guy, he really enjoyed the chance to work and discuss building with Jonny. “It is not often that the architect gets to work alongside a builder and both can learn from each other,” he reflects. As the walls went up, the build process became quite organic, with the family tweaking the original plans, putting in a bigger window here and an extra door there. Without the advantage of having an architect as part of


GRAND DESIGNS

N Z T V H O US E // STILT HOUSE

A huge picture window is the dominant feature of the upstairs bedroom in the ‘tower’

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PROJECT TEAM Architect Guy Marriage, First Light Studio (firstlightstudio.co.nz) Builder Jonny Clark (kapiti.twilight@gmail.com) Clickraft Makers of Architecture (makersofarchitecture.co.nz) Engineer Chris Speed (dunningthornton.co.nz)

LEFT A simple deck connects the two halves of this bach, forming a sheltered place to eat and relax BELOW Although sparsely decorated, the interior still allows for a little luxury, such as these David Trubridge pendant lights

ED’S FAVE THE VIEWS OF THE OCEAN, WHICH ARE PUNCTUATED BY TIMBER

the team, these changes would have been prohibitive from a cost point of view, but their inclusion certainly benefited the final look and feel of the house. Internally, too, there’s a sense of evolution, with many of the finishing touches having been gathered from local recyclers, like Scaife Timber. “I was trying to re-create the feel of the baches from my childhood. For me, the whole aesthetic is about found objects, where things don’t match,” says Briony. “I love the fact that every piece has a story and has had a life before this, and that we’re now giving them a new life, with a new story.” There was innovation, too. The Pyroclassic ‘Mini’ fireplace, for example, was specially launched with this building, and is one of the world’s most efficient log burners. There is also the Click-Raft building system used in the ceiling of the tower. It is clever, lightweight, simple and beautiful. Both were invented and are still here, made in New Zealand. The eventual build went a little over time, but was brought in on budget — a remarkable feat given the cost of building a seaside home these days. However, it doesn’t take into account the huge number of people hours it took to build the house. And that comes down to the stamina, innovation and tenacity of owners Guy, Briony and Roger, and the generosity of their friends, colleagues and, in particular, their neighbour Jonny. The result is an ode to the classic Kiwi bach, punctuated by the addition of current building techniques. It is a curious hybrid of the traditional and the modern, a celebration of the classic Kiwi dream and a testament to the generosity of people.

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MATERIALS Recycled native timbers Scaife Timber (scaifetimber.com) Greenstone hook/Matika Jonny Clark (kapiti.twilight@gmail.com) Building wrap Pro Clima (proclima.co.nz) Building supplies Black Sheep (blacksheepconstruction.co.nz) Paint Resene (resene.co.nz) Scaffolding Kapiti Hire (kapitihire.co.nz) SERVICES Plumbing supplier Benson-Cooper Plumbing (benson-cooper plumbing.co.nz) Electrician Mark Minenkoff Engineer Chris Speed (dunningthornton.co.nz) Fire installation Wellington Fireplace (wellingtonfireplace.co.nz) FITTINGS & FIXTURES Heating/fireplace Pyroclassic (pyroclassic.co.nz) Tiles The Tile Space (tiles.co.nz) Custom windows Wood Workshop (woodworkshop.co.nz) Joinery — windows and doors Porirua Building Recyclers (buildingrecycler.co.nz) Interior finishing & kitchen cabinetry/worktops Neil Cromie (kapiti.twilight@gmail.com) Feature lighting David Trubridge (davidtrubridge.com) Lighting Ideal Electrical (ideal.co.nz) Plumbing fittings Porirua Building Recyclers Flue The Flue Shop (theflueshop.co.nz)


N Z T V H O US E // STILT HOUSE

LEGEND 1

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DINING ROOM

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KITCHEN

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WC

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BEDROOM

6

STUDY

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STORAGE

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BATHROOM

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BEDROOM

IT WAS A PLAN THAT CAPTURED THE TRUE SPIRIT OF OLD-SCHOOL NEW ZEALAND BACH BUILDING, WHERE YOU COULD COBBLE TOGETHER A CHEAP HOLIDAY HOME IN YOUR DOWNTIME WITHOUT MUCH BUILDING EXPERIENCE OR KNOW-HOW

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Colour Palette

Location appears to be the basis of this colour scheme. Blond timber is reminiscent of driftwood and black and grey from the stones on the beach. Furnishings in turquoise and yellow are a nod to the sun and the sea

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Get the Look

01: Psychedelia rug in yellow a and nd white. in-spaces.com in-spaces.co davidtrub bridge.com 03: Hinaki light in 02: Coral light in Natural. davidtrubridge.com Painted Black. davidtrubridge.com 04: 0 Acapulco chair in La Perla White. acapulcochair.com.au 05: Ka ate & Kate Original throw thr Kate rug. designstudiohome.com.au designstudiohome com au 06: Linen Lu Luca uca cushion cushion. eadielifesty eadielifestyle.com.au 07: Eames chair in white. matisse.co.nz 08: Bespoke dining table. rawsunshinecoast.com.au 09: Barcelona chair. knoll.com 10: Norraker bench. ikea.com 11: Angsskara quilt. ikea.com

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0508 800 755

HENDERSON

A unique thermally broken and contemporarily designed joinery suite, that adds to the insulation of your home Nulook Henderson P 09 837 3491 F 09 837 3492 E hulme@xtra.co.nz

www.nulook.co.nz


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PROJECT // MO UN T A LBE RT H OUS E

CUBIST THINKING

THIS DELIGHTFULLY PROPORTIONED, MODERN HOME IS THE PERFECT FIT FOR ITS AUCKLAND FAMILY

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PROJECT // MO UN T A LBE RT H OUS E

ED’S FAVE THE OUTDOOR COURTYARD, WHICH CAN BE ENJOYED FROM THE OPEN LIVING SPACE

WOR DS // JOHN WILLIAMS PHOTOGRA PHY // JAMIE C OBEL

W

hen builder Nye O’Shannessy and his designer wife Claire bought their 1940s bungalow in suburban Mount Albert, they were faced with a common scenario for Auckland homeowners — a large section with a modest house sitting somewhere in the middle. The question was how to maximise their investment and still leave room for a decent-sized family home. With the new Unitary Plan now in force in Auckland, the pressure is on to intensify housing in the suburbs, so subdivision was an obvious and straightforward option for the couple and their two young daughters. “After a bit of thought, we decided to move the original house to the back of the section and build a new house at the front,” says Nye. “While we were building our new home, we lived in the old house.” Being a builder, Nye had all the necessary skills to construct his home exactly how he

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wanted, and to the standard he chose. What he didn’t have was the design expertise to realise his dream. That’s when he brought in architect Jan Bernau. “I’d worked with Jan before — particularly on this really tight site in Point Chev, where he’d used the space really well, which is exactly what we needed,” says Nye. “My immediate thought was a courtyard house,” says Jan. “It was a small parcel of land, hemmed in on three sides by its neighbours, and there were no views to look out to. It’s like meditation … you want to look in, not out,” he adds. Nye’s brief to Jan was fairly basic. Primarily, he wanted to maximise the living spaces. Other than that, his requests were modest — a separate master suite, tucked away from the rest of the house, two identical bedrooms (to avoid arguments) for his children with a shared bathroom, and a TV lounge that could function as a fourth

DETAILS

HOUSE MOUNT ALBERT HOUSE LOCATION MOUNT ALBERT, AUCKLAND

“THERE WERE NO VIEWS TO LOOK OUT TO. IT’S LIKE MEDITATION … YOU WANT TO LOOK IN, NOT OUT” – JAN BERNAU


Access to the private courtyard is via an unobstructed, 11-metre aperture in the main living pavilion

The outdoor dining area is lined with triangular bluestone paving

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“THE FORM OF THE BUILDING I DESIGNED IS BASED AROUND INTERLOCKING THREE CUBES,” SAYS JAN. “EACH REPRESENTS A DIFFERENT FUNCTION — LIVE, SLEEP, STORE — AND IS DEFINED BY THREE CONTRASTING MATERIALS: CONCRETE, WOOD AND METAL” – JAN BERNAU

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PROJECT // MO UN T A LBE RT H OUS E

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bedroom. Not to forget a double garage, where Nye could store the tools of his trade. “The form of the building I designed is based around interlocking three cubes,” says Jan. “Each represents a different function — live, sleep, store — and is defined by three contrasting materials: concrete, wood and metal. The shape and size of these volumes was partly determined by the height-toboundary relationships with its neighbours.” The boxes are nestled together, creating a series of private, open spaces as they overlap each other. At the front of the house, beside the garage box, there’s a welcoming entry courtyard. The main outdoor living courtyard is located centrally, and there’s a small northfacing service area for drying and airing clothes at the confluence of the living and sleeping boxes. For the living box, Nye was determined to try his hand at board-formed, in-situ concrete — not an easy or cheap option. But being a builder, he had the skill set, and he could also absorb some of the costs. “It’s something I’ve always wanted to do,” he says. The concrete creates visual strength for the centre of the house, like a bunker from which the metal box (garage) at the front and the wooden box (bedrooms) at the back can hang

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off. The thermal property of the concrete also offers a stable climate within the living areas. The resulting footprint is relatively small for a three-bed family home — just 180sqm — but it makes up for its size with an efficient use of space. There is very little wastage and hardly any traffic areas. “Why waste space with corridors?” remarks Jan. “I also saved space by using built-in furniture and storage. Aesthetically, I think it’s much nicer to look at a piece that has been specifically designed to fit into the space, rather than something that doesn’t quite fit or look good. It costs less, too. I try to use every square centimetre — German efficiency,” he laughs. But this house is not just about spacesaving. Nye was also keen to make his new home as energy efficient as possible. “We opted for one single power plant that services the heating and the hot water, which totally makes sense,” he continues. “Normally, you’d be told you have to have two units because of the different temperatures required for heating and hot water, but it makes more sense to have one integrated unit to do everything.” A large bank of photovoltaics on the roof, all of which can be independently controlled from a smartphone app, supplements the

WE LOVE THE CONTRAST BETWEEN TIMBER, METAL AND CONCRETE

ABOVE Built-in furniture was used wherever possible. It fits the space, looks good, and is cost-effective OPPOSITE TOP The TV lounge can be completely opened up or closed off from the main living area thanks to a sliding wall OPPOSITE BOTTOM The extractor unit above the kitchen island, in black tubular steel, was custom designed by the homeowner


PROJECT // MO UN T A LBE RT H OUS E

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PROJECT TEAM Architect Jan Bernau

ABOVE The downstairs shared bathroom sits between the two children’s bedrooms LEFT The balcony, off the upstairs master bedroom, has solid balustrades that shield the occupants from neighbours below OPPOSITE The master suite occupies the entire top floor of the house, and comprises a bedroom, walk-in wardrobe and bathroom

power needs of the family.. “In the summer months we often don’t pay anything for electricity,” says Nye. “We even get a small credit back from the power company, thanks to the inverter pushing back power to the grid.” Nye says the cost benefit of setting up the control system was a long-term investment. However, he reckons that being able to regulate the heated towel rails alone will pay for the entire control system within 10 years. All in all, this is a very smart house in

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many ways. It’s as much as a family needs — nothing more, nothing less — and it’s delivered in an aesthetically pleasing package. Jan goes a step further, saying it’s his favourite of all the houses he’s designed. Why? “Because they let me do what I wanted,” he says. “Nye and Claire were very easy to deal with and they knew what they wanted. Nye is a perfectionist, so I knew no corners would be cut. A lot of hard work and love has gone into this house. Technically, it’s spot on.”

FIXTURES & FITTINGS Cladding — cedar Rosenfeld Kidson (rosenfeldkidson.co.nz) Zinc Metal Design Solutions (metaldesignsolutions.co.nz) Window/door joinery Hulme Aluminium (hulmealuminium.co.nz) Benchtops Absola Stone (absola.co.nz) Splashback and tiles Mosaic Earth Tiles (middleearthtiles.co.nz); Artedomus (artedomus.co.nz) Oven, stove, dishwasher and refrigerator Fisher & Paykel (fisherpaykel.com/nz) Taps, shower fittings, bath, basin, toilet and taps Robertson (robertson.co.nz) Roof Alpine Roofing (alpineroofingco.com) Paints Resene (resene.co.nz) Control systems Evident (evident.co.nz)


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PROJECT // MO UN T A LBE RT H OUS E

LEGEND

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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FIRST FLOOR PLAN

Colour Palette

Colour reflects the materials chosen here. Concrete is mirrored in grey soft furnishings. The honeycoloured timber is reflected through the yellow and rust cushions. The dark grey steel is seen through black and chocolate accents. Green and blue are a nod to the natural surrounds

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Get the Look

01: Reminiscent canvas. united-interiors.com.au 02: Reindeer hide. thedesignhunter.com.au com.au 03: Tom Dixon Copper Shade pendant. ecc.co.nz 04: Sheepskin hide rug. zanui.com.au 05: Piper washed linen cushion. globewest.com.au 06: Ninety coffee table. oxdenmarq.com 07: Errol sofa. jardan.com.au 08: House Doctor Korbe basket set. einrichten-design.de

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S I M P L I C IT Y BY DE S I G N I T ’ S T H E D E TA I L S W E O B S E S S O V E R T H AT S E T U S A PA R T

12495_FPD_GD

Discover our range of expertly designed products at fisherpaykel.co.nz/simplicity


PROJECT // MOERAKI HOUSE

SMALL HOUSE, BIG IMPACT

ARCHITECTURALLY DESIGNED AND SELF-BUILT ON A TINY SITE, THIS PINT-SIZED HOUSE SHOWS WHAT CAN BE ACHIEVED WITH A LITTLE THOUGHT AND A LOT OF EFFORT

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PROJECT // MOERAKI HOUSE

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PROJECT // MOERAKI HOUSE

WE LOVE THE RICH CONTRAST OF TIMBER AGAINST THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

WOR DS // JOHN WILLIAMS

A

fter two-and-a-half years living and working in Melbourne, Sam and Tania Blatch returned home to the small fishing village of Moeraki on the north Otago coast to take over the running of the local pub, the Moeraki Tavern, from Tania’s parents. Soon after returning, the couple decided to investigate the possibility of adding value to the tavern, both in terms of functionality and potential resale, by building owner’s accommodation on site. The tavern and its car park sit on the level area of the site at the foot of a hill, just a few metres from the shoreline, so there was no room to develop the land further. Above it, however, a small parcel of land offered the opportunity they were looking for, given the right design. Luckily, Tania’s brother, Regan Johnston, is an architect. Even luckier, one of his specialities is designing small houses. “We’d seen a bach he’d done down at Taieri Mouth,

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south of Dunedin, and we liked the simplicity of that, so we asked him to design us something along similar lines,” says Sam. “We wanted three bedrooms and good views, but left the aesthetics up to Regan. I also wanted the house to be made mainly from timber, inside and out, so I could take on as much of the work as possible,” he adds. Sam is a carpenter by trade and, to cut costs, he planned to work on building the house between shifts down at the pub. “Apart from the earthworks and craning in the aluminium windows and joinery, I figured all I’d needed was the help of a few casual labourers, a plumber and an electrician. I could do the rest myself,” he says. Everything was falling into place. Regan drew up the concept plans and Sam began the consenting process with the local council. And that’s when they ran into a problem. “Moeraki has known land stability issues, which put the build price up, so we decided to

DETAILS

HOUSE MOERAKI HOUSE LOCATION MOERAKI

ABOVE The house gives little away as you approach the front entrance OPPOSITE There was only a small footprint of land to build on, which determined the size and shape of the home’s floor plan


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“WE’D SEEN A BACH [ARCHITECT REGAN HAD] DONE DOWN AT TAIERI MOUTH, SOUTH OF DUNEDIN, AND WE LIKED THE SIMPLICITY OF THAT, SO WE ASKED HIM TO DESIGN US SOMETHING ALONG SIMILAR LINES” – SAM BLATCH

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ABOVE A large picture window in the lounge had to be braced by steel cables LEFT The mezzanine floor above the kitchen has a built-in desk space along its leading edge

scratch it,” says Sam. This derailed the project for a full two years. “But then we thought about it again and came to the conclusion that it would make more sense to build the house, as it would make the tavern a more functional and attractive package if we came to selling the property. So we brought it back to life and had Regan undertake the full construction drawings.” So how did they resolve the instability issues? “Provisions were made that allow the house to be re-levelled on its piles, should the land move in the future,” says Regan. “We didn’t use a standard pile configuration — instead we sunk a series of piles around the perimeter of the house and floated it, via long beams, on these piles. If the house ever needs levelling, you simply jack it up to the desired level, drill new holes through a metal connection bracket into each pile, then bolt the house back on.” With the potential instability problem solved, Regan could now complete the construction drawings and work could get underway. Because Sam was taking on the

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PROJECT // MOERAKI HOUSE

“BECAUSE SAM WAS BUILDING THE HOUSE HIMSELF, WE CHOSE TO USE PROPRIETARY FIXTURES, FITTINGS AND MODULES, WHICH SAVED MONEY AND LIMITED THE USE SOME OF THE EXPENSIVE SUB-TRADES” – REGAN BLATCH

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The ground-floor master bedroom opens straight out onto the deck

PROJECT TEAM

Architect Regan Johnston

lion’s share of the work himself, he scheduled the build to be carried out during the offseason at the tavern. “We started in August, with a five-month build schedule,” says Sam. “The Christmas deadline was immovable, because after Christmas it gets kind of crazy down here.” Sam had never project-managed and built a full house for himself before, but that didn’t faze him. “One of the main challenges I had to deal with was juggling my commitment to running the tavern with the building of the house,” he says. “There were 16-hour days for months on end, dashing up and down the hill to work on the house between shifts at the pub — and Tania was pregnant with our second child at the time.” Thankfully, there were no major hiccups during the build, and Sam said he enjoyed being back on the tools again. “There were a couple of close calls the day we craned in the two 600kg front windows,” remembers Sam. “We had to pull back a couple of times because of the wind. That was a bit of a nervous day.” The budget went well, too. Because Regan had detailed such a simple house from the

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outset, it was a relatively cheap build. The large picture window at the front of the house, for example, uses post-tensioned steel cables to brace the structure. The alternative would have required a steel portal up the wall and across the roof — a far more expensive solution. “Because Sam was building the house himself, we chose to use proprietary fixtures, fittings and modules, which saved money and limited the use of some of the expensive subtrades,” explains Regan. “There was no need for a tiler, for example, because we chose an all-in-one shower unit, which Sam just dropped into place.” Energy efficiency was also considered by the architect. The finished house is heavily insulated and orientated in the right direction — away from the cold southerly winds — and there are lots of windows to the north-east to take advantage of solar gain in the winter. Operable windows at lower level and skylights in the roof provide natural ventilation in the summer, all of which are double-glazed. So the house came in pretty much on budget. What about Sam’s Christmas deadline? “We moved in on Christmas Eve,” smiles Sam. “The last week was pretty stressful and I had some early-morning finishes putting final touches to the house — it was like an episode of The Block!” Sam can be justifiably proud of what he has achieved here in Moeraki. There aren’t many people who can walk into their home and say, “I built this.”

SERVICES Landscape contractor Rob Lark, Central Oak Landscapes (0413 052 377) Concrete contractor Bellamy Concrete (bellamyconcrete.com.au) Decorative steel contractor Vincenzo Botte, By Vincenzo (0420 338 000) Structural and hydraulic engineer Bruce Lewis, Peninsula Consulting Engineers (0424 253 818) Geotech engineer Ben White, White Geotechnical Group (0417 968 395) FIXTURES & FITTINGS Bathroom fittings Mahak Attique, Candana (candana.com.au) Kitchen appliances Lucy Pollicina, Winning Appliances (winningappliances.com.au) Timber flooring Australian Architectural Hardwoods (02 6562 2788) Lighting Glenn Stokes, LA Lounge (0415 446 227) Joinery Greg Coure, Timberline Joinery (0414 597 510) Carpet Adam Lawson, Max Lawson’s Carpet (02 9905 7733) Stone Bobby Choroomi, Granite and Marbleworks (0418 271 559) Tiles Chloe Bollinger, Living Tiles (02 9818 0000) Door hardware Brett Papworth, Style Finish (02 9957 6344)


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PROJECT // MOERAKI HOUSE

LEGEND

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

ED’S FAVE THE PARED-BACK INTERIOR, WHICH LETS THE HOUSE STEAL THE SPOTLIGHT The Moeraki Tavern is just a short stroll down the hill from the house

Colour Palette

Like a cabin, this house is all about timber and bush. Nature reigns supreme through vast windows, bringing in the ocean and the trees. White ceilings and grey floors provide contrast to the cladding and black furnishings tie in with the thick black architraves that frame the view

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PROJECT // MOERAKI HOUSE

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Get the Look 01: Tula rug in grey. therugseller.co.uk 02: Conveyor or hite shelving unit. freedomfurniture.co.nz 03: Phendei white plate collection. thedesignhuntershop.com.au 04: Clay linen quilt cover. kipandco.com.au 05: Plushious velvet Navy Blue cushion. frenchbedroomcompany.co.uk 06: Rose Pink velvet hrow. cushion. idyllhome.co.uk 07: Antigua Dove Grey linen throw. coastnewzealand.com 08: Bogart Block three-seater sofa. m.au globewest.com.au 09: Savoy leather chair. schots.com.au ping 10: Montego dining table. globewest.com.au 11: Chopping board. soakstudio.etsy.com

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PROJECT // PA D D I N GT ON T E RRAC E

TRANSFORMER AN ICONIC TERRACE IS PEELED BACK AND PUT BACK TOGETHER AGAIN

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A Tiffany blue door is a signal of good things to come

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WOR DS / / A N NA B E L L E C L O RO S

T

errace houses are integral to the Sydney ethos, lining the streets with history and character. Architect Annabelle Chapman secured herself a diamond in the rough that had been stripped of its original details, but this didn’t stop her from drawing up a plan to rebuild the residence and restore it to its former glory. They say visualisation is the key to making things happen, and in this case it certainly worked. Before Annabelle took the leap and purchased the Paddington house in 2013, she designed it in its entirety — essentially turning her vision into reality. “The final design was almost identical to the initial sketch plan,” she says. The terrace was renovated for the worse in the ’70s, with the removal of original internal details and some external details, too, but when life gives you lemons, make lemonade — or in this case, start from scratch.

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The brief revolved around creating a three-bedroom, three-bathroom house (it was originally two bedrooms) on different levels for Annabelle and her family. “The brief also included the total renovation of all the living areas, which resulted in the demolition and rebuilding of the entire house, keeping only the existing front and side walls of the terrace,” says Annabelle. “I wanted to create a contemporary space using steel, recycled ironbark and concrete as the main materials. As it was a terrace house, with an internal width of just over 4 metres, it was important to design the space with minimalism.” Beginning the project in January 2015, the build was a collaborative effort and the home was signed, sealed and delivered in February 2016. “I had great rapport with the builder and all the workmen on the project,” says Annabelle. “I was on-site almost every day for an hour or so in the

DETAILS

HOUSE PADDINGTON HOUSE LOCATION PADDINGTON, SYDNEY DATE COMMENCED JANUARY 2015 DATE COMPLETED FEBRUARY 2016 COST $1.7 MILLION

ABOVE The front living room offers a spot to enjoy the fireplace OPPOSITE Clusters of art add vibrancy and personality on the trip up the stairs


PROJECT // PA D D I N GT ON T E RRAC E

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PROJECT // PA D D I N GT ON T E RRAC E

WE LOVE THE ARCHITECTURAL STEEL STAIRCASE THAT CAME ALL THE WAY FROM ITALY

“THE STAIRS CAME IN FIVE LARGE SECTIONS AND WERE HAND-WELDED ON-SITE BY FIVE ITALIANS MUTTERING TOGETHER WITH THE ODD CIGARETTE HANGING OUT OF THEIR MOUTHS!” – ANNABELLE CHAPMAN morning on my way to work.” One of the greatest parts of building a new house is seeing it all come together, and thanks to the heavy use of concrete in the design, the architect was able to bear witness to the home coming to life. “My favourite parts of the project were the concrete pours, as the building changed quickly and the floors were instantly created,” she says. “Additionally, the arrival and installation of the steel stairs was very exciting. The stairs came in five large sections and were hand-welded on-site by five Italians muttering together with the odd cigarette hanging out of their mouths!” Broken up into common and private sections, the living area is the hub of the home and features the steel staircase which leads to the upper three levels that house the bedrooms. “The staircase provides a sculptural element to the space,” says Annabelle. “There’s also a light well

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PROJECT // PA D D I N GT ON T E RRAC E

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PROJECT // PA D D I N GT ON T E RRAC E

RIGHT The design of the home embraces the concept of indoor–outdoor living

“I WANTED TO CREATE A CONTEMPORARY SPACE USING STEEL, RECYCLED IRONBARK AND CONCRETE AS THE MAIN MATERIALS” – ANNABELLE CHAPMAN

fi lling the house with uninterrupted northern light.” The kitchen and dining room are located half a level down from the central living room, but all the spaces are connected by the same vein. “The floors, walls and ceilings to the kitchen and living areas are predominantly polished and off-form concrete,” explains Annabelle. “Aluminium sliding doors stack away and open up the rear section of the house to the polished concrete rear terrace.” Far from being a one-trick pony, the Paddington Terrace isn’t just special because of its enviable location — it’s a compact capsule of the essence of Sydney living. Thoughtful in its approach, the home is minimalist in design but maximalist at heart.

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PROJECT // PA D D I N GT ON T E RRAC E

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PROJECT TEAM Architect and interior designer Annabelle Chapman, Annabelle Chapman Architect (achapmanarchitect.com.au) Builder Nick Cockle, Cockle Constructions (0419 694 470)

LEFT Fish scale tiles are an elegant touch in the bathroom OPPOSITE LEFT The fish trap pendant is a bespoke piece

SERVICES Landscape contractor Rob Lark, Central Oak Landscapes (0413 052 377) Concrete contractor Bellamy Concrete (bellamyconcrete.com.au) Decorative steel contractor Vincenzo Botte, By Vincenzo (0420 338 000) Structural and hydraulic engineer Bruce Lewis, Peninsula Consulting Engineers (0424 253 818) Geotech engineer Ben White, White Geotechnical Group (0417 968 395) FIXTURES & FITTINGS Bathroom fittings Mahak Attique, Candana (candana.com.au) Kitchen appliances Lucy Pollicina, Winning Appliances (winningappliances.com.au) Timber flooring Australian Architectural Hardwoods (02 6562 2788) Lighting Glenn Stokes, LA Lounge (0415 446 227) Joinery Greg Coure, Timberline Joinery (0414 597 510) Carpet Adam Lawson, Max Lawson’s Carpet (02 9905 7733) Stone Bobby Choroomi, Granite and Marbleworks (0418 271 559) Tiles Chloe Bollinger, Living Tiles (02 9818 0000) Door hardware Brett Papworth, Style Finish (02 9957 6344)

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PROJECT // PA D D I N GT ON T E RRAC E

LEGEND 1

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BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN

MASTER BEDROOM WALK IN ROBE

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ED’S FAVE THE RECREATION OF THE TERRACE’S FAÇADE, WHICH IS IN LINE WITH THE ORIGINAL THAT ONCE SAT IN ITS PLACE

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Colour Palette

Colour plays a significant role when creating a contemporary space in a terrace house. Charcoal and Tiffany blue achieve this on the exterior. Inside, stark white walls are combined with concrete and black and the brick work is reflected in the artwork. The pistachio rug provides a hint of the past

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PROJECT // PA D D I N GT ON T E RRAC E

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Get the Look 01: Hot & Sultry canvas. united-interiors.com.au 02: Wicker Bell pendant. cranmorehome.com.au 03: Bellini Tall stool in American walnut with Kalamata top. nooknook.com.au 04: Persian throw. eagle-products.de 05: Barnsbury dining table. freedom.com.au 06: Enzo mirror. oďŹ cinainglesa. com 07: Classic CafĂŠ dining chair in Walnut. westelm.com.au 08: Charlie sofa. fanuli.com.au 09: Floating Gems rug. tibetsydney.com.au

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152: BLACK ROCK TOWNHOUSE

Photography Stu Morley

162: EICHARDT’S PRIVATE HOTEL

INTERIORS

142: ROCKY MOUNTAIN RETREAT

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INTERIOR PROJECT / / RO C K Y MO U N TA I N R E T R E AT

Twin Peaks

AN AUSTRALIAN DESIGNER CREATES A KIWI GEM GRAND DESIGNS

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A timber-lined ceiling ties in with the walls and floor

DETAILS

HOUSE ROCKY MOUNTAIN RETREAT LOCATION QUEENSTOWN COST UNDISCLOSED

WO R DS / / L AU RE N MC GARRY P HOTO G RA P H Y / / MARINA MATH EWS

L

ocated on a mountainside in Queenstown, New Zealand, this residence’s interior was designed by Di Henshall, one of the Sunshine Coast’s most sought-after designers. Surrounded by mountains, cliffs and lakes, Queenstown boasts an enviable backdrop. The clients called on Di to create a home they would be able to enjoy all year round. “They wanted a minimal, simple yet elegant family home that would accommodate household activities in addition to sophisticated cocktail parties,” says Di. The design revolved around the use of space rather than just its visual appeal. The clients required plenty of room for their children to enjoy time together as well as separately. The home needed to tick all the boxes for family occasions and possess all the goods for entertaining. Being a completely new build, there were plenty of questions as to how this mammoth idea would come to

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The home seamlessly blends into the natural landscape


INTERIOR PROJECT / / RO C K Y MO U N TA I N R E T R E AT

A wine cellar is a must for any enthusiast

ED’S FAVE THE VIEWS OF THE STUNNING SCENERY, WHICH CAN BE ENJOYED THANKS TO THE FLOOR-TOCEILING WINDOWS

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WE LOVE THE GENEROUS DINING TABLE THAT EXTENDS ACROSS THE ROOM

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INTERIOR PROJECT / / RO C K Y MO U N TA I N R E T R E AT

“THEY WANTED A MINIMAL, SIMPLE YET ELEGANT FAMILY HOME THAT WOULD ACCOMMODATE HOUSEHOLD ACTIVITIES IN ADDITION TO SOPHISTICATED COCKTAIL PARTIES” – DI HENSHALL GRAND DESIGNS

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INTERIOR PROJECT / / RO C K Y MO U N TA I N R E T R E AT ABOVE A moody bar offers plenty of room for entertaining

PROJECT TEAM

Architect Mason & Wales (masonandwales.com) Interior designer Di Henshall (dihenshall.com.au)

life. After months of discussions between the clients and the designer, a plan was developed and taken to the build team in New Zealand, where Di spent several months on location, ensuring the team understood the vision. To kick off the project, a building platform was put in place and pinned to the rock face. Then the three-storey home was created, featuring all the trimmings. It isn’t surprising that the sole inspiration for this project was the area’s picturesque location. Influenced by the elements and changing seasons, the interior palette takes its cues from the snow-capped mountains and green foliage, which all come together to create a rounded colour palette. “The essence of the home is one of cosiness, comfort and a retreat from the

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“THE ESSENCE OF THE HOME IS ONE OF COSINESS, COMFORT AND A RETREAT FROM THE OUTSIDE WORLD” – DI HENSHALL outside world,” says Di. “I used wools, felts, furs, velvets, leather and linens.” That being said, the elements play a massive role in the materials that were used in this build. New Zealand’s extremely hot summers and even colder winters made for some solid research into what materials would be best for inside and out. Di created test pieces for the exterior cabinetry, which she then left outside in the Queensland summer heat. Having created a unique home that’s one with the mountain it’s carved into, Di Henshall has designed a stunning piece of interior architecture that has never been seen before. A cut above the rest, this home is pure, unadulterated sophistication.

Colour Palette

Cream and shades of brown rule the day in this palette. The result is a cosy space that is warm and inviting. Pops of orange only enforce this notion. The neutral palette acts as a framework for the blue and green seaside landscape seen from the expansive windows


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INTERIOR PROJECT / / RO C K Y MO U N TA I N R E T R E AT

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Get the Look

01: Antler chandelier. rapideffects.com.au 02: Logan rug. therugseller.co.uk 03: Resin medium Modern Tribal platter. dinosaurdesigns.com.au 04: Arne Jacobsen by Louis Poulsen AJ oor lamp. cultdesign.co.nz 05: Gordon ottoman. ozdesignfurniture.com.au 06: Natural grey hide cushion. downthatlittlelane.com.au 07: Blue cushions. tom-tailor.com 08: Gus Adelaide sofa. globewest.com.au 09: Fur throw. domu.com.au 10: Studded stool in Ivory Ostrich print. frenchbedroomcompany.co.uk 11: Batari dining table. schots.com.au

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STARTING FROM SCRATCH A NEW START FOR A BLACK ROCK TOWNHOUSE

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INTERIOR PROJECT // BLAC K RO C K T OW N H OUS E

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ABOVE An open kitchen and dining area generates a free-flowing ambience BELOW Metallic accents bring a glamorous feel to the entry

WOR DS / / A N NA B E L L E C L O RO S P H OTO G RA P H Y / / STU MO RLEY

T

he waterside suburb of Black Rock, Melbourne, offers a peaceful sanctuary from the hustle and bustle of the CBD. Emerging triumphant from life’s challenges, the client wanted a fresh start and sought the expertise of interior designer Danielle Scandrett to bring her vision to life. The client shares the townhouse with her daughter, and all parties agreed to a brief that revolved around creating a classic but contemporary atmosphere that was equally as warm and inviting. “The owner was leaving a large Victorian-style home oozing with ornate features, large spaces and high ceilings,” says Danielle. “She wanted the new property to incorporate and display some of her favourite accessories and artworks.” Doors, downlights, mouldings, skirts, cabinetry, joinery and carpets were replaced and timber floors were re-stained. The existing rooms were gutted, reconfigured and redesigned to fall in line with the new aesthetic of the home.

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INTERIOR PROJECT // BLAC K RO C K T OW N H OUS E

DETAILS

HOUSE BLACK ROCK TOWNHOUSE LOCATION BLACK ROCK, MELBOURNE COST UNDISCLOSED

ABOVE The home is full of unique art pieces that bring layers of colour to the interior

When creating a new space there are often a few hurdles, and this renovation was no exception. As the townhouse shares a driveway and a common wall, Danielle had to be mindful and considerate of the neighbours during the renovation. Another challenge was addressing the existing staircase that featured a stainless-steel balustrade. “As the brief was to create an elegant and feminine environment, we had to decide how to handle the staircase, which ran from the basement theatre room and up three levels to the rooftop deck,” says Danielle. “We decided to replace the existing balustrade with a timber classic profi le and placed frosted film on the glass panels.” Inspired by the beachside location of the townhouse, the interior palette was influenced by the Hamptons, which worked seamlessly with the client’s art pieces and existing furniture collection. “The seaside location provided the inspiration for a sophisticated style of interior, allowing us to bring a more relaxed, elegant feel to the home,” says Danielle. “Our palette was generally based around warm greys, charcoals and fresh whites. The neutral base invited the introduction of rusts, shades of blue and mauves.” Along with a subtle colour palette, the materials selected ranged from grass cloth wallpapers through to handwoven rugs, porcelain tiles and Neolith and Caesarstone benchtops.

ED’S FAVE THE COCOONING THEATRE ROOM, WHICH OFFERS ANOTHER WORLD OF STYLE

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INTERIOR PROJECT // BLAC K RO C K T OW N H OUS E

“THE SEASIDE LOCATION PROVIDED THE INSPIRATION FOR A SOPHISTICATED STYLE OF INTERIOR, ALLOWING US TO BRING A MORE RELAXED, ELEGANT FEEL TO THE HOME” – DANIELLE SCANDRETT

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WE LOVE THE LIVING AREA AND ITS STATEMENT ARTWORK THAT TIES IN WITH THE POPS OF RED AND FLASHES OF BRIGHT WHITE IN THE FURNISHINGS

Struggling to pick a favourite part of the renovation, Danielle can’t go past the entrance and new front doors. “I love the drama of the entrance and am really excited about the new doors,” she enthuses. “They welcome light into an otherwise dark entrance and also bring some pattern and interest into the space. I also love the downstairs living room as it functions as an alternate area for the client’s daughter to relax with friends.” The master suite is another highlight of the project, which was completely gutted and redesigned to meet the client’s needs. It incorporates a touch of glamour through the metallic accessories and glass pendant light. The end result is a peaceful retreat that has lashings of colour, texture and mood.

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LEFT Double basins and mirrors ensure there's ample room in the luxurious bathroom ABOVE Layers of texture in the bedroom make for a cocooning space

PROJECT TEAM

Interior designer Danielle Scandrett (daniellescandrettinteriors.com.au)

Now happily ensconced in her home, the client couldn’t wait to make the move and settle into the space. A positive experience for Danielle and the client, the project came full circle in the best way. “Both my client and I had independently shared some recent life challenges, and the project was based on new beginnings for us both,” says Danielle. “The design, build and decoration process was a cathartic experience that brought us continual joy and laughter during some challenging times.”

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Colour Palette

Beige, taupe, chocolate and cream form the base of this palette. Cooler tones of steel, navy and lavender provide a freshness to the project while orange in the living area adds warmth


INTERIOR PROJECT // BLAC K RO C K T OW N H OUS E

01

02

03

04 10

05

Get the Look

01: Thierry B Euphoria, purple synthetic polymer paint on linen. thierrybfineart.com 02: Linacre pendant. cromwellaustralia.com.au 03: Anvil black leather chair. cromwellaustralia.com.au 04: Fornasetti No.155 and No.165 wall plates. amara.com 05: Arabesque grey rug. therugseller.co.uk 06: Bordeaux velvet cushion. idyllhome.co.uk 07: Humphrey Bogart console. cromwellaustralia.com.au 08: Circus pouf in Dark Red velour. curiousgrace.com.au 09: Yardley crystal table lamp. cromwellaustralia.com.au 10: Key Largo gold mirror. cromwellaustralia.com.au

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WOOLLAHRA 163 Edgecliff Rd, NSW CROWS NEST 113A Willoughby Rd, NSW RICHMOND 229 Swan St, VIC F O R T I T U D E VA L L E Y Shop 2, 826 Ann St QLD

1300 898 889 A CS BAT HROO MS. C O M .A U


View Collection at modabathware.com EXCLUSIVE TO ACS DESIGNER BATHROOMS


ES CAPE // E I C H A RD T ’S H OT E L

EICHARDT’S PRIVATE HOTEL A NEW STANDARD IN LUXURY

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ES CAPE // E I C H A RD T ’S H OT E L WOR DS / / T I NA STE PHE N

O

n the shores of Lake Wakatipu sits Queenstown’s iconic Eichardt’s Hotel, a heritagelisted building with an adjacent modern appendage, making it one of the world’s most sought-after luxury design hotels. While searching for pastoral lands in the 1800s, William Gilbert Rees settled into the site with a homestead and corresponding farm buildings. When gold was found in the nearby Shotover River, William’s property became the centre of a gold rush and the main centre of business quickly sprung up adjacent to the homestead. Seizing the opportunity, William redeveloped his home and woolshed as a hotel, initially called the Queens Arm, then later in 1869, when business partner Albert Eichardt became sole proprietor, the hotel was renamed Eichardt’s. Fast forward more than a century and Eichardt’s Hotel has undergone a complete transformation, with a fi rm focus on luxury, elegance and heritage. After the site sat unoccupied for almost half a century,

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current owners Andrew and Sarah Cox enlisted architect Michael Wyatt to create a world-class luxury facility and retail precinct, with a modern heritage and a strong connection to the past. In 2002, the Coxs embarked on the new concept which would take more than 10 years to complete, and includes a new appendage in striking contemporary grooved stonework and trapezoid windows. The cantilevered design is juxtaposed against the original historic hotel structure, and the flat-box aesthetic pays homage to the neighbouring buildings. The exterior cladding is a combination of Corten steel, Oamaru stone, as well as Colorsteel FlaxPod on the penthouse facade. Opening its doors in October 2016, the new luxury enclave instantly became an iconic local landmark, set on one of central Queenstown’s most significant sites overlooking The Remarkables. The precinct combines retail, hospitality and office space as well as an art gallery, which links to the hotel on the ground and second floors.

THE HOTEL OFFERS A RESPITE FROM THE HUSTLE AND BUSTLE OF QUEENSTOWN, WITH IMMEDIATE ACCESS TO THE AMENITIES OF THE CITY AND THE HARBOUR ABOVE Queenstown’s iconic steamship TSS Earnslaw is a daily sight within the ever-changing vista of Lake Wakatipu OPPOSITE LEFT Crackling fires are an essential element of the hotel’s ambience during winter OPPOSITE RIGHT The hotel houses several eateries, catering for guests throughout the day OPPOSITE BOTTOM Old meets new with floorto-ceiling glazing and exposed steel beams, offset by traditional tiling and furniture


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ES CAPE // E I C H A RD T ’S H OT E L

ABOVE The guest rooms exude luxury with layered textures and a warm, natural colour palette RIGHT Eichardt’s bar is the place to relax and unwind OPPOSITE Plush furnishings create an opulent atmosphere

Guests can enjoy traditional hotel suites, as well as lake-front apartments and the Eichardt’s private penthouse. The hotel is listed as a member of the Small Luxury Hotels of the World. The Cox’s enlisted interior designer Nina Bell of the Imperium Group to oversee the interior fit-out, with her brief focusing on sympathetically connecting the traditional elements of the heritage buildings into the new build spaces. The design focus for The Grille restaurant was a modern eatery modelled on traditional French bistro style and inspired by New York’s Balthazar Restaurant, a favourite of the Coxs. The overall aesthetic nods to the heritage of the original Eichardt’s building, and embraces the colours and materials evident in the surrounding Central Otago landscapes. Slate floors were installed to match and link with the existing Eichardt’s foyer, as well as extensive steelwork and aged New Zealand leather banquette seating. These main elements provided a strong, semi-industrial aesthetic, with a focus on large-scale dining and providing an elegant canvas for

the picturesque views of Lake Wakatipu. The owners’ vision was to blend the existing classical features of Eichardt’s with the look and feel of a luxury lodge, located in the urban setting of central Queenstown. For the guest suites and penthouse, privacy from the adjacent public spaces, without hindering the unsurpassed views, was one of the foremost challenges, which the architect tackled with extensive glazing and deck areas. While the suite interiors were closely modelled on the existing hotel design, the Penthouse took on a life of its own and was created to balance comfort and opulence in equal measure. Warm textures such as leather, velvet and possum fur were used extensively, and the colour palette was chosen to be calming and restful. The hotel is enchanting, with cosy nooks and roaring fi res, interiors which nod to the outdoors beyond, and a dramatic presence, both historical and modern, on the shores of Lake Wakatipu, arguably one of the most beautiful locations in the world. eichardts.com

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ES CAPE // E I C H A RD T ’S H OT E L

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Get the Look

01 & 05: Mirrors. interiordesignonline.co.nz 02: Axis side table. weekendtrader.net 03: Trafalgar Square lantern. trenzseater.com m 04: Washed velvet square stitch quilt. cittadesign.com 06: Tonk k stool. stclements.co.nz 07: Folio sofa. edito.co.nz 08: Lamp. interiordesignonline.co.nz

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SHOP ONLINE WWW.SCHOTS.COM.AU A. BENTLEY VINTAGE LEATHER DINING CHAIR RRP $749 B. KARIN RECYCLED WOOD SIDEBOARD RRP $2,499 C. BERKLEY ROUND RECLAIMED PINE DINING TABLE RRP $2,895

B.

C.

A.

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AUSTRALIA'S LARGEST RANGE OF LIGHTING ON DISPLAY

B.

D.

E. A.

C.

Bulbs not included. Sold separately. A.TEUFEL IRON PENDANT IN DARK GREY RRP $249 B. JENA IRON PENDANT IN RUSTIC WHITE RRP $269 C. PANZER IRON PENDANT IN MATT BLACK WITH TIMBER TOP RRP $279 D. WERNER BEATEN IRON PENDANT IN RAW FINISH RRP $229 E. TEMPLEHOF IRON PENDANT IN DARK GREY RRP $279

D. B.

E. C. A.

Bulbs not included. Sold separately. A. FLOAT GLASS PENDANT NO. 3 WITH ANTIQUE NICKEL RRP $159 B. LUXMORE GLASS PENDANT WITH ANTIQUE NICKEL RRP $249 C. SPHERE GLASS PENDANT WITH ANTIQUE BRASS RRP $129 D. MAURI GLASS PENDANT WITH ANTIQUE NICKEL RRP $129 E. FLOAT GLASS PENDANT NO. 2 WITH ANTIQUE NICKEL RRP $229

MELBOURNE 400 Hoddle Street, Clifton Hill, Melbourne ph 1300 774 774 GEELONG 299 Melbourne Road (off Mackey St), North Geelong ph 1300 693 693

www.schots.com.au


INDUSTRIAL & CONTEMPORARY - THOUSANDS OF LIGHTS TO CHOOSE FROM

F. C.

A. B.

D.

E.

Bulbs not included. Sold separately. A. LARGE HALMSTAD WHITE MARBLE PENDANT WITH BRASS RRP $69 B. BJORK WHITE MARBLE PENDANT RRP $89 C. LARGE OLI PENDANT IN BRASS RRP $59 D. BJORK BLACK MARBLE PENDANT RRP $89 E. SIMPLO WHITE MARBLE PENDANT CLEARANCE $41.40 F. MEDIUM OLI PENDANT IN COPPER RRP $49

A.

C.

D. B.

Bulbs not included. Sold separately. A. INDUSTRY METAL PENDANT IN ANTIQUE BLUE RRP $149 (AVAILABLE IN ANTIQUE GREEN & WHITE) B. EYE HOOK PENDANT IN GLOSSY WHITE RRP $249 (AVAILABLE IN GLOSSY BLACK) C. BASTILLE METAL PENDANT IN ANTIQUE GREEN RRP $129 (AVAILABLE IN ANTIQUE BLUE & WHITE) D. SALEN IRON PENDANT IN ORANGE CLEARANCE $95.40

*Prices are correct at time of printing and are subject to change without notice.

Schots Home Emporium | www.schots.com.au


AUSTRALIA'S LARGEST RANGE & STOCK OF VINTAGE TOP-GRAIN LEATHER FURNITURE

B.

B.

C.

A.

A. C.

A. CARESSA LEATHER ARMCHAIR IN DARK BROWN RRP $1,749 B. ALARIK IRON TABLE LAMP IN ANTIQUE BRASS RRP $89 C. CRABNEST IRON & JUTE BASKETS RRP FROM $49EA

A. BUTTON LEATHER ARMCHAIR IN VINTAGE CIGAR RRP $1,195 B. BARUK IRON TABLE LAMP IN ANTIQUE BRASS RRP $99 C. JAFAR JUTE RUG IN BLACK & NATURAL 135X80CM RRP $109

B. C.

B.

I.

A.

A.

A. WING LEATHER ARMCHAIR IN VINTAGE CIGAR RRP $1,795 B. WEAVE LEATHER & JUTE RUG IN BLACK 180X120CM RRP $199 C. MISCHA TABLE LAMP IN MATTE BLACK WITH SHINY COPPER RRP $169 (AVAILABLE IN OTHER FINISHES)

A. CLUB LEATHER ARMCHAIR IN VINTAGE CIGAR RRP $1,495 B. VIKKI IRON TABLE LAMP IN BLACK WITH MATTE BRASS RRP $249

MELBOURNE 400 Hoddle Street, Clifton Hill, Melbourne ph 1300 774 774 GEELONG 299 Melbourne Road (off Mackey St), North Geelong ph 1300 693 693

www.schots.com.au


MARBLE MID-CENTURY FURNITURE / HUGE RANGE OF STOOLS

D.

A. B.

E. C.

A. LARGE TARO STEEL SIDE TABLE WITH WHITE MARBLE TOP RRP $199 B. MEDIUM TARO STEEL SIDE TABLE WITH WHITE MARBLE TOP RRP $169 C. SMALL TARO STEEL SIDE TABLE WITH WHITE MARBLE TOP RRP $129 D. PERIN STEEL CONSOLE TABLE WITH WHITE MARBLE TOP RRP $349 E. NINA STEEL COFFEE TABLE WITH WHITE MARBLE TOP RRP $449

B.

D.

E.

F.

H.

G.

A.

C.

I.

A. NANI TEAK STOOL IN RUSTIC FINISH RRP $259 B. CHARLOTTE ELM BAR STOOL IN ANTIQUE TAN RRP $199 C. BINA SWIVEL STOOL IN NATURAL & WHITE RRP $149 D. KAREL BAR STOOL IN DARK ASH RRP $229 E.PENCO TEAK BAR STOOL IN RUSTIC FINISH RRP $225 F. FINNIC BAR STOOL WITH BLACK FRAME & ELM SEAT RRP $199 G. DECKER RECYCLED ELM STOOL IN NATURAL FINISH RRP $265 H. LEO IRON BAR STOOL WITH WHITE LEGS & PINE SEAT RRP $99 I. LEO IRON STOOL WITH YELLOW LEGS & PINE SEAT RRP $89

*Prices are correct at time of printing and are subject to change without notice.

Schots Home Emporium | www.schots.com.au


SUPERB HEMLOCK DOORS / DETAILS FOR YOUR HOME

A.

C.

B.

E.

D.

G.

F.

A. EDWARDIAN 3 PANEL DOOR IN RAW HEMLOCK 204X82X4CM RRP $269 B. EDWARDIAN 1 LIGHT DOOR IN RAW HEMLOCK 204X82X4CM RRP $329 C. NICHOLSON DOOR IN RAW HEMLOCK 204X82X3.6CM RRP $269 D. NICHOLSON 2 LIGHT DOOR IN RAW HEMLOCK 204X82X3.6CM RRP $329 E. NICHOLSON 1 LIGHT DOOR IN RAW HEMLOCK 204X82X4CM RRP $329 F. DECO 3 PANEL DOOR IN RAW HEMLOCK 204X82X4CM RRP $269 G. VESTIBULE GLASS DOOR IN RAW HEMLOCK 204X82X3.6CM RRP $349

DOOR, WINDOW AND CABINET FURNISHINGS IN VARIOUS FINISHES. TOP RIGHT CLOCKWISE: BLACK, CHROME, SOLID BRONZE AND POLISHED BRASS.

PRESSED ALUMINIUM PANELS AVAILABLE IN VARIOUS DESIGNS, SIZES AND FINISHES RRP FROM $39EA

MELBOURNE 400 Hoddle Street, Clifton Hill, Melbourne ph 1300 774 774 GEELONG 299 Melbourne Road (off Mackey St), North Geelong ph 1300 693 693

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AUSTRALIA'S LARGEST COLLECTION OF LUXURIOUS BATHROOM VANITIES B.

B.

C.

C. A. A.

A. MEDWAY SINGLE VANITY IN WHITE WITH WHITE MARBLE TOP RRP $1,495 B. LORA ROUND SWIVEL MIRROR IN CHROME 68CM RRP $349 C. MODERN BASIN SET IN CHROME PVD (WELS: 5S/5.5L/M) RRP $218.90

A. HALDEN SINGLE VANITY IN WHITE WITH WHITE MARBLE TOP RRP $2,399 B. SHERBROOKE MEDICINE CABINET WITH 3 MIRRORS & 2 DOORS IN WHITE RRP $1,295 C. GOOSENECK BASIN SET IN CHROME PVD (WELS: 5S/5.5L/M) RRP $202

B.

C. A.

A. OC CLASSIQUE DOUBLE VANITY IN WHITE WITH WHITE MARBLE TOP RRP $2,999 (ALSO AVAILABLE WITH BLACK GRANITE TOP) B. CHATHAM BASIN SET IN CHROME PVD (WELS: 5S/5.5L/M) RRP $329 C. DECKER RECYCLED ELM STOOL WITH BACK IN NATURAL FINISH RRP $399

*Prices are correct at time of printing and are subject to change without notice.

Schots Home Emporium | www.schots.com.au


THE HEART OF THE HOME FEATURING STUNNING MARBLE MANTLES AND THE LEGEND GAS FIRE

A.

B.

D.

C.

A. ALSTON LIMESTONE MANTLEPIECE IN WHITE RRP $2,999 B. LEGEND DV36L SERIES 3 GAS FIRE HEATER RRP $3,295 C. GRANITE HEARTH IN ABSOLUTE BLACK 140X45CM RRP $469 D. CARESSA LEATHER ARMCHAIR IN ANTIQUE EBONY RRP $1,749

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GEELONG (3,500m2)

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299 Melbourne Road North Geelong 1300 693 693

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*Prices are correct at time of printing and are subject to change without notice.


Project Design Bubble

NOTHING SHORT OF AMAZING

182:

BEACH LIVING

186:

AS DEEP AS THE OCEAN

191:

A PRIVATE ESCAPE

196:

STYLE ADDICT

KITCHENS & BATHROOMS

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200: LUXURIOUS FUNCTIONALITY 204: THE INNER SANCTUARY GRAND DESIGNS

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PROJECT / / N O L I M I T S

NOTHING SHORT OF AMAZING A kitchen that is truly top of the block

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PROJECT / / N O L I M I T S WOR DS / / L AU RE N MC GARRY

J

ulia and Sasha weren’t shy on the latest season of The Block. This ran true in their bold design choices and sheer determination to find ways to produce the designs they set out to achieve. Being perfectionists isn’t always easy when faced with multiple room challenges and other contestants’ opinions, but the girls from Melbourne proved with their challenge apartment kitchen win that perfection may just be possible. The girls produced a jaw-dropping, sleek, luxurious kitchen leaving judges stunned and in awe of the work they had produced. The contemporary feel of the open-plan space features a monochrome colour scheme. The use of black matt cupboards seamlessly ties in with the black marble island benchtop and contrasts beautifully with the white benchtop that sits under the black cupboards. The pair used Bosch Series 8 appliances throughout the kitchen challenge. Two Series 8 pyrolytic ovens were selected, sitting side by side; one incorporates added steam, microwave oven, warming drawer, built-in coffee machine and semi-integrated dishwasher. They also used a Bosch Series

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8 built-in fridge and freezer. This sits nicely behind the matching black cupboards, which allow the back wall of the kitchen to be seamless. The dark features continue throughout the kitchen, connecting the entire space with ease: The stand-out features include the mirrored splashback, which allows a more spacious, open feel to the dark-featured kitchen; the wine fridge, which adds a level of sophistication and excitement; and the oldstyle library ladder, which adds wow factor. The monochrome colour palette of this space is complemented perfectly with the choice of lighting. The downlights bring even lighting to the whole space, while one decorative pendant light lends mood and style to the island. LED panels in the joinery, which provide lighting in the cupboard spaces, are activated and controlled by voice command technology. The use of a floorto-ceiling window at the end of the kitchen allows for a wonderful flow of natural light into the area throughout the day. This kitchen is the perfect balance of modern, high-end luxury and practicality.


WE LOVE THE OLDSCHOOL LADDER, WHICH ADDS A TOUCH OF HISTORY TO THE SPACE

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PROJECT // T E XT URA L VI BE S

BEACH LIVING A kitchen that’s all about style meets functionality

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PROJECT // T E XT URA L VI BE S WOR DS / / L AU RE N MC GARRY

F

or their holiday home in Bronte, this family from Hong Kong were after a modern design which felt Miami Fabulous. The owners selected interior and architecture firm Design Bubble, along with Cradle Design Studio, to completely remodel their original 1980s home. The original U-shaped kitchen was completely flipped and made into a beautiful open-plan space, perfect for large events and entertaining. The laundry and kitchen walls were removed to create this open space. Instead of having a separate laundry, designer Jessica Williams decided to incorporate the laundry into the kitchen space. All neatly hidden behind the kitchen joinery is the washing machine, dryer and hanging space. Inspired by nearby Bronte Beach, the consistent colour palette of crisp whites features pastel colours and punchy turquoise, an accurate representation of the location. The client “was not afraid of textures and patterns, so we layered these wherever we could”. This is shown subtly in the kitchen through the marble splashback and island bench. Along with copper and black tones featured throughout the kitchen, it adds a very chic and modern element to the design. This kitchen is extremely bright during the day, with natural light flooding in through the waterfacing window, reflecting off the bright, white cupboards. In order to have the same effect at night, the lighting design consists mainly of energy-efficient LED downlights, which are bright enough to produce the same light which reflects off the cupboards. This kitchen has done a full 360. A dated space with very little life has been transformed into an entertainer’s paradise filled with light and class. designbubble.com.au

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WE LOVE THE SUBTLE MARBLE WHICH ADDS A CHIC ELEMENT TO THIS UNDERSTATED KITCHEN

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PROJECT / / N E O N WAV E S

AS DEEP AS THE OCEAN A space that’s pure bliss

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PROJECT / / N E O N WAV E S

WE LOVE THE BOLD USE OF COLOUR AND LIGHTING

WOR DS / / L AU RE N MC GARRY

F

rom designer Mal Corboy, this kitchen takes on all the ideals of a regular beach house, but with a super-modern twist. Situated on Onetangi Beach on Waiheke Island, New Zealand, this new holiday home is modern luxury meets industrial class. The location of this build, situated right on the beach, provided some challenges. The builders had no access to the site from mid December until February, which was a big setback. Another issue the designer and builders faced was working with the tides and making sure their trucks had access to the beach. This proved to be time-consuming. The inspiration behind this design comes from a small beach pebble the owner gave to Mal. The colour scheme from the multiple colours present in the pebble inspired the selection of the Pietra Grey marble that has been used for the benchtops throughout, as well as in the rest of the home. LED strip lights in the kitchen have been used to enhance the space at night and allow the kitchen to stand out in the open plan of the house. The effect of the bold, blue splashbacks and feature pieces on the cabinets adds to the ocean-like ambience, with the neon blue lending a contemporary touch to the home. This kitchen is a great reflection of Mal Corby’s work. The use of bold colour and lighting make the space a dramatic, contemporary holiday home unlike any other. malcorboy.com

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GRAND DESIGNS

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Introducing the Steel Cooker Range The Only Upright Cooker Available on the Australian Market with Combi-Steam Functionality Combi-Steam cooking utilises the combination of regular oven cooking with the added use of steam. This helps to preserve nutrients which leads to both healthier and tastier food whilst saving time and energy. Normal cooking functions utilising high temperatures reduce the humidity in standard ovens, increasing the rate of extraction of water from the food resulting in drier, smaller portions. The entire range of Steel ovens and cookers are available with this unique functionality.

For more information visit www.steelbrand.com.au

Available at all Leading Retailers:


PROJECT // OP ULE N T OAS I S

A PRIVATE ESCAPE A stunning bathroom that oozes serenity

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PROJECT // OP ULE N T OAS I S

PHOTOG RAPHY // STEPHEN G O ODENOUGH PHOTO GRA PHER

T

he owners of this master ensuite requested a design with simple clean lines, sleek surfaces and attractive bathroom fittings and fi xtures. The result is a bathroom that integrates seamlessly with the overall feel of the master bedroom wing — a private zone, a place to linger and restore. Including a twin shower, twin basins, bath and hidden toilet, the design pays homage to the home’s contemporary architecture with its layered forms and wow factor. While the design is modern and restrained, the layout forms a practical space which features a double walk-in shower with

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PROJECT // OP ULE N T OAS I S

WE LOVE THE CUSTOMMADE CABINETRY, WHICH IS UNIQUE AND FUNCTIONAL

overhead rain showerhead, private toilet space and generous vanity unit and storage, with the bath taking centre stage as the piece on view from the master bedroom. To make the room feel more spacious, the vanity has been cantilevered from the wall, playing on the theme of layers with the furniturelike storage unit below, connecting it to the surrounding architecture. The tiling is simple and restrained, but the contrast of other materials, textures and natural hues provides a layered depth of forms and enhances the feeling of space. While the design utilises all the available space, the mix of selected ďŹ nishes and ďŹ xtures ensures the desired sense of luxury. This master ensuite has a calm and serene ambience that belies it superior functionality. daviniasutton.com

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PORTER DAVIS HOME USING MONIER MADISON TILES – COLOUR SOHO NIGHT

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COLORBOND® STEEL - MONUMENT®

BEFORE

AFTER

MONIER C-LOC™ - BARRAMUNDI

BEFORE

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STYLE ADDICT Jen Bishop from Interiors Addict transforms a retro bathroom into a timeless design

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PROJECT // BAC K T O BAS I C S

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PROJECT // BAC K T O BAS I C S

WE LOVE THE NEUTRAL PALETTE OF WHITE AND TIMBER WOR DS / / A N NA B E L L E C L O RO S PH OTO G RA P H Y // JAC Q U I TU RK

Y

ou may know Jen Bishop as the woman behind the Interiors Addict blog, brightening up our days with the latest and greatest when it comes to design. With an auction looming for their Wahroonga, Sydney, apartment, the pressure was on for Jen and her husband Damian Francis to completely revamp their existing bathroom. Jen knew the design of the space, which was quintessentially ’70s, had to change as soon as they bought the apartment. “Pre-reno, this was a very ordinary beige bathroom with a shallow bathtub and woeful storage,” she recalls. “We always knew it would have to go as soon as possible!” To keep costs down, the new design maintained the existing layout of the bathroom, but everything else was updated to happily co-exist with the apartment’s timeless aesthetic. “Everything was ripped out and stripped back to bare brick,” says Jen. “A new stud wall was created across the back shower to enable us to create a niche inside the shower, and cornicing was removed and

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replaced.” The existing shower was swapped with a frameless design and a new oval bath sits in place of the original piece. To ensure the custom nature of the project, Jen opted for timber vanities crafted from Western Australian marri timber by Ingrain Designs. “These are handmade investment pieces designed to last and be loved for many years,” says Jen. While the timber vanities add instant warmth to the space, the rest of the bathroom revolves around a neutral palette. “I chose a dark charcoal paint between the white tiles and decorative cornice to make it pop and provide contrast,” says Jen. “I wanted a high-end look without spending a fortune.” Jen and Damian have transformed their retro space into a timeless design that will last for years to come. “I wanted the bathroom to blend the classic details of the apartment with a fresh, luxury look,” says Jen. “I didn’t want this to be any old apartment bathroom refresh.” It’s safe to say this space is anything but average. theinteriorsaddict.com


PROJECT // BAC K T O BAS I C S

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PROJECT // MOD E RN OB S E RVAT ORY

LUXURIOUS FUNCTIONALITY A bathroom that’s all about harmonious vibes

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PROJECT // MOD E RN OB S E RVAT ORY

WE LOVE THE CONNECTION TO THE OUTDOORS THROUGH THE USE OF FLOOR-TO-CEILING WINDOWS WOR DS / / L AU RE N MC GARRY

I

t was important for designer Lynne Bradley to pay respect to this grand heritage home while achieving a bathroom that was not only beautiful, but boasted functionality. And Lynne has certainly done this by creating a space that exudes pure class and sophistication. Grounded by veined marble flooring, a tranquil environment has been established through the use of the subway tiles in the shower and a generous window, which frames the landscaped garden. The freestanding bath is located on a risen platform, which creates a dramatic feature as you walk into the bathroom. The floorto-ceiling observatory window creates an amazing backdrop to the crisp white bathtub. The window allows natural light to flood

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the room, offsetting the black tone of the vanity. Contrasting with the grey walls are the white subway tiles, which add another layer to the room and work well with the marble flooring. The glass shower door enables you to take in all the different textures of the room at once, and marries with the observatory glass window. There were a few challenges in this design; the floor needed to be completely removed and replaced, and the floor plan was changed to allow for three distinct zones to be created — shower, vanity/dressing and bath. The resulting space has a feel of a luxurious five-star hotel, with the use of colours, lighting, and the integration of the outdoors establishing a truly enviable bathroom. lynnebradleyinteriors.com.au


PROJECT // MOD E RN OB S E RVAT ORY

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PROJECT // LUXE LI F E

THE INNER SANCTUARY An opulent space made for relaxation

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PROJECT // LUXE LI F E

WE LOVE THE ANTIQUE MIRRORS — NOT ONLY STUNNING, BUT FITTING OF THE HOME’S ERA

PHOTOG RAPHY // MAT THEW LOWE , OPEN2VIEW

D

esigned by Mark Bruce for Beaver Kitchens, the owners had strong ideas and inspiration for this bathroom renovation. The end result is a perfect place to relax, pamper and soak away the stresses of life. The room boasts double vanities in Statuario vein marble, both with independent storage discreetly located adjacent to as well as under basin cabinetry, detailed with traditional quarter-turned pillars. In addition, a generous cupboard is located behind the full-length mirror for towels and other items. LED strip lighting has been concealed in the walls, cabinetry and ceiling that surround the antique mirrors. Due to the owners’ differing time schedules, the bathroom needed to have an isolation element for reduced disturbance, yet cohesion with the bedroom and wardrobe. For this reason, a separate room was created exclusively for the toilet, bidet and freestanding basin. As the owners did not want glass in the shower area, a generous tiled walk-through shower space has been designed. Existing original double-glass doors have been included in the renovated bathroom as a nod to the home’s era. Large windows fill the north side of the bathroom and shower area and control of light and privacy is managed by Santa Fe shutters. Beautiful surfaces and light-filled space make this stunning bathroom the inner sanctuary that was visualised. beaverkitchens.co.nz

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PROJECT // LUXE LI F E

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Project Vivid Design

OUTDOORS

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209: BEST IN SHOW 213:

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NATIVE WITH A TWIST


PROJECT // T H E G RE E N E RY GA RD E N

ABOVE This paved area offers a place for rest and relaxation RIGHT The aptly named The Greenery Garden features lush hedges and evergreens that provide the bones for a year-round aesthetic

BEST IN SHOW Designed to nourish the senses, an award-winning garden proves that classic is best

WORDS // ANNABELLE CLOROS PHOTOGRAPHY // PATRICK REDMOND

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s the 2016 Melbourne International Flower & Garden Show was celebrating 40 years of greening Australia, Joby and Carolyn Blackman of Vivid Design knew they had to create an unforgettable space — hence, The Greenery Garden. The brief for their display garden revolved around designing a space that would flourish throughout the seasons, ultimately presenting a space that is quintessentially Melbourne: clean, sophisticated and stylish. Opting to use tried-and-true greenery, Joby and Carolyn were keen to demonstrate that plants can still play a starring role in a garden’s design. “We wanted to show plants can and should form the foundation of a great garden and that hedges and evergreens can provide the bones for a year-round look that supports and highlights flowers and edibles,” says Carolyn. Revelling in the beauty of contrast, The Greenery Garden illustrates the value of combining the hardscape with green plantings GRAND DESIGNS

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PROJECT // T H E G RE E N E RY GA RD E N

and colourful flowers — including hydrangeas, salvias and gardenias — which add an element of colour and softness. In line with its Melbourne aesthetic, Australian bluestone and brick are present in the sunken paved area, which offers a place for contemplation and rest. “The elegance of slimline brick paving was specifically chosen for warmth, texture, and to create the illusion of increased space — especially when contrasted wi th the slabs of classic Australian bluestone,” says Carolyn. Overlooking the generous seating area, a finned pergola subtly transitions from black to white as visitors move through the space, creating a unique point of interest. Just steps away from the paved area is the square water feature — a highlight of the project for Carolyn. Encased by hedges on all four corners, “the integration between the hedge blocks and the water feature is key — almost as if the hedges are protruding into the water feature”, she says. The link between the built and living garden elements is continued with the bluestone seat located to the side of the water feature, which invites quiet intimacy and personal rejuvenation in the garden space. A notable feature of the design is an espalier tree that Vivid utilised as a living feature that crawls up a wall encased by hedges. “The garden features

This award-winning garden, featuring lighting by Gardens at Night, pulls out all the stops

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PROJECT // T H E G RE E N E RY GA RD E N

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PROJECT // T H E G RE E N E RY GA RD E N ABOVE & RIGHT The ultra-contemporary square water feature is a highlight of the project for Carolyn of Vivid Design

a double hedge to not only create a backdrop for the main garden view, but a secret, secondary vista where the context is created for a stunning bronze sculpture titled Under the Moonlight by Christian Maas,” says Carolyn. Brimming with plants and flowers that “nourish the senses”, the garden is not one that follows the trends, but stays true to a classic design that puts timeless materials and greenery front and centre. With the garden, which was presented by The Greenery Garden Centre, securing the City of Melbourne Award for Excellence for the Best in Show, the Mark Bence Construction Award, a Gold Medal, and The Horticultural Media Association Award for the Best Use of Plant Life, the proof is in the pudding — or in this case, the planting. “We wanted to create a garden that aged well and improved over time,” says Carolyn. “The story is one of timeless refinement, enjoyment, style and the importance and value of having a lovely garden in your life every day.”

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PROJECT // ORI E N TA L D E LI GH T

The courtyard was restructured and a handcarved natural rock basin, teamed with a small bamboo pipe which allows water to flow over the rock, was installed

NATIVE WITH A TWIST This structured native garden reflects the stunning location and the owners’ love of Japan WOR DS // DAN IE LL E TOWN S E N D PHOTOGRAPHY // KEVIN WAKELING

J

apan has inspired the world with its distinctive approach to garden design, and although it’s a long way from the Asian nation, this picturesque Queenstown, New Zealand property certainly shows evidence of that influence. Inspired by their time living in Japan, the homeowners didn’t only want a structured native garden; they wanted a Japanese-themed courtyard, too. Therefore, the brief for their garden, situated under The Remarkables mountain range and overlooking Lake Wakatipu, was for a native planting theme with a Japanese twist. “It was to be a native garden with structure and a Japanese-themed courtyard that utilises the outer garden,” says Joe Nutting, managing director of Southern Landmarx Ltd, who constructed the garden for this scenic property in Lakeside Estate. Originally, the courtyard was a small pond feature that had the required effect but needed a lot of maintenance, such as ongoing algae treatment, to maintain water quality. The courtyard was restructured and a hand-carved natural rock basin, teamed with a small bamboo pipe which allows water to flow over the rock, was installed. “In the end, this was a bolder statement in the courtyard but in a subtle way,” says Joe. The main structure is the waterfall that feeds into the pond. This was shaped with natural boulders weighing up to 1.5 tonnes LEFT Food sustainability has been achieved, with the couple growing their own vegetables in two areas

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fertilisers were added during garden bed preparation, and fertiliser is still added during maintenance. Sub-soil drains were installed post-construction to remove water run-off from the road. With the brief for the garden specifying a strong Japanese influence mixed with native plants, the designer, LAND Landscape Architects, integrated both formal and native plantings. This was an approach that appealed to Joe. “I love the natural surroundings of the Otago region but I also like to use plants other than natives in my plant palette as you can get more variation with colour, fragrance, foliage, structure and seasonal changes,” he says. The property required screening from the road, which was achieved with evergreen pittosporum hedging. Gabion baskets were used in layers to terrace the southern end of the building down to the natural ground level. Gabion walls were installed with an 80mm steel-mesh rigid structure and lined with a mix of washed Shotover River gravel. Macrocarpa timber sleepers were used in natural form to allow nature to grey them, keeping them as natural as possible.

GRAND DESIGNS

PROJECT // ORI E N TA L D E LI GH T

and finished with mixed-grade round river stone from the adjacent Shotover River. Local stone is also used in the water feature. “The courtyard — inspired by Japanese Zen gardens — is a strong component of the design and can be seen from the tatami mat room inside the home,” says Joe. “The revamped courtyard garden is my favourite part of the designed space; it is peaceful and simple in structure but bold in overall appearance and effect.” The owners are also very proactive in the native revegetation of the garden and adjacent gully area, which was originally mostly covered in noxious weed but is now completely filled with native vegetation. Food sustainability has been achieved through the couple growing their own vegetables in two areas. “Moving from a small unit in Japan to a larger garden in New Zealand, the homeowners required a large vegetable garden area which later turned into the development of a second garden area,” says Joe. As a section of the property is reclaimed landfill, the soil structure and drainage was poor. A lot of organic material and

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PROJECT // ORI E N TA L D E LI GH T The designer, LAND Landscape Architects, integrated both formal and native plantings

Peeking through the fence to a haven of green that lies beyond

This difficult site with a challenging soil structure and strong winds has been established into a place of tranquillity The Japanese-themed courtyard utilises the outer garden

The paving is 500mm x 500mm concrete pavers selected by the building architect to blend with the tones of the house. The architect required the pavers to be cut to match the building features. “This property is a real team effort with the design personnel, construction crew, maintenance team and the very enthusiastic owners who love gardening and growing their own produce,” says Joe. “It is a difficult site

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with a challenging soil structure and strong winds, but after eight years the garden has been established into a place of tranquillity that can be enjoyed. For me, a garden is a place to enjoy, to be amazed by and to relax in.” This peaceful Japanese-style garden with native influences is the perfect example of this design philosophy, and importantly, also provides the owners with a strong connection to Japan in their new home.


POWERFULLY SLEEK The Sirius Downdraft rangehood boasts the most powerful extraction method of any of its type on the market. With a FKRLFHRIëYHRIIERDUGPRWRUVWKDWDUH whisper quiet, the unit can be ducted LQëYHGLUHFWLRQVPDNLQJLWVXLWDEOH IRUYDULRXVDSSOLFDWLRQVDQGNLWFKHQ designs. The Sirius Downdraft is both HIIHFWLYHDQGDHVWKHWLFDOO\VWXQQLQJ With sleek black or white glass FRQWUROVDQGDKLJKJUDGHVWDLQOHVV ëQLVKWKHXQLWLVGHVLJQHGWRPDWFK both induction and gas cooktops.

The rangehood rises when in use and retracts into the benchtop when idle, creating clean lines in the kitchen and boasting a seamless design. With two designs to choose from, Proud Mount and Flush Mount with light, the Sirius Downdraft is the perfect addition to your kitchen. Sourcing the best components and designing the most practical, stylish and functional hoods for all applications, Sirius prides itself on being at the forefront of the market.

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FLOORING

223: ROOFING AND CLADDING 227: BUILDING MATERIALS

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SOURCEBOOK

219:


S O URCE B O O K // FLO ORING

Matrix by Gavin Harris in 100 per cent New Zealand wool

TOTALLY

Floored

WITH MYRIAD CHOICES IN HARD AND SOFT FLOORING AVAILABLE, IT’S NEVER BEEN EASIER TO MAKE THE PERFECT SELECTION FOR YOUR HOME

DESIGNER RUGS Designer Rugs is one of Australia’s leading rug manufacturers and suppliers. Working with a team of in-house designers as well as collaborating with artists and designers from the worlds of art, fashion, architecture and design, the company has ranges in many of the best residences and commercial projects. Pictured above is High Tea by Petrina Turner in New Zealand wool.

WO R DS / / X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

BELOW Lost in Transmission by Kerrie Brown. designerrugs.com.au

ABOVE Powder Room by Romance Was Born in 100 per cent New Zealand wool. designerrugs.com.au

RUGS

A

beautiful rug will define your space and help make hard floors feel soft and homely. Rugs are available in many shapes, sizes, colours and patterns. Choose from a unique custom design or one of the many collections available from design houses around the country and internationally. The best rugs are made from the finest materials, such as pure wool, silk, hemp and cotton. Look for natural dyes and quality construction when selecting a rug and, of course, purchase from a rug specialist to ensure you are buying a quality product that will last.

ABOVE Satellite (Copper) from the in-house-designed Saffron range in New Zealand wool blend. designerrugs.com.au GRAND DESIGNS

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Berber Knot Atlas Limestone runner from the Latitude Collection by Armadillo&Co. curiousgrace.com.au

Braid Weave Charcoal from the Perennial Collection by Armadillo&Co. curiousgrace.com.au

ARMADILLO&CO

Armadillo&Co was founded by Jodie Fried and Sally Pottharst, born from a desire to create beautiful products that are ethically produced. Using natural, sustainable fibres, and working with weavers in communities using Fair Trade practices, their products are handmade and infused with the artisanship of those who create them. armadillo-co.com

JAPANESE ABSTRACTIONS MAISON DADA Japanese Abstractions by Thomas Dariel is a collection of six rug designs, all created around the concept of the imaginary trip to Japan of the Dadaist and feminist artist Sophie TaeuberArp. Each rug measures 170cm x 240cm and is a combination of geometric shapes and traditional Japanese patterns; a result of the unexpected yet poetic encounter between pure abstraction and cultural inuences between west and east. maisondada.com

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RIGHT Berber Knot Ecru Ghan from the Latitude Collection by Armadillo&Co. curiousgrace.com.au BELOW Berber Knot Nala in Natural Slate from the Latitude Collection by Armadillo&Co. curiousgrace.com.au


S O URC EB O O K // FLO ORING

TILES

W

ith new technologies leading the way in decorative effects for floor and wall tiles, it’s easy to get the look of natureinspired timber and stone in a range of beautiful colours. Amber Tiles’ Heartwood porcelain delivers a durable alternative to timber with an authentic look and all the advantages of a strong ceramic surface. Perfect for the eco-conscious homeowner, the range offers alternative choices without compromising on style. ambertiles.com.au

Heartwood Charcoal is mysterious and bold, beautiful and haunting. It creates a mesmerising ambience for a relaxing space

Inspired by the strong, masculine yet calming look of the mountains in Bavaria. ambertiles.com.au

Beautiful and ecological, these tiles feature designs that mimic the beauty of marble, granite and sandstone

A stylish series of porcelain tiles inspired by the grace and splendour of snowy mountain peaks

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AGED OAK WIDE FLOORS Aged Oak Wide Floors is a third-generation company that sells only the finest hand-finished French oak engineered timber flooring, certified by the Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC), graded and machine-finished to the highest quality. This means timbers used are only from forests that meet the social, economic and ecological needs of present and future generations. The range includes a variety of widths, colours and finishes to ensure there’s a style to suit every application. agedoakfloors.com.au

TIMBER

A

timber floor is the ultimate in natural luxury and beauty. Choose from solid and engineered timber or bamboo in floorboards or parquetry in various colours and finishes including natural, whitewashed, aged and reclaimed. Ensure you only select from environmentally sustainable sources such as FSC and PEFC. Solid timber floors come in varying lengths and are laid by interlocking with tongue-andgroove fi xings directly to your subfloor’s bearers and joists, or battens over a concrete slab. Floating floors are increasingly popular due to their ease of installation, especially in apartment developments due to their sound-proof qualities.

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ABOVE & RIGHT For this Sydney project by Aged Oak Wide Floors, the Hamptons Signature Series in French oak from the Handcrafted Collection was selected. The colour is Vintage Grey with a brushed matt UV coating.


S O URC EB O O K / / S O U RC E B O O K RO O F I N G A N D C L A D D I N G

Hemp House from Grand Designs New Zealand Series Two

MATERIAL MATTERS

SELECTING THE CORRECT ROOFING AND CLADDING MATERIALS CAN PROVIDE THE BEST IN PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE AND AESTHETICS FOR YOUR HOME WORDS // KATE ST JA ME S, F DIA

W

hen it comes to the aesthetics of our houses, the roofing and cladding materials we select are of paramount importance. Not only must they look good, they must also be effective as a weatherproof layer to prevent water and other elements from entering, or leaving, our homes.

ROOFS North Cornwall House from Grand Designs UK Series 14

A good-looking roof can add value to your property, which is great when it comes time to sell. The roof is probably the largest and most prominent outside area of a building, so you’ll want one that enhances the look of the

structure, fits into its environment, provides protection and security, and offers good environmental and insulation properties. Roofing materials include metal cladding such as iron, copper and zinc; concrete, clay or terracotta tiles; natural slate; timber and asphalt shingles; and composite materials. It’s also important to understand council requirements and residential community covenants, which may dictate the type and, importantly, the colour of roof you’re allowed. For pergolas, gazebos, patios, sheds and other outdoor structures you can also use materials such as bamboo cladding, latte poles, palm fibre, plastic and fibreglass.

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S O URC EB O O K / / S O U RC E B O O K RO O F I N G A N D C L A D D I N G

Pakiri House from Grand Designs New Zealand Series One

Inverloch Sand Dune House from Grand Designs Australia Series Four

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Kinglake Non-Toxic House from Grand Designs Australia Series Six

Rusty House from Grand Designs New Zealand Series Two

CLADDING Cladding is a non-load-bearing layer attached to the outside of a building. The choice of cladding you choose will not only affect the look of the building, but also its thermal performance. Your choice of cladding should be carefully thought through to ensure it is appropriate for the style of home you build, as well as the location and orientation of the building. The right cladding can assist in a home’s thermal performance, whereas the wrong choice can make your house a hot box in summer and an ice box in winter! Choosing environmentally sustainable materials will go a long way to reduce the overall impact of a building. These include brick, timber, metal, reconstituted and composite materials and fibre cement, which can be used horizontally, vertically or angled to create unique patterns. There is a wide range of textures, colours and styles available, providing enormous design flexibility. A carefully considered combination of materials such as brick and iron, or timber and zinc can provide a more interesting appearance than using just one material, however this choice will depend on the architecture of the building. Sometimes less can certainly be more. As with all cladding and roofing materials, insulation is critical. Some cladding materials are supplied with insulation, however the need for more will depend on your specific location and climate. It’s also important to consider sound transference when selecting cladding. Unless you have thick masonry walls, sound can travel through these materials, so always check performance ratings.

North Cornwall House from Grand Designs UK Series 14

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S O URC EB O O K / / S O U RC E B O O K RO O F I N G A N D C L A D D I N G ABOVE Harcourt Quarry House from Grand Designs Australia Series Six RIGHT South-East London Urban Shed House from Grand Designs UK Series 12

Environmental and health considerations should always come first when choosing materials for our homes. Look for environmental credentials of companies and products as they will vary greatly between brands and manufacturing plants. Consider the lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the product, which refers to the environmental impact of the product over its lifetime, including its ultimate disposal or recycling; and Chain of Custody — the chronological documentation of a product from its original source through to its purchase by the end consumer. Many products, such as timber, carry certification for quality assurance. As with all building material choices, it’s best to work with professionals who can provide the most up-to-date research and product information, as well as creating design options and suggesting colours and finishes before you embark on your project.

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S O URCE B O O K // BUILDING MATERIAL S

Launceston Sub Station from Grand Designs Australia Series Six

THE RIGHT CHOICE

CHOOSING THE RIGHT BUILDING MATERIALS WILL KEEP YOU WARMER IN WINTER WORDS // ELIZABETH MCINTYRE

W

hether you’re trying to stay warm in winter or cool in summer, the heating and cooling of your home requires a significant amount of electricity. Recent data indicates that space heating and cooling accounts for around 40 per cent of total residential operational energy consumption. For those contemplating building or renovating their home, it has become increasingly important to choose a building design and materials that will minimise the energy required for heating and cooling, both from a cost savings and sustainability perspective.

THE IMPACT OF DESIGN ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY Passive solar design focuses on energy efficiency and considers the local conditions to maximise the thermal performance of a building. Solar design can reduce the need for expensive mechanical heating and cooling. This is because good solar design uses natural heating and natural cooling to keep temperatures within a comfortable range — typically 18 to 24 degrees Celsius — and should not cost more when included at the planning stage. Key considerations for passive solar design are: orientation and solar access, shading and glazing, sealing and ventilation, insulation, and thermal mass.

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HORBURY HUNT RESIDENTIAL AWARD — CARR PLACE RESIDENCE This four-bedroom home on an inner-city block was created for a young urban family. The texture and warmth of the bold masonry bedroom wing reference the industrial and urban site context. Open and glazed living spaces contrast well with the dark and brooding masonry box.

THERE ARE MANY FACTORS THAT, WHEN COMBINED, CAN HELP YOU ACHIEVE AN ENERGY-EFFICIENT HOME, INCLUDING THE PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN OF YOUR HOME, THE BUILDING MATERIALS USED AND THE POSITION OF WINDOWS. BY TAKING THESE ELEMENTS INTO CONSIDERATION YOU CAN HELP TO IMPROVE THE SUSTAINABILITY AND TEMPERATURE OF YOUR HOME When considering passive solar design, it is important to tailor the design features of your home to your climate. For instance, in southern parts of Australia, prominent northfacing shaded windows with overhanging eaves permit the entry of the sun’s warmth and restrict the entry of heat in summer. In contrast, in northern parts of the country, only shading is required but on different walls at different times of the year, together with well-designed ventilation. Properly sealed doors and windows are essential for allowing cross-ventilation and heat restriction when required.

THE ROLE OF THERMAL MASS IN STAYING WARM Research shows that building materials with high thermal mass have the highest energy efficiency. Thermal mass is the ability of a material to retain heat energy when subjected to varying temperatures and then slowly releasing it back into the environment as conditions change. This transfer of heat is called thermal lag. The hottest part of the day is usually between

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12pm and 2pm. A thermal lag of six hours, which is typical for brick houses, means the maximum heat flow will not reach inside the house until six hours after this time. In winter this means that as outside temperatures drop throughout the afternoon into the evening, the transfer of heat within the house is delayed, keeping you warm inside your home. Thermal mass should be incorporated in external walls as well as other areas, including a concrete slab and solid partition walls (as opposed to stud walls). Solid partition walls add significantly to the thermal mass, with the additional benefit of reducing noise between rooms. Thermal mass is different to the R-Value of a material. R-Value, or thermal resistance value, gives an indication of how quickly materials (like insulation) lose heat. The higher the R-Value, the slower the loss of heat. While insulation in external walls is essential, the R-Value is static and does not predict the energy used for heating and cooling to maintain a comfortable inside temperature as outside conditions change.


HORBURY HUNT RESIDENTIAL AWARD — NARANGA AVENUE HOUSE Located in a 1960s canal estate on the Gold Coast, this home is an ideal setting for contemporary living, offering protected indoor and outdoor spaces. Featuring extruded brick on edge and a screen that provides protection from the sun and rain, this permeable dwelling is a place that’s private and secure.

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HORBURY HUNT RESIDENTIAL AWARD — YTH RESIDENCE

YtH residence has been rebuilt from the ground up and connected into the neighbouring terrace to create a courtyard house offering adaptable multi-family living. The home’s facade, built entirely in face brick, responds to the rhythm of the street yet sits in contrast to its neighbours.

HORBURY HUNT RESIDENTIAL AWARD — DOUBLE COURTYARD HOUSE Budget limitations and geographical location meant that recycled bricks were not affordable or easy to access. This design was made from five different bricks from a standard range, yielding a surface quality and nuanced colour palette similar to that of a recycled brick. Toowoomba House from Grand Designs Australia Series Five

A LOOK AT DIFFERENT BUILDING MATERIALS A research project by Newcastle University looked at the thermal properties of different building materials over an eight-year period to understand the energy efficiency of each material. The building materials tested included: insulated brick veneer; cavity brick; reverse brick veneer; insulated lightweight materials; and insulated cavity brick. The project involved the construction and monitoring of a range of test buildings, each with over 100 sensors to monitor internal and external conditions as well as temperature and heat variations through each wall, floor and roof.

INSULATED LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS Insulated lightweight building materials have become increasingly popular because of their lower cost, durability and speed of construction. Some examples include timber and fibre cement. While most insulated lightweight materials have a high thermal resistance (R-Value), they don’t tend to have thermal mass in the walls. What this means is buildings made with insulated lightweight materials tend to exhibit greater variations in internal temperature.

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The important thing to consider with insulated lightweight building materials is while they can reduce the amount of heat entering a building, they do not provide any thermal lag (that is, they don’t delay the transference of heat until later in the day). Therefore, the energy consumption needed to maintain comfortable temperatures inside is higher in homes made of insulated lightweight materials.

HOW DOES BRICK PERFORM? Brick buildings, including both cavity brick and brick veneer, tend to have high thermal mass properties. As such they allow for more

stable inside temperatures. Brick buildings can reduce heat escaping from the inside during winter, but also reduce the effect of heat from the sun by releasing stored heat in the external brick wall back to the outside environment. In homes where the inside walls are made of brick and the exterior walls of other materials (such as fibre cement, timber or render), otherwise known as reverse brick veneer (RVB), there is a greater level of thermal mass than in buildings made with insulated lightweight materials. This results in a more stable and comfortable inside temperature. However, a lack of thermal mass in the external materials limits the energy


S O URCE B O O K // BUILDING MATERIAL S

North Wales House from Grand Designs UK Series 12

efficiency of reverse brick veneer. Insulated cavity brick requires the least amount of energy to maintain the internal temperature in the comfort zone. This is because the additional thermal mass in the external skin of brickwork decreases the impact of external conditions, such as cold weather and hot days.

Concrete Farm House from Grand Designs New Zealand Series One

THE IMPACT OF WINDOWS The Australian Glass and Glazing Association has stated that on average, 55 per cent of heat is lost through windows. However, when the building is made from brick with a concrete slab, the amount of sun entering through windows during the day is beneficial as this heat energy can be stored by the thermal mass of the walls and floor, then released in the evening once the temperature has dropped. With electricity prices rising and more awareness of the need for improved energy efficiency in our homes, it makes sense to look at ways we can reduce our energy consumption. There are many factors that, when combined, can help you achieve an energy-efficient home, including the passive solar design of your home, the building materials used and the position of windows. By taking these elements into consideration you can help to improve the sustainability and temperature of your home. Elizabeth McIntyre is CEO of Think Brick Australia, which represents Australia’s clay brick and paver manufacturers. Each year the Think Brick Awards encourage architects, designers and builders to rethink brick, concrete masonry and roof tiles as contemporary and sustainable design materials. thinkbrick.com.au GRAND DESIGNS

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ASK OUR ARCHITECT Editor-at-Large Chris Moller answers your questions When travelling to Central America and Spain recently, my wife and I noticed how prevalent communal living is there and how it engenders a wonderful spirit. Do you know of any examples in New Zealand?

Q A

In the age of Uber and Airbnb, community living is a refreshing alternative to our commercially focused world where we often expect every house to conform to market real estate norms of stand-alone suburban housing. Yet New Zealand has some very interesting community living examples, such as the Athfi eld House in Wellington, which is more mixed-use hill town than suburban home as it combines the Athfield office, a cafe and several homes arranged around collective courtyards. There’s a variety of more traditional examples around the country, including the Riverside community in Motueka, established in the early 1940s. Each of these attempts to unlock the value of sharing resources with minimal maintenance and running costs open up the opportunity for new forms of living and alternative ways to create mutually supportive communities.

We have a family that includes eight kids and it is difficult to get houses that have nine bedrooms. On many nights, there are up to a dozen people in our house. Our current home is not coping and we need a purpose build. Do you have any suggestions? Our budget is maximum $850,000

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The Cornwall House from Grand Designs UK

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If you need a purpose build, I would strongly suggest commissioning a good architect to explore the specific challenges. There is a host of possible solutions, so together you have to get creative, think sideways, and do solid design research into alternative options. It’s both a wonderful design challenge and a great exercise in how to do more with less. I would suggest looking into high volumes and shared spaces (especially bedrooms — why not one big bedroom for all?) with a separate space for study, play, etc. If you map out how much time each child really uses a bedroom, you will probably discover a lot about how different their needs are; some will find privacy very important, others not at all. Use this knowledge to work out what they really need, which will likely change as they grow up. Equally, you could explore it like a game, which keeps shifting like musical chairs. Various activities and needs could be achieved separately, yet in a flexible way, to enable change over time.

We are expecting our first child and hope to eventually have three. We currently live in a one-bedroom flat we own, but would prefer our own house. We have enough for a good deposit ($280,000). What pearls of wisdom can you give us?

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This is a decent sum of money to start with, so I would suggest initial discussion with your bank manager to understand your financial limits. Then, find a good architect to help you find a site that’s inexpensive and the opposite to what everyone else wants. Remember, demand is what pushes up the cost of land. Together with your architect, you can explore different alternative approaches to achieve a good-quality economic home. Don’t forget the process shouldn’t just be about

the practicalities, it should also be a fun and enlightening journey.

Have any of the homes featured on Grand Designs New Zealand inspired you in your own work? If so, which one?

Q A

To witness the realisation of someone’s dream is wonderfully inspiring. Each home has something unique or special to offer — unusual techniques, materials or design approaches to tackle the specific challenges of climate, site restrictions or the personal dreams of the people building them. This is in a similar vein to the food revolution, which has been influenced by cooking programs that have inspired and educated us in the value of good-quality ingredients (materials) and skills (design and construction). The impact of all this on my own work is perhaps more indirect as I have been exploring and developing my own construction systems and approaches to the challenges of our times for a very long time. For example, I have been developing Click-Raft for more than 10 years, and this new type of prefabricated construction system is only now beginning to be used in a variety of different kinds of projects to achieve a new generation of rapid off -site digitally fabricated timber construction. Another example is the recently completed Mt Pleasant Community Centre, which I designed using a unique construction system developed specifically for this project inspired by its unique landscape setting on the edge of the estuary.

Q&A — NEED CHRIS’S HELP? EMAIL YOUR QUERIES TO homedesign@universalmagazines.com.au


236: REAL ESTATE 238: BUILDING 240: LANDSCAPING

EXPERT ADVICE

234: ARCHITECTURE

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EXPERT ADVI C E / / A RC H I T E C T U R E Concreteologist House from Grand Designs New Zealand Series Two

50 SHADES OF GREY — CONCRETE CONSIDERATIONS We boast the longest unbroken lineage of art and culture in the world. Rock and stone have always been at the heart of Australia’s culture; they’ve been used as the nation’s canvas and provided shelter since the Stone Age WO R DS // PETER C OLQUHOUN PHOTOGRA PHY // HELEN BA NKERS

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he man-made version of rock or stone is concrete, which itself dates back millennia. When mixed with stone or decorative aggregates, concrete creates that same timeless feel.

Concreteologist House from Grand Designs New Zealand Series Two

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To give you an idea of how far decorative concrete has come, there is evidence that suggests the pyramids of Egypt were partly made of an agglomerate of limestone cast in-situ, or in other words, decorative stone.

This would certainly help explain its construction in the days before the scissor lift. Fast forward to contemporary design, and stone and concrete are still central — from Gaudi’s organic stone forms of Casa Batlló (1904) to the cantilevering levels and exposed stone in Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater (1935) and Richard Neutra’s Palm Springs home (1947). These buildings led the way in expressing stone and concrete in new and decorative ways. When it comes to choosing concrete, it’s far more than just 50 shades of grey. Coloured concrete can be made in virtually any colour, with the additional pigment added to the mix. In the 21st century, companies such as Geostone have also made enormous advances in concrete technology, streamlining the selection process when it comes to choosing aggregates, colours and mixes. Adding aggregate (the little stones put into the concrete mix) instantly creates colour and texture and this is where you can really make concrete look like stone. Usually there will be a range of dark to light aggregates of various sizes. Once the concrete is poured, it’s given a light spray to reveal these little stones. The concrete can then be polished using a range of tools and


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a thin top layer of the concrete cut away to reveal the full effect of the aggregates. For the most basic of concrete floors, either internal or external, you may hear architects and designers ask for a range of trowelled finishes. These include:

COVE FINISH A semi-rough textured finish that looks like swirls and figure 8s when applied. A common finish to driveways, pathways, outdoor entertainment areas and swimming pool walkways.

WOOD FLOAT A similar look to the cove. Rarely used except on heavily sloped driveways and under tiles to provide added grip.

BROOM A simple finish using a broom but gives a clean and uniform look.

STEEL TROWEL In small concrete spaces, a steel trowel is used by hand to give a smooth surface. Great for areas that need to be easily maintained like garages and outdoor kitchens.

MACHINE TROWEL A machine trowel gives a smoother finish and is used to cover larger areas. It also hardens and seals the surface, making it almost resistant to chipping and breaks. Great for house slabs and garages.

CLEAR RESIN SEALERS These are used to protect the concrete from stains. Laying concrete is like making a finger print — no two concrete slabs are the same. Concrete in all its wondrous, varied forms is still one of the best building materials to use in almost all circumstances. Depending on location and accessibility, it can be comparable in cost to other lighter forms of finishes and construction. Even left in its natural state, concrete has become one of the leading design trends in recent years. You can always lay other surfaces over concrete but you can’t always lay concrete over another surface. Its thermal qualities are excellent and can be engineered to carry any load. When you consider that floors, driveways, terraces and courtyards make up an enormous area of the home, consideration must be given to how these surfaces tie together. Using one versatile, durable, timeless material such as concrete in all its varied finishes and forms makes both design and structural sense. Remember, the Romans built an empire with concrete, so think about the possibilities at your place.

VALUABLE SOURCES Cement, Concrete & Aggregates Australia, Geostone Australia

Concreteologist House from Grand Designs New Zealand Series Two

TIPS The only way to choose aggregates is to sample them while planning your job. Aggregates can come from anywhere but it’s best to choose those available in your area, which is often determined by the quarries that supply to concrete manufacturers. All concrete is subject to cracking. This can be minimised by putting in control joints, the curing process, and pouring on the right day. There’s a range of methods and theories to minimise cracking, so make sure your builder/concreter has the experience and knowledge to get the pour right. Ensure your concreter uses only commercially available retarders (a chemical used to prevent the top layer

of the concrete from hardening). Sugar is often used, but take care as it can lead to an inconsistent finish — unless that is what you want. It is essential to use steel reinforcement to provide both additional strength and to assist in controlling the natural movement of the concrete. For internal polished floors, make sure you consult with your structural engineer, architect or designer. Don’t make a small concrete area (for example, a space the size of your average bathroom) too busy with large aggregates. Proportionally, the larger the area, the larger the aggregates.

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EXPERT ADVI C E / / R E A L E STAT E Brighton Sixties House from Grand Designs Australia Series Two

A CLEAR CHOICE Selecting the right windows can make or break your home’s aesthetic and cost you dollars in thermal efficiency WO R DS / / A N D R EW WIN TE R

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all in the window police! Who? Is this yet another new regulatory body determined to monitor and comment on our private lives, choices and actions? Can our selection of window design, placement, size and position really warrant such scrutiny? Sadly, no such authority exists but if the window police were real, forget the humble constable status — I would want to be a chief inspector. Why? Because I still see so many homes where a visit from me could have enhanced that project’s aesthetic, value and, most importantly, improved the living pleasure of its residents. I feel very passionate about this subject as I have always been able to see possibilities and potential with almost all homes. I feel very disheartened when I see residences where little regard has been paid to this fundamental element of design and what has been created has simply missed the mark. So here are a few of my guidelines and suggestions. • Period homeowners: Never install aluminium sliders on your main facade! Some terraces only have one or two windows so please retain and renovate the originals, or install replicas true to the original design. It may cost more, but added value should outweigh that — and expect admiring glances from your neighbours and passers-by. • New home builders: From bespoke architect designs to the project home,

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think ASPECT. What will that window look at? If aspect is an unknown due perhaps to a currently vacant block next door, play it safe by setting windows low, below possible fence height lines, or think privacy screens. Could you maybe place the opening on another elevation facing your block or street? Even project home builders will let you move around window positions at design stage; if they won’t, move on to the next builder! • Views add value, views add living pleasure. Will your home have a view if you place a window in a certain location? Are you on a corner, which means you have two street facades and where windows need to be considered even more carefully? An aspect down a street or towards trees can add interest to your home or renovation design; it is not always purely about water, bush or beach views. If your home faces a park or lake, ensure some principal living space can see this view. • Style: For those of you with period homes, I suggest you discover the original design and replicate it, maybe with a modern twist. Vertical slider windows are the most inexpensive option, but can therefore look rather ordinary, so try to avoid these on your front facade. Awning windows, louvres etc offer a quality look. If you’re on a tight budget, consider placing these in key areas only that will be highly visible

on prominent parts of the facade and living space. Don’t waste these on a spare bedroom on the side of the house, for example. Those of you with the one window facade design or narrow lot home have no excuse for not upgrading your facade; one high-end window type alone is strange so ensure it is not in total isolation. Complement this with another window or windows of similar type in another key area. • Screens: From simple fly screens to my pet hate, the traditional much-loved yet aesthetically hideous security screen, this element of window design is an unavoidable necessity, but again consideration needs to be applied. I often see security screens in windows too high or in questionable locations. In my opinion, security screens can often be reduced in number and swapped for fly screens where safety is not an issue, or maybe an upgrade to the clear security mesh screens in areas where it is. Even fly screens with strengthening bars can impact a window design. Yes, screens are a necessity, but review their visual impact on your window designs. How many display homes styled within an inch of their lives have windows encased in traditional security screens? They don’t, because they look awful. • Doors: These are equally important to a residence’s design credibility. Front main entry doors are vital to creating an


EXPERT ADVI C E / / R E A L E STAT E

Williamstown Bluestone Cottage from Grand Designs Australia Series Five

impression of the home and its design and style. If you’ve got it, flaunt it; don’t hide it behind a security screen door. Conventional size, double-door entry or oversized — whatever the dimensions, the choices are endless. I often see the same old designs being used; be brave, be bold. Even in traditional homes, where I would suggest traditional style, paint colour can add individuality. Then there are the doors in the prime living areas that lead to the all-important outside space. From sliders to stackers, retractable and bi-folds, this is one area where materials, colours and cost vary widely and where you should try to avoid compromise. Quality aesthetics will pay dividends in such key areas. A fi nal word of caution from chief inspector Winter of the about-to-be-formed Australian Window Police: Windows are designed to let the light in; shading must of course be considered for certain aspects, but blocking out with excessive or overgrown planting or heavy dark tinting can have a truly negative impact on interior spaces. Yes, I really do take the subject seriously. If you get the right window design for your home type, in the right place, maximise light and do not detract with excessive unsightly screens. Ensure any chance of a view or pretty aspect is considered and you can relax in the knowledge that if the window police were ever created, they would never be knocking on your door!

South Melbourne Brick House from Grand Designs Australia Series Four

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BUILDING SMARTER HOMES

ABOVE Deakin House from Grand Designs Australia Series Six

In today’s society, bigger is always portrayed as better, but when it comes to our homes, size doesn’t matter; what does is how well it performs and how smart its design is WO R DS / / C HRIS KN IE RIM

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PHOTOGRAPHY / / N I C K W I L S O N

hen I talk about building smarter homes, I am not referring to technology. Being smarter is thinking about the way we approach the design of our homes. We need to start future-proofi ng through design adaptability. Today’s homes are built larger and on smaller blocks by families with smaller households than in the past. The Institute of Family Studies shows that the average family household reduced from 4.5 to 2.6 household members between 1911 and 2011. Although families are getting smaller, the kids are staying around longer. This is where design adaptability comes in. As we have been increasing the size of the family home, we have been sacrificing the size of the backyard. What happened to the spaces where the kids would play cricket in summer and footy in winter? If you were fortunate enough to have a pool, it would end up looking like the local community pool, brimming with kids. People wonder why Australian sport is not at the level it used to be. It’s no wonder that with limited backyard space to play in, Australians are not performing on the world sporting stage like they used to. It is very rare to see children playing cricket or football in the street today. With the introduction of the internet and the evolution of computers and mobile devices, children prefer to be indoors nowadays, sending messages and taking pictures of

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themselves to post online. If there was an Olympic event for people taking the perfect selfie, I’m sure Australia would win the gold medal. So does size matter? I understand that people want to build large homes, but what many fail to understand is that the bigger the house, the more difficult it is to thermally regulate. Although an open-plan design is fantastic, it creates thermal issues in regulating temperatures within the house. With open-plan design, efficiency is lost because instead of heating or cooling a single room, you must now heat or cool an entire floor area. The dependence on mechanical heating and cooling devices adds to the increase in our energy bills while also increasing our carbon footprint. It is great to own a new home, but competition between display home builders to reduce costs comes at a price. These builders work on very small profit margins with high turnover, and to redeem and increase the profit margin, they place an emphasis on variations. Small changes can add big costs, such as upgrading the kitchen or minor alterations to plans. What most people fail to realise is that although they are receiving a new home at a competitive rate, the builders can only supply at these rates by using the cheapest materials available. Consequently, these homes have limited lifespans and require more regular maintenance. With this type of property, one needs

to consider aspects of the build that will provide a more efficient outcome.

ORIENTATION, INSULATION, ADAPTABILITY Many people don’t realise how important the orientation of a house is. When you consider purchasing a display home, find out if the design is adaptable to suit the orientation of your new block. This will affect the heating and cooling of your home. Insulation is an important aspect to consider. Insulate where possible the roof, floors and walls. On an average home, around 30 to 40 per cent of the external wall surface is glass and regardless of how well the remainder of the house is insulated, all the insulating benefits could be lost through the glazing. Up to 40 per cent of heating energy can be lost through glazing, while 87 per cent can be absorbed via heat gain through windows, hence the importance of performance glazing. In the long run, the money spent on energy bills to heat and cool the home far exceeds the cost of upgrading your windows to a more efficient specification at the construction stage. What if we didn’t have to leave our homes? Not many people think about adaptability of design and the importance of futureproofing your home. This is achievable by building smarter and thinking smarter. After living in your home and becoming a part of the community, do you really want to leave as you get older? Many people don’t


Deakin House from Grand Designs Australia Series Six

want to leave, but most have no choice as the house no longer suits their needs. I have heard this complaint time and time again: “We really don’t want to leave but we have no choice; we can’t go up and down the stairs.” What if someone was thinking smartly during the design stage to overcome this? A future-proof design would consider the needs of an elderly inhabitant, knowing that a single-floor dwelling is more appropriate. It’s simple to fi x. One example is to consider, during the initial design stage, the installation of provisional plumbing within the ground-floor walls. These could be capped off, ready to be tapped into in the future for a new kitchen or bathroom. Consider having wider doorways on the ground floor, especially in the bathroom, for wheelchair access. With housing affordability almost out of reach of most young couples, homes that allow parents to live downstairs while the younger family lives upstairs could be the perfect scenario. This can bring back an opportunity for families and communities to connect as they did in the past. I reach out to all of you to consider design adaptability and the size of your house-toland ratio — and please, bring back the backyard!

Deakin House from Grand Designs Australia Series Six

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EXPERT ADVI C E / / L A N D S C A P I N G

TOP PICKS FOR A NATIVE AUSSIE LANDSCAPE Where else would you find native flora as uniquely named as in Australia? Some favourite Aussie natives include the Woolly Bush, Pigface, Snake Vine and Cousin It. Here are my top picks for your native garden WO R DS // MAT T LEACY

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he abundance of native flowers and plants in Australia can help bring an outdoor space to life, attracting birds and using a minimum of water, all while creating a landscape aesthetic like nowhere else in the world.

FOR COASTAL/NATURAL VIBES SCALE AND SCREENING Banksia integrifolia, often termed the Coast Banksia, is one of four Banksia species originally collected by Joseph Banks in the 1700s. It is fast-growing along the east coast of Australia, offering beautiful greens, silvers and flowers of pale yellow, and coping with salt and wind, making it a great coastal choice. Melaleuca quinquenervia (Paper Bark) is one of the most diverse plant genera in Australia, with around 250 different species. Growing in silty or swampy soil along the east coast of New South Wales and Queensland makes them suited to the section of the garden with wet soil or drainage problems. In terms of aesthetics, it’s covered by a white to grey papery bark, producing flowers with short cream and white bottlebrush spikes.

SHAPING AND FILLING Westringia fruticosa is an excellent native choice if you want a shrub that is fast-growing,

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durable and capable of year-round flowering. It is great for seaside gardens due to its strong resistance to salt spray and offers dense, fine leaves and small white flowers that not only look beautiful, but also attract a variety of birds and wildlife. It can be shaped into the perfect sphere if that look is desired. Endemic to southern Aussie shores, Leucophyta brownii or Cushion Bush gives off a beautiful silver appearance, with white– yellow flowers in the summer months. You’ll often find it along dunes, cliff faces and seaside gardens and it does not require a lot of watering once established. In terms of where to plant it, it’s great for giving shady areas some light. Mix with deep-green foliage plants and this plant will come to life. A native shrub from the south coast of Western Australia, Adenanthos sericeus ‘Woolly Bush’ is much-loved for its silver foliage that is so soft you will want to rub your face in it. It’s a great feature plant, providing contrast in many gardens, and is relatively drought-tolerant and low-maintenance in terms of pruning. Poa labillardieri ‘Eskdale’ is a native grass which is perfect for colour contrasting and softening hard surfaces. It sprouts beautiful, fine, upright blue–green foliage, making it an ideal choice for mass planting and larger

regeneration projects. In terms of climate, you’re looking at milder coastal conditions for the best results.

GROUND COVERS There are multiple species of Carpobrotus glaucescens native to Australia, with the majority growing along the east and south coasts. Also known as Pigface, these succulents produce a striking bright pink flower, similar to Daisies, as well as an edible berry-like fruit, which was used by native Aborigines as a food source. They can withstand salt spray, salt soils and dry periods and are perfect for ground cover. Hibbertia scandens (Snake Vine) is a vigorous and adaptable climbing plant that can be used for ground cover, rock walls, fences or trellises. It flourishes in a variety of conditions, but flowers best in full sun, producing large yellow flowers throughout most of the year. The vines are water wise and require occasional pruning, but they can bring a lush and tropical feel to an outdoor space. This plant is a great option for smaller gardens, growing horizontally with ease. Native to eastern Australia, the Casuarina is a popular coastal plant. The Casuarina glauca ‘Cousin It’ is known for its unique appearance and suitability for ground cover, rockeries and hanging baskets. If you’re looking to bring something a little different to your garden, this is a definite winner.

FOR STRUCTURED/ORGANISED VIBES SCALE AND SCREENING The Bottlebrush is one of Australia’s most loved and recognised native plant species, and there are plenty of good reasons why. They are brilliantly adaptable garden plants, with long lifespans and minimal maintenance requirements. They work well as both a hedge or feature tree, and flourish primarily in the east and south-east of Australia.


SHAPING AND FILLING Correa alba, or White Correa, makes for a fantastic hedge if clipped properly. It is one of Australia’s hardiest native plants, with high resistance to salt spray and adaptability to both sunny and semi-shaded environments. These shrubs are also beautiful to look at, producing subtle bell-shaped white and light pink flowers in the mid-autumn and early winter months. It also has really interesting tan tones to its stem and a beautiful grey-green leaf. We all know Doryanthes excels, or Gymea Lilies, for their spectacular red flower stems and striking foliage, providing great structure in the garden. Native to south Sydney, they are a staple of the Australian bush and a valuable addition to local landscapes. They not only look great, but are also durable and adaptable to a variety of harsh conditions so are well worth the investment.

GROUND COVERS

cover that looks great and has high durability, it’s difficult to go past Ajuga australis. An Aussie native found in most Australian states, it’s a herbaceous flowering plant, growing with a loose rosette of leaves and producing deep blue or purple flowers in spring and summer. Rhagodia spinescens is a hardy native shrub found across all Australian states, suitable for both coastal and inland environments and perfect for ground cover, hedging and bordering. It suits most soil types and can be positioned in full sun or light shade. It boasts a lovely grey to blue foliage that is understated and elegant.

EXPERT ADVI C E / / L A N D S C A P I N G

Aesthetically, they produce spectacular flower spikes in a broad range of colours — from mauve, pink and orange to cream and green. Their flowers act as a great attraction for native birds and bees. Tristaniopsis laurina, or Water Gum, grows mostly along the east coast, often on creek banks and in rainforest openings. It is a great street tree and larger garden tree, producing a dense foliage canopy of green leaves and offering lots of shade. It also produces bright yellow flowers in spring and summer, which help to bring colour to outdoor spaces. Best known by most Aussies as Lilly Pillies, Acmena smithii, is a native species that makes for a great feature tree, screen or hedge in outdoor landscapes. It’s a particularly hardy plant when growing and can adapt to plenty of different climates, whether it’s tropical or temperate. It’s also great for creating a musical garden, with fruits attracting a variety of local birds and wildlife.

Founder of the award-winning North Shorebased Landart Landscapes, Matt Leacy has 20 years’ experience in design, construction and maintenance services across landscaping and pool installation for both residential and commercial properties. landart.com.au

If you’re looking for a dense-growing ground

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S H O PPI N G / / H O T P RO D U C T S & S E RV I C E S

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PRODUCT AND SERVICE REVIEW 02

01: SHAKE IT UP Corinthian’s Moda door collection takes its cues from the design principles of the Shakers, a classic American technique that strips design down to the bare essentials. Moda’s design is sleek and deceptively simple, subtly working with any room style. Fully compatible with Corinthian internal door systems, Moda is available as a solid or glazed door, with options including mediumdensity fibreboard infill and clear or translucent glass. Carrying the heft and feel of a solid door, Moda reduces noise levels and increases thermal efficiency. Available in 24 designs, Moda doors are factory03

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primed on each side for a superior paint finish. corinthian.com.au 02: MAN’S BEST FRIEND Meet Rocko, a beloved Great Dane, whose portrait was commissioned by his owners and painted by Jac Clark. Before painting an artwork of a client’s beloved pet, Jac needs to know something about the animal to ensure the colours and expression used help capture their personality. Generally, a commission will take around five to six weeks before it’s delivered anywhere in Australia. morabon.com.au 03: A NEW STANDARD Handle-less furniture is in demand for the kitchen and living areas throughout the home. Blum offers fitting solutions that inspire and support this trend, allowing unique design ideas to be carried through to furniture interiors. “Blum has expanded the options for designers to realise their vision of handle-less furniture,” says Kylie Peterson, national marketing manager of Blum Australia. “With the introduction of Tip-On Bluemotion for Legrabox and Movento, designers, cabinetmakers and consumers will experience more design opportunities, ease of manufacturing and quality and performance that will last the lifetime of the furniture.” blum.com

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04: LIGHT MY FIRE Handcrafted by master artisans in Byron Bay, the Aether, by Aurora Suspended Fires, is a modern expression of beauty in simplicity. Perfect as a modern indoor fireplace or on the deck, the Australian-made suspended fireplace is available as both wood burning or bioethanol fuelled and will rotate 360 degrees. With an 8.2-kilowatt rating and pizza oven functionality, this fireplace is both beautiful and practical. The Aether enables you to finish off your indoor or outdoor living space, combining the restorative properties of fire with a contemporary designer fireplace. aurorasuspendedfires.com


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05 05: BACK IN BLACK Black, bold and bang on-trend, ILVE’s new series of built-in ovens is the culmination of two years’ research and development in Italy. Black kitchen appliances are a growing trend led by international stylists and interior designers. “Black appliances in the kitchen are very much on-trend with today’s kitchen designs in Europe,” says Daniel Bertuccio, marketing manager of Eurolinx. “In Australia we have also seen a rise in popularity, with people requesting black appliances, and we are excited to launch this colour option into the new ILVE in-built oven range.” ilve.com.au 06: INSIDE & OUT Innovative design for both indoor and outdoor spaces, the VOLA freestanding shower is available in finishes including natural brass, brushed chrome, stainless steel and polished chrome. en.vola.com 07: CLASSICALLY INSPIRED Inspired by classic architecture and design, the Trace series is

created with an aged look of a bygone era and plays on the raw quality of metals and cement, offering a stunning industrial and contemporary look. The Trace series is the latest arrival at Design Tiles and comes in many sizes, colours and finishes. You can choose from a range of colours including Mint, Mint Decor, Vitro and Alumina, which are stocked items, and Iron, Bronze and Corten, which are special-order items. designtiles.com.au 08: LOCK IT DOWN With the launch of Stegbar’s new Alumiere range comes an upgrade in hardware that’s designed to significantly improve the functionality and visual appearance of locks and handles for windows and doors. Available in a convenient one-key solution that locks and unlocks all the windows in a home, the hardware comes in stainless steel, aluminium grey, white or black finish. Custom-designed solutions include exclusive sliding window locks, sleek flush-pull handles and contemporary handles with hidden

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06 key locks. All hardware is corrosionresistant, offering a lifetime of good looks. stegbar.com.au

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09: SLIDING DOORS Alfresco living is in demand when it comes to entertaining, and the advantages of abundant natural light and establishing a connection between interior and exterior spaces is growing. Open up your home with Paarhammer sliding doors, stackers and giant or corner sliders for indoor–outdoor living. Paarhammer sliding doors are custom-made in a variety of combinations and can be up to 3 metres high or 5 metres wide per individual leaf. Timber frames with double or triple glazing ensure that energy efficiency and sound protection are standard. Also available for all bushfire levels, including BAL-FZ. paarhammer.com.au

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11 10: A MINIMALIST MOMENT Minimalism isn’t just an aesthetic, it’s a philosophy. Function meets form at a crossroad where clean lines abound to elevate design details. Mastella’s Vov bath is characterised by this renowned Italian brand’s use of organic forms and materials, creating a distinctive aesthetic that is found in its considered collections. abey.com.au 11: TOWER OF POWER A newcomer to the Australian market, Bream Innovation is a small Australian company run and owned by a qualified Australian electrician. Noticing that there was a gap in the market for smart benchtop power outlets and USB power solutions, Bream Innovation introduced the PowerTower. The company’s goal is to deliver innovative and affordable electronic solutions to the Australian public. info@power-tower.com.au

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12: TEAK TIME The stunning Tatra open double vanity allows you to store all your toiletries within reach and looks great at the same time. Made from teak wood, you know it’ll last for years. Schots’ latest collection elegantly contrasts a contemporary form with a rustic finish to create a range of unique vanities. Pair with a natural concrete or Riverstone basin for an untouched look, or create a minimalist setting by adopting a neutral palette. Discover how you can Unearth the Uncommon with Schots’ collection of vanities at Clifton Hill and North Geelong. schots.com.au 13: TIMELESS INNOVATION Morsø created the 6600 series around the concept of wanting something more than just a functional heating appliance; the company wanted a challenging interpretation of style and function. The convector combines cast iron, glass and an elliptical shape that’s complemented by a unique double door which maximises the glass area and provides a 180-degree view of the flames. Morsø craftsmen produce the finest cast-iron stoves in the world and the Morsø 6643 is proof of this, thanks to its breathtaking beauty and supreme performance. castworks.com.au 14: FANNING OUT Whispair utilises revolutionary technology that doesn’t rely on

finding a balance between air movement and noise. Whispair hoods are equipped with a fan motor that is positioned outside of the cooking environment which eliminates noise. Whispair hoods also boast commercial-style baffle filters that remove by-products from the air stream including steam and grease while maximising air flow. Utilising German fans, Whispair is proudly 100 per cent Australian owned, designed and assembled. 15: CAST FROM STONE This cast-stone bath and matching basin by MODA is an elegant and luxurious bathroom centrepiece featuring inspirational design and beauty combined with modernday practicality and use. MODA cast-stone products are constructed from 100 per cent Porcelite, a blend of limestone and highperformance resins. Pure white, each item is individually hand-finished by craftsmen. MODA cast-stone products are available in any colour either in a matt or gloss finish. acsbathrooms.com.au

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Terms & Conditions * Offer available with all Vino Pro models while stocks last. See www.huskybrand.com.au for more details. Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer. Rob Dolan True Colours wine package valued at $159.


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I N D EX

INDEX AAA ............................................................................................ 22 ACS Designer Bathrooms ............................................ 160 Amber Tiles ..........................................................................IBC Arisit ...........................................................................................217 Australian Living ................................................................140 Blum ...............................................................................................6 Bosch............................................................................................12 Bream Unique Lighting ................................................... 47 Castworks................................................................................ 78 Concrete Resurfacing Systems ................................... 18 Corinthian Doors ................................................................. 58 CSR Monier ............................................................................195 Designer Rugs........................................................................ 16

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Dowell Windows & Doors ..............................................34 Fisher & Paykel .....................................................................115 Häfele .........................................................................................44 Heatstrip..................................................................................127 Husky Vino Pro ...................................................................245 Hydrotherm ............................................................................. 10 Jetmaster ................................................................................. 76 King Living ............................................................................ IFC Len Wallis Audio ..................................................................40 Lopi.............................................................................................139 Mantell Furniture ..................................................................27 Melbourne Polytechnic..................................................247 Nulook Henderson ........................................................... 103

Paarhammer Windows and Doors ........................... 24 Sanctum Design.....................................................................21 Schots Home Emporium .............................................. 169 Signature Homes............................................................ OBC Smeg.............................................................................................. 8 Sovereign Interiors ................................................................4 Steel ..........................................................................................190 Stegbar......................................................................................48 Talostone ................................................................................... 14 Whispair..................................................................................... 91 The Woodworkers Company ..................................... 150


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Grand designs new zealand issue 33 2017  
Grand designs new zealand issue 33 2017  
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