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MAKE ONE CHANGE 3 . . . .Dispelling worry about mammography 4 . . . .Fighting Depression– the Secret Disease 5

. . .Is your elder eating right?

6–7 . .Lyme Disease– Preventable, Treatable 8–9 . .Knowledge is power when it comes to heart attack and stroke 10 . . .Panicked about school? Tips to calm your child 11 . . .Profiles in giving

If you would like to donate to Your Hospital: The Campaign for Anna Jaques, please contact Sarah Gnerre at the Anna Jaques Community Health Foundation. 978-463-1176 or sgnerre@ajh.org.

A Healthy Version of a Classic Fall Favorite:

APPLE CRISP PARFAIT

This version of apple crisp has a light, flavorful topping and is provided courtesy of the American Diabetes Association. Serves 9

Ingredients 3 cups peeled & sliced apples (about 3 medium apples) 1/3 cup old fashioned cooking oats 3 Tbsps brown sugar or the equivalent in artificial sweetener 2 Tbsps water 1 tsp cinnamon 4 oz fat-free vanilla yogurt, sweetened with artificial sweetener 1/4 tsp cinnamon 1/8 tsp ground nutmeg 3/4 cup fat-free whipped topping

Preparation 1. Mix apples, oats, brown sugar, water and cinnamon. 2. Pour apple mixture in a 1-quart microwave-safe bowl. 3. Cover with wax paper and microwave on high for 5 to 7 minutes, rotating 1/4 turn halfway through cooking time. 4. Depending on thickness of fruit, cooking time may be longer.

Nutrition Information Exchange/Choices 2 Carbohydrate Calories: 149 g Calories from Fat: Total Fat: 1 g Saturated Fat: 0 g Cholesterol: 1 mg Sodium: 26 mg Total Carbohydrate: 35 g Dietary Fiber: 3 g Sugars: 24 g Protein: 2 g

Anna Jaques Hospital is the proud co-sponsor of the Newburyport Farmers’ market. The market is open Sundays, 9–1 at the Tannery in Newburyport.

MAKE ONE CHANGE Editor: Deborah Chiaravalloti Designer: Rose Russo

Make One Change is published quarterly by Anna Jaques Hospital. The material in Make One Change is for educational and informational purposes only. It is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice or care. Please consult a doctor with any questions or concerns you might have regarding your condition. To have your name added to, or removed from, the mailing list call 978-463-1175.

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Why Worry? She’s “The Queen of Mammography” MEET LISA MOORE M A M M O G R A P H Y S U P E R V I S O R AT A N N A J A Q U E S

e

ach October, the prevalence of pink ribbons reminds women of the importance of preventing breast cancer through self care. Anna Jaques

Hospital has a secret weapon in the battle against breast cancer – Lisa Moore, Mammography Supervisor. Last year Lisa performed 2,755 mammograms. She knows first hand, the importance of that diagnostic tool. Lisa says in her 20-plus years of mammography experience she has learned that women delay or ignore their mammograms for one reason – fear. “We know that fear is the main reason why patients delay testing. But in the case of breast cancer, what you don’t know might kill you. Time and time again we see women who come in for their mammogram, and as a result of that screening, or follow up testing, cancer is discovered in its early stages,” said Lisa. “Because we caught the cancer early, those women are healthy today.” Lisa works hard to communicate regularly with women so they don’t miss their annual mammograms. She communicates with patients’ physicians whenever patients miss follow up testing, and she calls patients who are delaying important biopsies. “A couple of years ago we had a patient who needed a biopsy. We reminded her, her doctor’s office reminded her, and she kept delaying the procedure,” said Lisa. “When she finally had the biopsy, cancer was discovered, but it was in the very early stages. She had the cancer treated and she is fine today. What if she hadn’t had that follow up biopsy?” “Perseverance is the key,” said Lisa. “We don’t want women falling through the cracks.” Ask anyone who knows Lisa and they will tell you that perseverance, and a bit of irreverence come naturally to her. It seems that the “Mammo Queen” is a deserved, and fitting, title. To schedule a digital mammogram at Anna Jaques Hospital, call 978-834-8210. 3


THE NOT SO SECRET WORK TO FIGHT THE “SECRET DISEASE” – Depression.

Depression is sometimes called the secret, or invisible, disease and can remain undiagnosed for years. It doesn’t care about age or gender, position or lifestyle. It can destroy careers and families, and yet, people are very hesitant to talk about depression. “Expecting a person suffering from depression to snap out of it may not be a safe or effective decision. Depression is a chronic and recurrent disease,” said Alex Lipin, MD, chief of the department of psychiatry at Anna Jaques. “People suffering from depression are prone to harm themselves and attempt suicide more often, tragically, with a high rate of success. Depression needs serious treatment with medications, in addition to family support and therapy.” “A very successful and safe treatment for the most severe form of depression is ECT (Electroconvulsive Therapy) which is offered here at Anna Jaques,” said Dr. Lipin. “Depression can be treated successfully, but only with consistent medical intervention and psychotherapy, both of which are available at the hospital.” Dr. Lipin says that many medical conditions such as thyroid disease, lupus, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and others may cause symptoms of depression. That is why it is important to talk to a primary care physician who can screen the patient for depression and if appropriate, make a referral to a mental health professional for treatment. “Staff members in the adult psychiatric unit (a locked unit) at the hospital help patients identify what has happened that may have caused their depression,” said Moe Lord, RNC, BS, nursing director of psychiatric services at Anna Jaques. “Then we help them look inside to find their own resilience, strength, and coping strategies.” The staff uses many treatment tools to help patients including traditional psychotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, coping and self esteem groups. (Cognitive-behavioral therapy is based on the idea that our thoughts cause our feelings and behaviors, not external things, like people or events. Therefore, we can change the way we think to feel better, even if the situation does not change.) If you believe that you, a friend, or loved one may be suffering from depression, talk with your physician first. S/he can refer you to a mental health professional who can help.

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Avoiding Malnutrition in Seniors Your elderly uncle walks a mile each day and has remained trim all his life. But is he really healthy, getting all of the nutrients he needs? • Financial strain. Living on a limited income can cause malnutrition in older adults. Lack of money can lead some seniors to forego meals in order to pay for other things such as heating fuel. Many seniors take expensive medications, which may cause an additional financial strain, forcing them to choose between medicine and food. Solution: Speak with your loved one’s physician to see if less expensive medications are available. Seek heating assistance from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 800-632-8175.

M

alnutrition, the lack of a balanced, healthy diet full of nutrients and vitamins, can be a serious problem in senior citizens. It’s estimated that 3.7 million senior adults are malnourished, many of whom may othersize appear healthy. SOCIAL AND HEALTH FACTORS:

When senior citizens fail to follow a healthy diet, the underlying reasons are often a variety of social factors or medical conditions.

• Improper diet. Appetites change as adults age, causing some seniors to miss meals or eat just a handful of crackers rather than a proper dinner. This can cause chronic medical conditions to worsen, despite medication. Solution: Invite your loved one over for dinner, or help him or her prepare a meal and place some portions in the freezer.

THESE TIPS MAY HELP YOU SPOT A MALNUTRITION PROBLEM: • Look for physical problems, such as unusual weight loss, easy bruising, slow-healing wounds, and improperly fitting dentures, which often cause a person to skip meals. • Know what medications an elderly loved one takes and how these drugs may affect his or her appetite.

• Depression. Many seniors suffer from depression as they watch their independence shrink and their health decline. Depression affects as many as 6 million Americans over the age of 65. It can significantly reduce a senior’s appetite. Solution: Work with your loved one’s physician to find a mental health professional who can screen him or her for depression and establish a treatment plan. Find a companion who can spend time with your loved one and eat at least one meal a day with him or her. • Chronic conditions. Debilitating, long term conditions, such as stroke, can impact a senior’s ability to shop or cook for him or herself. Solution: Medical intervention, such as physical, occupational, and/or speech therapy can help your loved one return to the activities of daily life.

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LYME DISEASE Preventable  Treatable M A S S AC H U S E T T S

Lyme disease in Massachusetts is

Diagnosis:

“a public health crisis”, according to the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Massachusetts has one of the highest incidence rates of the disease in the US, and it is continuing to increase.

Based on physical findings, a blood test,

“Lyme disease is dangerous because it can make you sick quickly, and if left untreated, the disease can create long-term health problems” said Joseph Gross, MD, infectious disease specialist at Pentucket Medical Associates in Newburyport. These long term health problems may include:

disease are treated successfully with

Chronic arthritis, which usually causes severe swelling in one knee.

Nervous system problems including meningitis, Bell’s palsy, weakness, pain, or both, in the hands, arms, feet and/or legs.

The heart can also be affected by Lyme disease, causing a slowing down of the heart rate and fainting.

“Everyone should know the symptoms of Lyme disease,” said Dr. Gross. “It’s important so that you can describe them to your physician. Symptoms include fever, headache, unusual fatigue, and a characteristic red round or oval expanding skin rash like a “bull’s eye.” (see above)

Source: Massachusetts Department of Public Health

and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks, your doctor can determine if you are suffering from Lyme disease. Dr. Gross said “Most cases of Lyme a 2 to 4 week course of antibiotics.”

Prevention: Ticks are most numerous in wooded or grassy habitats, and may be found in grassy dune areas. Follow these steps to protect yourself: • Use a repellent with DEET or Permethrin. DEET products should not be used on

How to remove a tick

infants under two months of age.

1.

• Wear long, light-colored pants tucked

Use fine-tipped tweezers

to grasp the tick as close to

into your socks or boots, and a long-

the skin's surface as possible.

sleeved shirt so you can see ticks that

2. Pull upward with steady,

may be on your clothing. • Stay on cleared trails when walking or hiking. • Talk to your veterinarian about tick

This illustration shows the sizes of several ticks at different life stages in relation to the size of a dime. In general, adult ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed and nymphal ticks are approximately the size of a poppy seed.

Source: CDC, www.cdc.gov/lyme/transmission/ blacklegged.html

even pressure. Don't twist or jerk the tick; this can cause the mouth parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens, remove the mouth parts with tweezers. If you are unable to remove the mouth

control options (tick collars, repellents)

parts easily with clean tweezers, leave them alone

for your pets.

and let the skin heal.

3. After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite

For More Information: Talk to your doctor, or the local board of health. To make an appointment with Dr. Gross at Pentucket Medical Associates call (978) 499-7200. www.pmaonline.com

area and your hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub, or soap and water.

To read more about Lyme disease log

Avoid folklore remedies such as "painting" the tick

on to The Massachusetts Department

with nail polish or petroleum jelly, or using heat to

of Public Health (MDPH), Division

make the tick detach from the skin.

of Epidemiology and Immunization, www.mass.gov/dph/tick.

6

7


LYME DISEASE Preventable  Treatable M A S S AC H U S E T T S

Lyme disease in Massachusetts is

Diagnosis:

“a public health crisis”, according to the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Massachusetts has one of the highest incidence rates of the disease in the US, and it is continuing to increase.

Based on physical findings, a blood test,

“Lyme disease is dangerous because it can make you sick quickly, and if left untreated, the disease can create long-term health problems” said Joseph Gross, MD, infectious disease specialist at Pentucket Medical Associates in Newburyport. These long term health problems may include:

disease are treated successfully with

Chronic arthritis, which usually causes severe swelling in one knee.

Nervous system problems including meningitis, Bell’s palsy, weakness, pain, or both, in the hands, arms, feet and/or legs.

The heart can also be affected by Lyme disease, causing a slowing down of the heart rate and fainting.

“Everyone should know the symptoms of Lyme disease,” said Dr. Gross. “It’s important so that you can describe them to your physician. Symptoms include fever, headache, unusual fatigue, and a characteristic red round or oval expanding skin rash like a “bull’s eye.” (see above)

Source: Massachusetts Department of Public Health

and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks, your doctor can determine if you are suffering from Lyme disease. Dr. Gross said “Most cases of Lyme a 2 to 4 week course of antibiotics.”

Prevention: Ticks are most numerous in wooded or grassy habitats, and may be found in grassy dune areas. Follow these steps to protect yourself: • Use a repellent with DEET or Permethrin. DEET products should not be used on

How to remove a tick

infants under two months of age.

1.

• Wear long, light-colored pants tucked

Use fine-tipped tweezers

to grasp the tick as close to

into your socks or boots, and a long-

the skin's surface as possible.

sleeved shirt so you can see ticks that

2. Pull upward with steady,

may be on your clothing. • Stay on cleared trails when walking or hiking. • Talk to your veterinarian about tick

This illustration shows the sizes of several ticks at different life stages in relation to the size of a dime. In general, adult ticks are approximately the size of a sesame seed and nymphal ticks are approximately the size of a poppy seed.

Source: CDC, www.cdc.gov/lyme/transmission/ blacklegged.html

even pressure. Don't twist or jerk the tick; this can cause the mouth parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens, remove the mouth parts with tweezers. If you are unable to remove the mouth

control options (tick collars, repellents)

parts easily with clean tweezers, leave them alone

for your pets.

and let the skin heal.

3. After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite

For More Information: Talk to your doctor, or the local board of health. To make an appointment with Dr. Gross at Pentucket Medical Associates call (978) 499-7200. www.pmaonline.com

area and your hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub, or soap and water.

To read more about Lyme disease log

Avoid folklore remedies such as "painting" the tick

on to The Massachusetts Department

with nail polish or petroleum jelly, or using heat to

of Public Health (MDPH), Division

make the tick detach from the skin.

of Epidemiology and Immunization, www.mass.gov/dph/tick.

6

7


Knowledge is power Know the Symptoms of Heart Attack Heart disease is our nation’s No. 1 killer. Many heart disease deaths can be prevented if you know the signs and symptoms of heart attack and act fast.

Signs and Symptoms of Heart Attack • Chest discomfort: pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or is intermittent. • Discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach. • Shortness of breath, with or without chest

prevent

You can heart disease by making simple, but important, lifestyle changes:

discomfort. • Breaking out in a cold sweat, feeling nauseous or lightheaded.

• Quit smoking.

Heart Attack Symptoms for Women:

• Lose or maintain your weight.

Women are somewhat more likely to experience

• If you drink alcohol, do so in

additional symptoms of heart attack:

moderation; one to two drinks daily

• Shortness of breath

for men, one drink daily for women.

• Nausea/vomiting

• Eat a heart-healthy diet low in

• Back or jaw pain

saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol and sodium. • Be physically active. • Manage stress and control. your blood pressure. • Get adequate rest.

ACT FAST! If you are with someone exhibiting the symptoms of heart attack, don’t wait more than five minutes before calling 9-1-1.

To find a cardiologist at Anna Jaques Hospital, call the Physician Referral line, 978-463-1090 or log onto www.ajh.org and click the button “Find a Physician.”

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Know the Signs of Stroke Stroke is known as the “silent killer” because it strikes without warning. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States and a leading cause of long-term disability. “From the minute you begin to experience stroke symptoms, you’re literally in a race against time to get treatment,” says Diane Wigmore, RN, BS, director of the emergency department at Anna Jaques Hospital (AJH). “You have three hours to get to the hospital and begin clot busting medications or you’ve missed the opportunity to stop the stroke from doing further damage.”

Today there are treatments that may reduce the risk of damage from the most common type of stroke, but only if you get help quickly — within three hours of your first symptoms.

Signs and Symptoms of Stroke Use these tips from the National Stroke Association to act FAST if you suspect that someone you are with may be suffering a stroke.

F A S T: F:

FACE: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

A: S: T:

Anna Jaques is a Primary Stroke Service Once the patient arrives at the hospital, he or she is immediately taken to the computed tomography (CT) scanner to

ARMS: Ask the person to raise both arms.

confirm whether or not a

Does one arm drift downward?

stroke is underway, as well as to perform other tests. If the

SPEECH: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase.

patient has arrived within three

Is their speech slurred or strange?

hours of the onset of symptoms,

TIME: If you observe any of these signs, call 9-1-1

a physician can administer

immediately

tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to bust the clot and

CALL 9-1-1. DO NOT DRIVE A STROKE VICTIM TO

restore necessary blood flow, if

THE HOSPITAL.

there are no contraindications

Ambulance personnel will call ahead to Anna Jaques and alert the emergency department that a stroke patient is on the way,

and it is the type of stroke that responds to tPA.

prompting the activation of the Stroke Team.

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School is in session... your child is still panicking. Now what? Be positive. The first year of school is an exciting milestone and your child will reflect your attitudes toward school.

Invite older siblings to talk about what they like about school. In these conversations, allow your child to express worries and concerns, so you can talk them out.

Make sure school mornings aren’t rushed (as much as possible!) Rushing causes stress and increases anxiety. Prepare all necessary things, such as clothes, snacks, backpack, supplies, set out the breakfast dishes, etc. the evening before.

Help your child choose a familiar or cherished small item that can be carried from home to increase comfort in a new environment. Your child can leave it in his or her cubby for quick "recharging" during the day.

Make sure that whoever picks up your child up from school arrives on time. This will help to avoid the child’s anxiety over whether or not someone is going to arrive to take him or her home.

Most importantly, give your child lots of hugs and reassurance that they are wonderful. Written in part with information from the National Association for Education of Young Children (NAEYC) http://www.naeyc.org

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Profiles in Giving: Leading the Way with Gifts to Your Hospital: The Campaign for Anna Jaques N

othing more accurately describes the relationship between Charlie Cullen’s family and Anna Jaques Hospital than the name of the hospital’s $6 million capital campaign – Your Hospital: The Campaign for Anna Jaques. Charlie is the campaign’s chairman and his family has a multigenerational relationship with Anna Jaques.

Charlie’s father, the late James F. Cullen, served as a hospital trustee, a mantle that Charlie has taken up after completing his tenure as chair of the Anna Jaques Community Health Foundation. Now Charlie’s children, Dan and Lindsay, have joined him in making a significant family gift to the capital campaign, to name the Administrative Offices. “We hope our gift inspires others to support the campaign and passes on my Dad’s lesson that getting involved in the life of the community is very important.”

planning began for a capital campaign to help W hen underwrite Anna Jaques Hospital’s Master Facility

T

he Abdulla family has been on Salisbury Beach for more than 90 years. “Uncle Joe began with a portable popcorn cart in the 1920s,” said Fred Abdulla. “Then he and Aunt Jennie opened a penny arcade named Joe’s Playland, and our parents, Fred and Julia, started the ice cream stand in the 1940s. These businesses grew to become the Joe’s Playland we know today.” Five generations later, Joe’s Playland is still family-owned and operated. Supporting Your Hospital: The Campaign for Anna Jaques seemed natural for the Abdulla family. “The hospital keeps our family, and our customers’ families healthy,” said Dan.

Plan, one of the first people asked to serve on the campaign steering committee was a physician – a very busy physician – Michele Sasmor, MD of Riversong Plastic Surgery. She readily agreed to serve on the steering committee and the medical staff campaign committee. She also set the pace for other physicians when, along with her husband Dr. David Strohschein, she became the first Anna Jaques physician to make a generous pledge to the campaign to name the enclosed fountain in the Institution for Savings inpatient unit. To date, Dr. Sasmor and other members of the AJH medical staff have collectively committed over $400,000. “Anna Jaques may be the physicians’ base of operations, but the hospital belongs to the community, and our patients need and deserve the private rooms that are the centerpiece of this project,” Dr. Sasmor said.

Fred, his wife, Donna, Dan, his partner, Mark Moquin, and Joe’s Playland made a family gift to the campaign to name the hospital’s administrative conference room, now known as the Abdulla Conference Room. 11


25 Highland Avenue • Newbur yport, MA 01950

Nonprofit Organization US Postage PAID Newburyport, MA Permit No. 163

Simple ways to stay safe on Halloween Children should always be accompanied by a responsible adult. Groups of kids should include two or three parents. Dress your children in bright costumes and make sure they wear a glow stick or something reflective. Teach your children never to go inside someone’s house while trick or treating. Check your children’s candy: Look for old, worn, or torn wrappers, homemade or unwrapped treats, fruit, sharp objects and candy that looks as if it may have been tampered with. For small children, remove hard candies.

Have fun! Make sure you follow these simple tips so that you and your children have a safe and memorable Halloween!

2011 Fall Make One Change  

Magazine for Anna Jaques Hospital

2011 Fall Make One Change  

Magazine for Anna Jaques Hospital

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