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ROSER GARCIA PORTFOLIO 2016-2017-2018


INTRODUCTION The content of this portfolio is not just about my projects since I started to study Fashion Design, but a celebration of the start of a constant conceptual growth and mind-opened state. Coming from a small town and having studied technological sciences in High School collided heavily with my current studies. But since I was a little child, art and design had been a special part from humanity's work that got me so trapped and made me feel something so special that I couldn’t understand how it could be that strong. Studying fashion has allowed me to open myself to the world and comprehend these feelings I had for such a long time, understanding how the creative process is developed. I felt in love with it, I have learnt a lot working harder than ever before making my ideas tangible. Now, my aim is to be able to create the same way as the artists and designers I like did, approaching professional methods to make ourish these feelings I felt inside to those who look or wear my work. This is my background and the landscape drawn behind this portfolio. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, Roser.


CURRICULUM VITAE


ROSER GARCIA 4 Oskar Zügel, Tossa de Mar (Girona) 17320 SPAIN

+34 697619348

r.garica.p@gmail.com

Nativie proficiency - Spanish & Catalan Professional proficiency - English PROFILE Passionate learner with experience in dealing with costumers from a wide range of nationalities. Focused on improving my sewing and pattern-making skills, aiming to work inside the Couture and/or Bespoke Tailoring field. Very interested in sustainable processes of garment manufacturing and the resarch on new textiles. Responsable and worker. EXPERIENCE S HO P AS S I STAN T, TOT F OTO D E TO SSA S. L . U. , TO SSA D E M AR, GI RO N A J U NE - S E PT E M B E R 2 0 1 4 AN D JU N E - AU GU ST 2017

/Executed personal assisted customer services tasks as fashion and product advising, preparing costumed wrapping and managing orders with special packaging for international ships. /Repaired and replaced defective items. /Steamed and ironed fashion items for a professional presentation to the public. /Maintained a revision of the stocks of the store. /Cleaning and organization of the stocks. /Cleaning and organization of the store items. /Design of propaganda and promotion posters. CRÊP E CO O K , TOT F OTO D E TO SSA S. L . U. , TO SSA D E M AR, GI RO N A J U NE - AU G U ST 2 0 1 6

/Executed cleaning tasks and kept order in the kitchen daily. /Worked attending customers petitions. /Worked on the cash desk position, closing and checking the sales. /Mastered in preparing french crispy crêpes.

EDUCATION LA S A L L E H I G H S C H O O L , G I R O N A CI TY, GI RO N A G CS E AN D T E C H N O LO G I CAL S CI E N CE F O U N DATI O N 2 0 1 0 - 2 0 1 6

/Two year foundation of LOE Bachillerato specialized in Science, in which were studied

technical subjects as Maths, Physics, Technological Science and Technical Drawing. /Prepared the LOE PAU exams to access to Science Degrees.


IST IT U TO E U R O P E O D I D E S I G N , B ARCE LO N A CI TY, B ARCE LO N A BA IN FAS H I O N D E S I G N 2 0 1 6 - 2018

/Studying a degree in Fashion Design given by the University of Westminster in agreement with IED Barcelona. /Developing self-style criteria. /Learning research techniques for fashion design and concept development. /Learning garment confection and pattern-making methods. ACTIVITIES

Participated in the Fashion Tech Workshop, with Alex Murray-Leslie as a course leader. /Confectioned a look with Muskin material in a week and prepared a presentation in the Yomo convention inside the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

SKILLS

BASIC KNOWLEDGE IN Sewing Techniques! Pattern Making Fashion styling

GOOD AT

Trend Forecasting ! Hand drawing and Digital Illustration ! Microsoft ofďŹ ce

HIGH LEVEL

Adobe Photoshop ! Adobe Illustrator ! Adobe Indesign

INTERESTS

CHARACTERISTICS

Common fabrics performance Exploration of new styles

Pay attention to detail Strong analytical skills

Made to Measure Technical new fabrics

Fast learner Discreet

PORTFOLIO AND SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/_rosele/ LINKEDIN https://www.linkedin.com/in/roser-garcia-palomo-09256712a/


FINAL COLLECTION 1ST YEAR


FASHION TECHWORKSHOP 1ST YEAR


http://www.fashionbarcelona.com/blog/4382-2/ http://beteve.cat/clip/reportatge-moda-tecnologica-i-sostenible-a-lied/


TEXTILE DESIGN 2ND YEAR


TEXTILE DESIGN 1ST YEAR


TREND REPORTS APPLIED TO ART AND FASHION 1ST YEAR


ISTITUTO EUROPEO DI DESIGN BARCELONA WESTMINSTER BA IN FASHION DESIGN Fashion Investigation Module Anna Rowe Anna Tomà s

Essay SURREALISM INFLUENCES IN THE CONTEMPORARY FASHION

Roser Garcia Palomo November 28th, 2016 Barcelona


Garcia Palomo

Introduction to Surrealism The Surrealism as way of expression is an art movement that was born between the two World Wars as a response to the social decadence then stablished and led by the new era of machines and technological approaches. The artists focused their efforts in to create a new way of doing art that would be able to break with the current society and so break the materialism brought by the bourgeois, that they thought was the main cause of the First World War. The purpose of this new way of creating was the experimentation of the artist in order to produce something random and nonsensical that would impact the viewer so he could understand by himself that there’s something further than the real life and the rational, the world of dreams and the unconscious, where all our ideas are randomly originated. The one who named this newborn creative activity was Frenchman André Breton, the author of the First Surrealist Manifesto, a manuscript that defined it as a movement, first literary and later artistic, that was based on the ‘écriture automatique’ (automatic writing). This technique consisted in composing a text with neither clear sense nor connection between the subjects presented, creating a narrative without meaning so each reader could interpret it freely. Breton was able to experiment these theories himself when he started to work as a junior doctor in the neurology department of Nantes’ hospital. He had read from subjects as the conscious and unconscious parts of our minds from Sigmund Freud’s work, becoming very interested in this field. He started to kept records of the dreams and thought processes of mental patients. Later on, he began altogether with Philippe Soupault to work on a series of texts based on the technique of ‘free association’, which was published later the same year entitled Les champs magnétiques (Magnetic Fields). This essay is nowadays considered as the first definition of the ‘écriture automatique’. In the First Surrealist Manifesto Breton explained the conclusions he got from his experimentations that led him to write Les champs magnétiques and understand the new way of managing our mental working process: ‘Totally preoccupied with Freud as I then was and familiar with his methods of investigation which I had some slight occasion to practice on patients during the war, I resolved to obtain from myself what one tries to obtain from others, namely a monologue delivered as rapidly as possible, on which the critical mind of the subject is unable to pass judgement, unembarrassed consequently by reticence, comprising, as precisely as possible, spoken thought.’ However, the impact of this ideas became strongly influential not for the writers but for the artists, who wanted to create a new movement that could make people react to the modern world situations and open their minds. First was shown in the automatic drawings, where the producer was able to let their mind work freely, by sketching shapes and undefined objects done without purpose. Yet, this was just a base for a further interesting jump, the recognition of our dreams and the representation of them. So surrealism ended up not just being about the development of a new painting technique or the introduction of a concrete theme, it was much more intellectual and it had a powerful deep motivation that went beyond the perception. Klingsöhr-Leroy, Cathrin and Uta Grosenick. Surrealism. Köln: Taschen, 2004. Print. Breton, André. First Surrealist Manifesto. Paris: A.S. Kline, 1924. Print.

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Garcia Palomo

Commentary of The Two Masks by Giorgio de Chirico Giorgio de Chirico was born in Greece, yet he had Italian roots. He studied in Athens, Florence and Munich. These mixture of cultures brought him the opportunity to learn about different intellectuals and artists that later influenced his works, such as the preSocratics, Friederich Nietzsche or Arnold Böcklin. Therefore, the development of his most relevant work was mainly focused in the metaphysical and the composition of not related elements on a same space to create an impossible association. One of the art works that represents this characteristic way of portray is The Two Masks, where we find an unclarified landscape. First of all, because of the background, we recognize the sky but we can’t identify what does the yellow block on perspective represent. On top of it, a collection of what appears to be different pieces of wood. Then much closer to the spectator the presence of two mannequin faces leader the center of the painting, and finally in front there’s another compound of abstract constructions that breaks with the colors of the human-like figure. What Chirico reaches with this depiction is our feeling of familiarity because of the sky and the abstract elements shaped in usual forms, but at the same time the scary feeling of a stranger getting close to us, whom we don’t know his identity and intentions. The black holes of the first dummy help achieving the mystery and sinister look of the painting even is colored mainly in light tones.

lingsöhr-Leroy, Cathrin and Uta Grosenick. Surrealism. Köln: Taschen, 2004. Print. Trivium Art History: http://arthistoryproject.com/artists/giorgio-de-chirico/

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Garcia Palomo

Commentary of Promontory Palace by Yves Tanguy Yves Tanguy produced a group of landscapes that have been termed les coulées (or flowing forms) for their molten character. Yet the most relevant of the paintings from this sequence is Promontory Palace, where the abstract watery silhouettes and the consistence of the solid rounded structures meet in a deep stormy landscape where far in the sky something that seems corresponding to a hair lock disappears. ‘In the natural world such geologic metamorphosis would require intense heat and volcanic activity. Yet Tanguy’s restrained grays and muted pinks, accented with cool blue and pale green and yellow, deny the presence of fire and earth.’ So alternately, the artist created a negative scenery but which completely filled the equivalent aspect of the primary inspiration. However, he kept his usual style which is characterized by an infinite space occupied by soft and organic abstract figures. Also accomplishing the idea of make it familiar to the viewer so he can imagine itself in it but at the same time it has the notion of impossibility and fantasy that we have seen before in Chirico’s work. ‘The strength of his imagery derives from the delicate tension he creates between the logic of sensation and the freedom of imagination.’

Guggenheim Online: https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/4033

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Garcia Palomo

The Influence of Surrealism in Haute Couture and Street Style (Yves Tanguy) The main bases of Yves Tanguy’s work were the abstraction and subsequently the creation of imaginary spaces inhabited by curious volumes and surreal organic forms. This two key points that sign his work are now reflected in many catwalks from Couture Houses like Givenchy, Jacquemus, Viktor & Rolf or Maison Martin Margiela. Givenchy’s fall/winter 2016 haute couture collection it’s one of the best examples because it actually represents on its designs this idea of melting forms and rounded structures played by ruffles, with a soft feeling yet with strange textures given by pleated crépe de chine and hand embroidered silk that remembers to the Promontory Palace.

From left to right: Promontory Palace picture, looks 1 and 13 from Givenchy’s Haute Couture collection.

Also Jacquemus fall/winter 2016 collection seems to be very related with Tanguy’s work, the way the garments are design seem to recreate the same unknown elements that take up the paintings like Deux Fois du Noir. Simon Porte Jacquemus made cut outs and gathered the fabrics, like wool and velvet, in different ways in order to create unusual volumes and deconstructed pieces without a clear shape.

From left to right: Deux Fois du Noir picture, looks 22 and 28 from Jacquemus collection La Reconstruction.

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Garcia Palomo

These elements have become trendy thanks to main street and value brands like Pull & Bear and H&M that have recently included garments with shiny pleated polyester fabrics which are alike Givenchy’s dresses texture and have a fluid movement that reminds us about the melting objects.

From left to right: Pull & Bear pleated dress, H&M pleated jumpsuit.

Also Forever 21 and COS, have looked for and developed the idea of deconstructing the garments and work for finding new shapes playing with thick fabrics and gathering them or making cut outs. Even every clothing line has its style, different targets and has used diverse techniques to arrive to the final result, all the designs have the surrealist flair that matches them with each other as we can see in the images below.

From top left to right (clockwise): Selfie Leslie white dress, Jaded London pink bodysuit both sold at Forever 21. Straight dress with black detail, green layered midlength skirt, asymmetric belted cardigan all from COS.

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Garcia Palomo

The Influence of Surrealism in Haute Couture and Street Style (Giorgio de Chirico) Chirico’s work, even if it seems something too unreal and untidied, it has been a big inspiration for designers. During the surrealist period he focused mostly on creating artworks that were mostly inhabited by dummies. May he be trying to show how a strange face really looks to us, how we see the things we don’t know or we don’t understand. Also the over exposition of abstract pieces which he uses to occupy part of the paintings help to disturb our vision and makes us get lost on them. Loewe seems to have taken these ideas into its spring summer 2017 collection where women bodies were transformed by leather pieces that were on top of the garments or applied to them and using a visible stitching so the models look like the mannequins he used to represent. Also the idea of the juxtaposition of a variety of fabrics of different prints and fibers just in one costume, like the way he filled his art works.

From left to right (clockwise): The Great Machine picture, look 23, close up of look, look 43 from Loewe’s runway and The Two Masks picture.

Also Marques ‘Almeida has reflected some elements from Chirico’s paintings, such as the way he shaped his mannequins elongating the thighs and shortening the calf, the designers have experimented with the shapes of the body and the result actually is very similar to the art works silhouettes.

From left to right: Hector and Andromache (1924) picture, Marques ‘Almeida look 11from spring summer 2017 collection.

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Garcia Palomo

These concepts that we have previously explained have also reached the streets but in a softer and more wearable way. Like the patchwork garments, a technique that has been applied mostly to dresses, pants and accessories. But because of the fast fashion needs, instead of combining diverse fabrics they play mixing printings in the same piece of cloth. From left to right: Short patchwork print jumpsuit from Asos, Kiss the Sky patchwork print wide pants.

The leather applications and visible stitches have been introduced very powerfully as we see in & Other Stories and Zara collections.

From left to right: Zara black crop top and dress, Zana Bayne x & Other Stories leather garment.

Finally, Marques ‘Almeida pants have not reached the streets yet, but the main idea remains in the nowadays pants. Deforming the regular shape of our legs in a wide variety of ways, not only playing with the cut but with the prints the pants are foreshortened and shape a wide thigh.

Bounded kick flare trousers, white stripe printed leggings both from Topshop.

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Bibliography Breton, André (1924). First Surrealist Manifesto. Paris: A.S. Kline. De Chirico, G. and Faerna, J. (1995). De Chirico. 1st ed. New York: Cameo/Abrams [i.e. Abrams/Cameo]. Klingsöhr-Leroy, C. and Grosenick, U. (2004). Surrealism. 1st ed. Köln: Taschen. Trivium Art History. (2016). Giorgio de Chirico, 1888 - 1978 Biography and Artworks | Trivium Art History. [online] Available at: http://arthistoryproject.com/artists/giorgiode-chirico/ [Accessed 26 Nov. 2016]. Guggenheim. (2016). Promontory Palace. [online] Available at: https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/4033 [Accessed 26 Nov. 2016]. Voorhies, A. (2016). Surrealism | Essay | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art. [online] The Met’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/surr/hd_surr.htm [Accessed 26 Nov. 2016].

Roser Gracia's Portfolio  

Portfolio recopilation of projects from the 1st and 2nd year of BA Fashion Design

Roser Gracia's Portfolio  

Portfolio recopilation of projects from the 1st and 2nd year of BA Fashion Design

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