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ROSEN PUBLISHING presents

The world’s largest educational PRIMARY SOURCE MATERIALS company

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Dear Loyal Jackdaws Clients and New Friends, Greetings and welcome! I want to take this opportunity to convey to you how excited I am to be interacting with you in the world of maps, documents, broadsheets, treaties, and letters and how incredibly enthusiastic I am about the Jackdaws Primary Source portfolios. Indeed, my enthusiasm has been of such long standing—more than twenty-five years—that when I was approached to acquire the company I jumped at the chance. I have spent my entire scholarly and publishing career combing through archives all over the world. You can imagine what an honor and privilege it is to be entrusted with the stewardship of the Jackdaws facsimile holdings and to be charged with innovating new portfolio subjects, new digital formats, and new means of dissemination while preserving the great Jackdaws legacy. We honor this legacy by sharing with you here the photograph of our founder John Langdon-Davies, the great war correspondent and prolific author, and that of Roger and Mary Jacques, who spent their entire professional careers lovingly curating an even greater number of collections with students’ curriculum needs and curiosity foremost in mind. I provide you with my own photo so that you can introduce yourselves to me at conferences and we can collaborate together on the many new directions in which we can travel together. You can also reach out to me at rogerrosen@gmail.com. I very much want to hear from you. Thank you for your past support of the Jackdaws initiatives, and please stay tuned for our next chapter in the 21st century. With Best Wishes,

Roger Rosen President JACKDAWS

“Students will be able to analyze the events of history through photography, and will be able to make real-life connections by viewing images captured from the past. The Jackdaw photographs are valuable primary sources. The photos will reach all types of learners, including struggling readers who are met by barriers of written words because they cannot read or understand them.” —Robin Vincent, Columbiana Middle School, Alabama

John Langdon-Davies

Roger and Mary Jacques

Roger Rosen


Unit Introduction Every well-designed unit lesson begins with a hook activity that grabs students’ attention and entices them to learn more about the topic. The primary sources featured in Jackdaw Portfolios and Focus Jackdaws are ideal for this. Teachers might select one document or extra-large photograph that is particularly intriguing or thought provoking. The image of a young boy in the coalmines from the Photo Collection Child Labor: The Shame of the Nation is a good example. Open the unit by asking students to examine the photo and share their impressions, thus beginning C3’s arc of inquiry, where learners:

WONDER & QUESTION

INVESTIGATE

SYNTHESIZE

EXPRESS

According to the C3 Framework, students must use primary and secondary texts to draw conclusions about what actually happened in a time and place.

“Historical inquiry is based on materials left from the past that can be studied and analyzed. [These are] referred to as historical sources or primary sources, and include: written documents, but also objects, artistic works, oral accounts, landscapes that humans have modified, or even materials contained within the human body, such as DNA. These sources become ‘evidence’ once they are selected to answer a historical question.”

FREEr! de with or e!) 0 valu (a $15.0

—National Council for Social Studies (NCSS), The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards. [end quote]

Double-Entry Journaling In order for students to read primary and secondary sources closely for details, it is important to allow adequate time for the processing of information. Double-entry journaling is one strategy that can help. In addition to providing time for reflection, this technique helps students make personal connections to the past by asking them to share their own impressions of primary source materials. Have students draw a line down the middle of one or two journal pages. Label the column on the left “Facts.” Label the column on the right “Interpretations.” Students are then asked to examine a primary source and take notes under Facts. They should consider questions such as: Who created the source? What is his or her frame of reference? When was the source created? Make a list of new vocabulary terms. Explain in two to three sentences the main idea of the source. Under Interpretations, have students evaluate the sources by recording their personal reactions to the primary source. For example: Is there anything about the source that surprised them? How do they feel about the creator of the source? How would they have behaved if they found themselves in similar circumstances? What are some questions they still have about the source? What did they learn from this primary source about a particular time period?

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Use to Direct Student Inquiry One of the benefits of using primary sources is that it makes history come alive, which works to deepen student understanding of the period, event, and context. Unlike memorizing a list of names and dates from the pages of a textbook, viewing events through the eyes of actual participants enables students to make an emotional connection with people of the past and encourages them to become historical thinkers. The following are some ways Jackdaw collections can be used to direct student inquiry:

Index

Student-centered inquiry with a goal of “civic action”

Books

Aligned with the CCSS goals of deep meaning and understanding

Photo Collections

Moves beyond reading a chapter and answer multiple choice questions

World History

Departs from the memorization of facts, dates and figures

WWII History

Social studies teaching has been redefined by the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards. This opens a doorway to rigorous professional practice. Here’s how the C3 Framework is different:

U.S. History

Published in 2013, the C3 Framework is a richly collaborative response to the merger of Social Studies and ELA in the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Its stated purpose is to provide guidance to states and teachers in enhancing the rigor of K–12 Civics, Economics, Geography, and History. The fifteen professional organizations and thousands of contributing practitioners who crafted these frameworks shared a goal of building critical thinking, problem solving, and participatory skills of learners. The universal value of knowledgeable, thinking, and active citizens moves the framework forward.

Inside BackCover

C3

How to Teach with Jackdaws includes: • A brief guide to implementing the C3 Social Studies Framework Standards using Jackdaw collections • Practical, hands-on ways to integrate primary and secondary sources into everyday learning • Teaching strategies to read closely, gather information, draw conclusions, and communicate information • Ways to differentiate instruction based on learning styles and reading abilities

CAREER

pp. 110–112

CIVIC LIFE COLLEGE

pp.108–109

—National Council for Social Studies (NCSS), The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards, p. 6.

Simply put, Jackdaws are the most effect way to support the mandates recommended by the National Council for Social Studies’ (C3) Framework in preparing students for college, career, and civic life.

pp.83–107

Developing questions and planning inquiries Applying social studies concepts and tools Evaluating and analyzing sources Creating evidence-based claims Communicating conclusions and taking action

An Overview of the New Social Studies Standards “Now more than ever, students need the intellectual power to recognize societal problems; ask good questions and develop robust investigations into them; consider possible solutions and consequences; separate evidence-based claims from parochial opinions; and communicate and act upon what they learn. And most importantly, they must possess the capability and commitment to repeat that process as long as is necessary.”

pp.59–82

• • • • •

How Do Jackdaws Help Teachers and Students?

pp.57–58

Jackdaw collections directly support the NCSS’s C3 Framework for Social Studies State Standards:

Use these convenient subject tabs to locate Jackdaws products!

These unique collections of primary and secondary sources put history into the hands of your students.

pp.8–56

Prepare Students for College, Career, and Civic Life with Jackdaw primary source collections.


A Jackdaw is a portfolio of hands-on primary source teaching materials.

What’s in a Jackdaw® portfolio? PRIMARY SOURCE DOCUMENTS Authentically reproduced documents—actual letters, diaries, telegrams, newspapers, and maps— let students actually see and touch history while they expand critical thinking and analysis skills.

H The Policy of Intervention Broadsheet 3

he Spanish-American War transformed America into a world power, and also made it dominant in the Caribbean. Difficulties during the Spanish-American War in moving ships from the East to the West Coasts raised issues about a canal through Central America. This canal came to be seen as important to the security of the United States in time of war. Growing interest in the Caribbean meant Americans became more aware of this region’s issues and needs. Few of its countries had stable governments, and it was common for political opponents to use armed force to overthrow the reigning government and gain power. Many Caribbean governments also borrowed money from European nations and were unable to repay debts, which brought about the threat of armed intervention to collect these debts. American policy was directed toward creating stability in the area, particularly since a canal was planned to link the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

T

landing to crush the rebellion. President Theodore Roosevelt immediately recognized the new Panama government, which agreed to the original treaty. Panama, in effect, became a protectorate under control of the United States. Under direction of Colonel George W. Goethals, the Army Corps of Engineers began construction of the canal, which was completed in 1914. President Woodrow Wilson signed a treaty with Colombia in 1914 in which America apologized for its actions during the Panama revolution. President Wilson offered Colombia $25,000,000 as compensation, but the Senate backed pleas from Theodore Roosevelt to kill the treaty. It was not until 1921 that Colombia received an apology and payment for loss of its province.

Roosevelt Corollary

In 1902, a crisis in Venezuela led President Theodore Roosevelt to expand the meaning of the Monroe Doctrine. The Venezuelan government refused to pay debts owed European nations, which led to a blockade. Cuba Raising the flag over the governor’s palace, Santiago, Cuba, October 1898. The defeat of the Spanish in the SpanishThe Venezuelan The first nation American War opened the imperialist era. Library of Congress government finally to come under agreed to arbitrate the “protection” of the problem. President Roosevelt responded to this issue United States was Cuba. General Leonard Wood was in a statement known as the Roosevelt Corollary. In it, appointed military governor of Cuba in 1899 to help he said “chronic wrongdoing” on the part of a nation the island recover from destruction caused by the may “require intervention by some civilized nation.” Spanish-American War. He began programs to rebuild This meant if a nation failed to pay its debts or roads, improve sanitation, and begin the process of displayed an inability to perform government tasks, self-government. then it was the responsibility of the United States to Many Cubans were upset that they were not intervene in any such situation within the Western immediately granted full self-government. The United Hemisphere. States Senate then passed the Platt Amendment in The Dominican Republic in 1905 informed 1901, which was forced into the Cuban Constitution. President Roosevelt it could not pay debts owned This bill forbade Cuba from negotiating any treaty European nations. American forces landed in the that impaired its independence or to borrow money it could not repay. It also gave the United States power to intervene in Cuba’s affairs in order to protect its independence or to preserve law and order. America was also granted a military base at Guantanamo Bay. The Cuban government accepted the Platt Amendment in order to finally achieve its independence. It was not abrogated (abolished) until 1934. Although some Cubans welcomed American assistance, others disliked what they considered to be interference in their internal affairs.

Dominican Republic, and the United States took on the responsibility of managing the Dominican Republic’s finances until all debts were repaid. This became a pattern that was followed in other areas of the Caribbean region. United States Marines were sent to enforce debt collection or to assist governments faced with rebellion. Many Latin Americans resented these interventions on grounds it interfered with their right to conduct their own affairs. President Roosevelt’s successor, William Howard Taft, added a new element to the Corollary. In what became known as “Dollar Diplomacy,” Taft used armed forces to assist Americans engaged in business in Latin American nations. Taft pressured Latin Americans to rely upon American rather than European businessmen. For example, he arranged for American banks to refinance Nicaraguan debts and then landed marines to ensure American banks were repaid.

Woodrow Wilson and Latin America

Before becoming president in 1913, Woodrow Wilson had been a critic of intervention in Latin American affairs. He promised Latin America that “one of the chief objects of my administration will be to cultivate the friendship of our sister republics of Central and South America.” However, within a year, Wilson changed his mind. Woodrow Wilson believed it was America’s moral duty to save Latin American nations from their failure to have stable economies and governments. He shared Theodore Roosevelt’s fear of European nations using the issue of debts to intervene in the affairs of Latin America. President Wilson sent troops to end violence and maintain peace in several nations such as Haiti and the Dominican Republic. They remained in Haiti for nineteen years and for six in the Dominican Republic. Wilson’s greatest problem arose in Mexico. In February 1913, the democratic government of Francisco Madero was overthrown by General Victor Huerta, and Madero was killed. Wilson was shocked and claimed Huerta as heading a “government of butchers” and established the principle that the United States would refuse to recognize any government that had come to power through means of force. He placed an embargo on sending war materials to Mexico and urged other nations to withdraw recognition of the Huerta government. A minor incident in the port of Vera Cruz was used by President Wilson as a pretext to land troops in 1914 and to demand an apology for an insult to the American flag. Argentina, Chile, and Brazil offered to mediate the dispute between the United States and Mexico, but soon realized Wilson wanted nothing less

continued *

Panama and the Isthmus Canal

BROADSHEET ESSAYS

Notes

On The Jackdaw®

American IMPERIALISM

CONTENTS Broadsheet Essays 1. Origins of American Imperialism 2. The Road to Expansion 3. The Policy of Intervention 4. The United States and Asia Timeline: 1823-1934 Primary Source Documents 1. Excerpts from President Monroe’s message to Congress (Monroe Doctrine), 1823 2. President Fillmore’s message to the emperor of Japan, 1852, and a nineteenth-century illustrated Japanese translation of his letter 3. Graphic views of U.S.-Caribbean relations before the Spanish-American War, 1851-1896 4. Memorial of Queen Liliuokalani in relation to the crown lands of Hawaii, 1898 5. Lou Henry Hoover letter describing her experience in Tientsen during the Boxer Rebellion, 1900 6. Poster: Documents and photographs relating to the Spanish-American War, 1898 7. Excerpt from a speech by Senator Albert J. Beveridge on policy toward the Philippines, Congressional Record, 1900 8. Excerpt from “Letter from the Hon. George F. Hoar,” published by the Anti-Imperialist League, 1899 9. Proclamation by the U.S. government to the inhabitants of Guam, 1900 10. First and last page of the treaty with Cuba that includes the Platt Amendment and a transcript of the amendment, 1903 11. Excerpts from President Theodore Roosevelt’s annual message to Congress (Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine), 1904 12. Political cartoons concerning U.S.-Mexican relations, 1913-1916 13. Poster: Map and photographs relating to the U.S. Library of Congress military intervention in Nicaragua, 1926-1929 14. Letter referencing FDR’s Good Neighbor Policy, Arthur Bliss Lane to the president of Nicaragua, 1933

Beneath the United States: A History of U.S. Policy Toward Latin America by Lars Schoultz. Harvard University Press, 1998. The Boxer Rebellion: China 1900, The Artist’s Perspective by Peter Harrington et al. Greenhill Books, 2000. The Boxer Rebellion: The Dramatic Story of China’s War on Foreigners that Shook the World in the Summer of 1900 by Diana Preston. Berkley Publishing Group, 2001. The China Dream by Joe Studwell. Grove Press, 2003. Defiance to the Old World: The Story Behind the Monroe Doctrine by George Dangerfield. Putnam, 1970.

Jackdaw Broadsheet Essays are the historian’s detailed narratives of the topics presented in journal-like formats. Written in logical sequence, they offer carefully compiled research and background information for studying and evaluating the documents.

Panama was the second Latin American nation to become an American protectorate. The United States in 1901 negotiated the Hay-Paunceforte Treaty with England, which allowed America to have sole control over a canal across Central America. The United States for decades had been interested in building a canal through Nicaragua, but there was also interest in the shorter route across Panama. The famous French builder Ferdinand de Lesseps had attempted to build a canal through the Isthmus of Panama in the late nineteenth century, but failed. A group of French and American speculators bought an interest in Lesseps’ New Panama Canal Company and offered to sell it to the United States for $40,000,000. Panama was part of the country of Colombia. Secretary of State John Hay negotiated a treaty that paid Colombia $10,000,000 for the right to construct a canal plus $250,000 per year as rent. The Colombian Senate rejected the treaty on grounds payment was too low, and because they feared losing control over the province of Panama. Philippe Bunau-Varilla, agent of the New Panama Canal Company, worked with rebels in Panama to organize a rebellion against the Colombian government. American naval ships prevented Colombian troops from Jackdaw 716

American Imperialism

From Columbus to Castro: The History of the Caribbean 1492-1969 by Eric Williams. Vintage, 1984. The Great Guano Rush: Entrepreneurs and American Overseas Expansion by Jimmy M. Skaggs. St. Martin’s Press, 1994. Matthew Calbraith Perry: Antebellum Sailor & Diplomat by John H. Schroeder. U.S. Naval Institute, 2001.

The United States and Imperialism by Frank A. Nimkovich. Blackwell, 2000.

Reproducible Student Activities with Response Key

BOOKS TO READ

Broadsheet 3 — Page 1

Underground Railroad Timeline

Freebooters Must Die: The Life & Death of William Walker by Frederick Rosengarten. Haverford House, 1976.

Path Between the Sea: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1814 by David McCullough. Simon & Schuster, 1977.

President Theodore Roosevelt (center) visiting the Panama Canal Zone, 1906. Roosevelt was instrumental in getting a canal built through Panama. When he visited the Canal Zone in 1906, he became the first president to travel outside the United States while still in office. National Archives

1619 A Dutch ship lands in Jamestown, Virginia

TIMELINES Jackdaw timelines provide dates and data that visually guide students through the topics and position the content in history.

with approximately twenty Africans who are sold as indentured servants.

1641 Massachusetts is the first colony to legalize slavery.

1662 Virginia passes a law that makes slavery hereditary (determined by the mother).

1775 The American Revolution is fought. -1783 1786 All Northern states have by now either abolished or restricted slavery.

©2005 Jackdaw Publications Div. of Golden Owl Publishing Co., Inc. P.O. Box 503, Amawalk, NY 10501 Phone: 914/962-6911 Fax: 914/962-0034

1793 Congress passes the first Fugitive Slave Act. Eli Whitney invents the cotton gin.

Jackdaw® 716 All rights reserved. Printed in U.S.A. ISBN 1-56696-257-9

Canada passes an antislavery act banning further importation of slaves. Slaves born after this date will gradually be emancipated.

Warning: The materials in this Jackdaw may not be reproduced by any method without written consent of the copyright holder, Golden Owl Publishing Company, Inc. Jackdaw and Jackdaws are registered trademarks.

NOTES ON DOCUMENTS

Name:

Branching Out ✎ Opinion Express 1. When the American Revolutionary War ended, the United States struggled to improve itself. Inventors created machines that made travel, communications and manufacturing much better. Use Broadsheets 2 and 4 and Exhibits 3a, 3b and 12. Pick one invention. Compare the invention to something that is used today. (For example, you might compare Samuel F. B. Morse’s telegraph to today’s fax machine). Tell how you feel the invention you chose from the Industrial Revolution changed life for the people living in the 1800s. Next, tell how you feel the current invention you chose has helped people today. Try to give concrete examples of each.

A background description of every document, along with its source, helps students understand its significance. Transcripts and translations are provided where appropriate.

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Industrial Revolution Comes to America

Jackdaw Study Guide Activities

Congress passes the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850.

1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe publishes Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

1854 Runaway slave Anthony Burns is captured in Boston and returned to slavery amid great protest.

1857 The Supreme Court rules in the Dred Scott

case that blacks are not citizens and thus have no civil rights.

1859 John Brown and a band of men raid the Harper’s Ferry arsenal.

1816 The American Colonization Society is founded

1861 The Civil War begins.

to relocate free blacks to Africa.

1820 Congress passes the Missouri Compromise. 1826 Levi and Catherine Coffin help their first fugitive slaves.

1831 William Lloyd Garrison begins publishing the abolitionist newspaper The Liberator.

Nat Turner leads a slave uprising in Virginia.

1833 Slavery is outlawed throughout the British Empire. Slaves in Canada are freed.

finds his freedom.

1844 Jonathan Walker is caught trying to help slaves

arrives in Mobile, Alabama.

1863 January 1: The Emancipation Proclamation frees slaves in the Confederate states.

1865 The Civil War ends. The Thirteenth Amendment outlaws slavery throughout the United States.

1868 The Fourteenth Amendment grants

citizenship and civil rights to all persons born or naturalized in the United States.

1870 The Fifteenth Amendment guarantees every

male, American citizen the right to vote regardless of race, color, or having previously been a slave.

1879 William Still publishes The Underground Railroad.

reach the Bahamas. He is imprisoned and the letters “SS” (Slave Stealer) are branded into his hand.

Why do you think you have more items listed under a particular topic? What does this tell you about today’s workers? Where can they expect to find the most work? Explain your reasoning.

Do you feel the United States needs to encourage certain kinds of invention today? Explain where you think improvements are needed. Why do you feel this way?

The Elgin Settlement in Canada is founded.

1850 Congress passes the Compromise of 1850.

1860 Clothilde, the last slave ship carrying Africans,

of African slaves.

1838 Frederick Douglass runs away and successfully

3. After the Revolutionary War, leaders such as George Washington felt it was important for the new states to be able to communicate with one another. If states could not communicate easily, the new country might not stay united.

plantation and flees to Philadelphia.

1808 Congress passes a law prohibiting importation

The American Anti-Slavery Society is founded.

2. Make a list of different kinds of improvements used today. Divide your list according to three topics: travel, communications and manufacturing. Which of your three lists is the longest?

1849 Harriet Tubman escapes her Maryland

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND GUIDES Reproducible student activities and guides simplify lesson planning by offering a wide range of activities for all students.

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1845 Frederick Douglass publishes Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass.

1847 Frederick Douglass begins to publish the abolitionist newspaper The North Star.

William Still begins assisting fugitive slaves in Philadelphia. Library of Congress

Jackdaw 621 Underground Railroad

© 2004 Jackdaw Publications, Inc.

For reproduction rights, please contact the publisher at 800-237-9932


Many Jackdaws are now available in two grade-level editions: 5–8 & 8–12.

What is a Focus Jackdaw® portfolio? Focus Jackdaws are scaled down versions of Jackdaws that allow an up-close explanation of more specific historical eras and events. They are ideal for enhanced classroom discussions, concentrated group study, and individual student research projects. Focus Jackdaws include 6–8 primary source documents, an illustrated Broadsheet Essay that provides essential background for document understanding and analysis, a timeline of key events, a reading list for more in depth study, and critical thinking questions. When your students need to focus on key historical periods and events, Focus Jackdaws concentrate their attention while making history come alive. Broadsheet Essay

Boston Tea Party On the evening of December 16, 1773, around 100 men, disguised as Indians and carrying tomahawks and hatchets, boarded three ships moored at Griffin’s Wharf in Boston Harbor. Once on board the ships, the Dartmouth, the Eleanor, and the Beaver, the disguised men ordered off the customs officials, brought up tea chests from the ships’ holds, chopped open the chests, scooped out the tea, and dumped it into the harbor. Over 2,000 people standing on the docks watched this destruction of 342 chests of tea, valued at about $600,000 in today’s money. What soon became known as the Boston Tea Party would be perhaps the most pivotal event leading up to the American Revolution. What led up to this destruction of private property? What would be the consequences of this bold action?

Calm before the Storm

Because of the tremendous costs of the French and Indian War (1754-1763), the British government faced an enormous debt. To help pay this debt, Parliament passed revenue-making laws, such as the Stamp Act, which required colonists to buy a tax stamp for each piece of paper goods they used. Thinking such tax laws illegal, the colonies would begin a decade-long protest. Library of Congress

Following the Boston Massacre in 1770, and lasting until the fall of 1773, a relatively relaxed relationship existed between Britain and her American colonies. The shooting deaths of five men in March 1770 put a damper on radical protests. In October 1770, Boston merchants agreed to give up the nonimportation of British goods, after hearing that Parliament had repealed all of the Townshend duties (taxes), except for the one on tea. Also, a new British prime minister, Lord North, was more interested in reconciliation rather than confrontation with the colonies. Finally, a lack of larger issues such as the Stamp Act or Townshend Acts meant that there were no reasons for the two sides to come to loggerheads. This calmer political atmosphere also meant better economic times for colonial merchants. Colonial imports, including the taxed tea, for the years 17711773 almost doubled in value, compared to the previous three years, 1768-1770.

Beneath this calm surface, however, were important unresolved issues. King and Parliament still believed they had the constitutional right to tax the colonies. At the same time, defiance of British law continued in the colonies. Merchants, including many prominent ones, went on smuggling as before and had no qualms about bribing customs collectors. When customs officials tried to do their jobs, they often met stiff

Jackdaw 709F Boston Tea Party — Page 1

® Photo Collections Jackdaw Put your students at the scene! Jackdaw photo collections consist of 12 extra-large 17”x22” black-and-white photographs illustrating an important historical subject. A thought-provoking way to make history come alive, these photos place the students at the scene! See page 83 for more information. Appropriate for all grade levels.

For reproduction rights, please contact the publisher at 800-237-9932

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US HISTORY COLLECTIONS

SLAVERY AND THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR COLLECTION ISBN: 978-1-5081-7168-3

SCHOOL:

$260.50

15% OFF COLLECTION: $221.43 This collection includes the following portfolios:

Slavery in the United States

Dred Scott Decision Underground Railroad

The Slave Trade & its Abolition

War Between the States: Civil War

PROGRESSIVISM AND THE GREAT DEPRESSION COLLECTION ISBN: 978-1-5081-7169-0

SCHOOL:

$176.00

15% OFF COLLECTION: $149.60 This collection includes the following portfolios:

Triangle Shirtwaist Fire

Stock Market Crash of 1929

Labor Movement in America

❖ Truman journal entry on the bomb and his resolve to use it, July 1945.

The Depression

THE NEW DEAL AND WWII COLLECTION ISBN: 978-1-5081-7170-6

SCHOOL:

❖ Newspaper articles on Hiroshima blast, Japan’s surrender, and the end of the war, August 1945.

$260.50

15% OFF COLLECTION: $221.43 This collection includes the following portfolios:

Eleanor Roosevelt: First Lady of the World

Japanese-American Internment Camps

The New Deal

The Atomic Bomb

WWII: The Home Front

CIVIL RIGHTS COLLECTION ISBN: 978-1-5081-7171-3

SCHOOL:

$118.50

❖ Letter, Albert Einstein to President Roosevelt, 1939.

15% OFF COLLECTION: $100.73 This collection includes the following portfolios:

Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Black Voting Rights: The Fight For Equality Ku Klux Klan

❖ Anti-Japanese propaganda poster.

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U

D

NDERGROUN R A I L R O A D

A Jackdaw® by Michael Fulton and Regina Krieger Fulton

❖ Page from the Boston Vigilance Committee Handbook, c. 1854.

❖ Antebellum map showing free and slave states, 1856.

❖ Runaway slave advertisements and reward poster, 1736-1837.

❖ Joint Resolution of Congress submitting the proposed 13th Amendment to state legislatures for ratification, February 1, 1865.

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WORLD HISTORY COLLECTIONS

PREHISTORY AND ANCIENT HISTORY COLLECTION ISBN: 978-1-5081-7172-0

SCHOOL:

$345.00

15% OFF COLLECTION: $293.25 This collection includes the following portfolios:

The Development of Writing

The Middle East: The Land & Its People

Byzantine Empire: A Cultural Legacy

Incas: A Cultural History

China: A Cultural Heritage

Tutankhamun & The Discovery of the Tomb

❖ Typewritten letter in Serbo-Croatian from condemned conspirator Veljko Cubrilovic to his young daughter (with English translation).

THE MIDDLE AGES COLLECTION ISBN: 978-1-5081-7173-7

SCHOOL:

$318.00

❖ F ull-page Neutrality League advertisement from the Manchester Guardian, August 4, 1914.

15% OFF COLLECTION: $270.30 This collection includes the following portfolios:

1066 Magna Carta

Marco Polo and His Journey to China

The Crusades

The Black Death Silk Road

THE WORLD AT WAR COLLECTION ISBN: 978-1-5081-7174-4

SCHOOL:

$287.50

15% OFF COLLECTION: $244.38 This collection includes the following portfolios:

The Rise of Napoleon

The Coming of War: 1939

The Russian Revolution

The Holocaust

Assassination at Sarajevo

❖ E nglish translation of message of Germany’s chancellor to German ambassador to Britain announcing that Germany was at war with France, August 3, 1914.

ENGLAND AND THE WORLD IN THE 16TH CENTURY COLLECTION ISBN: 978-1-5081-7175-1

SCHOOL:

$287.50

15% OFF COLLECTION: $244.38 This collection includes the following portfolios:

Drake and the Golden Hinde The North-West Passage

Elizabeth I Cromwell’s Commonwealth and Protectorate

Shakespeare’s Theatre

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❖ Selection of press clippings from British newspapers regarding outbreak of war, August 1914.


❖ Marco Polo’s last will, 1323.

❖ Page from the Latin edition of The Travels of Marco Polo, c. 1485, with notations by Christopher Columbus.

❖ Mongol passport, Yuan Dynasty, 1260-1368.

❖ Title page from the first printed edition of The Travels of Marco Polo, 1477.

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U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

Indians of North America Grades 5–8 Your students will develop a more positive image of North American Indian culture and achievements and greater awareness of their historic mistreatment through the colorful contents of this Jackdaw. The exhibits—pictures of famous chiefs; a map of tribe locations; religious, cultural, and domestic displays; even uncovered Indian myths and secrets—will help students define the usually vague conception of “Indians” and form an appreciation for Indian peoples and their societies. Historian: Marigold Coleman. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Historical Exhibits ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Map of North America showing best-known tribes. Notes on the tribes. Famous Indian chiefs—poster. The religion of the Indians. Indian myths. Ceremonial masks with instructions on how to make one. “Hunting the Buffalo”—by Indian artist Blackbear Bosin. Indian houses. Indian art—poster. Hopi petition to government, 1894, with totemic symbols. How to do it: Indian secrets and methods.

Reproducible Student Activities Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6120-2 — $92.67/$69.50

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

Jamestown Colony

Slavery Comes to the New World

Grades 5-8

Grades 5–8

As the location of the first elected legislative assembly in what would become the United States, Jamestown Colony established the roots of American democracy. Yet the colony’s pattern of conflict with Native Americans and the development of slavery as a system of labor are legacies that cloud our nation’s history. This wellbalanced collection of primary source documents—which includes John Smith’s map of Virginia, literature promoting colonization, correspondence from an indentured servant, European drawings of Native Americans, Bacon’s rebellious declaration, and photographs of archaeological artifacts—demonstrates to students the adventurous and idealistic side of colonial life, as well as the harsh reality of settlers struggling to survive in the New World. Historian: Robyn Hallowell Griswold. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

Students will learn about the development of the slave trade in the Americas from 1503, when the first slaves were brought to the Caribbean, to its abolition throughout the British Empire. This Jackdaw shows that slaving was a lucrative trade. Documents graphically depict the evils of the trade—how slaves were jammed side-by-side on the ship Brookes, ads selling slaves, and how the world dealt with slavery. Historian: John Langdon-Davies, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois.

Support Materials

Timeline: Prehistory to 1808

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Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ John Smith’s map of Virginia, 1612. ❖ John White drawings of Native Americans of Virginia, 1585, and excerpts from John Smith’s description of the Powhatan Indians, 1624. ❖ Broadside list of goods to take to the New World, 1622. ❖ Letter of an indentured servant, 1623. ❖ Nathaniel Bacon’s declaration, 1676. ❖ Jamestown Colony archaeological artifact photo-poster. ❖ Profile: John Smith and Pocahontas, American Legends.

Order Focus Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6290-2 — $48.67/$36.50

The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Slavery Slavery in North America Horrors of the Middle Passage A Change in Opinion

Historical Documents ❖ A plan of the slaving ship Brookes prepared by the Wilberforce Committee to show the sufferings of the Africans in the Middle Passage. ❖ Portrait of William Wilberforce by Sir Thomas Lawrence. ❖ A bill advertising a West Indian slave auction, 1829. ❖ Selected pages from the Journal of John Newton, 1750-54. ❖ A remonstrance from the Council and Assembly of Jamaica to the House of Commons on the subject of the slave trade, 1789. ❖ Accounts of the numbers of Africans delivered to the islands of Barbados, Jamaica, and Antigua for the years 1698-1708. ❖ Views of slavery from cartoons of 1790, 1830, and 1832. ❖ Sold into slavery: scenes from slave life.

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U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

The Mayflower & The Pilgrim Fathers

Pilgrims and the Mayflower Grades 5–8

Grades 8–12

The striking contrast between the Pilgrims’ story as taught in schools and the true-life adventure of persecution, a harrowing voyage, and a desperate struggle to survive will capture your students’ interest. An Admiralty appraisal of the ship, Mayflower, a suggested list of provisions for the would-be settlers to bring from England, and a contemporary account of the landing in New England provide vivid details. Historian: Richard Tames, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The

The striking contrast between the Pilgrims’ story as taught in schools and the true-life adventure of persecution, a harrowing voyage, and a desperate struggle to survive will capture your students’ interest. An Admiralty appraisal of the ship, Mayflower, a suggested list of provisions for the would-be settlers to bring from England, and a contemporary account of the landing in New England provide vivid details. Historian: Richard Tames. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

To Dwell Among Crystal Rivers Sixty-six Days Why Settle in the Wilderness? The New Colony

Timeline: 1492–1622 Historical Documents ❖ “The Pilgrims and Their England”—an illustrated booklet with a contemporary map and details of the Mayflower passengers. ❖ The record of the Pilgrims’ request to settle in Leyden, 1609. ❖ The Hubbard map—the first map of New England to be printed in the New World, 1677. ❖ The Plymouth Patent granted by King James I to the settlers, 1622. ❖ Pages from “Mourt’s Relation,” 1622, describing the landing in New England. ❖ Pages from Good Newes from New England, a pamphlet written in 1624 by Edward Winslow to encourage settlers to come to Plymouth. ❖ A list of provisions which would-be settlers were advised to bring from England, 1630. ❖ Extracts from William Bradford’s A History of Plymouth Plantation. ❖ An appraisal of the Mayflower made under Admiralty supervision in 1624.

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The First Colony The England They Left From England to Leyden The Mayflower Of Plymouth Plantation

Historical Documents ❖ “The Pilgrims and Their England”—an illustrated booklet with a contemporary map and details of the Mayflower passengers. ❖ The record of the Pilgrims’ request to settle in Leyden, 1609. ❖ The Hubbard map—the first map of New England to be printed in the New World, 1677. ❖ The Plymouth Patent granted by King James I to the settlers, 1622. ❖ Pages from “Mourt’s Relation,” 1622, describing the landing in New England. ❖ Pages from Good Newes from New England, a pamphlet written in 1624 by Edward Winslow to encourage settlers to come to Plymouth. ❖ A list of provisions which would-be settlers were advised to bring from England, 1630. ❖ Extracts from William Bradford’s A History of Plymouth Plantation. ❖ An appraisal of the Mayflower made under Admiralty supervision in 1624.

Reproducible Student Activities

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

Colonial Immigration

Immigration in Colonial Times

Grades 5–8

Grades 8–12

During the American colonial period, 1607-1775, thou­sands upon thousands of Europeans and Africans voyaged from their native lands to the uncertainties and hardships of the New World. Some came as free men and women, some as servants, some as prisoners, and some as slaves. This Jackdaw portrays these early emigrants and examines why and how they came and where they were located. Hands-on documents—lists of passengers, a large gravestone rubbing, an early map, letters—personalize the wide range of social strata and geography characterizing this topic. Historian: Mary Stetson Clarke, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

During the American colonial period, 1607-1775, thou­sands upon thousands of Europeans and Africans voyaged from their native lands to the uncertainties and hardships of the New World. Some came as free men and women, some as servants, some as prisoners, and some as slaves. This Jackdaw portrays these early emigrants and examines why and how they came and where they were located. Hands-on documents—lists of passengers, a large gravestone rubbing, an early map, letters—personalize the wide range of social strata and geography characterizing this topic. Historian: Mary Stetson Clarke, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets

Broadsheets

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Why Did They Come? From Worlds Apart The Difficult Voyage Forced to Emigrate

Timeline: 1492–1763 Historical Documents ❖ List of passengers on the Mayflower. ❖ Rubbing of gravestone of Phinehas Pratt, Charlestown, Massachussetts, 1680. ❖ Letter from Georgia colonist Thomas Causton to his wife, 1732. ❖ The Virginia Gazette, September 17 to September 24, 1736. ❖ Earliest printed map of Detroit, 1764. ❖ Statement of figures from a Spanish expedition to California, 1769. ❖ Page of prayers to be used at sea, 1636. ❖ An indenture, 1731. ❖ Pamphlet, “Notes on the Slave Trade,” 1757. ❖ Broadside ballad, “The Trappan’d Maiden: or, The Distressed Damsel.”

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Reason for Emigration English Emigrants Non-English Emigrants The Perilous Crossing Conditions of Emigration

Historical Documents ❖ List of passengers on the Mayflower. ❖ Rubbing of gravestone of Phinehas Pratt, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1680. ❖ Letter from Georgia colonist Thomas Causton to his wife, 1732. ❖ The Virginia Gazette, September 17 to September 24, 1736. ❖ Earliest printed map of Detroit, 1764. ❖ Statement of figures from a Spanish expedition to California, 1769. ❖ Page of prayers to be used at sea, 1636. ❖ An indenture, 1731. ❖ Pamphlet, “Notes on the Slave Trade,” 1757. ❖ Broadside ballad, “The Trappan’d Maiden: or, The Distressed Damsel.”

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U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

Salem Village and the Witch Hysteria

Witch Hysteria Comes to Salem Village Grades 5–8

Grades 8–12

Students will learn an objective lesson of the dangers of mob rule to society and individual rights when they study witch hysteria in Salem Village. Unique historical documents, together with broadsheets, explore the background, events, and personalities involved in this famous series of witchcraft trials. Historian: Richard B. Trask, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Students will learn an objective lesson of the dangers  of mob rule to society and individual rights when they study witch hysteria in Salem Village. Unique historical documents, together with broadsheets, explore the background, events, and personalities involved in this famous series of witchcraft trials. Historian: Richard B. Trask. The

Broadsheets

Broadsheets

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Witchcraft on the European Continent No Peace for Salem Village A Town Turned Upside Down The People of Salem Village

Timeline: 1486–1711 Historical Documents ❖ Map of the Salem Village area in 1692 with index. ❖ Four pages from the Salem Village Church Record Book, November 1691-December 1692 and August 1706-March 1709. ❖ The examination of Martha Corey, March 21, 1692. ❖ Witchcraft painting: “Examination of a Witch,” 1853. ❖ Bridget Bishop death warrant and return, June 1692. ❖ William Barker confession, August 29, 1692. ❖ Mary Esty petition, September 1692. ❖ Jailer’s bill, 1692. ❖ Act by Court of Mass. reversing attainders of condemned witches, 1711. ❖ Poster: Judges, ministers, and books important in the history of Salem Village witchcraft. ❖ List of persons who died during the witch hysteria, 1692-1693.

Reproducible Student Activities

contents of this Jackdaw feature: ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

European Background Salem Village The Witch Hysteria Begins The Court of Oyer and Terminer Rebecca Nurse The Minister and the Children

Historical Document ❖ Map of the Salem Village area in 1692 with index. ❖ Four pages from the Salem Village Church Record Book, November 1691-December 1692 and August 1706-March 1709. ❖ The examination of Martha Corey, March 21, 1692. ❖ Witchcraft painting: “Examination of a Witch,” 1853. ❖ Bridget Bishop death warrant and return, June 1692. ❖ William Barker confession, August 29, 1692. ❖ Mary Esty petition, September 1692. ❖ Jailer’s bill, 1692. ❖ Act by Court of Mass. reversing attainders of condemned witches, 1711. ❖ Poster: Judges, ministers, and books important in the history of Salem Village witchcraft. ❖ List of persons who died during the witch hysteria, 1692-1693.

Reproducible Student Activities

Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6218-6 — $92.67/$69.50

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

Wolfe at Quebec

Boston Tea Party to the American Revolution

Grades 5–8 In 1759, a 15-minute battle ended a 10-week siege and won Quebec and Canada for Britain. Personal and official documents tell the story of the daring assault that led to the capture of this key citadel. The heroic exploits of James Wolfe, and his character, are revealed in the documents and in the Broadsheets. Students may “read all about it” in the newspapers and enjoy the interesting public notices and ads from 1759. A historical map places students at the site, and the drawings help them recognize the combatants. Historian: Richard Howard. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Challenge of Quebec James Wolfe Redcoats and Whitecoats French and Canadians The Siege The Fall of Canada

Historical Documents ❖ Water color of James Wolfe by George Townshend, 1759. ❖ Letter from Wolfe to friend Captain Parr, Jan. 24, 1758. ❖ Map of the location of Quebec, with a view of the town and drawings of Indian, British and French uniforms. ❖ Memo from Wolfe to his Brigadiers, Aug. 29, 1759, from the Murray Papers. ❖ Brigadiers’ reply to Wolfe, Aug. 29, 1759, from the Chatham Papers. ❖ Public Advertiser, Oct. 17, 1759. ❖ “The Taking of Quebec,” colored engraving by J. & C. Bowles. ❖ Public Advertiser, Oct. 19, 1759. ❖ Message from William Pitt to the Duke of Newcastle with news from Quebec, Oct. 16, 1759.

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Grades 5–8 The history in this Jackdaw takes your students from the Boston Tea Party to Bunker Hill and the struggle to field and fund our army. Documents include a handbill persuading British soldiers to desert, a 1783 issue of the South Carolina Gazette, and early American “home-made” money. Historian: David Johnson, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois and Diane Mayr. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Taxes, Tea and Trouble George Washington, Commander-In-Chief Why the British Lost the War After the War

Timeline: 1754–1789 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Letter to East India Tea Company defending Boston Tea Party, 1773. Map of Boston and the fighting at Bunker Hill, 1775. Proclamation by King George III ordering a general fast, 1776. Draft of the Declaration of Independence with notes and amendments. Declaration of Independence signed by Congress on July 4, 1776. Resolve of Congress giving Washington power to raise forces and make people accept paper money, 1776. Pages from the journal of British Lieutenant William Digby, 1776-1777. Letter from General Heath to General Burgoyne on captured British soldiers, 1778. Letter from General Washington to New York Governor Clinton, 1779. Issue of the South Carolina Gazette and General Advertiser, 1783. Congressional commission to Benjamin Hopkins, 1779. American paper money. Lottery ticket printed by Americans to raise money for the war, 1776. Handbill persuading British soldiers to desert. Order of battle: diagrams drawn by George Washington, 1777. Captain Cooley’s note authorizing provisions for scouts, 1779. Reconnaissance order giving instructions for a mission, 1779. General George Washington taking the salute at Trenton, 1776. Map of the battlefields of the American Revolution.

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U.S. HISTOry

U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

9

Boston Massacre

Focus Jackdaws

By Richard Pandich

Boston Massacre

Grades 5–8 Boston Massacre

grades 5–8 The Boston Massacre is one of the best-known events in American history, yet many of the facts surrounding that fatefulevents day in in The Boston Massacre is one of the best known March 1770 are misunderstood. Did British soldiers mercilessly and American history, yet many of the facts surrounding that fateful indiscriminately shoot unarmed civilians, or were the soldiers merely day in March 1770 are misunderstood. Did British soldiers merciprotecting themselves? Whyshoot were British troopscivilians, in Boston in firstthe lessly and indiscriminately unarmed orthe were place? What led to the fatal confrontation between soldiers and soldiers merely protecting themselves? Why were British troops civilians? What happened to the soldiers who fired upon the civilians? in Boston in the first place? What led to the fatal confrontation Students will learn the answers to these questions and more when between soldiers and civilians? What happened to the soldiers they explore this unique collection of historical documents that who fired upon the civilians? Students will learn the answers includes a broadside urging colonists to boycott an importer of British to these questions and more when they explore this unique goods, Paul Revere engravings, inflammatory patriot newspaper collection of historical documents that includes: a broadside articles and broadsides, and excerpts from the deposition of Captain urging colonists to boycott an importer of British goods; Paul Thomas Preston, the leader of the detachment of British soldiers Revere engravings; inflammatory patriot newspaper articles and involved in the Boston Massacre. Historian: Richard Pandich. The broadsides; and excerpts from the deposition of Captain Thomas contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature: Preston, the leader of the detachment of British soldiers involved Support Materials in the Boston Massacre. Historian: Richard Pandich. The contents ❖ Illustrated Broadsheetfeature: Essay of this Focus Jackdaw ❖ Timeline

❖ Critical Thinking Questions Support Materials

Recommended Reading List ❖ ❖ Illustrated Broadsheet Essay ❖ Timeline Historical Documents ❖ Critical Thinking Questions ❖ Paul Revere engraving showing the landing of British troops at Boston, 1768. ❖ Recommended Reading List ❖ Broadside urging colonists to boycott an importer of British goods, 1770.

❖ Paul Revere engraving of the “The Bloody Massacre,” 1770. Historical documents

Broadside a pro-American of the Massacre, 1770. ❖ ❖ Paul Revererelating engraving showingaccount the landing of British troops at ❖ Transcribed excerpts from the deposition of Captain Thomas Preston, Boston, 1768. March 1770. ❖ Broadside urging colonists to boycott an importer of British goods, ❖ Broadside commemorating Massacre victims, c. 1770. 1770. ❖ Boston-Gazette article commemorating the first anniversary of the ❖ Paul RevereMarch engraving Massacre, 1771. of the “The Bloody Massacre,” 1770. ❖ ❖ Broadside relating a pro-American account of theMassacre,” Massacre, Two 19th-century depictions of the incident: “The Boston c. 1770. ❖ Transcribed excerpts from theAttucks” deposition 1868, and “The Death of Crispus c. 1856.of Captain Thomas Preston, March 1770. Order Focus Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6268-1 — $48.67/$36.50 ❖ Broadside commemorating Massacre victims, c. 1770. ❖ Boston-Gazette article commemorating the first anniversary of the Massacre, March 1771. ❖ Two 19th-century depictions of the incident: “The Boston Massacre,” c. 1868, and “The Death of Crispus Attucks” c. 1856.

Boston Tea Party

Grades 5–8Tea Party Boston

5–8 upon its American To protest a special tea tax Englandgrades had imposed colonies,To members patriottea group of Liberty up upon he protestofathe special tax Sons England had dressed imposed as Indians one cold December night in 1773, boarded three British American colonies, members of the patriot group Sons of Lib ships, anddressed dumped 342 of tea into Harbor. England’s erty up chests as Indians oneBoston cold December night in 1773 response to this brazen act of rebellion, the Coercive Actschests (knownof tea int boarded three British ships, and dumped 342 in America the Intolerable Acts),response would soto punish and enrage BostonasHarbor. England’s this brazen act of rebe colonists that war became virtually inevitable. Bring to life the the highly lion, the Coercive Acts (known in America as Intolerabl charged atmosphere of pre-Revolutionary War America with these Acts), would so punish and enrage colonists that war becam fascinating and informative primary source documents, including virtually inevitable. Bring to life the highly charged atmospher a letter defending the Tea Party, protest broadsides, a newspaper of pre-Revolutionary War America with these fascinating an account of the incident, a contemporary political cartoon, and a informative primary source documents, including a letter de Boston Tea Party song. Historian: Richard Pandich. The contents of fending the tea party, protest broadsides, a newspaper accoun this Focus Jackdaw feature: of the incident, a contemporary political cartoon, and a Bosto Support Materials Tea Party song. Historian: Richard Pandich. The contents of th ❖ Illustrated Broadsheetfeature: Essay Focus Jackdaw ❖ Timeline ❖ Critical Thinking Questions Support Materials ❖ Recommended Reading List ❖ Illustrated Broadsheet Essay

❖ Broadside protesting the nonimportation of tea, November 3, 1773. ❖ Recommended Reading List ❖ Broadside reporting results of a meeting on the unloading of tea, December 2, 1773. Historical documents ❖ New York broadside relating events in Boston, December 16, 1773. ❖ Broadside protesting the nonimportation of tea, November 3, 1773 ❖ Letter to the East India Company defending the Boston Tea Party, December ❖ 1773. Broadside reporting results of a meeting on the unloading of tea, 17, December 2, 1773. ❖ Boston-Gazette report on the tea party, December 20, 1773. ❖ New Yorkshowing broadside relating events in 16, 1773 ❖ Political cartoon the tarring and feathering of Boston, a customsDecember officer, ❖ Letter to the East India Company defending the Boston Tea Party, 1774. December 1773. held in Boston in response to the Intolerable ❖ Broadside reporting17, a meeting Acts, June 17, 1774. ❖ Boston-Gazette report on the tea party, December 20, 1773. ❖ Nineteenth-century song about the Boston Tea Party. ❖ Political cartoon showing the tarring and feathering of a customs

officer, 1774.

Order Focus Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6269-8 — $48.67/$36.50 ❖ Broadside reporting a meeting held in Boston in response to the ❖

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Timeline

Historical Documents ❖ Critical Thinking Questions

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Intolerable Acts, June 17, 1774. Nineteenth-century song about the Boston Tea Party.

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

Patriots & Loyalists

Lexington & Concord

Grades 5–8

Grades 5–8

By some estimates, as many as 20 percent of American colonists remained loyal to the king during the Revolutionary War. Some Loyalists—or Tories, as they were scornfully called by the Revolutionaries—sought refuge from Patriot wrath by fleeing to England, Canada, or other areas under British control. Those who remained faced reprisals, punitive laws, and even confiscation of their property. Immerse your students in the difficult and dangerous world of the Loyalists with this rich assortment of primary source documents, ranging from Lord Dunmore’s proclamation encouraging slaves to join the British to a list of Loyalist prisoners held in New York City, a Continental Congress resolution recommending pardons for Loyalists, depositions of men held prisoner by Loyalists, and British and American illustrations and political cartoons. Historian: Richard Pandich. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

On April 19, 1775, British troops marched on the Massachusetts towns of Lexington and Concord on orders to disarm rebellious American colonists and arrest their ringleaders. Little did they know that the ensuing conflicts would ignite the American Revolutionary War. This fascinating array of primary source documents, including a contemporary map with military camps and troop movements, Amos Doolittle engravings, and British and American propaganda broadsides, brings to life the events of the day and explores the causes and immediate aftermath of the shots heard ’round the world. Historian: Richard Pandich. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ Proclamation of Lord Dunmore, royal governor of Virginia, November 7, 1775. ❖ Patrick Henry’s warning about Governor Dunmore’s Proclamation, November 20, 1775. ❖ List of Loyalist prisoners held in New York City, July 1, 1776. ❖ Resolution of the Continental Congress recommending pardons to Loyalists, April 23, 1778. ❖ Depositions of three men held prisoners by the British and Loyalists, 1781/82. ❖ Illustration: “Judgment Day of Tories,” c. 1857. ❖ British political cartoons on the treatment of Loyalists in America, 1775 and 1783.

Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ Map of Boston, Lexington and Concord by British mapmaker J. DeCosta, 1775. ❖ “The Battle of Lexington,” an Amos Doolittle engraving, 1775. ❖ “Engagement at the North Bridge in Concord,” an Amos Doolittle engraving, 1775. ❖ “A Circumstantial Account of an Attack,” a British broadside, 1775. ❖ “A List of the Names of the Provincials Who Were Killed and Wounded,” an American broadside, 1775. ❖ “Bloody Butchery by the British Troops,” an American broadside, 1775. ❖ “The Retreat,” a British cartoon, 1775. ❖ Historical postcards from the battle sites.

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U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

Women in the American Revolution

The American Revolution Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

Historical documents in this Jackdaw take your students from the Boston Tea Party to Bunker Hill and the struggle to field and fund our army. Documents include a handbill persuading British soldiers to desert, a proclamation by King George III ordering his subjects to fast, a 1783 issue of the South Carolina Gazette, early American “home-made” money, and a fund-raising lottery ticket. Historian: David Johnson. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

This Jackdaw illustrates the often forgotten breadth of activity of American women during the war for independence and moves them from the margins of the historical pages to the center. Your students will gain a new appreciation of the role women played as spies, soldiers, and even prisoners of war. Letters, plays, poems, and personal journals provide firsthand accounts to stimulate thinking. The Broadsheets can lead to a discussion of women’s rights. Historian: Carol Berkin. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Tea, Tax and Trouble Gentleman Johnny The Old Fox The World Turned Upside Down The Big Country

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Letter to East India Tea Company defending Boston Tea Party, 1773. Map of Boston and the fighting at Bunker Hill, 1775. Proclamation by King George III ordering a general fast, 1776. Draft of the Declaration of Independence with notes and amendments. Declaration of Independence signed by Congress on July 4, 1776. Resolve of Congress giving Washington power to raise forces and make people accept paper money, 1776. Pages from the journal of British Lieutenant William Digby, 1776-1777. Letter from General Heath to General Burgoyne on captured British soldiers, 1778. Letter from General Washington to New York Governor Clinton, 1779. Issue of the South Carolina Gazette and General Advertiser, 1783. Congressional commission to Benjamin Hopkins, 1779. American paper money. Lottery ticket printed by Americans to raise money for the war, 1776. Handbill persuading British soldiers to desert. Order of battle: diagrams drawn by George Washington, 1777. Captain Cooley’s note authorizing provisions for scouts, 1779. Reconnaissance order giving instructions for a mission, 1779. Map of the battlefields of the American Revolution.

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Women in Politics and Propaganda The Home Front War Civilian Heroines and Army Wives Loyalist Women in Exile Why No Women’s Rights after the Revolution?

Historical Documents ❖ Installment of The Defeat, a play by Mercy Warren, Boston Gazette, July 19, 1773. ❖ “Ode to George Washington,” a poem by Phillis Wheatley, Pennsylvania Magazine, April 1776. ❖ Advertisement for spinners, Pennsylvania Packet, 1775. ❖ “A New Touch on the Times Well Adapted to the Distressing Situation of Every Sea-Port Town,” a broadside, 1779. ❖ “A letter from a lady in Philadelphia to her friend in this place,” Boston Independent Chronicle, July 27, 1780. ❖ Excerpt from the Marquis of Chastellux’s Voyages, Paris, 1786. ❖ General orders of George Washington regarding camp followers, August 4, 1777. ❖ Letter from Hannah Winthrop to Mercy Warren, 1777. ❖ “Pension for Margaret Corbin” from the Journal of the Continental Congress, July 6, 1779. ❖ Letter from Esther Sewall to her sister-in-law Katy Quincy, 1778. ❖ “A Society of Patriotic Ladies,” a reproduction of a mezzotint by Philip Dawe.

Reproducible Student Activities

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U.S. HiStory U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

U.S. History

14

Story of the the Story of Declaration of of Independence Declaration Independence

American Revolution: Women on All Fronts

Grades Grades 4–6 4–6

Grades 5–8 This Jackdaw illustrates the often forgotten breadth of activity of American women during the war for independence and moves them from the margins of the historical pages to the center. Your students will gain a new appreciation of the role women played as spies, soldiers, and even prisoners of war. Letters, plays, poems, and personal journals provide firsthand accounts to stimulate thinking. The Broadsheets can lead to a discussion of women’s rights. Historian: Carol Berkin, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

A Woman’s Life in Colonial America Words and Actions The Fate of Loyalist Women Women’s Lives After the Revolution

Timeline: 1774–1796 Historical Documents ❖ Installment of The Defeat, a play by Mercy Warren, Boston Gazette, July 19, 1773. ❖ “Ode to George Washington,” a poem by Phillis Wheatley, Pennsylvania Magazine, April 1776. ❖ Advertisement for spinners, Pennsylvania Packet, 1775. ❖ “A New Touch on the Times Well Adapted to the Distressing Situation of Every Sea-Port Town,” a broadside, 1779. ❖ “A letter from a lady in Philadelphia to her friend in this place,” Boston Independent Chronicle, July 27, 1780. ❖ Excerpt from the Marquis of Chastellux’s Voyages, Paris, 1786. ❖ General orders of George Washington regarding camp followers, August 4, 1777. ❖ Letter from Hannah Winthrop to Mercy Warren, 1777. ❖ “Pension for Margaret Corbin” from the Journal of the Continental Congress, July 6, 1779. ❖ Letter from Esther Sewall to her sister-in-law Katy Quincy, 1778. ❖ “A Society of Patriotic Ladies,” a reproduction of a mezzotint by Philip Dawe.

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TheThe StoryStory of theofDeclaration of Independence is designed for younger the Declaration of Independence is designed for students and students less proficient in English or who may readorbelow younger students and students less proficient in English who graderead level.below This high-interest Jackdaw contains essential may grade level. This high-interest Jackdawhistorical contains documents of the Revolutionary students to era enjoy—the essential historical documents of era the for Revolutionary for stuDeclaration of Independence is aDeclaration full-size replica, and the DeCosta dents to enjoy hands-on — the of Independence is a full-size replica, andmilitary the DeCosta whichmovements, includes military map, which includes campsmap, and troop is sure camps andinterest. troop movements, is sure to the elevate interest. The to elevate The Broadsheets explain significant events Broadsheets the significant events to the Revoluleading to theexplain Revolution and describe the leading remarkable document, tion and describe remarkable This document, of the Declaration of the Independence. Jackdawthe is Declaration complete with Independence. This Jackdaw is complete with vocabulary words, vocabulary words, Critical Thinking questions, and a large range of critical thinking questions, and a large range of reproducible reproducible activities for students at these levels. Historian: Rebecca activities for students at these levels. Historian: Rebecca Spears Spears Schwartz. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Schwartz. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Quarrels Between King and Colonies Quarrels Between King and Colonies An Outcry in the Colonies An Outcry in the Colonies On the Revolution On thePath Pathtoto Revolution A Time for Independence A Time for Independence

Historical Documents Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Declaration ofofIndependence, JulyJuly 4, 1776. Declaration Independence, 4, 1776. Jefferson’s draft Declaration of Independence, 1776. 1776. Jefferson’s draftofofthe the Declaration of Independence, DeCosta mapofof Boston, Lexington and Concord, DeCosta map Boston, Lexington and Concord, 1775. 1775. Poster: “Stamp Act Protest,” Poster: “Stamp Act Protest,” 1765.1765. Illustration Boston Party, Illustration ofof thethe Boston TeaTea Party, 1773.1773. British political cartoons, “The Wise Men of Gotham” and “BunBritish political cartoons, “The Wise Men of Gotham” and “Bunker’s Hill, or ker’s Hill,Head or America’s America’s Dress,” 1776.Head Dress,” 1776. British political cartoon, “The Horse America,” British political cartoon, “The Horse America,” 1779. 1779. Cover Thomas Paine’s Common Sense, Cover ofofThomas Paine’s Common Sense, 1776. 1776. Congress Voting the Declaration of Independence, 1776, by Edward Congress Voting the Declaration of Independence, 1776, by Edward Savage, Savage, c. 1800. c. 1800. Gallery of portraits. Gallery of portraits.

Reproducible Activities Reproducible Activities ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Life Ways — an introduction to colonial life in the 1770s. Life Ways—an introduction to colonial life in the 1770s. Timeline — 1760-1776. Timeline—1760-1776. Classics of History — a letter of advice from Thomas Jefferson. Classics of History—a letter of advice afrom Thomas Jefferson. Life Stories — Thomas Jefferson, brief biography. Life Stories—Thomas Jefferson, aactivity. brief biography. Geo-graph — a map-reading Geo-graph—a map-reading Puzzles and Problems —activity. interactive, problem-solving activity usPuzzles and Problems—interactive, problem-solving activity using Paine’s ing Paine’s Common Sense. Common Sense.

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17 Visit www.jackdaw.com Order toll free 800-789-0022 ❖ Fax toll free 800-962-9101

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U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

The Making of the Constitution

Story of the Constitution Grades 4–6

Grades 8–12

The Story of the Constitution provides younger students, older students reading below grade level, and students less proficient in English with an easier approach to important documents of American history. In an easy-to-use, fully reproducible 24-page resource book, this Jackdaw describes the writing of the U.S. Constitution and introduces historical figures and the significant events and issues. The resource book features eight sections of stimulating stories, information and related activities, vocabulary words, and Critical Thinking questions that are certain to capture students’ interest at this level. Plus, there are ten hands-on, historical documents and a colonial-style newspaper to foster further student involvement. Historian: Rebecca Spears Schwartz. The contents of this Jackdaw

This Jackdaw observes the participants and examines the issues, ideals, and principles that led to our Constitution. The historical document replicas allow students to touch and read some of the same documents our founding fathers used. Hands-on documents include three forms of the Constitution, a proposal for a Bill of Rights, a chronology of events and a list of the delegates to “The Grand Federal Convention.” Historian: Elizabeth Bidwell Bates. The contents

feature:

Resource Book with Reproducible Activities ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Story of the Constitution—three chapters. Timeline—1786­–1789. Life Ways—an introduction to the culture and society of Philadelphia, 1787. The Players—an informative description of convention delegates. Life Stories—James and Dolley Madison, a brief biography of two historical figures, with activities. Geo-graph—practice in map reading, math, and graphing. Puzzles and Problems—a Bill of Rights interactive problem-solving activity. Classics of History—“Washington, the Brave,” a poem to this important leader, with activities. Pastimes—handicraft and recipe from the time period.

“Jackdaw Times” Newspaper Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ Prophecies of the American Downfall ❖ The Grand Federal Convention ❖ The Results of Accommodations and Compromise ❖ Ratification: Not the Work of a Day ❖ Brief Moment of Harmony

Historical Documents ❖ Buell map of the United States of North America, 1784. ❖ A chronology on the Making of the Constitution and a list of delegates to “The Grand Federal Convention.” ❖ Edmund Randolph’s presentation of the Virginia Plan. ❖ Page of Washington’s copy of first printed draft of the Constitution. ❖ Draft of Benjamin Franklin’s speech to the Federal Convention. ❖ A broadside version of the Constitution of the United States. ❖ George Mason’s speech on slavery. ❖ Gallery of portraits with contemporary comments. ❖ Proposal for the Bill of Rights.

Reproducible Student Activities

Mitchell map, 1783. Broadside version of the Constitution. Proposal for the Bill of Rights. Letter from convention delegate Robert Morris to his sons. Letter from Abigail Adams to John Adams. U.S. census of 1790. James Madison’s will. Street map of Philadelphia, 1762. Engraving of Washington’s inauguration. Illustration of George Washington the farmer.

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

The Presidency

A History of Political Parties in America

Grades 5 and up As head of the executive branch of government, the president of the United States has one of the most influential jobs in the world today. But much has changed since George Washington was sworn in as our nation’s first president on April 30, 1789. While Article II of the Constitution provides a basic job description for the chief executive— including powers, qualification, terms of office, and the election process—the explanation of how the president is able to carry out these duties is surprisingly vague. The Framers of the Constitution left it up to the individuals elected president to determine their specific role in national and world affairs. But presidential powers are not unlimited. The legislative and judicial branches, through the system of checks and balances, also play an important part in defining the job of the president. This Focus Jackdaw traces the evolution of the presidency from its beginnings to present day. A wide variety of primary sources—such as campaign memorabilia, letters, diary entries, photographs, and government documents—will help students understand the official role of the president, as well as offer them a glimpse into how this powerful position has shaped the private lives of those who have served as chief executive. Historian: Robyn Griswold. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions and Response Key Recommended Reading List Presidential Trivia

Historical Documents ❖ Excerpt from George Washington’s letter to Catherine Macauley Graham, Jan. 9, 1970 ❖ Letter sent by Benny Pierce to his mother, Jun. 11, 1852 ❖ First and last pages of the Articles of Impeachment of Andrew Johnson, 1868 ❖ Republican ballot from the election of 1876 ❖ Campaign button poster ❖ Presidential election process flow chart poster ❖ Entry from President Harry Truman’s personal diary, Jul. 27, 1974 ❖ Memo to Watergate Special Prosecutor Leon Jaworski, Aug. 9, 1974 ❖ A day in the life of President Gerald Ford, Apr. 28, 1975 ❖ Sections 2-4 of the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution, Oct. 16, 2002

Grades 8–12 Most students will be surprised to learn that the modern U.S. twoparty political system did not always exist and that our Constitution makes no provision for political parties. Hands-on historical documents—newspapers, broadsides, campaign posters, and photos—trace the issues, growth, and changes in American politics. Scenes from the 19th-century campaign trail, political memorabilia, and two collections of political cartoons enliven this topic. Historian: Christine Scriabine. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Political Parties Before the Civil War The Modern Democratic Party The Republican Party Third Parties

Timeline: 1798–1968 Historical Documents ❖ Selections from Journal of William Maclay, United States Senator from Pennsylvania, 1789-1791. ❖ Letter from Robert McMullen, Chairman of the Democratic Republican Committee, 1808. ❖ Tally of the 1824 Electoral College vote. ❖ Campaign newspaper, The Harrisonian, August 1840. ❖ Democratic broadside, c. 1852. ❖ Scenes from the 19th-century campaign trail. ❖ Questions for admittance to the Know-Nothing Party, 1854. ❖ Scrapbook of 19th-century political cartoons. ❖ Excerpts from Horse Sense, by Samuel W. Allerton, 1896. ❖ Building a third party: the Progressive Party, 1912. ❖ Campaign broadside targeted at women voters, 1924. ❖ The New Deal in cartoons, 1933-1944. ❖ Draft of John F. Kennedy campaign address, 1946. ❖ Scenes from the 20th-century campaign trail. ❖ Richard M. Nixon resignation letter, August 1974, and memo to Watergate Special Prosecutor Leon Jaworski, August 1974. ❖ Excerpt from Ronald Reagan’s RNC welcoming speech, 1988. ❖ Poster of American political party memorabilia, 1844-1980. ❖ Abraham Lincoln and Hannibal Hamlin campaign poster, 1860.

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U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

Archaeology & Slave Life at Mount Vernon

The Electoral College Grades 8–12 This Jackdaw portfolio will help students learn what the Electoral College is and how it works, the origin and history of the Electoral College, and the pros and cons of the Electoral College system. The historian uses primary source documents from as early as 1801 and as recent as 2000. Teachers and students alike will gain a better understanding of the Electoral College system by using this portfolio. Historian: Christine Scriabine. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Support Materials I llustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Recommended Reading List Critical Thinking Questions with Response Key

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Primary Source Documents Counting the Electoral Votes, February, 9–1801 Tally of the 1824 Electoral College Vote John Quincy Adams’ Acceptance of His Election T he “Bloody Shirt” Reformed—Thomas Nast Cartoon Electoral College and Popular Vote Map of the 1964 Presidential Elections Memorandum/Analysis: Hamilton Jordan to Jimmy Carter, July, 1976 Strange Country—Gary Parish Cartoon Certificate of Ascertainment, Texas, 2000 Certificate of Vote, California, 2000

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Order Focus Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6305-3—$48.67/$36.50

Grades 5–8 History and science students will learn about both colonial times and the science and art of archaeology with this specially prepared Jackdaw. Students should realize that George Washington’s Mount Vernon was home to over 300 slaves. Extensive archaeological research has revealed detailed information about the daily lives of the slaves on Washington’s estate. Using old maps and letters, a ship’s invoice, census record, slave ad, and on-site archaeological findings, students will study not only about 18th-century Mount Vernon but also many other places like it in colonial America. Featured in addition to the historical documents is a comprehensive lesson on how archaeology is accomplished. Three copies—enough for class groups—of a large, full-color poster displays artifacts from Mount Vernon and accompanying reproducible hands-on activities help students learn about and become involved in archaeology. Historians: Nancy Hayward, Amy Shook, Esther White. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Reproducible Student Readings & Activities ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

George Washington the Farmer Slave Life at Mount Vernon Educational Story: A Day at Mount Vernon Archaeology at Mount Vernon with Archaeology Terms Student Activities Pamphlet with Activity Terms

Historical Maps ❖ The Vaughan Plan, drawn by Samuel Vaughan, 1787. ❖ The Five Farms, surveyed and drawn by George Washington, 1793.

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Maryland Gazette, August 20, 1761. Invoice from the Nautilus, April 1763. Letter to farm manager Pearce from Washington, June 1795. Slave Census, 1799.

Archaeology in Action: Artifact Assemblages ❖ Poster with full-color photos of seven assemblages of 47 artifacts with identification keys. There are three copies of the poster included in the Jackdaw to facilitate group use.

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

The Emerging Nation: America 1783-1790

China Trade in Growing America: 1783-1843 Grades 5–8

Grades 8–12

With this Jackdaw, students will discover how post-Revolutionary War America became a world trading force. They will learn about the Empress of China, America’s first ship to hoist her flag in Chinese waters; how tea, porcelain, and silk were produced; and what life was like on sailing ships and in old Canton. Five broadsheets and a fascinating array of historical documents—including maps, ships’ papers, and Asian artifacts—illustrate the methods and success of American traders in the Far East and show how the China trade fueled U.S. expansion and the opening of the Pacific Northwest and Hawaii for trade. Historians: Miriam Butts and Patricia Heard, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

This Jackdaw gives students an understanding of the diplomacy involved in negotiating the Treaty of Paris, and students are made aware of the many problems faced by our new nation: the question of slavery, the conflict with Native Americans over land, and continuing violations of the Treaty provisions by both Britain and the U.S. The Treaty of Paris in this Jackdaw is an exact reproduction. Thirteen more documents—maps, treaties, and letters to and from George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and others—bring to life this era of Indian wars, Barbary pirates, and foreign hostilities. Editor: Mary A. Giunta, compiled by Burt Knauft. The contents of this

Broadsheets

Broadsheets

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Independence and the Need for Trade Challenges of the American China Trade Life in Canton Record-setting Ships and Merchant Princes The Lure of the China Trade

Timeline: 250–1843 China Trade Word List with Chinese Characters Historical Documents ❖ Two marine society certificates, 1797 and 1822. ❖ Articles of Agreement for the sloop Experiment, November 12, 1785. ❖ Map of the world showing the voyages of the Empress of China and the Columbia and their differing routes to China. ❖ Carpenter’s certificate of Retier Beckett for the ship Fame, 1802. ❖ Title page of the log of the Columbia, September 1787. ❖ Pages from the journal of the Massachusetts, October 7-12, 1790. ❖ Grand Chop, 1846. ❖ Watercolor set: The Process of Tea Culture. ❖ Watercolors of porcelain manufacture. ❖ Clark & Nightingale merchandise inventory for the Halcyon, May 12, 1795. ❖ Poster: “Something for Mrs. Peabody”—fancy items of the China Trade. ❖ Poster: Tea trade images and artifacts.

Reproducible Student Activities

Jackdaw feature: ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Making of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 Impact of Treaty of 1783 on Slaves in U.S. Whose Land? Treaties with the Indians Barbary Pirates: Threat to U.S. Commerce on the Seas

Timeline: 1755–1790 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Treaty of Paris, 1783. Mitchell Map I of Emerging Nation, 1783. Mitchell Map II, 1783, redline version. Letter, General Washington to Guy Carleton, 1783. Letter, Guy Carleton to General Washington, 1783. Inspection Roll of Negroes, 1783. Map, Indian nations north of Ohio River, 1780s. Treaty of Fort McIntosh, 1785. Letter, John Adams to John Jay, 1785. Letter, John Jay to Thomas Jefferson, 1786. Map, Mediterranean Sea and Barbary States, 1780s. Letter, Richard O’Bryen to Thomas Jefferson, 1785. Resolution on redeeming captives in Algiers, 1787. Letter, Thomas Jefferson to John Jay, 1787.

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21


U.S. HiStory

U.S. HISTORY

17

U.S. History

U.S. History

Industrial Industrial Revolution Revolution Comes to to America America Comes

The America: TheEarly EarlyIndustrialization Industrialization ofofAmerica: “FromWharf Wharf to “From to Waterfall” Waterfall”

ThisThis Jackdaw provides students with a story daring, Jackdaw provides students withofaingenuity story of and ingenuity of exploitation and reward, as America struggled for economic and daring; of exploitation and reward, as America struggled for independence and political through through industrialization. economic independence and stability political stability industriDocuments and historical engine and grist mill alization. Documents andillustrations—steam historical illustrations — steam engine and grist early and millwages, regulations and wages, letters of plans, earlymill millplans, regulations and letters of Samuel Slater Samuel Slater and Eliclassroom-size Whitney — plus classroom-size of the and Eli Whitney—plus maps of the canalmaps and railroad canal andand railroad systems and a photo-poster on the “Contribusystems a photo-poster on the “Contributions to Technology” tions to Technology” all add to students’ understanding of this all add to students’ understanding of this exciting era. Historians: exciting era. Historians: Miriam Butts and Patricia Heard, adapted Miriam Butts and Patricia Heard, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The

This This Jackdaw provides students with a story daring, Jackdaw provides students withofaingenuity story of and ingenuity of exploitation and reward, as America struggled for economic and daring; of exploitation and reward, as America struggled independence and political stability through industrialization. for economic independence and political stability through inDocuments and Documents historical illustrations—steam engine and— grist mill dustrialization. and historical illustrations steam engine andmill grist mill plans, mill and wages, plans, early regulations andearly wages, andregulations letters of Samuel Slater letters of Samuel Slater and Eli Whitney plus classroom-size and Eli Whitney—plus classroom-size maps — of the canal and railroad maps of the and railroad and a photo-poster on the systems andcanal a photo-poster onsystems the “Contributions to Technology” “Contributions to Technology” all add to students’ understanding all add to students’ understanding of this exciting era. Historians: of this exciting era. Historians: Buttsofand Heard. Miriam Butts and Patricia Heard.Miriam The contents this Patricia Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets Broadsheets ❖ The Other American Revolution

Broadsheets Broadsheets ❖ Patriotism with Profit

Grades 5–8 Grades 5–8

by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: contents of this Jackdaw feature: ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Other American Revolution The Role of Inventors in the Industrial Revolution The Role of InventorsStory in the Industrial Revolution The Millworkers’ The Millworkers’ Story Improving Transportation Improving Transportation

Timeline: 1645-1851 Timeline: 1645–1851 Historical Documents Historical Documents ❖ Agreement to the Incorporation of the Middlesex Canal, 1793.

Agreement the Incorporation the Middlesex Canal, 1793. 1795. Letter fromtoSamuel Slater to of employer, William Almy, Letter from Samuel Slater to employer, William Almy, 1795.and Columbian Oliver Evans’ designs: automated gristmill, 1783, steam engine, 1804. automated gristmill, 1783, and Columbian steam Oliver Evans’ designs: engine, 1804. Letter: Eli Whitney to D. Wadsworth, Comm. of Ordnance, 1814. Two from the Hurd Mill wages book, 1827. Letter:pages Eli Whitney to D.Thomas Wadsworth, Commissary of Ordnance, 1814. Amoskeag Millthe regulations, Manchester, New1827. Hampshire, 1859. Two pages from Thomas Hurd Mill wages book, Mechanic’s awarded to Amos Dow by Amoskeag Amoskeag Millcertificate regulations, Manchester, New Hampshire, 1859. Mills, 1871.certificate awarded to Amos Dow by Amoskeag Mills, 1871. Mechanic’s Broadside: “Enlarge the Canals!”, probably New York, 1832. Broadside: “Enlarge the Canals!”, probably New York, 1832. Maps showing principal canals, highways and railroads, 1840Maps showing principal canals, highways, and railroads, 1840-1860. 1860. “Steamship Savannah/The First Ocean Steamer,” Boston, 1854. 1854. “Steamship Savannah/The First Ocean Steamer,” Boston, Certificate for nine shares of stock in the California Petroleum Certificate for nine shares of stock in the California Petroleum Company, 1865. Company, 1865. ❖ Poster: Contributions to Technology. ❖ Poster: Contributions to Technology. ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Reproducible Student Activities Reproducible Student Activities Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6213-1 Order Jackdaw B-605M — —$92.67/$69.50 $51.95

22

Grades 8–12 Grades 8–12

The contents of this Jackdaw feature: ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Patriotism with Profit Dollars and Sense Dollars and Sense Many Revolutions Many Revolutions Bone and Bone andSinew Sinew Web of Web ofCommunications Communications

Historical Documents Historical Documents

Agreement totothe Incorporation of the Canal, Canal, 1793. 1793. Agreement the Incorporation ofMiddlesex the Middlesex Letter from Slater to employer, William Almy, 1795. Letter fromSamuel Samuel Slater to employer, William Almy, 1795. Oliver Evans’ designs: automated gristmill, 1783, and Columbian steam Oliver Evans’ designs: automated gristmill, 1783, and Columbian engine,engine, 1804. 1804. steam Letter: Eli to D. Commissary of of Ordnance, 1814.1814. ❖ Letter: EliWhitney Whitney toWadsworth, D. Wadsworth, Comm. Ordnance, ❖ Two pagesfrom from Thomas Mill book, wages1827. book, 1827. Two pages thethe Thomas HurdHurd Mill wages ❖ Amoskeag Mill regulations, Manchester, New Hampshire, 1859. Amoskeag Mill regulations, Manchester, New Hampshire, 1859. ❖ certificate awarded to Amos Dow by Amoskeag ❖ Mechanic’s Mechanic’s certificate awarded to Amos Dow by Amoskeag Mills, 1871. 1871. ❖ Mills, Broadside: “Enlarge the Canals!”, probably New York, 1832. ❖ Broadside: “Enlarge the Canals!”, probably New York, 1832. ❖ Maps showing principal canals, highways, and railroads, 1840-1860. ❖ Maps showing principal canals, highways and railroads, 1840❖ “Steamship Savannah/The First Ocean Steamer,” Boston, 1854. 1860. ❖ Certificate for nine shares of stock in the California Petroleum ❖ “Steamship Savannah/The First Ocean Steamer,” Boston, 1854. Company, 1865. ❖ Certificate for nine shares of stock in the California Petroleum ❖ Poster: Contributions to Technology. Company, 1865. ❖ Poster: Contributions to Technology. Reproducible Student Activities ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Reproducible Student Activities Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6052-6 — $92.67/$69.50 Order Jackdaw B-A32 — $51.95

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U.S. HiStory

U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

U.S. History

18

LouisianaPurchase Purchase and and its Louisiana its Legacy Legacy

Lewis&&Clark Clark Expedition: 1804–1806 Lewis Expedition: 1804–1806

Take students behind the scenes of theof1803 Purchase, an Take students behind the scenes the Louisiana 1803 Louisiana Purepic land deal between the economically troubled French government chase, an epic land deal between the economically troubled and thegovernment United States,and whichthe notUnited only doubled the which size of our French States, notcountry only but also the put our Constitution theput test.our Historic documents doubled sizefledgling of our country but to also fledgling Coninclude to a 1775 French map ofdocuments Louisiana Territory, treaty stitution the test. Historic include: aselected 1775 French map of Louisiana selected treaty pages,Pike, letters from pages, letters fromTerritory, Thomas Jefferson and Zebulon an act of Thomas Jefferson and Zebulon Pike,toan actpossession of CongressofauthorizCongress authorizing the president take Louisiana ing the president take possession of Louisiana and an Territory, and an to excerpt from the memoirs of theTerritory, French governor excerpt from the memoirs of the French governor of Louisiana. of Louisiana. Historian: Robyn Hallowell Griswold. The contents of this

TakeTake youryour students on the exciting 8,000-mile journey of Lewis and students on the exciting eight thousand mile Clark. Study the documents—Jefferson’s instructions— toJefferson’s Lewis, the journey of Lewis and Clark. Study the documents 1814 map of their routes, and drawings of the Indians and natural instructions to Lewis, the 1814 map of their routes, and drawings wonders discovered thewonders way. Readdiscovered an 1806 newspaper account of the Indians and along natural along the way. of their after 28 months in of thetheir West. Broadsheets discuss Read an return 1806 newspaper account return after 28 months thethe story fromBroadsheets the Louisianadiscuss Purchase the end of the and in West. thetostory from thejourney Louisiana Purchase to the end of theA.journey and beyond. Historian: James beyond. Historian: James Crutchfield. The contents of this Jackdaw

Grades5–8 5–8 Grades

Historian: Robyn Hallowell Griswold. The contents of this Focus Focus Jackdaw feature: Jackdaw feature:

Support Materials Support Materials ❖ Illustrated Broadsheet Essay

❖ ❖ Illustrated Timeline Broadsheet Essay ❖ Timeline ❖ Critical Thinking Questions ❖ Critical Thinking Questions ❖ Recommended Reading List ❖ Recommended Reading List ❖ Louisiana Purchase Map ❖ Louisiana Purchase Map

Historical Documents Historical Documents

Cartede dela la Louisiane Louisiane etetdes Pays Voisins—Map Louisiana and ❖ ❖ Carte des Pays Voisins —ofMap of Louisiana and Neighboring Countries, c. 1775. Neighboring Countries, c. 1775. ❖ First page of the Treaty of Cession, April 30, 1803. ❖ First page of the Treaty of Cession, April 30, 1803. Coverand and signature of of thethe Convention for Payment of sumsof due by ❖ ❖ Cover signaturepage page Convention for Payment sums France to the United States, April 30, 1803. due by France to the United States, April 30, 1803. Excerptfrom from Thomas letter to Senator Breckinridge, ❖ ❖ Excerpt ThomasJefferson’s Jefferson’s letter to Senator Breckinridge, August 12, 1803. August 12, 1803. Congressional act authorizing the president to “take possession” of the ❖ ❖ Congressional act authorizing the president to “take possession” Territory of Louisiana, October 31, 1803. of the Territory of Louisiana, October 31, 1803. ❖ Excerpt from Memoirs of My Life, by Pierre Clément de Laussat, French ❖ Excerpt from Memoirs of My Life, by Pierre Clément de Laussat, governor of Louisiana, December 20, 1803. French governor of Louisiana, December 20, 1803. ❖ Engraving depicting the flag raising ceremony in New Orleans upon the ❖ Engraving depicting the flag raising ceremony in New Orleans transfer of Louisiana from France to the United States, December 20, 1803. upon the transfer of Louisiana from France to the United States, ❖ Letter from Captain Zebulon Pike to Thomas Jefferson, October 29, 1807. December 20, 1803. ❖ Letter from Captain Zebulon Pike to Thomas Jefferson, October 29, Order Focus Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6259-9 — $48.67/$36.50 1807.

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Grades 5–8 5–8 Grades

A. Crutchfield. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: feature:

Broadsheets Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Louisiana Purchase The Louisiana Purchase Preparing Journey Preparing forfor thethe Journey The VoyageofofDiscovery Discovery The Voyage The Legacyofofthe the Expedition The Legacy Expedition Contemporary Expeditions Contemporary Expeditions

Timeline: 1804-1806 Timeline: 1804–1806 Historical Documents Historical Documents

❖ Map of Louisiana as perceived by its French owners, 1757. ❖ Map of Louisiana as perceived by its French owners, 1757. ❖ Letter from Lewis to General Irvine, April 1803. ❖ Letter from Lewis to General Irvine, April 1803. ❖ President Jefferson’s instructions to Lewis, June 1803. ❖ President Jefferson’s instructions to Lewis, June 1803. ❖ Jefferson’s letter of credit to Lewis for financing, July 1803. ❖ Illustration, Jefferson’s letter of credit Lewismeeting for financing, 1803. 1804. ❖ Lewis and to Clark withJuly Indians, ❖ Catlin Illustration, Lewis and Clark meeting Indians, 1804. ❖ drawing, Mandan Indianwith village, 1832. ❖ Map Catlinand drawing, Mandan Indian village, 1832. River, June 1805. ❖ sketch of Great Falls, Missouri ❖ Drawing Map and sketch of Great River, June 1805. ❖ of Clark and Falls, men Missouri building winter-quarters huts. ❖ Title-page: Drawing of Clark and 1814 men building winter-quarters ❖ official Philadelphia versionhuts. of the expedition. ❖ map showing the routes traveled bythe Lewis and Clark. ❖ 1814 Title-page: official 1814 Philadelphia version of expedition. ❖ article the traveled return of and Clark, 1806. ❖ Newspaper 1814 map showing theon routes by Lewis Lewis and Clark. ❖ of the men ❖ List Newspaper articleon onthe the expedition. return of Lewis and Clark, 1806. ❖ the Freeman-Custis expedition. ❖ Animals List of theidentified men on the by expedition. ❖ Flat Head Indians from Clark’s journal, 1806. ❖ Sketch Animalsof identified by the Freeman-Custis expedition. ❖ Sketch of Flat Head Indians from Clark’s journal, 1806. Reproducible Student Activities

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23


U.S. HiStory

U.S. HISTORY

19

U.S. History

U.S. History

Mountain the Fur FurTrade Trade MountainMen Men & & the

The of 1812 1812 The War War of

ThisThis Jackdaw is is ideal forforteaching and, Jackdaw ideal teachingwestward westwardexpansion expansion and, importantly, its impact on the American economy. The true story importantly, its impact on the American economy. The true story of the mountain men will introduce this group of the colorful, colorful,fur-trapping fur trapping “mountain men” will introduce this group of adventurers and entrepreneurs to your students. of adventurers and entrepreneurs to your students. For nearly forty For nearly fortymen years, “mountain men” survived, and years mountain survived, trapped, and explored thetrapped Great Plains explored Great Plains and Rocky Mountains, long before and Rockythe Mountains long before soldiers, settlers, and cowboys. soldiers, settlerstwo andpaintings cowboys. include two Posters include of Hands-on the annual posters rendezvous between paintings of the annual rendezvous between trappers, buyers trappers, buyers, and Indians and drawings and descriptions of and Indians, and drawings and descriptions of trappers’ equiptrappers’ equipment and weapons. Historian: James A. Crutchfield.

The The documents in this Jackdaw will will shedshed much lightlight on the documents in this Jackdaw much on complicated causes and results of this two-year war between the complicated causes and results of this two-year war; a war Britain and the United States, fought Canadainon the Great between Britain and the United Statesinfought Canada, on the Great Lakes, at sites along the around East Coast around to New Lakes, at sites along the East Coast to New Orleans. This Orleans. This initiated by the States, grew from war, initiated bywar, the United States, grewUnited from aggravation to armed aggravation armed conflict as theconstant U.S. refused tolerate conflict as thetoU.S. refused to tolerate Britishtointrusions: constant intrusions: blockades European markets, blockadesBritish of European markets, uninvitedofboarding of American uninvited boarding of American ships, forcing Americans into ships, forcing Americans into the British navy, arousing Indians the British navy, arousing Indians against American settlers, against American settlers, and Western boundary disputes. Replicas and Western boundary disputes. Students will learn: buildings of Washington, newspaper articles, the Congressional record, politicians’ in D.C. were burned; and in nearby Baltimore, the proclamations, a map of the battlegrounds, and of “Star-Spangled Banner” was written; General Andrewposter Jackson, the “Bat tle of Queenston Heights” for classroom display later President Jackson, won the Battle of New Orleans. Replicas andnewspaper illustrate the War of Historian: Richard The of articles, the1812. Congressional record, Howard. politicians’

Grades 5–8 5–8 Grades

ment and weapons. Historian: James A. Crutchfield. The contents Thethis contents of this Jackdaw feature: of Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Mountain Men The Mountain Men The Rendezvous The Rendezvous Equipment ofof thethe Mountain Man Man Equipment Mountain Fur Posts Forts Fur Postsand and Forts

Timeline & & Illustrious Personalities: 1806–1843 Timeline Illustrious Personalities: 1806-1843 Historical Documents Historical Documents

❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Map of mountain men era, 1836. Map ofU.S. U.S.during during mountain men era, 1836. Poster withillustrations illustrations of beaver trapping hat making. Poster with of beaver trapping and hatand making. Gen. Ashley’s that helped the “rendezvous Gen. Ashley’s adad that helped startstart the “rendezvous system.”system.” Trader’s license issued to Gen. Ashley, April 1822. Trader’s license issued to Gen. Ashley, April 1822. Keelboat drawing from Crockett’s Almanac, Keelboat drawing from DavyDavy Crockett’s Almanac, 1838. 1838. Drawing Indian attack ontrader’s fur trader’s keelboat, Drawing ofof Indian attack on fur keelboat, 1823. 1823. A. J. Miller paintings of the 1837 “Rendezvous.” A. J. Miller paintings of the 1837 “Rendezvous.” Drawings and descriptions of mountain men’s weapons. Drawings and descriptions of mountain men’s weapons. Poster with illustrations of forts and fur posts. Poster with illustrations of forts and fur posts.

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Grades 8–12 8–12 Grades

contents of this Jackdaw proclamations, a mapfeature: of the battlegrounds, and poster of the “Battle of Oueenston Heights” for classroom display tell and Broadsheets illustrate War of 1812. Historian: Richard Howard. The ❖ Collisionthe at Sea  contents of this Jackdaw feature: ❖ Clash in the Northwest  

❖ Peninsular War Broadsheets

❖ Collision War for theat Lakes   ❖ Sea Neptune ❖ Clash inRises   the Northwest ❖ Peninsular War Peace ❖ War for the Lakes Historical Documents ❖ Neptune Rises ❖ Peace Newspaper pages, New York Spectator, Christmas Day, 1811. ❖ ❖ John Randolph’s anti-war speech to Congress, December 1811. Historical Documents ❖ General William Hull’s proclamation to Canadians, July 13, 1812. ❖ Newspaper pages, New York Christmas ❖ Montreal Gazette report on fall ofSpectator, Detroit, Sept. 7, 1812. day, 1811. ❖ John Randolph’s anti-war speech to Congress, December 1811. ❖ Engraving: “Battle of Queenston Heights,” Oct. 13, 1812. ❖ Gen. Wm. Hull’s proclamation to Canadians, July 13, 1812. ❖ Kingston Gazette report on summer raid at York, Aug. 10, 1813. ❖ Montreal Gazette report on fall of Detroit, Sept. 7, 1812. ❖ Engraving: Army $3.00 bill“Battle of exchange, March 1814. ❖ of Queenston Heights,” Oct. 13, 1812. ❖ Kingston Painting imagining “The Capture of City of Washington,” 1815.10, 1813. ❖ Gazette report on summer raid at York, Aug. ❖ Army Broadside: “Glorious News from New Orleans,” ❖ $3.00 bill of exchange, March 1814.February 1815. Map of theater of war in“The America, 1811-15. ❖ Painting imagining Capture of City of Washington,” 1815. ❖ Broadside: “Glorious News from New Orleans,” February 1815. Reproducible Student ❖ Map of theatre of warActivities in America, 1811-15.

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24

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

The Mexican-American War

The Great Irish Potato Famine

Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

This Jackdaw describes the course of the Mexican-Ameri­can War and helps to put it in proper perspective. It dis­cusses the role of the slavery issue, the influence of Mani­fest Destiny, the boundary disputes, and the important precedent set by James Polk in the use of presi­dential power to start and conduct a war. The atmo­sphere of the times is recreated by an array of hands-on documents—letters, newspapers, broadsides, prints, cartoons, and photographs. Historian: Milton Meltzer. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

This Jackdaw chronicles the causes and catastrophic effects of the Great Irish Potato Famine of 1845-1850—which resulted in millions of Irish deaths and forced millions more to emigrate to England, the United States, and Canada—through primary source documents that include a firsthand report of pre-famine living conditions; a letter pleading for aid; British, Irish, and American newspaper accounts of the unfolding tragedy; and gripping contemporary illustrations. Historian: Christine Brendel Scriabine. The contents of this Focus

Broadsheets

Jackdaw feature:

❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Heading West Manifest Destiny Inside Mexico Our Country, Right or Wrong? War Abroad, Dissent at Home Victory and a Divided Nation

Historical Documents ❖ Chronology and map of the Mexican-American War, 1845-1848. ❖ The first page of the New-York Daily Tribune, May 13, 1846, containing President Polk’s war message. ❖ The second page of the New-York Daily Tribune, May 12, 1846, with a Horace Greeley editorial. ❖ The second page of the New-York Daily Tribune, May 28, 1846, with a report from the battlefield. ❖ A recruiting poster. ❖ Page of an antiwar speech by Congressman Severance from the Appendix to The Congressional Globe, February 4, 1847. ❖ Illustrations of famous battles. ❖ A letter from an American soldier in the field. ❖ Lincoln’s “spot” resolutions from The Congressional Globe, December 22, 1847. ❖ The first page of The American Star, October 20, 1847. ❖ A political cartoon poster.

Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ Excerpt from Letters On The Condition Of The People Of Ireland, 1846. ❖ Letter from Benj Morris Wall, Mayor of Waterford on behalf of the Poor Law Guardians, November 12, 1845. ❖ Selections from The Nation, 1847. ❖ Views from Punch, a London humor magazine, 1846-7. ❖ Graphic views of Ireland’s misery—illustrations from The Illustrated London News, 1849-1850. ❖ A view from the United States—articles from the Palladium, a Whig paper in New Haven, Connecticut, 1847. ❖ Photo album: scenes of emigration and immigration.

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25


U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

For related photo collections, see pp. 90–91

Immigrants to a Growing Nation: 1800-1880

Indian Resistance in Growing America

Grades 8–12

This Jackdaw and its documents will help students understand the white man’s “Indian problem,” and the Indians’ “white problem.” The Jackdaw teaches a wide scope of Native American history, covering the subject from the 17th century to the end of the 19th century from the East to West Coasts with a focus on key leaders. The documents provide a favorable image of Native Americans and their pleas for justice. Historians: Alvin M. Josephy, Jr. and Jean Strouse, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

This Jackdaw documents the immigrants’ saga through graphs, maps, prints, personal letters, and scrapbooks. The actual numbers of the successive waves of immigrants, their countries of origin, their reasons for migrating, and the adventures of the journey are vividly illustrated. This era is completed with materials documenting the final destinations for different ethnic groups, their adaptation to work and cultural changes, and finally the varied political and social reactions of earlier generation Americans to the immigrants. Historian: Christine Scriabine. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Introduction to Immigration 1800-1880 The British, Scotch and Welsh Germans and Scandinavians The Irish Americans and Immigrants

Timeline: 1783–1880s Immigration Maps, Charts, and Graphs Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Poster: From Old Home to New Home: Scenes from the Journey. Excerpt from The Emigrant’s Directory of the Western States of North America, 1819. “The Lament of the Irish Emigrant: A Ballad,” Boston, 1840. Newspaper clipping from The Nation, Dublin, 1848. Broadside advertising help for emigrants, Germany, 1851. Poster: Germans in Texas. Letter from Clara Chaney, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, to her grandmother in England, 1850. Poster: Nativism. Immigrants in cartoon. Excerpt from The Statutes of California, 1862. Central Pacific Railroad payroll, 1865. “The Beaver Creek Tragedy: The Missing Orphans of Osten and Aase Sondreson” by Robert Sanders. Excerpts from the Annual Report: Office of Commissioner for Protection of Emigrants to California, 1860. Poster: Irish and German Immigrants in the Civil War. List of drafted men who failed to report in the Eighth Congressional District, 1863.

Grades 5–8

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Indian Resistance in Northeast America The United States Expands: 1700-1812 America’s Manifest Destiny Patriots and Peacekeepers

Timeline: 1492–1890 Map Poster: Progressive Loss of Indian Lands, 1780s–1890s Historical Documents ❖ Pages from first Bible printed in America, Natick dialect, 1663. ❖ Paul Revere’s drawing of King Philip, 1772. ❖ Engraving: “How They Catch Fish,” from A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia, 1588. ❖ Engraving: “The Town of Secotan,” from the above, showing the layout of an Indian village. ❖ Pages from Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia, telling the tragic story of a Mingo chief, 1787. ❖ Indian leader portraits: the Prophet, Osceola, Sequoyah and Keokuk. ❖ Frontispiece and title page of The Life of Black Hawk, 1836. ❖ Part of a letter written by a Nez Perce chief, 1874. ❖ Illustration: Chief Joseph and followers pursued by U.S. troops, 1877. ❖ Last page of a Hopi petition asking the government for a survey of promised grazing lands, 1894. ❖ Remington’s painting of the Ghost Dance of the Oglala Sioux, 1890. ❖ George Catlin map of the location of Indian tribes, 1865. ❖ Catlin drawing of Sioux buffalo hunt.

Reproducible Student Activities

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

Indian Resistance: The Patriot Chiefs

Erie Canal

Grades 8–12

Grades 5-8

This Jackdaw and its documents, including a Catlin map, historical illustrations, Jefferson’s notes, and a letter from a chief, will help students understand the white man’s “Indian problem,” and the Indian’s “white problem.” This Jackdaw teaches a wide scope of Native American history, covering the subject from the 1600s to 1970s from the East to West Coasts with a focus on key leaders of Indian nations. The documents provide a favorable image of the Native Americans and their pleas for justice. Historian: Alvin M. Josephy, Jr. and Jean Strouse. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

After the American Revolution, there was a growing need for an efficient transportation route that would connect settlements west of the Appalachians with trading centers along the East Coast. The answer to this dilemma would be the Erie Canal, a 363-milelong water highway across New York State that linked Lake Erie to the Atlantic seaboard. Using this engaging set of primary source documents, which includes a full-color map and profile of the canal, an official canal guide, contemporary illustrations, and the boyhood recollections of a man who traveled west along the canal, students will learn how the Erie Canal served as a catalyst for great social and economic change in New York State and throughout the nation. Historian: Robyn Hallowell Griswold. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

King Philip’s War Tecumseh and Expansion Across the Allegheny Manifest Destiny and its Opponents Non-resistant Chiefs American Expansion on the Plains Modern Indian Policy and Indian Resistance Today

Historical Documents ❖ Pages from first Bible printed in America, Natick dialect, 1663. ❖ Paul Revere’s drawing of King Philip, 1772. ❖ Engraving: “How They Catch Fish,” from A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia, 1588. ❖ Engraving: “The Town of Secotan,” from the above, showing the layout of an Indian village. ❖ Pages from Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia, telling the tragic story of a Mingo chief, 1787. ❖ Indian leader portraits: the Prophet, Osceola, Sequoyah and Keokuk. ❖ Frontispiece and title page of The Life of Black Hawk, 1836. ❖ Part of a letter written by a Nez Perce chief, 1874. ❖ Illustration: Chief Joseph and followers pursued by U.S. troops, 1877. ❖ Last page of a Hopi petition asking the government for a survey of promised grazing lands, 1894. ❖ Remington’s painting of the Ghost Dance of the Oglala Sioux, 1890. ❖ George Catlin map of the location of Indian tribes, 1865.

feature:

Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ Excerpt from Memorial of the Citizens of New York, in favour of a Canal Navigation between the Great Western Lakes and the tide-waters of the Hudson, 1816. ❖ Map and profile of the Erie Canal, 1825. ❖ Photo-poster: The Erie Canal—The Nation’s First School of Civil Engineering. ❖ Erie and Junction Canal Guide, 1833. ❖ “Canal Life,” Harper’s Weekly, 1879. ❖ Excerpt from The Bark Covered House, 1876.

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27


U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

The Santa Fe Trail

California Gold Rush 1849

Grades 5–8 Take your students on the historic journey from Independence, Missouri, to Santa Fe, New Mexico, over the Santa Fe Trail, America’s first great road of commerce west of the Mississippi. The importance of the Santa Fe Trail comes alive through a dozen documents, which include a map showing the route of the trail through present-day states, an 1844 Table of Distances from Independence to Santa Fe, and a lithograph of Santa Fe in 1883. Historian: James A. Crutchfield.

Grades 5–8

The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

The color and excitement of the Gold Rush is captured in the “Mining Methods” poster, “The Miner’s Ten Commandments,” the “Bill of Fare” menu of the day, and even more in the photo of empty ships moored in San Francisco harbor. Where did the sailors go? Plenty to think and talk about here. The Broadsheets describe the discovery and the travel by land and sea to reach the gold country, while the 11 documents give students the feeling of being a “Forty-Niner” right there in gold territory. Historian: Andrew Bronin. The contents of this

Broadsheets

Jackdaw feature:

❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Mystery of Santa Fe William Becknell and the Santa Fe Trail Freighting on the Santa Fe Trail Josiah Gregg: Chronicler of Trail Life Demise of the Santa Fe Trail

Timeline: 1821–1859 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Map showing path of Santa Fe Trail over present-day states. Plan of Santa Fe, c. 1840. Engraving of Santa Fe, 1846. Advertisment for Josiah Gregg’s Commerce of the Prairies. Josiah Gregg’s “Map of the Indian Territory, Northern Texas and New Mexico Showing the Great Western Prairies,” 1844. Josiah Gregg’s Table of Distances between Independence and Santa Fe, 1844; Josiah Gregg’s Statistical Table, 1844. Plan of Bent’s Fort, 1845. Expedition recruitment notice, 1825. Illustration depicting wagon train with military escort. Pages from Colonel Stephen Watts Kearny’s Laws of the Territory of New Mexico, 1846. Illustration showing switchback rails at Raton Pass. Lithograph of City of Santa Fe, 1883.

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Discovery Forty-Niners To Califomia by Sea To California by Land San Francisco Self-determination: The Spirit of ‘49

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

“Map of the Emigrant Road Accompaniment,” booklet, 1849. A Gold Rush bill of fare, 1849. “The Miner’s Ten Commandments,” poster, 1849. Harper’s Weekly, October 3, 1857. The Placer Times, April 28, 1849. New York Herald, February 16, 1849. Page from President James K. Polk’s diary, December 7, 1848. Map of the gold regions of California, 1849. Sheet music for Stephen Foster’s “Oh! Susanna,” 1848. “Mining Methods,” poster. Panoramic daguerreotype of San Francisco harbor during the Gold Rush.

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24

U.S. HiStory

U.S. HISTORY

U.S. History

Trail of Trail ofTears Tears Grades Grades5-8 5-8

Set Set against the backdrop of a growing nation that was still against the backdrop of a growing nation that was still determining the ofofstates’ and the determining thepower power states’rights rights and thesystem systemofofchecks checks and balances in its national government, this Jackdaw and balances in its national government, this Jackdawreveals reveals the Cherokee faced under the the injustice injustice the the Cherokee faced under the U.S. U.S. government governmentinin the late 1700s and early 1800s and their removal the late 1700s and early 1800s, and their removalfrom fromthe theEast East in 1838. Evocative primary sources—including excerpts in 1838. Evocative primary sources — including excerptsfrom from treaties, treaties, political politicalcartoons, cartoons, denouncements denouncementsof ofthe the government’s government’s mistreatment of of the the Cherokee, Cherokee, and andaapage pageofofthe theCherokee Cherokee mistreatment Nationnewspaper—contribute newspaper — contribute to aunderstanding fuller understanding Nation to a fuller of the legal,of the legal,and political social of the events leading up to political, social and aspects of aspects the events leading up to the forced the forced march that ultimately thousands of Cherokee. march that ultimately killed thousandskilled of Cherokee. Historian: Audrey Historian: Audrey Green Rogers. contents Green Rogers. The contents of this Focus The Jackdaw feature:of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

Support Materials Support Materials ❖ Illustrated Broadsheet Essay ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents Historical Documents ❖ Sequoya’s Cherokee alphabet, 1821. ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Sequoya’s Cherokee alphabet, 1821. Front page of the Cherokee Phoenix, April 10, 1828. Front page of the Cherokee Phoenix, April 10, 1828. Indian Removal Act, May 28, 1830. Indian Removal Act, May 28, 1830. Political relating to U.S. policy, 1833-1886. Politicalcartoons cartoons relating to Indian U.S. Indian policy, 1833-1886. Circular and memorial of theofNew-York Committee in aid of the Circular and memorial the New-York Committee in aid of the Cherokee 1832. CherokeeNation, Nation, 1832. Pages Treaty of New Echota, December 29, 1835.29, 1835. Pagesofofthe the Treaty of New Echota, December Transcript of a letter from Chief John Ross to Congress, 1836. 1836. Transcript of a letter from Chief John Ross to Congress, Poster photographs, quotations and a map Posterwith with photographs, quotations and relating a map to relating to Indian Indianremoval. removal.

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U.S. History

For related photo collections, see pp. 86–87

Slavery Comes to America The Oregon Trail Grades 5–8 Grades 5–8

The classroom display of the slave sale poster, bill of sale for a slave, Travel the original Oregon Trail with this Jackdaw. The handsand Emancipation Proclamation provided in thisalive. Jackdaw will helpwill onthe documents make this historic trip come Students students understand the human tragedy of slavery and Lincoln’s follow the maps, climb aboard a covered wagon, read writings efforts to halt the practice and photos save the historical of fellow travelers, study early of Union. famousThe photographers, documents dramatically show your students the consequences of and experience daily life on the trail. Most importantly, students slavery on slaves, their owners, and our nation. Historian: William will learn why individuals and families, their ancestors, fromC.the Hine, adapted by Muriel L.East Dubois. The contents feature: relatively comfortable endured the tripoftothis theJackdaw Wild West. Historian: Carol L. Cohen. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets: ❖ Broadsheets Slavery Comes to the New World Colonies

❖ ❖ Slavery in the The South History of 1800s: the Oregon Trail ❖ ❖ Slavery theEmigrants 1800s: The Went North West Why in the ❖ ❖ The End of Slavery Leave-taking ❖ Life Along the Trail Timeline: Prehistory to 1865 ❖ Routes, Landmarks and Trail’s End

Historical Documents Timeline: 1803-1858

❖ Newspapers and slavery: Page 3 of the South Carolina Gazette, Oct. 1736; Page 1 of The Camden Journal (S.C.), Jan. 1831. Historical Documents John Fremont map, “Road from Missouri to Oregon.” ❖ ❖ Slave sale poster, 1835. Daily editorial page, July 1843. ❖ ❖ BillN.Y. of sale for aTribune slave, 1838. The Oregon Trail byslaves Francis ❖ ❖ Ordinance prohibiting fromParkman, carrying on1849. any mechanic or handicraft ❖ trades, Missouri 1796. River steamboat schedule. Shivelys Guide: guidebook for1848. emigrants, 1846. ❖ ❖ Portion of the Georgia Slave Code, Letterfor from Medoram Crawford, 1845. ❖ ❖ Petition payment for execution of slave by burning, 1802. ❖ Diagram of a covered wagon. ❖ Petition to free a slave, 1820. Patent of wagon odometer, 1848. ❖ ❖ Letter fromdrawings a slave, 1838. ❖ Ho Westward Ho! sheet music. ❖ The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863. ❖ Remedies for cholera. ❖ Horn’s map of Oregon Trail. Reproducible Student Activities ❖ William Henry Jackson’s photographs. ❖ Diary Elizabeth 978-1-5669-6215-5 Dixon Smith. OrderofJackdaw — $92.67/$69.50 ❖ Barlow Road letter. ❖ Plat of Oregon City. ❖ The Oregon Trail Today, photo essay.

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29


U.S. H

U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

For related photo collections, see pp. 86–87

For related photo collections, see pp. 86–87

The Trade & Its Abolition Slavery in the United States The Slave Trade & Slave Its Abolition Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

Students will learn development of the slave The classroom display of the slave sale poster, bill ofwill sale learn for a slave, Students about the development of theabout slavethe trade in the Americas from trade in the Americas from 1503, when the first slaves were brought to and the Emancipation Proclamation provided in this Jackdaw will help 1503, when the first slaves were brought to the Caribbean, to its abolition throughout the thethat Caribbean, to itsaabolition British of Empire. This students understand the human tragedy of Empire. slavery and British ThisLincoln’s Jackdaw shows slaving was lucrativethroughout trade. For the hundreds Jackdawwrong showswith thatit.slaving was agraphically lucrative trade. years devout Documents depictDocuments efforts to halt the practice and save theeven Union. The Christians historical saw nothing the of the trade how slavesgraphically were jammed side-by-side ship Brookes, ads depict the evils of on thethe trade—how slaves were jammed documents dramatically show students theevils consequences of — slavery slaves, andC.how with slavery. Johnads Langdon-Davies. side-by-side on theHistorian: ship Brookes, selling slaves, and how the on slaves, their owners, and our nation.selling Historian: William Hine.the Theworld dealt The contents of this Jackdaw feature: world dealt with slavery. Historian: John Langdon-Davies. The contents contents of this Jackdaw feature: of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Slavery Comes to the Colonies Slavery in the North Slavery in the Nineteenth Century The Slave’s Culture The Slave’s Reaction to Slavery Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation

Historical Documents ❖ Newspapers and slavery: Page 3 of the South Carolina Gazette, Oct. 1736; Page 1 of The Camden Journal (S.C.), Jan. 1831. ❖ Slave sale poster, 1835. ❖ Bill of sale for a slave, 1838. ❖ Ordinance prohibiting slaves from carrying on any mechanic or handicraft trades, 1796. ❖ Portion of the Georgia Slave Code, 1848. ❖ Petition for payment for execution of slave by burning, 1802. ❖ Petition to free a slave, 1820. ❖ Letter from a slave, 1838. ❖ The Emancipation Proclamation, 1863.

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Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Slavery How It Began The Middle Passage The Plantations The Men with a Conscience Why Did It Take So Long?

Broadsheets

❖ Slavery ❖ How It Began Historical Documents ❖ The Middle Passage ❖ A plan of the slaving ship Brookes prepared the Wilberforce ❖ byThe PlantationsCommittee to show the sufferings of the Africans in the❖ Middle ThePassage. Men with a Conscience ❖ Portrait of William Wilberforce by Sir Thomas Lawrence. ❖ Why Did It Take So Long? ❖ A bill advertising a West Indian slave auction, 1829. Historical Documents ❖ Selected pages from the Journal of John Newton, 1750-54. ❖ A plan of the slaving ship Brookes prep ❖ A remonstrance from the Council and Assembly of Jamaica Committee to show the sufferings of t to the House of Commons on the subject of the slave trade, 1789. middle passage. ❖ Accounts of the numbers of Africans delivered to the islands of Barbados, ❖ Jamaica, and Antigua for the years 1698-1708.Portrait of William Wilberforce by Sir ❖ A bill advertising a West Indian slave ❖ Views of slavery from cartoons of 1790, 1830, and 1832. ❖ Selected pages from the Journal of John ❖ Sold into slavery: scenes from slave life. ❖ A remonstrance from the Council and to the House of Commons on the subj Reproducible Student Activities ❖ Accounts of the numbers of Africans d Jamaica and Antigua for the Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6090-8Barbados, — $92.67/$69.50 ❖ Views of slavery from cartoons of 1790 ❖ Sold into slavery: scenes from slave lif

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V


U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

Nat Turner’s Slave Revolt – 1831

Dred Scott Decision

Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

Students will learn through intriguing documents—the governor’s handwritten proclamation, court and sheriff’s papers, a replica of the receipt for capture of Turner, and early illustrations—about Nat Turner and his band of fellow blacks’ rebellion, their slaughter of slaveholders, capture, trial, and hanging. Importantly, this Jackdaw sets the stage for the uprising by depicting the conditions of life for slave and slaveholder and follows it through the capture and trials of the conspirators. It places in perspective the effects of the insurrection on the relationships of blacks and whites in the years that followed. Historian: Henry Irving Tragle. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

The Dred Scott case began in 1846 when two slaves, Dred and Harriet Scott, filed freedom suits in the St. Louis Circuit Court. It ended over a decade later with a U.S. Supreme Court ruling that would obstruct future compromises between the North and the South on the issue of slavery and propel the nation closer to civil war. Show students the great historical significance of the Dred Scott court decision with this unique array of authentic primary source documents, including Dred Scott’s petition to sue for his freedom; excerpts from the Supreme Court’s majority and minority opinions; excerpts from speeches by Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and Stephen Douglas; a Southern newspaper editorial; an abolitionist broadside; and an interview with Dred Scott. Historian: Robyn Hallowell Griswold. The

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Locale: Southampton County, Va., 1831 Death and Destruction: August 21-23, 1831 The Reaction The Trials: August to November 1831 Aftermath: Effects of the Insurrection

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Contemporary print—“Nat Turner and his confederates.” Entry in journal of the Virginia Governor’s Council, August 1831. Contemporary print—“Horrid Massacre in Virginia.” List of the white persons who lost their lives in the insurrection. Copy of Governor John Floyd’s proclamation of a reward for the capture of Nat Turner, September 17, 1831. Copy of the receipt given to the captor of Nat Turner. Cover of “The Confessions of Nat Turner” to T. R. Gray, Nov. 1831. Copy of the record of the trial of Nat Turner, Nov. 5, 1831. List of persons brought before the Southampton County Court charged with participation in the insurrection. Certificate made by the Deputy Sheriff of Southampton County Court stating that he had executed Nat Turner. Governor Floyd to the Virginia General Assembly, Dec. 1831. Draft of a bill by the Governor to the General Assembly designed to effect stricter controls over “slaves, free negroes, and mulattoes.”

Reproducible Student Activities

contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

Historical Documents ❖ Dred Scott’s petition to sue for his freedom and Judge Krum’s ruling, April 6, 1846; and a bond for costs, July 2, 1847. ❖ Cover sheet summarizing the disposition of the U.S. Supreme Court case of Dred Scott v. John F.A. Sandford and excerpts from the opinions of Chief Justices Roger B. Taney and Benjamin R. Curtis, March 1857. ❖ Editorial from the Richmond, Virginia Enquirer, March 17, 1857. ❖ Excerpt from a speech by Frederick Douglass, May 1857. ❖ Broadside announcing an abolitionist meeting, 1857. ❖ “A Visit to Dred Scott,” Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, June 27, 1857. ❖ Excerpt from the Lincoln/Douglas debate, August 27, 1858. ❖ Political cartoon: “The Political Quadrille, Music by Dred Scott,” 1860.

Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List Map of the Missouri Compromise with a Description of the Travels of Dred Scott

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U.S. HiStory

U.S. HISTORY

31

U.S. History

U.S. History

Underground Railroad Underground Railroad

Secession Jim Crow Era

ThisTake extraordinary collection primary documents, including your students on a of trip on thesource Underground Railroad, the narratives by Underground Railroad conductors and runaway loosely organized routes to freedom used by fugitive slavesslaves, before a full-color mapThis showing slave andcollection free states,ofrunaway and duringAntebellum the Civil War. extraordinary primary slave advertisements, a freedom certificate, broadsides, source documents, including narratives byabolitionist Underground Railroad conductors runaway a full-color map a plan of theand Canadian Elginslaves; Settlement, and theAntebellum Joint Resolution showing slave and free states; runaway slave advertisements; of Congress, signed by Abraham Lincoln, submitting the proposeda freedom certificate; abolitionist plan of theillustrates Canadian 13th Amendment to the states forbroadsides; ratification,agraphically Elgin Settlement; and the Resolution of slavery Congress, signed the political, economic, andJoint human aspects of as well as by Abraham Lincoln, submitting the proposed 13th Amendment the courage and ingenuity of runaway slaves and those who helped to thethem states ratification, graphically illustrates the political, guide tofor freedom. Historians: Michael Fulton and Regina Krieger economic and human aspects of slavery as well as the courage Fulton. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Immerse your students in the most important survival crisis our The term “Jim Crow” signifies the elaborate legal and social nation has faced with 12 primary source documents that include a structure the South used to enforce the continued subordination newspaper article on South Carolina’s secession from the Union, of the black population after emancipation. This codified system Lee’s letter aboutdenied joiningfree the blacks Confederacy, letters from Abraham of segregation access to the political process, Lincoln and a black soldier, testimony from a former slaveholder, limited their education and economic opportunities, and dehuand a mapthem of thebased statesonin false 1860. notions Historians: National Historical In manized of white superiority. Publications and Records Commission. Editor, Mary A. Giunta, addition, southern whites employed terror through intimidation compiled Burtviolence, Knauft. The contents lynching, of this Jackdaw feature: and extrabylegal especially to doom the promise

Grades Grades5–8 5–8

and ingenuity of runaway slaves and those who helped guide them to freedom. Historians: Michael Fulton and Regina Krieger Broadsheets ❖ “Negroes Sale”: A Brief History of Slaveryfeature: in the United States Fulton. Thefor contents of this Jackdaw ❖ Laying Tracks for an Underground Railroad

Broadsheets ❖ Fighting Slavery Above Ground

❖ Sale”: A Brief History of Slavery in the United States ❖ “Negroes The Train tofor Freedom ❖ Laying Tracks for an Underground Railroad ❖ Fighting Slavery Above Ground Timeline: 1619–1879 ❖ The TrainU.S. to Freedom Map: Major Underground Railroad Routes

Stories from the Underground Railroad Timeline: 1619-1879 Map: Major U.S. Underground Railroad Routes Historical Documents Stories from Underground Railroad ❖ Runaway slavethe advertisements and reward poster, 1736-1837. ❖ Anti-abolition handbill, 1837.

Historical Documents ❖ “Song of the Abolitionist,” William Lloyd Garrison, 1841.

Runaway slave advertisements and reward poster, 1736-1837. Front page of The North Star, June 2, 1848. Anti-abolition handbill, 1837. Certificate of freedom of Harriet Bolling, 1851. “Song of the Abolitionist,” William Lloyd Garrison, 1841. Anti-slave catcher’s Front page of The mass Northconvention Star, Junebroadside, 2, 1848. 1854. Broadside warning of slaveofcatchers, Certificate of freedom Harriet1851. Bolling, 1851. Antebellum map showing free convention and slave states, 1856. 1854. Anti-slave catcher’s mass broadside, Page from the Boston Vigilance c. 1854. Broadside warning of slaveCommittee catchers, handbook, 1851. Excerpt from The Underground 1879. Antebellum map showing Railroad, free andWilliam slave Still, states, 1856. Page theElgin Boston Vigilance handbook, c. 1854. Detail from from the Settlement Plan,Committee 1866. Excerpt from The Underground Railroad, Still, 1879. Excerpt from Reminiscences of Levi Coffin, LeviWilliam Coffin, 1876. Detail from theofElgin Settlement Plan, Joint Resolution Congress submitting the1866. proposed 13th Amendment to Excerpt from Reminiscences Levi Coffin, Levi Coffin, 1876. state legislatures for ratification,ofFebruary 1, 1865. Joint Resolution of Congress submitting proposed 13th Photo-poster: “Underground Railroad: The Trainthe to Freedom.” Amendment to state legislatures for ratification, February 1, 1865. Reproducible Student Activities ❖ Photo-poster: “Underground Railroad: The Train to Freedom.” ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Reproducible Student Activities — $92.67/$69.50 Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6258-2

Grades 8–12 Grades 8-12

of Reconstruction. Show students what life was like for black Americans during the Jim Crow era with this thought-provoking ❖ What Is Secession? collection of primary source documents that includes eyewitness ❖ Right of States to Secede from the Union accounts of terrorization and examples of discrimina❖ Slavery—An Issue That Divided thelynching, Union tory voter registration requirements, newspaper pages ❖ “A laws Houseand Divided Against Itself Cannot Stand” and pamphlet excerpts documenting black Americans’ struggle ❖ The Significance and Consequences of the Civil War against the enduring prejudice of Jim Crow, and riveting con❖ Comparison: United States and Confederate Constitutions temporary photographs. Historian: Beth Haverkamp Powers. Timeline: 1607–1870 The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets

Historical SupportDocuments Materials

❖ map illustrating seceding and border states, 1860-61. ❖ U.S. Illustrated Broadsheet Essay ❖ ❖ Newspaper Timeline article on South Carolina’s secession from the Union, New York Tribune, December 1860. ❖ Daily Critical Thinking Questions ❖ gallery—17 annotated ❖ Secession Recommended Reading Listillustrations and photos of the turmoil, 1852-67. Historical Documents ❖ Ulysses S. Grant’s letter to Frederick Dent on the coming war and slavery, 1861. of George Smith regarding Ku Klux Klan intimidation ❖ April Statement priorfrom to the 1869E.presidential election. ❖ Letter Robert Lee to his sister about his decision to join the Aprilthe 1861. ❖ Confederacy, Excerpts from Constitution of the State of South Carolina, 1895. ❖ address and rationale and 1899. ❖ Jefferson ExcerptsDavis’ frominaugural Lynch Law in Georgia by Idafor B.secession Wells-Barnett, of the Confederacy, February ❖ establishment Texas poll tax receipts, 1903 and 1945.1862. ❖ and slaves from aRecorder, former slaveholder, May 1862. ❖ Letter Pages oflist theofIndianapolis a black-owned newspaper, 1912. ❖ Abraham Letter from NAACP secretary Walterdescribing White toLincoln’s Eleanorpolicy Roosevelt ❖ Lincoln’s letter to Horace Greeley on the war and slavery, 1934. August 1862. about lynching, ❖ of Freedom for slaveregistration “Augustus,” September 1862. ❖ Certificate State of Mississippi voter form, 1955. ❖ Testimony Jim Crow photo-poster. ❖ from former slaveholder to Freedman’s Inquiry Commission, November 1863. Order Focusa Jackdaw —of$27.95 ❖ Letter from James Herney, black soldier, B-807F to Secretary War Edwin Stanton, May 1866. ❖ Pictures and descriptions of 14 famous and important people during secession and the Civil War.

Reproducible Student Activities

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32

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U.S. HISTORY For related photo collections, see pp. 85–86

War Between the States: Civil War

The Civil War

Grades 5–8 Illustrations, posters, military documents, and personal letters bring to life the thoughts and actions of Lincoln, Jackson, Grant, and Lee and the “Billy Yanks” and “Johnny Rebs” who fought under them. Add history and color to your classroom with the Confederate recruiting notice, the Union recruiting poster, and Civil War photographs. Historian: David Johnson, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

A House Divides North Against South Presidents and Generals Rebuilding a Country

Timeline: 1820–1865 Historical Documents ❖ Letter from Lieutenant George Herbert, Union artillery, to his brother, 1862. ❖ Confederate recruiting notice, June 1862. ❖ Excerpt from Robert E. Lee’s Special Orders No. 191, September 1862. ❖ Letters from Union Lieutenant George Herbert criticizing his superior officers, 1862. ❖ The Emancipation Proclamation, January 1863. ❖ Pages from the Richmond Daily Dispatch, June 1863. ❖ Message from Confederate General Cobb to Governor Brown of Georgia the day after the burning of Atlanta, November 1864. ❖ Patriotic poster: “Our Union Defenders.” ❖ Poster: The Civil War in photographs.

Reproducible Student Activities

U.S. History

For related photo collections, see pp. 85–86

Grades 8–12 Illustrations, posters, military documents, and personal letters bring to life the thoughts and actions of Lincoln, Jackson, Grant, and Lee and the “Billy Yanks” and “Johnny Rebs” who fought under them. Add history and color to your classroom with the Confederate recruiting notice, the Union recruiting poster, and Civil War photographs. Historian: David Johnson. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Slavery and “Sesech” Billy Yank and Johnny Reb The Two Presidents Grant and Lee Gains and Losses

Historical Documents ❖ Letter from Lieutenant George Herbert, Union artillery, to his brother, 1862. ❖ Confederate recruiting notice, June 1862. ❖ Excerpt from Robert E. Lee’s Special Orders No. 191, September 1862. ❖ Letters from Union Lieutenant George Herbert criticizing his superior officers, 1862. ❖ The Emancipation Proclamation, January 1863. ❖ Pages from the Richmond Daily Dispatch, June 1863. ❖ Message from Confederate General Cobb to Governor Brown of Georgia the day after the burning of Atlanta, November 1864. ❖ Patriotic poster: “Our Union Defenders.” ❖ Poster: The Civil War in photographs.

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U.S. History U.S. History

34

U.S.HISTORY HiStory U.S. For related photo collections, see pp. 86–87

Emancipation Proclamation The First Transcontinental Railroad

Reconstruction after after the the Civil Civil War Reconstruction War

This Jackdaw t folio awill familiarize students with the This Jackdawpor provides fascinating array of historical docuEmancipation Proclamation, thethe Border and the Missouri ments that makes the history of West States, and coast-to-coast transCompromise. also learn about what was likeposter to be portation comeThey alive.will Display the route map and itfull-color enslaved, how the abolitionists por trayed slaver y, and the in your classroom. Students will marvel at the story of immigrant workers’ and strain, and their successScriabine. building the effects ofsweat emancipation. Historian: Christine Therailroad contents from east and from the west and finally connecting the rails of thisthe Jackdaw feature: with a golden spike. Historian: James A. Crutchfield. The contents Support Materials of this Jackdaw feature:

GiveGive students the background they need understand the complex students the background theytoneed to understand the issues of issues Reconstruction after the Civil newspaper complex of Reconstruction afterWar. the Broadsides, Civil War. Broadsides, pages, handwritten copies of Constitutional amendments, amendpolitical newspaper pages, handwritten copies of Constitutional cartoons, and contemporary bringillustrations to life the intense ments, political cartoons andillustrations contemporary bring to life the intense and socialthe battles that shaped the era political and social political battles that shaped era—from the freedmen’s — from for the jobs, freedmen’s for jobs, land reform struggle schools,struggle land reform, and schools, political power to the and political power to the formation and ultimate overthrow formation and ultimate overthrow of the Radical Reconstruction of the RadicalHistorian: Reconstruction governments. Historian: Milton governments. Milton Meltzer, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. Meltzer, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this JackThe contents of this Jackdaw feature: daw feature:

Grades Grades 5–8 5–8

Grades 5–8 5–8 Grades

❖ Illustrated Broadsheet Essay

Broadsheets ❖ Timeline

❖ of the Railroad ❖ Evolution Recommended Reading List in America ❖ Surveys ❖ Great CriticalTranscontinental Thinking QuestionsRailroad with Response Key ❖ Problems of Getting Started ❖ Building the Transcontinental Primary source documents Railroad ❖ T he Emancipation Proclamation, Washington, DC, January 1, 1863. Who’s & Timeline: 1830-1872 ❖ Map Who of the Missouri Compromise. ❖ L  etter from William G. Christie Historical Documents to his Father, James Christie in Minnesota, from Providence, February 1863. ❖ S. W. Lake Dexter editorialLouisiana, on railroad from16, New York to Oregon, 1832. ❖ P  hoto of Hubbard Pryor taken on October 10, 1864 as a slave. ❖ Thomas Hart Benton’s letter on a transcontinental railroad, 1835. ❖ Page Photoand of Hubbard Pryor October 1864 as aAct, soldier. ❖ selected texttaken fromon the Pacific10,Railway 1862. ❖ Full-color “The Old Union Wagon,” John Hogarth 1864. ❖ poster on completion of Lozier, transcontinental railroad, and for routes ❖ ad “Breaking that available. ‘Backbone,’” Benjamin H. Day, Jr., Currier & Ives, c. 1862. ❖ for inexpensive farming land along the Union Pacific ❖ Ad “ Writing the Emancipation Proclamation,” Adalbert Johann Volck,RR. Sketches ❖ William Henry photos:Second “PlacesSeries, to See, Places to Stay Along from the Civil War Jackson in North America, 1864. Transcontinental Railroad.” ❖ the “President Lincoln Writing the Proclamation of Freedom, January 1, 1863. ❖ U. S. map showing the route of the transcontinental railroad. ❖ Order Proposed timeJackdaw schedule — published two and one half years early Focus 978-1-5669-6306-0—$48.67/$36.50 — for the Union Pacific Railroad, 1866. ❖ Advertisements for the North-Western Stage and Western Union Telegraph companies. ❖ Photo Collage: Railroad Life in the American West, late 1800s.

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Broadsheets Broadsheets ❖ Rebuilding After the Civil War ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Rebuilding After the Civil War The Radical Republicans Take Control The Radical Republicans Take Control Toward a New Life Toward a New Life Carpetbaggers, Scalawags and White Supremacy Carpetbaggers, Scalawags and White Supremacy

Timeline: 1861–1877 Timeline: 1861-1877 Reconstruction 1865–1877 ReconstructionMap: Map: 1865-1877 Historical Documents Historical Documents

Recruitment broadside: MenMen of Color, To Arms! Now orNow Never!, 1863. Recruitment broadside: of Color, To Arms! orc.Never!, Portraits of black members of the Louisiana Legislature of 1868, with c. 1863. extracts from the Reconstruction Constitution. ❖ Portraits of black members of the Louisiana Legislature of 1868, ❖ with Ku Klux Klan broadsides political cartoons, 1868. extracts from theand Reconstruction Constitution. ❖ Ku Front pageKlan of Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, December ❖ Klux broadsides and political cartoons, 1868.26, 1868. ❖ Front Front page New Leslie’s Orleans Illustrated Tribune, January 15, 1869.December 26, ❖ pageofofThe Frank Newspaper, ❖ 1868. Thomas Nast cartoons. ❖ page of The Orleans Tribune, 15,Fourteenth 1869. ❖ Front Joint Resolutions of New Congress proposing theJanuary Thirteenth, and ❖ Thomas cartoons. Fifteenth Nast Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. ❖ Resolutions theSouthern Thirteenth, Four❖ Joint Excerpt from Reportof onCongress Conditionsproposing of Affairs in the States, 1872. and Fifteenth Amendments to thehis U.S. Constitution. ❖ teenth Broadside showing Robert B. Elliott delivering speech on civil rights, ❖ Excerpt January 6,from 1874.Report on Conditions of Affairs in the Southern States, 1872. Reproducible StudentRobert Activities ❖ Broadside showing B. Elliott delivering his speech on civil rights, January 6, 1874. ❖ ❖ ❖

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U.S. HISTORY

Reconstruction

The Oregon Trail

Grades 8–12 Give students the background they need to understand the complex issues of Reconstruction after the Civil War. Broadsides, newspaper pages, handwritten copies of Constitutional amendments, political cartoons, and contemporary illustrations bring to life the intense political and social battles that shaped the era—from the freedmen’s struggle for jobs, schools, land reform, and political power to the formation and ultimate overthrow of the Radical Reconstruction governments. Historian: Milton Meltzer. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

No More Driver’s Lash for Me Black Codes and White Rule Forty Acres and a Mule From Sheriff to Senator Home Rule Again and White Supremacy

Timeline: 1861–1877 Historical Documents ❖ Recruitment broadside: Men of Color, To Arms! Now or Never!, c. 1863. ❖ Portraits of black members of the Louisiana Legislature of 1868, with extracts from the Reconstruction Constitution. ❖ Ku Klux Klan broadsides and political cartoons, 1868. ❖ Front page of Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, December 26, 1868. ❖ Front page of The New Orleans Tribune, January 15, 1869. ❖ Thomas Nast cartoons. ❖ Joint Resolutions of Congress proposing the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. ❖ Excerpt from Report on Conditions of Affairs in the Southern States, 1872. ❖ Broadside showing Robert B. Elliott delivering his speech on civil rights, January 6, 1874.

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U.S. History

For related photo collections, see p. 89

Grades 5–8 Travel the original Oregon Trail with this Jackdaw. The documents make this historic trip come alive. Students will follow the maps, climb aboard a covered wagon, read writings of fellow travelers, study early photos of famous photographers, and experience daily life on the trail. Most importantly, students will learn why individuals and families from the relatively comfortable East endured the trip to the Wild West. Historian: Carol L. Cohen. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

History of the Oregon Trail Why the Emigrants Went West Leave-taking Life Along the Trail Routes, Landmarks and Trail’s End

Timeline: 1803–1858 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

John Fremont map, “Road from Missouri to Oregon.” New York Daily Tribune editorial page, July 1843. The Oregon Trail by Francis Parkman, 1849. Missouri River steamboat schedule. Shivelys Guide: guidebook for emigrants, 1846. Letter from Medoram Crawford, 1845. Diagram of a covered wagon. Patent drawings of wagon odometer, 1848. Ho Westward Ho! sheet music. Remedies for cholera. Horn’s map of Oregon Trail. William Henry Jackson’s photographs. Diary of Elizabeth Dixon Smith. Barlow Road letter. Plat of Oregon City. The Oregon Trail Today, photo essay.

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U.S. HiStory U.S.34 HiStory 25 For related photo collections, see p. 89

U.S. History

Manifest Destiny Grades 8-12

U.S. History

U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

The Railroad Manifest Destiny TheFirst FirstTranscontinental Transcontinental Railroad Grades 8-12

Grades 5–8 5–8 Grades

The term “Manifest Destiny” and the ideas it first became ThisThis Jackdaw provides ait fascinating arrayarray of historical documents Jackdaw provides a fascinating of historical docuThebehind term “Manifest Destiny” and the ideas behind first ments that the makes the of history of the and coast-to-coast transclearly defined during the 1840s, whenbecame Americaclearly entereddefined into a period that makes history the West andWest coast-to-coast transportation during the 1840s, when America entered portation come Display route and full-color of expansionist zeal that resulted ininto a diplomatic with zeal that comeresulted alive. Display the routethe map andmap full-color poster inposter your a period ofstruggle expansionist in alive. a diplomatic your classroom. Students willatmarvel at the of immigrant struggle with Great Britain boundary between Oregon Great Britain over the boundary between Oregon and Canada, theover thein classroom. Students will marvel the story of story immigrant workers’ workers’ and strain, and success the railroad and the of annexation the acquisition of their annexation of Texas, and the acquisition of Canada, vast amounts territory of Texas, sweatand andsweat strain and their success building thebuilding railroad from the east from thefollowing east and afrom the west and finally connecting the rails vast amounts of territory in the southwest war with in the southwest following a war with Mexico. This comprehensive and from the west and finally connecting the rails with a golden spike. withof a golden spike. Historian: James A. Crutchfield. The contents Mexico. This comprehensive historical documents, collection of historical documents, which includes contemporary collection Historian: James A. Crutchfield. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: of this Jackdaw which includes contemporary newspaper articles, feature: speeches, ilnewspaper articles, speeches, illustrations, and political cartoons, Broadsheets lustrations and political cartoons, will help students understand Broadsheets will help students understand the concept of Manifest Destiny and Evolution of the Railroad in America the concept of Manifest Destiny and❖ provide them valuable ❖ Evolution ofwith the Railroad in America provide them with valuable insight into one of the most charged Great Transcontinental Railroad Surveys insight into onehighly of the most highly ❖ charged and pivotal periods ❖ Great Transcontinental Railroad Surveys and pivotal periods in American history. Brendel Christine ❖ ofofGetting Started in Historian: AmericanChristine history. Historian: Brendel Scriabine. The ❖ Problems Problems Getting Started ❖ Building the Transcontinental Railroad Scriabine. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature: contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature: ❖ Building the Transcontinental Railroad Support Materials Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Who’s Who && Timeline: 1830–1872 Who’s Who Timeline: 1830-1872 Historical Documents Historical Documents

❖ S. S. W. editorial on railroad from New to Oregon, ❖ W.Dexter Dexter editorial on railroad fromYork New York to 1832. Oregon, 1832. Thomas Hart Benton’s letter on aon transcontinental railroad, 1835. 1835. ❖ Thomas Hart Benton’s letter a transcontinental railroad, Page and text from thethe Pacific Railway Act, 1862. ❖ Page andselected selected text from Pacific Railway Act, 1862. Historical Documents ❖ Full-color poster completion of transcontinental railroad, Full-color poster onon completion of Transcontinental Railroad, and ad and for Historical Documents ❖ Petition against annexation of Texas, 1844. routes ad for available. routes available. ❖ Petition against annexation of Texas, 1844. ❖ resolution Whig newspaper article of joint resolution forfarming annexaAd for inexpensive farming land along thePacific UnionRR. Pacific RR. Ad for inexpensive land along the Union ❖ Whig newspaper article on passage of joint for annexation of on passage❖ tion of Texas, 1845. ❖ Henry Jackson photos: “Places See, Places Staythe Along Texas, 1845. ❖ William William Henry Jackson photos: “Places to See,toPlaces to Stayto Along ❖“Manifest Pro expansionist in which the term “Manifest Destiny” first the Transcontinental Railroad.” Transcontinental Railroad.” ❖ Pro-expansionist article in which the term Destiny” firstarticle appeared, appeared, Review, 1845. ❖ U. mapshowing showing route oftranscontinental the transcontinental ❖ and U. Democratic S.S.map the the route of the railroad.railroad. The United States Magazine and Democratic Review, 1845. The United States Magazine ❖ TheinSouthern viewpoint: in America” by— published ❖ Proposed time schedule and oneearly—for half years ❖ “Progress Proposed time schedule—published two andtwo a half years theearly ❖ The Southern viewpoint: Excerpt from “Progress America” by William excerpt from William Gilmore Simms, 1846. — forPacific the Union Pacific Union Railroad, 1866.Railroad, 1866. Gilmore Simms, 1846. ❖ The President Polk’s war 1846. message to Congress, The Congressional ❖ North-Western and Western Union ❖ Advertisements Advertisements forfor thethe North-Western StageStage and Western Union Telegraph ❖ President Polk’s war message to Congress, Congressional Globe, Globe, 1846. Telegraph companies. companies. ❖ Page 2 from Oregon newspaper The Spectator, 1846. ❖ Page 2 from Oregon newspaper The❖ Spectator, 1846. Railroad Photo Collage: Railroad the American West, late 1800s. ❖ Photo Collage: Life Life in theinAmerican West, late 1800s. ❖ Contemporary pictorial chronicle of the seizure of California. ❖ Contemporary pictorial chronicle of the seizure of California. ❖ Political cartoons on the theme of Manifest Destiny, 1846-1848. Reproducible Student Activities ❖ Political cartoons on the theme of Manifest Destiny,Student 1846-1848. Reproducible Activities

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U.S. HiStory

U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

U.S. History

36

Indians Land Rush Indians&& the the Oklahoma Oklahoma Land Rush

TheCuster’s Oklahoma LastLand StandRush

Gather up your classclass and lead on theonexciting Oklahoma Land Gather up your and them lead them the exciting Oklahoma Rush—the greatest land giveaway in history, which was decided by Land Rush — the greatest land giveaway in history, which was actual races lotteries homestead sites. Replicas ofsites. historical decided by and actual racesfor and lotteries for homestead Replicas of historical documents — Sequoyah’s alphabet, documents—Sequoyah’s Cherokee alphabet,Cherokee which empowered which Americans empoweredtoNative Americans read write; to anmove act of Native read and write; antoact of and Congress Congress to maps moveofIndian tribes;an maps of homestead the territory; an actual Indian tribes; the territory; actual application; homestead application; and the handwritten presidential order and the handwritten presidential order opening the Oklahoma opening the Oklahoma Territory — chronicle the politics, ecoTerritory—chronicle the politics, economics, and culture of this era nomics and culture of this era, from broken U.S. promises to the from broken U.S. promises to the Indians to the hardships endured by Indians to the hardships endured by homesteaders. Historians: homesteaders. Historian:bySidney Theil, adaptedThe by Muriel L. Dubois. Sidney Theil, adapted Muriel L. Dubois. contents of this

Use these documents to discuss thethem waysoninthe which myths develop Gather up your class and lead exciting Oklahoma around popular of history the changes that which can result Land Rush — heroes the greatest land and giveaway in history, was decided by actual of races and events lotteries homestead Hands-on sites. Repfrom reexamination historic andforpersonalities. licas of historical Sequoyah’s Cherokee alphabet, documents bring thedocuments flamboyant— Custer to life and help authenticate which empowered Native Americans to read and write; an act the circumstances surrounding his tragic Last Stand. Historian: Brian Congress to move Indian tribes; maps of the territory; an W.ofDippie. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Grades Grades5–8 5–8

Grades Grades8–12 8–12

actual homestead application; and the handwritten presidential

Broadsheets order opening the Oklahoma Territory — chronicle the politics,

Timeline: 1803-1907 Timeline: 1803–1907 Map: Location of Five Civilized Tribes Before Removal Map: Location of Five Civilized Tribes Before Removal Historical Documents Historical Documents ❖ Sequoyah’s Cherokee alphabet, 1821.

❖ Treating with theculture Sioux of this era, from broken U.S. promises to economics and ❖ Road totoWar theThe Indians the hardships endured by homesteaders. Historian: ❖ War with SiouxThe contents of this Jackdaw feature: Sidney Theil. ❖ The Battle of the Little Big Horn Broadsheets ❖ The Aftermath of Battle ❖ The The Permanent ❖ Custer Myth Solution ❖ The Impossible Dream ❖ Harrison’s Hoss Race Historical Documents ❖ The The Homesteaders ❖ changing face of the Boy General: 3 portraits of Custer. ❖ AStatehood andofBeyond ❖ printed version the Treaty of Fort Laramie and two pages of original treaty signatures, 1868. Historical Documents ❖ Six pages from Custer’s “My Life on the Plains,” 1874. ❖ Sequoyah’s Cherokee alphabet, 1821. ❖ Two letters from the Secretary of the Interior to the Secretary of War: ❖ Congressional act to provide for an exchange of lands with the December 3, 1875, and February 1, 1876. Indians and for their removal west of the Mississippi River, 1829. ❖ Custer’s last message to Captain F.W. Benteen, June 25, 1876. ❖ Certificate from President James Polk to an Indian chief, 1846. ❖ mapbroadside: of the Custer Battlefield, ❖ Official Boomer “Grand Rush1876. for the Indian Territory,” 1879. ❖ General Alfred H. Terry to the Adjutant General of Military ❖ Telegram Licensefrom to trade with Indians, 1883. Division of the Missouri, June 27, 1876. ❖ Map of the Indian Territory, 1887. ❖ fromofR.C. Drum, Assistant Adjutant General, to H.T. Crosby, War ❖ Telegram First page a presidential proclamation by Benjamin Harrison Department, July 6, 1876. announcing the opening of the Oklahoma lands, 1889. ❖ letterof from a survivor,Territory, Frederick F.opened Gerard,to to settlement, his daughters. ❖ AMap Oklahoma 1889. ❖ The Bismark, Dakota Territory, Tribune Extra, July 6, 1876: Account1902. of ❖ Application for homestead claim, 1897, and final“First certificate, Custer Massacre.” ❖ the First page of the act to provide a temporary government for the ❖ “The Battle on the Little Big 1889. Horn River—The Death Struggle of General Territory of Oklahoma, drawingproclamation in The Daily Graphic, July 18, 1876. ❖ Custer,” Presidential by Theodore Roosevelt admitting Okla❖ Ahoma political cartoon by Thomas into the Union as a Nast, state,Harper’s 1907. Weekly, 1876.

❖ ❖

Reproducible Student Activities Reproducible Student Activities

The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

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Land vs. Native American Rights Rights LandHunger Hunger vs. Native American The Rush, thethe CivilCivil War and TheGold Gold Rush, WarImmigration and Immigration Mr. “Hoss Race” Mr.Harrison’s Harrison’s “Hoss Race” Black and Oklahoma Statehood BlackGold Gold and Oklahoma Statehood

Sequoyah’s Cherokee Congressional act toalphabet, provide1821. for an exchange of lands with the Congressional act their to provide for anwest exchange lands with the Indians and Indians and for removal of theofMississippi River, 1829. for their removal west of the Mississippi River, Certificate from President James Polk to 1829. an Indian chief, 1846. Certificate from President JamesRush Polk to Indian chief,Territory,” 1846. Boomer broadside: “Grand foranthe Indian 1879. Boomer “Grand Rush for1883. the Indian Territory,” 1879. Licensebroadside: to trade with Indians, Map oftothe Indian Territory, 1887. License trade with Indians, 1883. Firstofpage of a presidential Map the Indian Territory, 1887.proclamation by Benjamin Harrison, announcing openingproclamation of Oklahoma lands, March 23, announcing 1889. First page of a the presidential by Benjamin Harrison, Map of Oklahoma Territory, opened settlement, 1889. the opening of Oklahoma lands, March 23,to 1889. Application for Territory, homestead claim, 1897, and final Map of Oklahoma opened to settlement, 1889. certificate , 1902. First page for of the act to provide a temporary government Application homestead claim, 1897, and final certificate, 1902. for the Territory of Oklahoma, 1889. First page of the act to provide a temporary government for the Territory of Presidential proclamation by Theodore Roosevelt admitting OklaOklahoma, 1889. homa into the Union as a state, 1907. Presidential proclamation by Theodore Roosevelt admitting Oklahoma into Oklahoma the Union as Land a state,Rush 1907. photo-poster.

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37


U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

Wounded Knee Massacre and Ghost Dance Religion

Remember the Maine!

Grades 8–12

Newspapers, telegrams, reports, and the Broadsheets bring alive the story of the Spanish-American War. From its whispered beginnings through its explosive development, this is an intriguing account of the confrontation of two world powers, the one-sided contest, and its worldwide repercussions. Historian: Andrew Bronin. The contents

When students realize the plight of the Sioux Nation, as chronicled in this Jackdaw, expect class discussion to develop on the mistreatment of Native Americans and the consequences of majority oppression of minorities. Seventeen documents, Broadsheets, and a timeline of Indian religious movements give life to this dramatic story. Everyone will find the historic photos startling. Historians: Robert J. Stahl, Michael Adessa, Una Mason. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Sioux The Ghost Dance Religion The Massacre: Events and Accounts Aftermath and Survivors

Timeline: 1680–1889 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Maps: Progressive loss of Indian lands, 1780s-1990s. Maps: Reduced size of Great Sioux Reservation, 1868, 1889. Census drawings of heads of Sioux families, 1883. Sioux artist’s sketch of Ghost Dance ceremony, 1890. Agents’ letters and telegram to Commissioner Morgan, Oct. 11, 17, and Nov. 15, 1890. Newspaper accounts of Ghost Dance religion and Wounded Knee events. Sioux artist’s sketch of Sitting Bull’s arrest, Dec. 15, 1890. Rations list distributed to Big Foot’s band, Dec. 29,1890. Sioux artist’s sketch of Wounded Knee before the fighting. Diagrams of army and Indian positions. Telegram: Agent Royer to Commissioner Morgan, Dec. 29, 1890. Medical records: Captain Ives’ notes on wounded. Poster: Scenes and individuals connected with Wounded Knee. Survivor Alice War Bonnet’s story, dictated to her son, 1939. Army ballads and songs. Senate Bill: Proposed legislation to compensate Sioux, 1975. Senate resolution: 100th-year anniversary of Wounded Knee, 1990.

Grades 8–12

of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

War Fever Destruction of the Maine War in Cuba War in the Pacific Results

Historical Documents ❖ Poster: chronology of the war with Spain, 1898. ❖ Report from Captain Sigsbee in Havana, Feb. 1, 1898. ❖ The telegram, Feb. 15, 1898, from Captain Sigsbee reporting the Maine disaster. ❖ Telegram from a diver offering his services to recover the Maine. ❖ Two pages from the New York Evening Journal, Feb. 26, 1898, reporting “American People’s Views of the Maine Disaster.“ ❖ Declaration of War with Spain, April 25, 1898. ❖ Ship’s newspaper of the U.S.F.S. Olympia, June 1898. ❖ “Roosevelt at San Juan” a contemporary educational card game.

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

Spanish-American War

Yellow Journalism

Grades 8–12 Create classroom excitement about America’s “nice little war” with 15 unique documents, including full-color contemporary maps, newspaper pages, a cablegram from Teddy Roosevelt to Commodore Dewey, battlefield recollections of an African American soldier, photographs, and an anti-imperialism speech by William Jennings Bryan. Using the Broadsheets and documents, students will learn about the concept of imperialism, the influence of yellow journalism, major campaigns, Roosevelt’s colorful Rough Riders, and how America emerged from the war a world power with far-flung imperialist holdings. Historian: James A. Crutchfield. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

“Remember the Maine!” The Battle for the Philippine Islands The Cuban Campaign The Rough Riders

Timeline: January 17–December 10, 1898 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Goff’s Historical Map of the Spanish-American War in the West Indies, 1898. Strategic Map of Our War with Spain, 1898. Theodore Roosevelt letter to Colonel Frank Greene, January 13, 1898. Theodore Roosevelt cablegram to Commodore Dewey, February 26, 1898. Declaration of War with Spain, April 25, 1898. Cover of sheet music for “We’ll Stand by the Flag,” 1898. Page 1 and 2 of the Atlanta Constitution, May 2, 1898. Political cartoons of the Spanish-American War. Photo-poster: The War in Cuba. Map of the San Juan Battlefield. “Sergeant-Major Pullen of the 25th Infantry Describes the Conduct of the Negro Soldiers Around El Caney,” 1899. Discharge papers of Private Pleasant Abel Creswell, 1898. Tables showing strength of volunteer forces and losses. Illustrations of insignia and equipment worn by U.S. troops. Excerpt from William Jennings Bryan anti-imperialism speech, February 22, 1899.

Grades 8-12 In the 1890s, a fierce rivalry between newspaper publishers Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst permanently changed the course of American journalism. Core elements of their yellow journalism, like bold headlines, large pictures, nonpolitical news, and even sensationalism, scandals, and sometimes untruths, are still present in many newspapers today. Use the primary sources in this Jackdaw—newspaper front pages, contemporary political cartoons, the first comic strip, an article examining a citizen’s right to privacy, and Pulitzer’s defense of yellow journalism—to show students how a quest to grab readers’ attention and sell more copies helped to make the media industry a prevailing force in our society. Historian: Audrey Green Rogers. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature: Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents Front page of the New-York Daily Tribune, April 4, 1850. Front and feature pages of the World and the New York Journal, 1884-1898. Cartoon poster: The Yellow Kid and the Birth of the Comic Strip. Advertising poster: The New York Times, The Model of Decent and Dignified Journalism, 1896. ❖ Profile: Nellie Bly, Fearless Female Investigative Reporter. ❖ Excerpts from “The Rights of the Citizen—To His Own Reputation,” by E.L. Godkin, Scribner’s Magazine, 1890. ❖ “Hearst Defends So-Called Yellow Journals,” Fourth Estate, 1902. ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

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39


U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

American Imperialism

Populism and the Election of 1896

Grades 8–12 Teach students about America’s Age of Imperialism, a period between the mid-19th and 20th centuries when the U.S. expanded its political and economic influence into new territories throughout the world. This informative array of primary source documents—which ranges from pivotal presidential policy statements to political cartoons, photographs, and anti-imperialist literature—provides ample material to provoke lively classroom discussions about U.S. foreign policy, both past and present. Historian: Christine Brendel Scriabine, broadsheets written by Fred Stopsky with Christine Brendel Scriabine. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Origins of American Imperialism The Road to Expansion The Policy of Intervention The United States and Asia

Timeline: 1823–1934 Historical Documents ❖ Excerpts from President Monroe’s message to Congress (Monroe Doctrine), 1823. ❖ President Fillmore’s message to emperor of Japan, 1852, with illustrated Japanese translation. ❖ Graphic views of U.S.-Caribbean relations, 1851-1896. ❖ Queen Liliuokalani letter regarding crown lands of Hawaii, 1898. ❖ Lou Henry Hoover letter describing the Boxer Rebellion, 1900. ❖ Spanish-American War documents and photographs, 1898. ❖ Excerpt from Senator Beveridge speech on Philippines, 1900. ❖ Excerpt from Anti-Imperialist League pamphlet, 1899. ❖ Proclamation, U.S. government to the inhabitants of Guam, 1900. ❖ Pages of treaty with Cuba and text of Platt Amendment, 1903. ❖ Excerpts from President Roosevelt’s annual message to Congress (Roosevelt Corollary), 1904. ❖ Political cartoons concerning U.S.-Mexican relations, 1913-1916. ❖ Map and photographs relating to U.S. military intervention in Nicaragua, 1926-1929. ❖ Letter to president of Nicaragua referencing FDR’s Good Neighbor Policy, 1933.

Grades 8–12 History and civics students will learn more about the workings of our political system and democracy with this Jackdaw. They’ll see how in response to industrialization and economic pressures, farmers of the 1890s formed the Populist Party and directed their political activities against big business and political corruption. The Broadsheets and primary source documents help students understand what it was like to live in the 1890s and demonstrate how the American political process allows for peaceful expression of contrary views. Historian: Robert W. Cherney. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Problems of the Farmer, 1865-1890 The Farmer Organizes, 1865-1890 Birth of the People’s Party, 1890-1892 National Problems and National Politics, 1893-1869 The Election of 1896

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Two railroad posters advertising western lands, c. 1870. Life on frontier: photos of farm life in Nebraska, 1887-1890. Two grange posters, 1869 and 1873. Letter to Kansas Governor Lewelling, 1894. Page from “The Farmers’ Alliance,” Lincoln , Nebraska, 1891. Pages from a Populist songbook, 1890. Two pages from The Omaha Daily Bee, July 5, 1892, with an account of Populist national convention, 1892. Pages from a campaign book in which a southern Populist considers the race problem, 1894. Front page of the Emporia Weekly Gazette, Aug. 20, 1896, in which a Kansan criticizes the Populist movement. Selection from William Jennings Bryan’s “Cross of Gold” speech, 1896. A Republican campaign poster, 1896.

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40

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U.S. HISTORY

Panama Canal: Building the 8th Wonder of the World

U.S. History

For related photo collections, see pp. 90–91

Immigrants Come to America: 1870–1930

Grades 8–12

Grades 5–8

Through the use of hands-on historical documents—many photographs, postcards, treaties, telegrams, letters, health records, a steamship schedule, and maps—this Jackdaw explores the trials and tribulations of building the Panama Canal and why it is still so important today. The Broadsheets and documents address the problems presented by landslides, mechanical failures, yellow fever and malaria, revolution, and political intrigue. Historians: Robert Stahl and Ken deMasi. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Help your students discover what their ancestors went through. The Broadsheets detail the difficulties both skilled and unskilled newcomers often met. The timeline shows the change in the pattern of immigration from Northern Europeans to Mediterranean and Asian peoples. The documents bring the immigrants’ experiences to life with a citizenship certificate, actual minutes of a deportation hearing, and a classroom poster of Ellis Island photos. Historian: Christine Scriabine, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this

Broadsheets

Jackdaw feature:

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Early Quests to Build a Water Passage Through the Isthmus The U.S. Gains the Rights to Construct a Canal Across Panama Conquering Malaria and Yellow Fever More than Digging a Big “Ditch” and Filling It with Water Four Great Engineering and Construction Challenges

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Industrialization Brings Immigration Asian Immigrants Immigrants from Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean Immigrants from Northern Europe

Timeline: 1501–1999

Timeline: 1855–1935

Maps of Central America and Panama

Historical Documents

Exhibit: Advantages of the Lock System Over a Sea–Level System

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Historical Documents ❖ Map of routes investigated for an interoceanic ship canal, 1899. ❖ Correspondence regarding the advantages of a Nicaragua Canal, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 1899. ❖ Acknowledgement of receipt in Nicaragua of “camp outfits,” 1900. ❖ Signature page of Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty, November 18, 1903. ❖ Political cartoon showing the war on rats, c. 1907. ❖ Voucher for passage of laborers from Barbados, 1909. ❖ Photo album: “Building the 8th Wonder of the World, 1904-1914.” ❖ Isthmian Canal Commission personal injury record, 1911. ❖ Photo-poster: “Life in the Canal Zone.” ❖ Canal Record, August 19, 1914. ❖ Historical post cards from the Canal Zone. ❖ Pacific Mail Steamship Company schedule, July 19, 1922. ❖ Map of Canal Zone, U.S. Army map service, 1927-1967. ❖ Letter from President Carter to Congressmen regarding Panama Canal Treaties and a summary of the treaties, August 12, 1977.

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“Tariff of Immigrant Fares” folder, Philadelphia, 1887. American citizen certificate for Russian, Aaron Rubin, 1896. “Ellis Island” photo-poster—scenes from 1900-1912. Minutes of Ellis Island deportation inquiry, 1903. Questionnaire requiring racial, political information, 1905. “Chances for Homemakers” railway promotion, 1906. Letter to President Roosevelt on shameful treatment of immigrants, 1906. Italian passport—bureaucratic immigration process in Europe, 1907. Identification certificate—attempt to bypass exclusion laws. Telegram urging “cheap Chinese labor” be excluded, 1911. Ship’s passenger manifest, lists actor Charles Chaplin, 1912. U.S. Census questionnaire, 1920. Poster of selected photos and cartoons on immigrant life. “What Every Immigrant Should Know” booklet, 1922.

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41


U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

For related photo collections, see pp. 90–91

Immigration: 1870–1930

Chinese Exclusion Acts: 1882–1943

Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

Help your students discover what their ancestors went through. The Broadsheets detail the difficulties both skilled and unskilled newcomers often met. The timeline shows the change in the pattern of immigration from Northern Europeans to Mediterranean and Asian peoples. The hands-on documents bring the immigrants’ experiences to life with a citizenship certificate, actual minutes of a deportation hearing, and a classroom poster of Ellis Island photos. Historian: Christine Scriabine. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

The Chinese Exclusion Act, which was passed by Congress in 1882, renewed in 1892 and 1902, and then extended indefinitely in 1904, essentially shut down Chinese immigration to the United States for 61 years. This unique set of primary source documents—including pages from the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, political cartoons, anti-Chinese broadsides, official immigration documents, a letter expressing the Chinese viewpoint, and poems written by Angel Island detainees—help students understand the social and economic conditions that provoked this discriminatory series of laws and illustrates how they shaped the Chinese immigrant experience. Historian: Audrey Green Rogers. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Immigration in the Industrial Age Northern Europeans—The Continuing Stream Asians: The Chinese Asians: The Japanese Italians and Mediterranean Peoples Eastern Europeans Jewish Immigration

feature:

Support Materials Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Timeline: 1860–1930

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Historical Documents

Historical Documents

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“Tariff of Immigrant Fares” folder, Philadelphia, 1887. American citizen certificate for Russian, Aaron Rubin, 1896. “Ellis Island” photo-poster—scenes from 1900-1912. Minutes of Ellis Island deportation inquiry, 1903. Questionnaire requiring racial, political information, 1905. “Chances for Homemakers” railway promotion, 1906. Letter to President Roosevelt on shameful treatment of immigrants, 1906. Italian passport—bureaucratic immigration process in Europe, 1907. Identification certificate—attempt to bypass exclusion laws. Telegram urging “cheap Chinese labor” be excluded, 1911. Ship’s passenger manifest, lists actor Charles Chaplin, 1912. U.S. Census questionnaire, 1920. Poster of selected photos and cartoons on immigrant life. “What Every Immigrant Should Know” booklet, 1922.

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First and last page of the Chinese Exclusion Act, 1882. The “Chinese Question”—Political cartoons by Thomas Nast, 1869-1886. Anti-Chinese advertisement, 1886. “A Chinese View of the Statue of Liberty,” by Saum Song Bo, 1885, and a related anti-Chinese political cartoon, 1881. Fliers for Butte, Montana labor union boycott of Chinese businesses, 1898. Documents from the immigration case of Moy Long Lam, 1921-1923. Poems by Angel Island detainees with translations, 1910-1940. Excerpts from the INS Monthly Review relating to the proposed repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Acts, 1943.

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42

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U.S. HISTORY For related photo collections, see p. 88

World War I: 1914-1918

Triangle Shirtwaist Fire

Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

With an awareness of WWI and its causes and outcome, students will see the chain of political events that led to Communist Russia and Nazi Germany and gain a better understanding of the effects of the war on our world today. Documents include maps of pre-war and post-war Europe, the U.S. Declaration of War on Germany, and the coded Zimmermann Telegram with the decoded transcript that helped convince President Wilson to declare war. Historian: James A. Crutchfield. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

On March 25, 1911, fire broke out on the upper floors of the Asch building in New York City’s Greenwich Village. Before the blaze could be brought under control, 146 employees of the Triangle Shirtwaist Company, mostly teenage girls, either burned or jumped to their deaths. Using primary sources, such as eyewitness accounts, newspaper articles, official testimony and documents, photographs, and political cartoons, students can explore the horrific Triangle Shirtwaist fire from the events of the day and their aftermath to the labor and immigration issues that were a major contributing factor to the legal and social changes the tragedy eventually spawned. Historian: Christine Brendel Scriabine. The contents of this Focus

U.S. History

For related photo collections, see p. 93

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

War Clouds Over Europe The Beginning of Modern Warfare America Enters the War The Legacy of World War I

Timeline: 1914–1918 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Maps: Pre-war Europe in 1914, post-war Europe in 1918. British “Scrap of Paper” enlistment poster. Political cartoon: “A Chain of Friendship,” Brooklyn Eagle, July 1914. German advertisement in New York newspaper warning ocean-going ships to be aware of possible destruction, May 1, 1915. Poster: World War I weapons and warfare photos. Coded Zimmermann Telegram with decoded transcript, January 19, 1917. U.S. Selective Service Act, April 2, 1917. U.S. Declaration of War on Germany, April 6, 1917. Poster: Insignia and uniforms of U.S. Army, Navy and Marine personnel. Poster: Trench warfare photo collection. Front page “Extra” from the Cleveland News on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918.

Reproducible Student Activities

Jackdaw feature:

Support Materials ❖ Illustrated Broadsheet Essay ❖ Critical Thinking Questions ❖ Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire photo-poster. Front page and partial page 6 of the Los Angeles Herald, March 26, 1911. “The Washington Place Fire” by Triangle fire survivor Rosey Safran. “Mameniu!” (“Little Mother!”)—Sheet music and elegy to the Triangle fire victims. “147 Dead, Nobody Guilty”—A summary of opinions on the Isaac Harris/Max Blanck trial verdict. “The Triangle Workers: Unions and Radicals”—an illustrated poster. Excerpt from “Testimony of William L. Beers,” New York City fire marshal. Excerpt from “Recommendations of the Commission: Prevention of Fire.”

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U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

Prohibition

Labor Movement in America

Grades 8-12

Grades 8–12

Between 1920 and 1933, the Eighteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution made it illegal for Americans to manufacture, sell, or transport alcoholic beverages. The goal of Prohibition was to stop the proliferation of saloons and end the poverty, depravity, family disintegration, and industrial accidents caused by excessive drinking. But Prohibition had unexpected consequences: speakeasies, bootleggers, and criminal gangs flourished as drinking became the thing to do among college students, flappers, and respectable middleclass Americans. The primary sources in this Jackdaw—including a letter to law enforcement agents from a distraught housewife, political cartoons, photographs, and excerpts from a Prohibition pro and con debate—trace the Prohibition movement from its roots in the early 1800s through repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment in 1933. Historian: Christine Brendel Scriabine. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

Students will appreciate this Jackdaw’s keen, historic view of the brutal labor conditions of earlier decades and of the modern-day labor movement that has produced vastly improved conditions, which may impact their own future careers. Vivid documents attest to the terrible conditions and labor’s struggles for fair treatment. Students will be amazed by the extremely demanding early employment rules, “yellow dog” contracts, the wages paid for very hard work in the 1920s, and employers’ strong-arm tactics. The replicas of union and government documents, ads, and handbills add to student enlightenment. Historian: James A. Crutchfield. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Support Materials Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Historical Documents ❖ Political cartoon poster: The Battle for Prohibition, 1855-1917. ❖ Excerpts from “An Act to prohibit intoxicating beverages...” (Volstead Act), 1919. ❖ Verdict in United States of America v. Alphonse Capone, October 17, 1931, and related photographs. ❖ Joseph Webster Golinkin lithograph: “Speako de Luxe,” 1933. ❖ Letter from Mrs. Hillyer to Prohibition enforcement authorities, Seattle, 1931. ❖ Prohibition cartoons: 1925-1932. ❖ Excerpts from “Prohibition Pro and Con: Joint Debate Between Representatives of the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment and the Anti-Saloon League of America,” 1929. ❖ Prohibition photo-poster.

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Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

At Work in Early America Rise of the Large Labor Organizations Raising a Nation’s Awareness The Merger of American Labor

Who’s Who and Timeline: 1619–1965 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Rules of the Dover Manufacturing Company, early 1800s. Newspaper advertisement announcing a meeting of workers, 1837. Union membership certificate, 1886. AFL statement of purpose, 1893. Preamble of the Industrial Workers of the World, c. 1905. AFL leaflet: “How to prevent Consumption,” 1906. Labels used by AFL-affiliated unions, 1912. “Yellow Dog” contract. Federated Trades and Labor Council recruitment handout, 1928. Letter from AFL president to labor federations on ratification of Child Labor Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, 1935. AFL “Congratulations Chevrolet Workers” leaflet, 1935. Page 4 of Ford Facts, April 19, 1941. Cover and page 5 from Ammunition, August 1944. President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Second Bill of Rights,” 1944. CIO handbill: “Communist Gangster Tactics Beaten!!” c. 1949. Documents relating to the AFL-CIO merger, 1955.

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U.S. HISTORY For related photo collections, see p. 94

Struggle for Women’s Rights in America

Women’s Rights in the United States

Grades 5–8

Use the documents and Broadsheets in this Jackdaw to experience firsthand the struggle for women’s rights chronicled from the 1600s through the 1970s. Letters from Abigail Adams and Susan B. Anthony are included, as well as newspaper articles, sheet music, political cartoons, and a composite of portraits of outstanding women’s rights activists of the 19th century. The oppressive conditions that existed in institutions and the attitudes against which brave women fought are reflected in the Broadsheets and in the documents. Historian: Mary Stetson Clarke. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Use the documents and Broadsheets in this Jackdaw to experience firsthand the struggle for women’s rights chronicled from the 1600s through the 1970s. Letters from Abigail Adams and Susan B. Anthony are included, as well as newspaper articles, sheet music, political cartoons, and a composite of portraits of outstanding women’s rights activists of the 19th century. The oppressive conditions that existed in institutions and the attitudes against which brave women fought are reflected in the Broadsheets and in the documents. Historian: Mary Stetson Clarke, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Reaching for Equality The Feminist Movement Begins The Fight for Equal Rights At Last, the Vote

Timeline: 1600–1972 Historical Documents Page from Maryland Council Proceedings, January 1647. Letter from Abigail Adams to John Adams, March 1776. Seneca County Courier, July 1848. Page from the first issue of The Revolution, January 1868. Five cartoons on women’s rights, 1859, 1869, 1874, 1919. Letter from Susan B. Anthony, February 1900. Sheet music for “I’m a Suffragette,” 1912. Photographs from The New York Times Picture Section, May 11, 1913, showing suffrage parade on Fifth Ave., New York City. ❖ Leaflet, “Why the Equal Rights for Women Amendment?” ❖ Composite of portraits of outstanding women of the 19th century. ❖ U.S. postage stamps commemorating early women’s rights movement. ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

U.S. History

For related photo collections, see p. 94

Grades 8–12

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Discontent with Woman’s Lot The First Feminist Movement The Split in Feminist Forces Women Win the Vote The New Feminist Movement

Historical Documents Page from Maryland Council Proceedings, January 1647. Letter from Abigail Adams to John Adams, March 1776. Seneca County Courier, July 1848. Page from the first issue of The Revolution, January 1868. Five cartoons on women’s rights: 1859, 1869, 1874, 1919. Letter from Susan B. Anthony, February 1900. Sheet music for “I’m a Suffragette,” 1912. Photographs from The New York Times Picture Section, May 11, 1913, showing suffrage parade on Fifth Ave., New York City.­ ❖ Leaflet, “Why the Equal Rights for Women Amendment?” ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

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45


U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY For related photo collections, see p. 94

For related photo collections, see p. 104

Votes for Women: The Fight for Suffrage

1920s: America Enters the Modern Age

Grades 8–12 This Jackdaw traces the history of the American woman’s suffrage movement. The Broadsheets on the antisuffrage and English movements are topics often neglected in studies of woman’s suffrage. The documents all contribute to the portrayal of woman’s suffrage as daring, resourceful, intellectual, and courageous, as well as sometimes contentious and often witty. Students and teachers alike will smile and learn from the colorful postcards and many documents. Historian: Christine Scriabine. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Beginning of Suffrage Agitation Women Organize The Antisuffrage Movement The English Movement The Great Suffrage Battle

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Revolution, 1868, publication by Susan B. Anthony. Victoria C. Woodhull praying before Congress, 1870. Minor vs. Happersett, U.S. Supreme Court, 1875. Cartoon, premium and handbill on the W.C.T.U. The Woman Voter and the Newsletter, March, 1913. “Be Good to California, Mr. Wilson” sheet music, 1916. Rare example of a black women’s suffrage publication, 1914. “Votes for Women” postcards in full-color. Collection of Anti-Suffrage publications, 1910s. “Red Behind Yellow” folder, Assn. Opposed to Suffrage. “Woman Do Not Want It,” by Alice Stone Blackwell. Map from the Headquarters News Letter, 1916. Handbills, Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage. Handbills linking suffrage with the war effort, 1917-18.

Reproducible Student Activities

Grades 8–12 The vibrant history of the 1920s is depicted in magazine and newspaper articles, government documents, advertisements, photos, cartoons, and profiles of the colorful people and events of the Jazz Age. Introduce your students to prohibition and flappers, Sacco and Vanzetti, the Klan, Emily Post, sports heroes, and issues of the era. Historian: Christine Scriabine. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Prosperity Era Modernism in Literature, Art and Thought Life in the Twenties Popular Culture The Political Climate

Timeline: 1919–1929 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Maps on the suburbanization of Connecticut, 1920-30. Art Deco photo-poster. Excerpt from Emily Post’s Etiquette, 1922. Article: “The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain,” 1926. Photos: The Other America. Excerpt from Fred E. Burgess’ Memoirs of Eighty Years of Farming. “The Klan’s Fight for Americanism,” by Hiram Wesley Evans, 1926. “The Sacco and Vanzetti Cases,” by Elizabeth G. Evans, 1921. American Civil Liberties Union report, 1923. Selections from “The Censorship in Boston,” 1929. “The War in Passaic,” by Mary Heaton Vorse, 1926. Map of U.S. Highway 101, Los Angeles, 1926. 1920s sports album. 1920s ad book compiled from various magazines, c. 1927. Front page of Variety, Wednesday, October 30, 1929.

Reproducible Student Activities

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

Harlem Renaissance

Band Music in American Life: A Social History: 1850-1990

Grades 8–12 Learn what the Harlem Renaissance was all about and why it was so important to our culture. The creative outpouring of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s is captured in the Jackdaw’s colorful art, photos, manuscripts, and posters. The black intellectuals, artists, and writers of the era are explored as only a hands-on Jackdaw can do. Here is an ideal resource for both the social studies and literature curriculum. Historian: Christine Scriabine. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Harlem The New Negro  Literature of the Harlem Renaissance The Arts in Harlem Women of the Harlem Renaissance

Timeline: 1903–1930 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Maps of Manhattan and Harlem, 1800-1930. Poster: “True Sons of Freedom” by Charles Gustrine, 1918. Profile: James Reese Europe and the “Fighting 15th.” Harlem in the 1920s: A photo album. “Harlem Rent Parties” by Frank Byrd, 1938. “The Whites Invade Harlem” by Levi C. Hubert, 1938. Poster: Harlem Renaissance Books, Plays and Magazines. A review of Langston Hughes’ The Weary Blues by Countee Cullen, 1926. “Reflections on O’Neill’s Plays” by Paul Robeson, 1924. “The Prodigal Son,” from God’s Trombones: Seven Negro Sermons in Verse by James Weldon Johnson, 1927. Illustrations by Aaron Douglas for God’s Trombones, 1927. Race ads. Two paintings of the Harlem Renaissance: “Thinnin’ Corn” by Malvin Gray Johnson, 1929, and “Midsummer Night in Harlem” by Palmer Hayden, 1926. Profile: Zora Neale Huston, Renaissance Woman. Illustrations by Miguel Covarrubias for Zora Neale Hurston’s Mules and Men, 1935. Profile: William Grant Still, a Harlem Renaissance Classic. First page of the first movement of “Afro-American Symphony” by William Grant Still, 1931.

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Grades 8–12 Create classroom excitement with music by 19th-century military, professional, and amateur bands, the compositions of Sousa, music of today’s school bands, traditional sounds of ethnic bands, and gospel and New Orleans brass through 15 varied selections on a special audio-document cassette. Students will be amazed by early band instrument prices in the hands-on documents, and they’ll be able to hear Sousa speak on the cassette. The colorful history, variety, and importance of American bands from post-Civil War to the 1980’s is presented in this social history. Historian: Michelle K. Smith, Smithsonian Institution. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Brass Instruments and Brass Bands The Town Band Around 1900 The Professional Band: Gilmore and Sousa The School Band Movement Ethnic Bands New Orleans Brass Bands

Timeline: 1850–1990 Music Sample Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Ad, Marceau instruments, Sears catalog, 1899. Article on the bands of Honesdale, Penna., 1881. Page from solo cornetist’s part book, c. 1899. Parade band postcard, Vinalhaven, Maine, c. 1900. Collage of bandstand photographs. Newspaper article on a firemen’s parade, 1898. Program, Patrick S. Gilmore, conductor, 1892. Tour schedule, Sousa Band, 1896. Ad, school band instruments, Sears catalog, 1940. Interview with John Paynter, band director, 1991. Article on Italian festivals in New York, 1901-02. Interview, leader of Dirty Dozen Brass Band, 1990.

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47


U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

Blues in America: A Social History

Stock Market Crash of 1929

Grades 8–12 Here are the sounds, sights, and story of the Blues ready for hands-on use in your classroom. A special cassette features 11 Blues audiodocuments, while the Broadsheets and historical documents provide the story and actual sights of this era. Hear Lightnin’ Hopkins then hold and read his letter. Bring the colorful sounds, personalities, and history of the Blues right into your social studies, music, and literature classes. Historian: Michelle K. Smith, Smithsonian Institution. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

What Is the Blues? An Overview Folk Blues from the Rural South Blues Moves to the City . . .Women Spread the News Modern Blues: 1940s to 1990s

Music Sample Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

“Nightlife in Newark,” 1915 newspaper account. Music & Work in Mississippi, interview Othar Turner. Music & Social Life in Piedmont, interview Etta Baker. “The Saint Louis Blues,” W. C. Handy sheet music, 1914. Stage-Music-Movies, Chicago newspaper article, 1929. Race record advertisements, 1920s. Spirituals to Swing, article and advertisement, 1938. “Street Musicians,” painting by William H. Johnson, c. 1940. Review of Memphis Minnie performance, Chicago, 1943. Lightnin’ Hopkins letter to wife Antoinette, 1967. Collection of Blues lyrics/poetry with photos.

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Grades 8–12 October 29, 1929, Black Tuesday, marks an unforgettable day in American history and the end of the reckless prosperity of the 1920s. On that day at the New York Stock Exchange, frenzied investors sold off stocks, panicked by falling share prices from the weeks before. In an unlikely chain of events like a perfect storm, forces came together to bring on the Great Depression, an era of joblessness, poverty, hunger, and want. Students will experience the full impact of the great Stock Market Crash of 1929 with primary sources such as humorous and grim political cartoons, a pre-crash magazine article encouraging investment in the stock market, Black Tuesday ticker tape, an interview with a man who lost his life savings, stock purchase and loan documentation, President Hoover’s optimistic May 1930 speech to business leaders, and stark photographs of soup kitchen lines, closed banks, and the New York Stock Exchange after the crash. Historians: Rebecca A. Spears and Janet Morrissey. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ Excerpt from “Everybody Ought To Be Rich,” an interview with financier John J. Raskob, Ladies Home Journal, August 1929. ❖ Pierce Petroleum Corporation stock certificate, June 12, 1929. ❖ Demand loan envelope for stock purchase, August 16, 1929. ❖ Pages from The New York Times, October 25, 1929. ❖ Poster of political cartoons, 1921-1929. ❖ Ticker tape, October 29, 1929. ❖ Excerpt from President Hoover’s speech to the United States Chamber of Commerce, May 1, 1930. ❖ Photo-poster with an excerpt from a WPA interview with George Mehales, a man who “lost everything” in the crash.

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U.S. HISTORY

The Great Depression in America Grades 5–8

For related photo collections, see pp. 94–96

U.S. History

For related photo collections, see pp. 94–96

U.S. H

TheDepression Depression The Grades8–12 8–12 Grades

On October 29, 1929, the New York stock market On crashed and29, 1929,On 29,Stock 1929,market the New York stock market crashed October theOctober New York crashed and heralded the onsetand of the Great heralded the onset of the Great Depression. It has been estimated heralded the onset of the Great Depression. It has been estimated by 1933. It has been estimated that between twelve to fifteen million workers were unemployed that between twelve to fifteen million workers were unemployed by like inthat betweenWhat twelve to fifteendid million workers were by disconte conditions really the cities? problems the farmers face?unemployed How was the 1933. What were conditions really like in the cities? What problems did 1933. What were conditions really like in the cities? What problems did tion manifested? the farmers face? How was the discontent of the nationInmanifested? thefor farmers How knowledge was the discontent of the nation manifested?this Jackd a format designed both face? personal and classroom participation, evidence directly in the In reader’s hands. Through the use of historical documents — newspapers, In a format designed for both personal knowledge and classroom a format designed for both personal knowledge and classroom ers, in posters, etc. — the reader can sense feelings fear, discouragement, futility and anger a participation, this Jackdaw puts the evidence directly the reader’s participation, thisthe Jackdaw putsofthe evidence directly in the reader’s attempted to survive the black days of the Depression. Historian: Andrew Bronin. The contents of t hands. Through the use of historical documents—newspapers, hands. Through the use of historical documents—newspapers, feature: pictures, flyers, posters, etc.—the reader can sense the feelings of pictures, flyers, posters, etc.—the reader can sense the feelings of fear, discouragement, futility, and anger as the people attempted to fear, discouragement, futility, and anger as the people attempted to Broadsheets ❖ Andrew The Crash survive the black days of the Depression. Historian: Bronin, survive the black days of the Depression. Historian: Andrew Bronin. ❖ Depression adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: in Urban America The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Depression in Rural America Protest and DiscontentBroadsheets The Stock Market Crash ❖ The Crash Impact of the Depression The Great Depression: In the Towns and on the Farms ❖ Depression in Urban America Historical Documents The People Protest ❖ Depression in Rural America ❖ Page 1 of Variety, Wednesday, October 30, 1929. The Depression Changes the United States ❖ Protest and Discontent ❖ The Depression: A Family Album. ❖ Apples Impact of5¢the Depression ❖ Sign: Unemployed — Buy Each.

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

❖ ❖ ❖

Timeline: 1929–1941

❖ Depression scrip. Historical Documents ❖ A&P advertising flyers, 1933. ❖ Page 1 of Variety, Wednesday, October 30, 1929. ❖ Auction sale poster for farm equipment, North Dakota, 1933. Page 1 of Variety, Wednesday, October 30, 1929. ❖ The Depression: A Family Album. ❖ Page 1 of The Emporia Gazette, May 11, 1934. The Depression: A Family Album. ❖ Sign: Unemployed—Buy Apples 5¢ Each. ❖ Photo Sequence: A Kansas Dust Storm. Sign: Unemployed—Buy Apples 5¢ Each. ❖ Depression scrip. 27, 1930. ❖ Page 1 of The Daily Worker, Monday, January Depression scrip. ❖ A&P advertising flyers, 1933. ❖ Broadside: Veterans March to Washington, 1932. A&P advertising flyers, 1933. ❖ Auction poster for farm equipment, North Dakota, 1933. ❖ Campaign flyer: Closing-Out Sale sale of the G.O.P. Party, 1932. Auction sale poster for farm equipment, North Dakota, 1933. ❖ Poster: NRA — We Do❖ OurPage Part.1 of The Emporia Gazette, May 11, 1934. Page 1 of The Emporia Gazette, May 11, 1934. ❖ Photo Sequence: A Kansas Dust Storm. Photo Sequence: A Kansas Dust Storm. Reproducible Student Activities ❖ Page 1 of The Daily Worker, Monday, January 27, 1930. Page 1 of The Daily Worker, Monday, January 27, 1930. ❖ Broadside: Veterans to Washington, Order March Jackdaw B-A111932. — $51.95 Broadside: Veterans March to Washington, 1932. ❖ Campaign flyer: Closing-Out Sale of the G.O.P. Party, 1932. Campaign flyer: Closing-Out Sale of the G.O.P. Party, 1932. ❖ Poster: NRA—We Do Our Part. Poster: NRA—We Do Our Part.

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

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❖  R

Orde B-27

U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

For related photo collections, see p. 97

Money: Denarius to Decimal

Ele Firs Wo

❖  4 Broadsheets ❖  11 Historical Documents ❖  Reproducible Activities

❖  6 ❖  14 ❖  R

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Orde B-G8

The New Deal

Eleanor Roosevelt: First Lady of the World

Grades 8–12

789-0022 ❖ Fax toll 800-962-9101 This hands-on history of thefree New Deal includes Roosevelt’s First

Inaugural Address, one of his famous fireside chats, his 1935 Social Security Message, and 1933 and 1936 front pages from The New York Times. The Broadsheets will help your class appreciate the strength of Roosevelt’s personality and character and the bold objectives of the New Deal, many of which are relevant today. Historian: James V. Compton. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Depression and Franklin Roosevelt Roosevelt Leadership and Broad Purpose of the New Deal New Deal in Action I: Business, Agriculture, Labor New Deal in Action II: Unemployment, Social Security, Conservation The New Deal Critics and the Election of 1936 The Record of the New Deal

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

President Roosevelt’s First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1933. Excerpt of a speech by Senator Huey Long, March 7, 1935. The front page of The New York Times, September 14, 1933. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s fireside chat, June 28, 1933. Harry Hopkins’ diary entry, January 4, 1935. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Social Security Message, January 17, 1935. The front page of The New York Times, November 4, 1936. A leaflet for a United Automobile Workers protest meeting. A map of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Two anti-Roosevelt cartoons. Part of mural on Coit Tower, San Francisco.

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Grades 8–12 Introduce your students to the inspiring life and outstanding achievements of this remarkable woman who they may only know as F.D.R.’s First Lady. An intriguing array of hands-on documents chronicle her life’s activities—start with her schoolgirl essay and report card; read her magazine articles and letters; learn about her women’s rights and civil rights activism in the White House; her relationship with President Roosevelt, her trips abroad during WWII, and her leadership at the U.N.; and see what she carried in her wallet. Everyone will be surprised. Historians: John Sears and Christine Scriabine. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Early Life Democrat with a Capital “D” The Great Depression The War Years Civil Rights The United Nations and Human Rights

Timelines: Eleanor, 1884-1962 & FDR, 1882-1945 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Eleanor Roosevelt’s intriguing wallet contents, poster. “Flowers Discussion,” school composition by Eleanor, 1895. Eleanor’s Report Card, Allenswood School, Apr. 1900. Redbook, article by Eleanor on women, Apr. 1928. Letters between Eleanor and Molly Dewson, Aug. 1933. Eleanor Roosevelt’s newspaper columns, Nov. 1933. Letter from Rohima Halloway to Mrs. Roosevelt, Jan. 1934. Letter: Walter White, NAACP, to Mrs. Roosevelt, Nov. 1934. Memo: Eleanor to FDR on organizing campaign, July 1936. Letters to Mrs. Roosevelt from Cecil Peterson and Alice Donnell, July 1942 and Mar. 1944. Eleanor’s 1943 Pacific flights; FDR letter to “Bull” Halsey. Letters: Eleanor and President Harry S. Truman, 1950. Award to Eleanor from the Nat’l. Religion and Labor group. Letters: Eleanor Roosevelt and Sen. John F. Kennedy, 1960

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U.S. HISTORY

Rationing in World War II

World War II: The Home Front

Grades 8-12 Just months after entering WWII, the U.S. government instituted rationing. Channeling basic resources to the military meant that citizens at home had to cut down on their own consumption. The Office of Price Administration, established to oversee rationing, figured allotments for each individual and issued ration books. A massive propaganda blitz began—to convince citizens of their patriotic duty to do with less, reuse items, and turn in scrap metals for the war effort. Primary sources, such as a full-size ration book with instructions, ration cards and coupons, certificates of necessity, sugarless and meat substitute recipes, and government propaganda posters, involve students in the burdens Americans faced and help convey the sense of community that was fostered during this era. Historian: Rebecca A. Spears. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature: Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ War Ration Book One, 1942. ❖ Instructions for using War Ration Book One, 1942. ❖ Excerpt from rationing orders issued by the Office of War Information in cooperation with the State Defense Council of Florida, 1943. ❖ Office of War information poster urging citizens not to patronize black markets, 1943. ❖ Pages from “Sugarless and Meat Substitute Recipes,” York County Farm Bureau, 1945. ❖ Poster of rationing cards, coupons, stamps, and rationing-related photographs. ❖ Part II of Office of Pricing Administrations certificate for men’s rubber footwear, ca. 1942.

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U.S. History

For related photo collections, see p. 100

Grades 8-12 A full-size ration book with stamps, front pages of newspapers, the Declaration of War on Japan, advertisements on conserving fats, a canteen welcome card, documents about labor strikes and prejudice in the workplace, dozens of photos, and other documents bring to life the American home front during WWII. Students will enjoy descriptions of their grandparents’ experiences as welders who made tanks, students who gathered scrap, and citizens who served in the civil defense. The inconsistences of mistreatment of black and Japanese U.S. citizens are also included. Historian: David Jefferies. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Coming Conflict: America Before Pearl Harbor Pearl Harbor: Galvanizing the Nation Rationing and War Bonds: Daily Life During the War Division in Unity: Internal Conflicts Postwar America: Victory Brings Change

Timeline: 1929–1945 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Congressional Record, Dec. 8, 1941. Front page, San Francisco Call Bulletin, Dec. 9, 1941. Excerpt from Rhode Island “Citizen’s Defense Manual.” Identification cards for Civil Defense and Aircraft Warning Service. War Production Board advertisement on conserving fats. War Ration Book Four, 1943. Letter written during the month meat rationing began, 1943. OWI publication “The Negroes Role in the War,” 1943. Letters from National Federation for Constitutional Liberties about race riots, 1943. Issue of The Home Front, Connecticut War Council, 1943. CIO canteen welcome card. National Munitions Company strike documents, 1943. Case study, Bendix Aviation and workplace prejudice. Newspaper advertisements, 1941 and 1945. Front page, San Francisco Call Bulletin, Aug. 15, 1945.

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51


U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY For related photo collections, see p. 100

For related photo collections, see p. 100

World War II: Life at Home

Japanese-American Internment Camps

Grades 5-8 A full-size ration book with stamps, front pages of newspapers, the Declaration of War on Japan, advertisements on conserving fats, a canteen welcome card, documents about labor strikes and prejudice in the workplace, dozens of photos, and other documents bring to life the American home front during WWII. Students will enjoy descriptions of their grandparents’ experiences as welders who made tanks, students who gathered scrap, and citizens who served in the civil defense. The inconsistences of mistreatment of black and Japanese U.S. citizens are also included. Historian: David Jefferies, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Before the War America Goes to War Living with Rationing Division in America The Home Front After Victory

Timeline: 1929–1945 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Congressional Record, Dec. 8, 1941. Front page, San Francisco Call Bulletin, Dec. 9, 1941. Excerpt from Rhode Island “Citizen’s Defense Manual.” Identification cards for Civil Defense and Aircraft Warning Service. War Production Board advertisement on conserving fats. War Ration Book Four, 1943. Letter written during the month meat rationing began, 1943. OWI publication “The Negroes Role in the War,” 1943. Letters from National Federation for Constitutional Liberties about race riots, 1943. Issue of The Home Front, Connecticut War Council, 1943. CIO canteen welcome card. National Munitions Company strike documents, 1943. Case study, Bendix Aviation and workplace prejudice. Newspaper advertisements, 1941 and 1945. Front page, San Francisco Call Bulletin, Aug. 15, 1945.

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52

Grades 5–8 Your students will identify with the plight of Japanese internees as told in their letters, diaries, and photos. Use this tragic chapter of U.S. history to teach the dangers of majority abuse of a minority group. This Jackdaw provides the complete story from Pearl Harbor in 1941 through Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 to President Reagan’s official apology that included reparations in 1988. Historians: Leona Hiraoka and Ken Masugi, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets    ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Asian Immigration A Question of Fear Going to Internment Camps Fighting Internment Deciding Loyalty and Ending Relocation

Timeline: 1849–1988 Historical Documents ❖ Front page: San Francisco Chronicle, Dec. 8, 1941, announcing Japan had bombed Pearl Harbor. ❖ Walter Lippmann’s “Fifth Column” article, Feb. 12, 1942. ❖ Executive Order 9066, by F.D.R. on Feb. 19, 1942. ❖ Public Law 503: Penalties for not following Order 9066. ❖ Exclusion Order No. 27, with map of prohibited area. ❖ Map: The locations of assembly and relocation centers. ❖ Clippings: Seattle newspapers on plights of those interned. ❖ War Relocation Authority report on internment, Aug. 12, 1942. ❖ Camp Harmony Newsletter from Puyallup A.C. ❖ Student essay on journey from home to Pinedale A.C. ❖ Page: Hunt High School yearbook, Minidoka R.C., Idaho. ❖ Supreme Court decision: Korematsu v. The United States. ❖ Controversial “no-no boys” questionnaire, Feb. 1943. ❖ Public Law 100-383, by President Reagan in Aug. 1988, with apology to interned, granting each $20,000 in reparations. ❖ Camp scenes photo-poster. ❖ Japanese-American Internment photo album.

Reproducible Student Activities

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U.S. HISTORY

Japanese-American Internment

World War II: Atomic Bomb

U.S. History

For related photo collections, see p. 101

U.S. History

For related photo collections, see p. 100

Grades 8-12

Grades 5-8

Your students will identify with the plight of Japanese Internees as told in their letter, diaries, and photos. Use this tragic chapter os U.S. history to teach the dangers of majority abuse of a minority group. This Jackdaw provides the complete story from Pearl Harbor in 1941 through Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 to President Reagan’s official apology that included reparations in 1988. Historians: Leona Hiraoka and Ken Masugi. The contents of this

Documents from the Truman library, Einstein’s letter to FDR, the scientists’ petition against the use of the bomb, and the official bombing order will stimulate class discussion on whether the U.S. was justified using the atomic bomb to end WWII. The Broadsheets and timeline enhance student understanding of the events that lead the world into the Atomic Age. Historian: Michael J. O’Neal. The contents

Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

1800s to Pearl Harbor From Pearl Harbor to Executive Order 9066 Life in the camps Split Decisions: Americans of Japanese Ancestry in Court Affirming Loyalty Ending the Relocation, Finally

Timeline: 1800–1992 Historical Documents ❖ Front page: San Francisco Chronicle. Dec. 8, 1941, announcing Japan had bombed Pearl Harbor. ❖ Walter Lippmann’s “Fifth Column” article, Feb. 12, 1942. ❖ Executive Order 9066, by F.D.R. on Feb. 19, 1942. ❖ Public Law 503: Penalties for not following Order 9066. ❖ Exclusion Order No. 27, with a map of prohibited area. ❖ Map: the locations of assembly and relocation centers. ❖ Clippings: Seattle newspapers on plights of those interned. ❖ War Relocation Authority report on internment, Aug. 12, 1942. ❖ Camp Harmony Newsletter from Puyallup A.C. ❖ Student essay on journey from home to Pinedale A.C. ❖ Page: Hunt High School yearbook, Minidoka R.C., Idaho. ❖ Supreme Court decision: Korematsu v. The Untied States. ❖ Controversial “no-no boys” questionnaire, Feb. 1943. ❖ Public Law 100-383, by President Reagan in Aug. 1988, with apology to interned, granting each $20,000 in reparations.

Reproducible Student Activities

of this Jackdaw feature: ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Japan’s Push for Power A Secret Project Should America Use the Bomb? Hiroshima and Nagasaki Destroyed

Timeline: 1931–1945 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Letter, Albert Einstein to President Roosevelt, 1939. Anti-Japanese propaganda poster. Ralph Bard memo on using the Atomic Bomb, Jun. 1945. Petition from the scientists urging President Truman not to use the bomb, Jul. 1945. Truman journal entry on the bomb and his resolve to use it, Jul. 1945. Bombing order to Army Air Force, Jul. 1945. Truman letter to wife on negotiations at Potsdam, Jul. 1945. Statement by President Truman announcing Hiroshima bombing, Aug. 1945. Newspaper articles on Hiroshima blast, Japan’s surrender, and the end of the war, Aug. 1945. Cable, Senator Russell to President Truman, urging that Japan be dealt with harshly, and Truman’s response, Aug. 1945. Cable, Samuel Cavert to President Truman, expressing concern over atomic bombs, and Truman’s response, Aug. 1945. Resolution of Hiroshima, 1958. Truman’s handwritten notes on the Nuclear Age, 1958. Atomic Bomb photo poster.

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53


U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

For related photo collections, see p. 101

The Atomic Bomb

Modern Immigration

Grades 8-12 Documents from the Truman library, Einstein’s letter to FDR, the scientists’ petition against the use of the bomb, and the official bombing order will stimulate class discussion on whether the U.S. was justified using the atomic bomb to end WWII. The Broadsheets and timeline enhance student understanding of the events that lead the world into the Atomic Age. Historian: Michael J. O’Neal. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

War in the Pacific The Manhattan Project The Diplomatic Scene in 1945 Destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki Postwar Debate

Timeline: 1931–1945 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Letter, Albert Einstein to President Roosevelt, 1939. Anti-Japanese propaganda poster. Ralph Bard memo on using the Atomic Bomb, Jun. 1945. Petition from the scientists urging President Truman not to use the bomb, Jul. 1945. Truman journal entry on the bomb and his resolve to use it, Jul. 1945. Bombing order to Army Air Force, Jul. 1945. Truman letter to wife on negotiations at Potsdam, Jul. 1945. Statement by President Truman announcing Hiroshima bombing, Aug. 1945. Newspaper articles on Hiroshima blast, Japan’s surrender, and the end of the war, Aug. 1945. Cable, Senator Russell to President Truman, urging that Japan be dealt with harshly, and Truman’s response, Aug. 1945. Cable, Samuel Cavert to President Truman, expressing concern over atomic bombs, and Truman’s response, Aug. 1945. Resolution of Hiroshima, 1958. Truman’s handwritten notes on the Nuclear Age, 1958.

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Grades 8–12 Current census data confirms the U.S. is undergoing a demographic revolution, a dramatic change in the racial and ethnic composition of the nation. In 1965, the old national-origins quota system, which strongly favored northern and western European immigrants, was discarded in favor of a more ethnically and geographically equitable system. The result is a vast increase in the number of immigrants and a dramatic change in the composition of the immigrant flow. This Jackdaw narrates the unfolding story through hands-on documents, charts, photo essays, recipes, reminiscences, a family album, and political pamphlets. Historian: Christine Scriabine. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

New Americans and the Laws The New Immigrants Immigrants from the Western Hemisphere Asians and Africans The Refugees

Timeline: 1882–1996 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Poster, Mexican-Americans in the Depression & World War II. Guide for Irish immigrants. Article,”The Ordeal of Immigration in Wausau,” 1994. Naturalization requirements and information. Application for naturalization. Excerpts from “A Guide to Resettlement in the United States.” Vietnamese identity card and evacuee information, c. 1973. Article, “Illegals Made Slaves to Fashion,” 1993. Article, “Los Tejanos: The Mexican Texans,” 1993. Photos from “Life in a Vietnamese Buddhist Temple.” Texas Democratic Party Platform, 1996. Immigrant recipes and restaurants. Survey, “Immigrants Do Not Take Away Jobs...” “Foreigners Flock to Slopes to Work, Not Ski,” The New York Times, 1995. Certificate of Naturalization for Nicholas Cosmopulos, 1941.

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54

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U.S. HISTORY For related photo collections, see p. 102

Korean War

Jim Crow Era

Grades 8-12 The United Nations’ response to North Korea’s invasion of South Korea involved troops from many nations and became America’s first undeclared war, resulting in some 157,000 U.S. casualties and a still-divided Korea. Documents, including combat photos, maps, newspaper reports, and political documents, dramatically illustrate the events and politics of the Korean War. Students will welcome the comprehensive timeline and the Who’s Who that helps keep the many events and players straight. Historian: James A. Crutchfield.

U.S. History

For related photo collections, see p. 101

Grades 8-12

Who’s Who and Timeline: 1943–1953

The term “Jim Crow” signifies the elaborate legal and social structure the South used to enforce the continued subordination of the black population after emancipation. This codified system of segregation denied free blacks access to the political process, limited their education and economic opportunities, and dehumanized them based on false notions of white superiority. In addition, southern whites employed terror through intimidation and extra-legal violence, especially lynching, to doom the promise of Reconstruction. Show students what life was like for black Americans during the Jim Crow era with this thought-provoking collection of primary source documents that includes eyewitness accounts of terrorization and lynching, examples of discriminatory laws and voter registration requirements, newspaper pages and pamphlet excerpts documenting black Americans’ struggle against the enduring prejudice of Jim Crow, and riveting contemporary photographs. Historian: Beth Haverkamp Powers. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

Maps of the Korean Peninsula and Pusan Perimeter

Support Materials

The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Iron Curtain Falls The Struggle for Supremacy A Class of Personalities—Truman vs. MacArthur A Negotiated Peace Effects of the Korean War

Historical Documents State Department telegram to President Truman, Jun. 24, 1950. President Truman’s statement on Korea, Jun. 27, 1950. United Nations Security Council resolution, Jun. 27, 1950. Political Cartoon, Aug. 16, 1950. General MacArthur’s appeal to end the war, Oct. 1, 1950. U.S. Army intelligence report, Aug. 27, 1950. Translation of Chinese intelligence report, Mar. 8, 1951. Front page of the New York World Telegram and The Sun, Apr. 11, 1951. U.S. and Chinese propaganda leaflets. Photo poster: The War in Korea. Photograph of North Korean and Communist Chinese POWs. Eisenhower election campaign handout, 1952. Restricted memorandum reporting results of public opinion polls on Korean conflict, 1953. ❖ Civil Defense advertisement, 1950s. ❖ Fallout shelter plans. ❖ Department of Defense news release concerning economic and security threats to the Korean Peninsula, Jan. 1998. ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

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Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ Statement of George Smith regarding Ku Klux Klan intimidation prior to the 1869 presidential election. ❖ Excerpts from the Constitution of the State of South Carolina, 1895. ❖ Excerpts from by Ida B. Wells-Barnett, 1899. ❖ Texas poll tax receipts, 1903 and 1945. ❖ Pages of a black-owned newspaper, 1912. ❖ Letter from NAACP secretary Walter White to Eleanor Roosevelt about lynching, 1934. ❖ State of Mississippi voter registration form, 1955. ❖ Jim Crow photo-poster.

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55


U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

Ku Klux Klan

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka

Grades 8-12 Six Confederate Army veterans looking for “amusement” founded the Ku Klux Klan in Tennessee in 1865. Transition from a social club to a white racist vigilante organization did not take long in the stressful postwar period. Although this first Klan was officially disbanded within a few years, other Klans would rise to prominence during the next century to foment violence and hate against blacks, as well as Catholics, Jews, communists, socialists, and immigrants. Thoughtprovoking primary source documents like Reconstruction-era political cartoons; Klan pamphlets, photographs, broadsides, and business cards; and an application for membership in the Junior Ku Klux Klan are sure to stimulate classroom discussion on the causes and consequences of bigotry, racism, and hate. Historian: Christine Brendel Scriabine. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature: Support Materials Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

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Historical Documents ❖ Early anti-Klan political cartoons, 1868-1874. ❖ Letters from “Outrages by Ku-Klux Klan,” House of Representatives, 40th Congress, 1869. ❖ Klan pamphlet, “The Practice of Klanishness,” 1924. ❖ Application for membership in Junior Ku Klux Klan, c. 1924. ❖ Second Klan photo-poster, 1920s-1940s. ❖ Klan pamphlet, “The Principle of the United Klans of America, c. 1961. ❖ Broadsides and business cards from the third Klan, 1960s-1970s.

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Grades 8–12 Explore with your students the landmark 1954 Supreme Court school segregation case, Brown et al. v. The Board of Education of Topeka et al., which overturned the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson doctrine of separate but equal facilities for the races and opened the door for the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Eight critical primary source documents—including United States District and Supreme Court exhibits, expert testimony, and rulings; the front page of the May 17, 1954, issue of the Topeka State Journal ; and The Southern Manifesto— graphically illustrate the crucial role Brown v. The Board of Education played in redefining what it means to be equal in America. Historian: Robyn Hallowell Griswold. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature: Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List Annotated Map

Historical Documents ❖ Photographs filed in U.S. District Court in the case of Davis v. County School Board of Prince Edward County, Virginia, 1951. ❖ Complaint Filed with U.S. District Court in the case of Brown et al. v. The Board of Education of Topeka, February 28, 1951. ❖ Expert testimony by Dr. Kenneth Clark on the psychological effects of school segregation, February 27, 1952. ❖ Excerpts from the opinion of the U.S. Supreme Court in Brown et al. v. The Board of Education of Topeka et al., May 17, 1954. ❖ Congratulatory note sent to Chief Justice Warren by Associate Justice Felix Frankfurter, May 17, 1954. ❖ Front page of The Topeka State Journal, May 17, 1954. ❖ United States Supreme Court order to implement its ruling in the case of Brown et al. v. The Board of Education of Topeka et al., May 31, 1955. ❖ The Southern Manifesto, taken from The Congressional Record, March 12, 1956.

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56

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U.S. HISTORY For related photo collections, see p. 102

Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Struggle for Black Voting Rights

Grades 8–12

Nineteen historical documents, including Thomas Nast cartoons and reproductions of NAACP pamphlets, bring this struggle to life for your class and reflect the strong emotions that accompanied the fight for black suffrage. Vivid documents reflect historical events and changes in society concerning this troubling issue. Historian: Christine Scriabine, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this

In December 1955, Rosa Parks, an NAACP secretary and tailor’s assistant, defied Montgomery, Alabama, segregation laws by refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. Her subsequent trial and conviction sparked a yearlong black boycott of city buses that ended only after the Supreme Court ruled public bus segregation to be unconstitutional. Using this informative collection of primary source documents—including sections of Montgomery’s segregation code, civil rights posters and fliers, newspaper articles and political cartoons, photographs, and the Browder v. Gayle decision that found Montgomery bus segregation in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment—students will learn about the life and work of civil rights activist Rosa Parks, and about segregation and the birth of the civil rights movement. Historian: Audrey Green Rogers. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ Montgomery City Code, Sections 10-12. ❖ “Negroes’ Most Urgent Needs” and police commissioner candidate Clyde Seller’s response, Montgomery Advertiser, March 20, 1955. ❖ Civil rights “March to Freedom” poster, August 28, 1955. ❖ Newspaper articles on the bus boycott, Montgomery Advertiser, December 6, 1955. ❖ Photo-poster: “Fighting Segregation: The Montgomery Bus Boycott.” ❖ Browder v. Gayle decision, June 19, 1956. ❖ “Integrated Bus Suggestions,” December 19, 1956. ❖ Herb Block cartoons on the bus boycott, March 1956, and the civil rights movement, March 1965.

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U.S. History

For related photo collections, see p. 102

Grades 5–8

Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Reconstruction Period Losing the Vote The Fight for Suffrage “Give Us the Ballot...”

Timeline: 1861–1965 Historical Documents ❖ “White Man’s Government” cartoon, Thomas Nast, Harper’s Weekly, 1868. ❖ “Democratic Judges” and another cartoon, Thomas Nast, Harper’s Weekly, 1868. ❖ “It is Only a Truce...” and other cartoons, Thomas Nast, Harper’s Weekly, 1872-1879. ❖ “The First Colored Senator...” lithograph, Currier and Ives, 1872. ❖ “Black Political Parade” and another cartoon, Harper’s Weekly, 1872, 1876. ❖ “The Political Pinkertons” cartoon, Judge, 1892. ❖ “Negro Rule” cartoon, 1900. ❖ “Opinion of W.E.B. Du Bois,” The Crisis, 1920. ❖ “Election Day in Florida,” Walter F. White, The Crisis, 1921. ❖ Nixon v. Herndon, Supreme Court Reports 536, 1926. ❖ “Why the Poll Tax Must be Repealed” broadside, NAACP, 1944. ❖ Letters to and from Thurgood Marshall, 1946. ❖ Committee for Alabama letter, 1946. ❖ “Hands off Democracy” handbill, NAACP, c. 1949. ❖ “M is for Mississippi and Murder” pamphlet, NAACP, 1955. ❖ “Hands that Picked Cotton...” poster, c. 1965. ❖ “100% Registered to Vote” sticker, SCLC, 1990. ❖ Lowery, King and Young on voter’s card, SCLC, 1990. ❖ Fifteenth Amendment poster, 1870.

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57


U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

Black Voting Rights: The Fight for Equality

Cold War and the Super Powers

Grades 8–12

Your students will gain a solid understanding of the Cold War era that lead to the nuclear arms race and has now resulted in worldwide concern with the control and disposal of nuclear weapons and waste. Documents convey the fear, hysteria, and brinkmanship diplomacy of those perilous days; bring alive Cold War personalities such as Winston Churchill, John F. Kennedy, Harry Truman, and Joe McCarthy; and provide an up-close look at the House Un-American Activities Committee proceedings. Broadsheets detail the era from beginning to end. Historians: Stephen M. Forman, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois.

Nineteen historical documents, including Thomas Nast cartoons and reproductions of NAACP pamphlets, bring this struggle to life for your class and reflect the strong emotions that accompanied the fight for black suffrage. Vivid documents reflect historical events and changes in society concerning this troubling issue. Historian: Christine Scriabine. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Reconstruction Disfranchisement Blacks Organize We Shall Overcome

Historical Documents ❖ “White Man’s Government” cartoon, Thomas Nast, Harper’s Weekly, 1868. ❖ “Democratic Judges” and another cartoon, Thomas Nast, Harper’s Weekly, 1868. ❖ “It is Only a Truce...” and other cartoons, Thomas Nast, Harper’s Weekly, 1872-1879. ❖ “The First Colored Senator...” lithograph, Currier and Ives, 1872. ❖ “Black Political Parade” and another cartoon, Harper’s Weekly, 1872, 1876. ❖ “The Political Pinkertons” cartoon, Judge, 1892. ❖ “Negro Rule” cartoon, 1900. ❖ “Opinion of W.E.B. Du Bois,” The Crisis, 1920. ❖ “Election Day in Florida,” Walter F. White, The Crisis, 1921. ❖ Nixon v. Herndon, Supreme Court Reports 536, 1926. ❖ “Why the Poll Tax Must be Repealed” broadside, NAACP, 1944. ❖ Letters to and from Thurgood Marshall, 1946. ❖ Committee for Alabama letter, 1946. ❖ “Hands off Democracy” handbill, NAACP, c. 1949. ❖ “M is for Mississippi and Murder” pamphlet, NAACP, 1955. ❖ “Hands that Picked Cotton...” poster, c. 1965. ❖ “100% Registered to Vote” sticker, SCLC, 1990. ❖ Lowery, King and Young on voter’s card, SCLC, 1990. ❖ Fifteenth Amendment poster, 1870.

Grades 5-8

The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Communism vs. Democracy The Cold War Heats Up Communism Spreads to Asia and Cuba Foreign Policy Changes and the End of the Cold War

Timeline: 1917–1991 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Winston Churchill’s “The Sinews of Peace” speech, Mar. 5, 1946. Photo; House Un-American Activities Committee vs. Hollywood, 1947. Communist party membership card, 1947. “100 Things You Should Know About Communism…” questions and answers from HUAC booklet. Washington, D.C. defense map, 375 mile radius, 1952. Philadelphia Inquirer front page: “Rosenbergs Die…” Jun. 1953. Joseph McCarthy’s telegram to President Truman and Truman’s response, 1950. “Atomic Weapons Handbook” front page, 1959. Poster: JFK and the Cuban missile crisis, 1962. Photos: Missiles of the Cold War. Fallout/bomb shelter plans. Civil defense preparations, 1950-1967. U.S. and Soviet postwar summit history chart, 1955-1988.

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58

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

The Cold War

Senator McCarthy’s Witch-hunt

Grades 8-12

Grades 8-12

Your students will gain a solid understanding of the Cold War era that lead to the nuclear arms race and has now resulted in worldwide concern with the control and disposal of nuclear weapons and waste. Documents convey the fear, hysteria, and brinkmanship diplomacy of those perilous days; bring alive Cold War personalities such as Winston Churchill, John F. Kennedy, Harry Truman, and Joe McCarthy; and provide an up-close look at the House Un-American Activities Committee proceedings. Broadsheets detail the era from beginning to end. Historian: Stephen M. Forman The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Between 1950 and 1954, Senator Joseph McCarthy engaged in a virulent witch hunt for communist subversives. Utilizing tactics that included unfounded accusations, harassment, and bullying, McCarthy destroyed lives and careers and caused private citizens, as well as generals and the president, to fear him. Experience McCarthy’s sensational witch hunt through these unique primary source documents, including McCarthy’s Wheeling speech, political propaganda brochures, presidential correspondence, Congressional testimony, and political cartoons. Historian: Christine Brendel Scriabine. The contents of the Focus Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Beginning of the Cold War The Cold War in America The Cold War Turns Hot Diplomacy of the Cold War End of the Cold War Broadsheet Exhibits

Timeline: 1917–1991 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Winston Churchill’s “The Sinews of Peace” speech, Mar. 5, 1946. Photo; House Un-American Activities Committee vs. Hollywood, 1947. Communist party membership card, 1947. “100 Things You Should Know About Communism…” questions and answers from HUAC booklet. Washington, D.C. defense map, 375 mile radius, 1952. Philadelphia Inquirer front page: “Rosenbergs Die…” Jun. 1953. Joseph McCarthy’s telegram to President Truman and Truman’s response, 1950. “Atomic Weapons Handbook” front page, 1959. Poster: JFK and the Cuban missile crisis, 1962. Photos: Missiles of the Cold War. Fallout/bomb shelter plans. Civil defense preparations, 1950-1967. U.S. and Soviet postwar summit history chart, 1955-1988.

Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ McCarthy makes his debut on the national stage—Wheeling, West Virgina, Feb. 9, 1950. ❖ McCarthy attacks Truman, Feb. 1950. ❖ Draft of Truman’s reply, Feb. 1950. ❖ Anti-McCarthy brochure, Democratic Organizing Committee of Wisconsin, 1952. ❖ Pro-McCarthy booklet, the McCarthy Club, 1952 . ❖ Excerpts from hearing before the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations of the Committee on Government Operations, Apr. 29, 1953. ❖ Eisenhower turns against McCarthy—Entry from the diary of President Eisenhower’s press secretary, May 28, 1954. ❖ Fighting McCarthy and McCarthyism with a pen—a political cartoon poster. ❖ Senate condemnation of Senator McCarthy, Dec. 2, 1954

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59


U.S. History

U.S. HISTORY

Cuban Missile Crisis

The Assassination of President Kennedy

Grades 8-12 The world came close to a nuclear Armageddon during 13 days in October, 1962, when the U.S. and the Soviet Union, over-armed with nuclear weapons, came eyeball-to-eyeball over the issue of Soviet missiles in Cuba. Take students behind the scenes of this tensionfilled, unparalleled event with a thought-provoking collection of primary source documents that includes U-2 spy plane photos, a CIA map of missile installations, correspondence between President Kennedy and Soviet Chairman Khrushchev, text of Kennedy’s televised speech to the nation, a memorandum from Attorney General Robert Kennedy, newspaper front pages, and political cartoons. Historian: Christine Brendel Scriabine. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature: Support Materials Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

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Historical Documents ❖ Cuban Missile Crisis maps. ❖ Surveillance photo-poster. ❖ Draft of letter from President Kennedy to Chairman Khrushchev, Oct. 20, 1962. ❖ Press release: text of President Kennedy’s speech to the nation, Oct. 22, 1962. ❖ Letters from Chairman Khrushchev to President Kennedy, Oct. 24 and 27, 1962. ❖ Memorandum from Attorney General Robert Kennedy, Oct. 30, 1962. ❖ Newspaper front pages: Evening Telegraph, Herkimer, NY, Oct. 25, 1962, and Detroit News, Oct. 30, 1962. ❖ Political cartoon poster.

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Grades 8-12 The assassination of President John F. Kennedy has sparked more controversy and left more unanswered questions than perhaps any other event in modern history. Who killed President Kennedy? How was he killed? Was his death the result of a conspiracy? Was the Warren Commission part of a government cover-up? This Jackdaw offers students a unique opportunity to handle and analyze documentary evidence including a reproduction of the alleged weapon, F.B.I. photographs, Warren Commission exhibits and testimony, and a full-color model of Dealey Plaza. The documents will inspire lively classroom debate and help students form their own hypotheses and opinions. Historians: Michael Rand, Howard Loxton, and Len Deighton. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

J.F.K. Dallas The Assassination The Warren Commission Jack Ruby

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Dealey Plaza plan and model. Anti-Kennedy poster circulated in Dallas on Nov. 21, 1963. Photograph of the assassination. Warren Commission Exhibit 387: autopsy descriptive sheet. Warren Commission Exhibit 385: medical illustration of President Kennedy’s neck wounds. F.B.I. eyewitness reports of autopsy. Warren Commission Exhibit 397: autopsy descriptive sheet. F.B.I. Exhibit 60: photographs of President Kennedy’s shirt. Partial transcript of Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy’s testimony, as reproduced in Vol. V of the Warren Commission Hearings. Warren Commission Document 767: summary of Secret Service interview of Alonzo Hudkins. Advertisement from The American Rifleman, Feb. 1963. Full-size reproduction of the alleged assassination weapon. “Unanswered Questions”: assassination evidence summary. Map of Central and Oak Cliff areas of Dallas.

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U.S. HISTORY U.S. History

For related photo collections, see p. 103

The Vietnam War

New York State History

Grades 8-12

Grades 4–6

The Vietnam War is America’s most controversial war. Why did we fight and what did we accomplish? The Broadsheets and documents give voice to many different perspectives, from ardent supporters to passionate opposition. Students, teachers, and even parents will be intrigued by the documents and, perhaps, personally relate to the draft lottery chart. Historian: David Jefferies. The contents of this

Explore New York history with a replica report of the purchase of Manhattan, George Washington’s evacuation order, early photos of the Erie Canal, a poster offering $10,000 reward for “Boss” Tweed, photos building the Empire State Building, and a full-color classroom poster of Uncle Sam by New Yorker James Flagg. Historian: Andrew Bronin, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois and Janet Morrissey. The contents

Jackdaw feature:

of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets

Broadsheets

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Beginnings to the Gulf of Tonkin Gulf of Tonkin and the Tet Offensive The Anti-War Movement Vietnamization and the Paris Peace Accords The Fall of Saigon and the Aftermath

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Native Americans and Explorers New York as a Colony New York Becomes a State New York in the 1800s New York’s First 50 Years in the 20th Century

Timeline: 1941–1982

Timeline: Prehistory–1952

Historical Documents

List of Governors: 1777–Present

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Front page of the San Francisco Chronicle, May 8, 1954. Portion of the 1954 peace agreement signed by the Vietnamese and French. Newspaper story on marines landing at Da Nang. After combat report, Nov. 1965. “Nine Rules” of conduct for U.S. soldiers. Roger Rangers’ advice to soldiers. Vietcong policy towards POWs. “New Mobilizer” Jan. 1970. Congressional Medal of Honor for Nicholas Cutinha. Joint Peace Treaty by students of U.S. and Vietnam. Letter from soldier Tom Lucas to Albert Ettinger. Bureau of Public Affairs pro-war publication, 1970. Draft document poster. Front page of the San Fransisco Chronicle, Apr. 30, 1975.

Reproducible Student Activities Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6107-3 — $92.67/$69.50

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

First known map of New Amsterdam on Manhattan Island, 1651. P. Schagen’s letter on purchase of Manhattan by P. Minuit, 1626. Poster encouraging English to settle in New York, 1738. Front page of the New York Weekly Journal, November 25, 1734. Order by General Washington to evacuate New York City, 1776. Plans and drawing of “Fortress West Point,” 1780 and 1791. Enlistment papers for the Detachment of Sea Fencibles, 1814. New York Consolidated Lottery poster, 1826. Poster advertising land for sale in southwestern New York, 1837. Handbill advertising Schenectady rail and canal connections, 1834. Posters depicting life on the Erie Canal. Poster offering $10,000 Reward for William M. (Boss) Tweed, 1875. Immigrants arriving at Castle Garden, 1866. Manuscript of “The New Colossus” by Emma Lazarus, 1883. World War I Poster: Uncle Sam by James Montgomery Flagg. Photo Album: Building the Empire State Building, 1930-31. Strip of ticker tape from New York Stock Exchange.

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U.S. HiStory

U.S. HISTORY

23

U.S. History

U.S. History

California Gold Rush 1849 Texas: A Lone Star History

California State History History California State

Learn the interesting through oldcaptured maps, posters, TheTexas colorhistory and excitement of theway Gold Rush is in the photographs, diary pages, treaties, letters, and other historical “Mining Methods” poster, “The Miners Ten Commandments,” sources. SixFare” Broadsheets timeline trace more Texasinhistory from the “Bill of menu ofand the aday, and even the photo of empty ships moored inexplorers San Francisco WhereStudents did the Native Americans and the to theharbor. 20th century. sailors go? Plenty to think and talk about here. The Broadsheets become eyewitnesses to the rich diversity and culture of Texas as describe the discovery, and theatravel by land to reach the they examine the maps, read personal diary,and andseasee how early gold country, while the 11Historian: hands-onRebecca documents giveSchwartz. students the oil fields actually looked. Spears The

Students will learn California’s Native Americans, its years Introduce your about students to the rich heritage of California — as a Spanish territory, how it became a state, and its ethnic, from pre-history to the 100th anniversary of statehood — with this cultural, agricultural, and industrial diversity by California’s holding and reading exciting Jackdaw. Students will learn about Native Americans; its years a Spanish territory; howofficial it became a state; primary sources that as include broadsides, maps, documents, and its ethnic,and cultural, and industrial diversity by photographs, the firstagricultural Bear Flag. Historian: Benjamin F. Gilbert, holding and reading primary that include broadsides, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois and sources Janet Morrissey. The contents of this

Broadsheets Broadsheets ❖ Native Americans, Explorers and the Land

Broadsheets ❖ The Spanish in California

Grades 5–8 4–7 Grades

feeling a “Forty-Niner” contentsofofbeing this Jackdaw feature: right there in gold territory. Historian: Andrew Bronin. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Discovery Spain and Mexico: 1718–1835 Forty-Niners The Republic, the Union and the Confederacy: 1836–1865 To Califomia by Sea Reconstruction and Settlement: 1865–1880 To California by Land NewFrancisco Industries, Populations and Reforms: 1876–1900 San Texas in the TwentiethThe Century Self-determination: Spirit of ‘49

Timeline: 1519–1990 Historical Documents

❖ “Map of the Emigrant Road Accompaniment,” booklet, 1849. Historical Documents ❖ A Gold Rush bill of fare, 1849. ❖ De Piñeda map of Gulf of Mexico, 1519. ❖ “The Miner’s Ten Commandments,” poster, 1849. ❖ Harper’s Map of Gulf of Mexico, 1705.3, 1857. ❖ Weekly, October ❖ The BurrPlacer map ofTimes, Texas,April 1834. 28, 1849. ❖ ❖ New Poster, “Benefit forFebruary the Relief of Texians,” 1836. ❖ York Herald, 16,the 1849. ❖ Page Travis’s appeal to the “People anddiary, all Americans.” ❖ from President Jamesof K.Texas Polk’s December 7, 1848. ❖ Map Letteroffrom Anna to Sam Houston, 1836. ❖ the Santa gold regions of California, 1849. ❖ music Stephen1837. Foster’s “Oh! Susanna,” 1848. ❖ Sheet Seguin’s I.O.Ufor to Navarro, ❖ poster. ❖ “Mining The DiaryMethods,” of Mary Austin Holley. ❖ daguerreotype of 1838. San Francisco harbor during the Gold ❖ Panoramic Handbill, “Texan Universal Pills,” ❖ Rush. Treaty of Tehuacana Creek, 1844. ❖ Letter from Santa Anna to H.Activities A. McArdle, 1874. Reproducible Student ❖ Testimony of Susanna Dickenson Hannig, 1876. ❖ Poster, “The Discovery of Oil.” Order Jackdaw B-A3 — $51.95 ❖ Letter from Quanah Parker to Gov. Thomas Campbell, 1909. ❖ Poster, Miriam Ferguson’s 1926 campaign for governor and handbill from opponent Jane McCallum.

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Grades 4–6 Grades 4–6

maps, Jackdawofficial feature:documents, photographs and the first Bear Flag. Historian: Benjamin F. Gilbert, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois and Broadsheets Janet Morrissey. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: ❖ California: The Land and Early People

❖ LandRule and Early People ❖ California: The Period ofThe Mexican ❖ ❖ The Gold!Spanish in California ❖ The Period of Mexican Rule ❖ One Hundred Years of Statehood ❖ Gold! ❖ One Hundred Years of Statehood Timeline: Prehistory–1950

Timeline: Prehistory–1950 California Native American Tribal Groups Map California Native American Tribal Groups Map Overland Routes Map Overland Routes Map Missions, Presidios Pueblos Missions, Presidios andand Pueblos Map Map Historical Documents Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Drakeplate plate brass. The Drake of of brass. Map of California as island, about Map of California as an an island, about 1650.1650. Statement of provisions, tools, religious items and other supplies Statement of provisions, tools, religious items, and other supplies for the for the Spanish expedition to and San Monterey, Diego and Monterey, 1769. Spanish expedition to San Diego 1769. Map of Rancho San Miguel, Sonoma County, 184? Map of Rancho San Miguel, Sonoma County, circa 1840s Excerpts from The Emigrants’ Guide to Oregon and California,1845. Excerpts from The Emigrants’ Guide to Oregon and California, 1845. Reproduction of the original Bear Flag, 1846. Reproduction of the original Bear Flag, 1846. Articles I, Section 1-6 of the first Constitution of the State of CaliArticleshandwritten I, Section 1–6 of first Constitution of the State of California, fornia, inthe English and Spanish, 1849. handwritten in English and Spanish, 1849. California Emigration Society broadside, 1849. California Emigration broadside, 1849. of Mining,” c. 1855. Hutchings’ pictorialSociety lettersheet: “Methods Hutchings’ pictorial lettersheet: of Mining,” circa 1855. Hutchings’ California Indian“Methods scenes, 1854 and 1859. Hutchings’ California Indian scenes, 1854 and 1859. Emigrant railway ticket, Chicago to San Francisco, 187? Emigrant railway Chicago to San Francisco, circa 1870s “Regular Ticketticket, Workingmen’s Party,” anti-Chinese broadside, 1878. “Regular Ticket Workingmen’s Party,” anti-Chinese broadside, 1878. “Unique Map California,” “Unique Map of of California,” 1888.1888. Proclamation Mayor of San Francisco, April Proclamation byby thethe Mayor of San Francisco, April 18, 1906.18, 1906. Photo-poster: Migrants Immigrants GoldtoRush Photo-poster: Migrants andand Immigrants – Gold– Rush WWII.to WW II. Photo-poster: Japanese-American Internment Camps. Photo-poster: Japanese-American Internment Camps.

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WWII HISTORY For related photo collections, see pp. 97–98

The Coming of War: 1939

Anne Frank’s World

Grades 8–12

Grades 6-12

Hitler’s rise to power, England’s failed attempt at appeasement, and other important events leading to World War II in September 1939 are portrayed and analyzed in this powerful Jackdaw. Hands-on maps, photos, official German and British documents, and Broadsheets trace Hitler’s ominous rise to power and the inevitable steps to war. Historian: Martin Gilbert. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Through personal narratives, photographs, diary pages, and other documents, this Jackdaw surveys the world outside the secret annex—the fate of Anne’s friends, the resistance and deportation of the Jews of Amsterdam, the escape of some, and the help of many in the Christian population and the betrayal by others. It follows Anne after her arrest from the Westerbork camp in Holland to the death camp Auschwitz to Bergen-Belsen, where, with her sister Margot, she perished and from where—through her famous diary—she entered world history as the personification of all the Jewish children murdered in the Holocaust and as a universal symbol of the human spirit. Historian: Robert Sugar. Mr. Sugar escaped Nazi persecution on a Kindertransport (Children’s Transport) from Vienna to Great Britain.

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Hitler’s Rise to Power Europe Watches Germany The Road to Munich Last Steps to War

Historical Documents ❖ Maps illustrating the relationship of Germany to the rest of Europe, 1919-39. ❖ A confidential report describing the meeting in May 1933 between Sir Horace Rumbold and Adolf Hitler. ❖ A booklet of pictures and quotations illustrating the spread of fascism and Hitler’s rise to power. ❖ The certificate, signed by Hitler, which accompanied the medal awarded to the British diplomat Basil Newton in commemoration of the Olympic Games held in Berlin in 1936. ❖ A handbill advertising a Mosley meeting which was handed to Randolph Churchill as he came out of a theater. ❖ Front page of the News Chronicle, September 15, 1939, announcing Chamberlain’s departure for Munich. ❖ Statement signed by Chamberlain and Hitler, September 30, 1938. ❖ A page of the Evening Standard, October 1, 1939, reporting Duff Cooper’s resignation from the government. ❖ A poster announcing the provision of gas helmets for babies. ❖ Minutes of the Cabinet meeting held on September 2, 1939, at which it was decided to issue an ultimatum to Hitler. ❖ Front page of the Daily Herald, September 4, 1939, announcing the outbreak of war.

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WWII History

For related photo collections, see p. 97

The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

Support Materials ❖ Illustrated Broadsheet Essay ❖ Timeline ❖ Critical Thinking Questions

Historical Documents ❖ Photo-poster documenting the German invasion of the Netherlands and the resistance and deportation of the Jews. ❖ Excerpts from Dora Unger’s (Scheinowitz) memoir of crossing the border to Holland. ❖ Photographs of the secret annex, including the movable bookcase that concealed the entrance. ❖ Pages from Anne Frank’s diary. ❖ Red Cross document listing the Frank family in last transport from Westerbork to Auschwitz. ❖ Photograph and profile of Miep Gies, main protector of the secret annex inhabitants. ❖ Interview with Ed Silverberg, Anne’s friend “Hello,” about his escape from Holland. ❖ Photo-poster documenting the fate of Anne, Margot, and Anne’s friends Hanneli (Lies) and Sanne.

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WWII HISTORY WW II History

For related photo collections, see p. 98

The Holocaust Grades 6–12 Students will realize the tragedy of overwhelming moral magnitude and great historical significance that was the Holocaust. The handson historical documents are powerful: the chronology from Yad Vashem, Reich Citizenship Law stripping Jews of all rights, photos of the horrors of the Holocaust, Hitler’s directive by Bormann on the “Jewish Question,” and extraordinary maps labeled with countries and numbers of Jews to be sent to death camps. This Jackdaw examines the evolution of anti-Semitism from origin to its, fatal culmination in the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question.” Historian: William Phillips. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Origins of Antisemitism Hitler and the Rise of Nazism The Final Solution The Response of the Free World The Legacy of the Holocaust

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Chronology of the Holocaust, 1933-1945. Page of Der Sturmer, radical anti-Semitic tabolid, 1938. Reinhard Heydrich directive of 21 September 1939. Letter from Herman Goering to Reinhard Heydrich on the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question.” Reich Citizenship Law proclaimed by Hitler, Sep. 1935. Newspaper accounts of Nazi terror, 1938-1942. Portions of the Wannsee protocol, Jan. 1942. Hitler’s secret directive signed by Martin Bormann, July 1943, banning discussion of the “Jewish Question.” Five maps, “The Geography of Genocide,” 1918 to 1945. Photo and invoice for Zyklon B gas used in death camps. Aerial photograph of Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp. Collection of photographs on the horrors of the Holocaust.

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WORLD HISTORY

The Development of Writing

  Grades 5–8

From man’s early attempts at communication by painting on cave walls to the variety of alphabets in use throughout the world today, the key points of the development of writing—which parallel the development of civilization—are presented in this Jackdaw’s Broadsheets and documents. Students will find the map of language and alphabet development especially informative and intriguing. Historian: Carol Donoughue. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

From man’s early attempts at communication by painting on cave walls to the variety of alphabets in use throughout the world today, the key points of the development of writing—which parallel the development of civilization—are presented in this Jackdaw’s Broadsheets and documents. Students will find the map of language and alphabet development especially informative and intriguing. Historian: Carol Donoughue, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Cave Painting and Picture Writing Sumerian and Egyptian Writing The Phoenicians, Greeks, and Romans Illuminations, Books and Paper The Impact of the Printing Press

Timeline: 20,000 B.C.–A.D. 1940 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Map showing areas where different scripts arose. Sumerian “medical” tablet. The Rosetta Stone. Detail from the tomb of Thethi. Greek letter written on papyrus. Malpas Diploma. Page from the Luttrell Psalter. Pages from The Pen’s Excellencie or The Secretaries Delight, 1618. Page from Webb’s Useful Penmanship, 1796. Page from A New Copy Book of the Small Italian Hand, 1727. Page from Edward Daniel Riches’s copy book, 1840. Poster: Other Types of Writing—Chinese, Hebrew, Arabic, Gujarati (Indian), and Russian.

Grades 8–12

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Cavemen and Picture Writing The Sumerians The Egyptians The First Alphabet The Romans Medieval Manuscripts Handwriting Since the Invention of Printing

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Map showing areas where different scripts arose. Sumerian “medical” tablet. The Rosetta Stone. Detail from the tomb of Thethi. Greek letter written on papyrus. Malpas Diploma. Page from the Luttrell Psalter. Pages from The Pen’s Excellencie or The Secretaries Delight, 1618. Page from Webb’s Useful Penmanship, 1796. Page from A New Copy Book of the Small Italian Hand, 1727. Page from Edward Daniel Riches’s copy book, 1840.

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World History

Writing: Cave Painting to Printing Presses


WORLD HISTORY

World History

Money: Denarius to Decimal

Tutankhamun & the Discovery of the Tomb

Grades 8–12 This Jackdaw shows how the first coins and tokens came into being and the peculiar range of things—shells, knives, and stones—that were used before man had a recognizable coinage. The design, minting, and forging of coins is traced from the days of Ancient Greece and Rome to Britain’s newest decimal issue, and many famous and beautiful coins are reproduced in their original size. The introduction of paper money is explained and facsimiles include notes from China, Confederate money from the time of the American Civil War, and the special Treasury issue of WWI. There are also special features on the penny, the dollar, Great Britain’s new Mint in Wales, and Britain’s changeover to the decimal system, which was first suggested, surprisingly enough, by Sir Christopher Wren in 1695. These and other items give an intriguing insight into the history of the coins in your pocket. Historian: Robin Grieve. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Beginnings of Money The Making of Money The Penny The Change to Decimals

Historical Documents ❖ A maps showing the spread of the dollar. ❖ De Monetae—an extract from the Exchequer of records of the 13th century laying down the rules for making the new solver coins. ❖ Translation of exhibit 2. ❖ Proclamation by Charles II “Making currant His Majesties Farthings and Halfpence of Copper,” 1672. ❖ Extracts from Sir Christopher Wren’s Proposall for the introduction of decimal currency, written in 1695. ❖ Front page of the Sydney Gazette, October 28th, 1804, showing the currencies of New South Wales. ❖ “Apprehension of an Extensive Gang of Coiners”—a 19th century broadsheet. ❖ Pages from the Decimal Currency Act, 1967. ❖ Christopher Ironside’s designs for Britain’s decimal coins. ❖ Picture sheet of silver coins. ❖ Picture sheet of gold coins. ❖ Paper money—notes from different countries.

Grades 6–9 This Jackdaw traces the story of the excavation, illus­trating Howard Carter’s work as an archaeologist and the enormous public interest in the discovery of the tomb. Through pictures—both full-color and black-and-white—drawings, and a hands-on model, it shows the treasures buried with the young pharaoh, and the fabulous golden shrine and coffins in which the mummy of Tutankhamun lay in its blackened bandages. A wealth of contemporary illus­trations brings to life the ancient world in which the myste­rious young pharaoh lived and died. Historian: Magnus Magnusson. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Gift of the Nile   Who Was Tutankhamun?    Burying a Pharaoh   Finding the Tomb

Historical Documents ❖ The gold-plated back panel from Tutankhamun’s throne showing the young pharaoh with his wife—printed in full-color. ❖ Page from the News of the World, April 8, 1923, reporting the death in Egypt of Lord Carnarvon. ❖ Letter from Howard Carter to his Egyptian foreman. ❖ Two of the index cards prepared by Carter with notes and drawings of the items in the tomb. ❖ A colorful poster showing some of the Tutankhamun treasures. ❖ The work of an archaeologist—illustrations showing how Carter unpacked the tomb. ❖ The wall painting from the burial chamber—printed in color. ❖ A working model of the outer shrine printed in metallic colors and ready to build. ❖ A page—printed in color—from the papyrus of Ani relating to the Egyptians’ beliefs about death. ❖ The people of Egypt—illustrations.

Reproducible Student Activities

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WORLD HISTORY

China: A Cultural Heritage

Grades 6–9 The exhibits in this Jackdaw illustrate the exotic customs and culture of the Byzantine Empire, the commercial center of the silk and spice trades. The Broadsheets emphasize this era’s preservation of the heritage of Greece and Rome during Europe’s Dark Ages. Display the Timeline of Events and List of Emperors to add historical perspective to class discussion. Historian: Adriane Ruggiero. The contents of this

Students and teachers alike will marvel at The Great Wall Chart. This six-foot long timeline illustrates in full color the dynasties of ancient China. This Jackdaw places China’s art, drama, literature, philosophy, craftsmanship, and technology in chronological perspective. Color reproductions of Chinese artistic treasures from many dynasties introduce China’s cultural heritage. Historians: Marjorie Norman and Peter Evans. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets

Broadsheets

❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Byzantine Empire: A Historical Overview A Tour of Constantinople, Imperial City The Byzantine Emperor: Chosen of God Great Lives The Art of Byzantine Diplomacy The Spread of Byzantine Civilization

List of Emperors & Timeline: 1313–1453 Exhibits ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Trade makes Byzantium rich. Coronation of an emperor. Correct protocol at the court of the Byzantine emperor. Byzantine liturgical poetry—a hymn of thanksgiving. Excerpt from the Byzantine liturgy. Hagia Sophia—Byzantium’s most important building. Monasteries—strongholds of tradition and learning. Mosaics and icons—the most famous art forms of the Byzantines. Entertainments—baths, banquets, and the races. Byzantine science, technology, and medicine. Home and family life and the lives of women. Greek and Cyrillic alphabets.

Grades 6–9

Artists, Craftsmen, Techniques, Materials Chinese Society, Dress and Behavior Literature in Poetry and Prose Search for Harmony and Tranquillity: Religion in China

Historical Documents ❖ The Great Wall Chart—6' full-color timeline of the dynasties, development, and details of China’s history. ❖ The jade burial suit of Princess Tou Wan—color photo. ❖ A copy of the Analects of Confucius dating from the T’ang dynasty. ❖ “Thatched Cottage in the Western Mountains”—a handscroll painting by T’ang Yin (1466-1524) illustrating features of Chinese painting. ❖ “Admonitions of the Instructress to the Court Ladies”—full-color details of two panels from the scroll of Ku K’ai-chi. ❖ The “gates of the ghosts”—Chinese drama with color plate. ❖ A Cultural Revolution propaganda poster, “Down with Economism!” ❖ Invention and discovery—Chinese achievement in technological development. ❖ The octagon kite—instructions for making a Chinese kite.

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World History

Byzantine Empire: A Cultural Legacy


WORLD HISTORY

World History

The World of Islam

The Middle East: The Land & Its People

Grades 6–9 Your students will benefit from this introduction to the Islamic World, which is so active in the world today with so little known to most Americans. The World of Islam reveals thirteen centuries of achievement of thought and action. Early Islamic scholars and scientists were far ahead of Europe in medicine, astronomy, and mathematics. Islamic art and literature produced beautiful and sophisticated works. This Jackdaw sets these achievements against the background of Islamic history. Hands-on exhibits introduce Mohammed, the Qur’an, Ramadan, and the spread and history of the Muslim faith. Historian: Richard Tames. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Exhibits The Prophet and the Faith—in words and pictures. The Qur’an—a color reproduction of a page from a medieval edition. The Spread of Islam—specially drawn historical maps. The Hajj pilgrimage—part of a pilgrim’s souvenir brochure. Mosques—an illustrated feature. The Cities of Islam—a survey of famous Islamic cities. The Arts of Islam—reproductions of some of Islam’s greatest treasures. Islamic Science—descriptions and illustrations of the most outstanding achievements by Muslim scientists in medicine, mathematics, optics, and astronomy. ❖ Great Lives—some of the most famous Muslim rulers, mystics, and writers. ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

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Grades 6–9 Students will learn how the Middle East was the center of civilization, the birthplace of the alphabet and the wheel, and also the birthplace of three major religions. They will realize the importance of the Middle East as oil supplier to the world. This Jackdaw, through hands-on exhibits, presents the culture and some politics of the Middle East. Students will learn about the region’s four major languages, and they will be fascinated by how and why mummies were made, by whirling dervishes, muezzins and minarets, and by regional recipes and songs. The region’s critical importance today is characterized with key historical documents on the creation of Israel and an early agreement between Yitzhak Rabin and Yasir Arafat. Historian: Adapted from a Jackdaw by Vivian Russell. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Land and the People: Historical Background Growth and Change People of the Arab World Israel

Exhibits ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Map of the Middle East. Languages of the Middle East: Arabic, Hebrew, Turkish, Persian. Songs of the Middle East: Egypt, Israel. Ancient and modern architecture. How and why mummies were made. Fabulous creatures. Whirling dervishes. Muezzins and minarets. Recipes: Middle Eastern favorites. Palestine and the creation of the State of Israel. Transcripts of letters between Yasir Arafat and Yitzhak Rabin, Norway, 1993.

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WORLD HISTORY

The Vikings

Hadrian’s Wall

Grades 8–12

Bring the Roman occupation of Britain to life in your classroom with documents depicting daily military life and the remarkable defense against the barbarians. Outstanding classroom displays include a detailed map of Roman Emperor Hadrian’s 80-mile wall, a pictorial description of building the wall, and a chart of “The Soldier’s Arms and Armour.” Historians: David and Pauline Jones. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

The Vikings’ world and their influence is explored and illustrated in this Jackdaw. Through hands-on documents, students learn about the ships the Vikings traveled in, the life they led, their culture and customs, and the art and traditions they left behind. The archaeological evidence presents a fascinating and colorful picture of these fearless adventurers. Their own sagas relate their history and exploits. Historian: Sylvie Nickels. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets

Broadsheets

❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Romans Come to Britain Building and Manning the Wall Legionaries and Auxiliaries Garrison Life on Hadrian’s Wall The History of the Wall

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Pictorial map of Hadrian’s Wall. Building the wall: a pictorial description. “The Soldier’s Arms and Armour”: an illustrated poster. Survey of Chesters, a fort on the wall. Building inscription from fort at High Rochester. Guard roster of a Roman cavalry regiment in Syria. Soldier’s discharge diploma from Malpas. Tombstone of a Roman centurion.

Reproducible Student Activities

❖ The Vikings, who and why

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Viking homelands—an illustrated map. Traders and travelers—the Viking world. They come to the British Isles. Viking sites in Britain—an illustrated poster. The death of St. Olaf—a full-color illumination from the Flateyjarbok. How the Vikings traveled. The Viking home—a reconstruction of Viking life. Beliefs and burials. Viking culture—writing and ornaments. Thralls, karls, and jarls—the Viking social structure. Clothes, customs, and cleanliness— Viking fashion and behavior.

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World History

Grades 8–12


World History

WORLD HISTORY

Alfred the Great

1066

Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

Introduce your students to a true English hero who saved 9thcentury England and Anglo-Saxon culture from Danish raiders. The richness of the Anglo-Saxon culture that Alfred fought to preserve is illustrated with documents your students will want to touch and study—pages from the Lindisfarne Gospels, a picture of the Alfred jewel, a display of coins, workable scale models of a church and a ship, and a classroom poster on warfare. Historian: David Johnson. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Give your students hands-on access to illustrated details from the Bayeux Tapestry that have led historians to a new interpretation of the Battle of Hastings. A complete before and after account of Hastings is provided, including the coronation of William the Conqueror. Display the full-color poster of Harold and the comet in class, guide your students along the 46-inch long Bayeux Tapestry depicting “The Great Battle,” and learn about castles, arms, and armor. Historian: John Langdon-Davies. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets

Broadsheets

❖ Brief account of Alfred of Wessex’s life ❖ Muddle and manuscripts: Difficulties of interpreting Alfred’s life from limited sources ❖ Under the Golden Dragon: System of raising armies and men for the navy ❖ Alfred’s England ❖ Full-time king: Alfred’s achievements

❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Historical Documents

❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

❖ Map of Anglo-Saxon England with key to present-day names. ❖ Two pages from the Lindisfarne Gospels. ❖ Four pages from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle covering some of Alfred’s battles with the Danes. ❖ Translation of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle on Alfred’s reign. ❖ The treaty between Alfred and Guthrum in which Alfred extends the boundaries of Wessex. ❖ Alfred’s introduction to his translation of “Cura Pasoralis.” ❖ Translation of “Cura Pasoralis” with word-for-word gloss of the first page. ❖ Picture sheet of Anglo-Saxon coins from the time of Alfred. ❖ Anglo-Saxon art and architecture. ❖ The Alfred jewel. ❖ he Anglo-Saxon wall painting excavated at Winchester. ❖ Model of the church of St. Lawrence, Bradford-upon-Avon. ❖ Model of an Anglo-Saxon ship. ❖ Anglo-Saxon warfare—a picture sheet. ❖ Study Guide / Lesson Plan–Reproducible Activities

Normans and Some Others Contenders for the Throne Spring and Summer, 1066 What Actually Happened October 14, 1066 After Hastings

Historical Documents Pages on 1066 from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Harold and the comet of 1066 from the Bayeux Tapestry. The Great Battle: a plan, and details from the Bayeux Tapestry. A charter with the sign manual of William I. The first known painting of the Battle of Hastings. Arms and armor. The Norman castle in pictures. Saxon and Norman architecture. A kite-standard based on Harold’s dragon standard.

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WORLD HISTORY

The Crusades

Grades 8–12

Grades 6–9

John, King of England, was forced to meet his barons. Their quarrels had reached such a state that the barons were determined to make war on their king unless he signed a promise not to interfere with them, nor to ask them for more money and services than the law and custom allowed. The document he sealed was called Magna Carta, The Great Charter. The Magna Carta seems even more important today than it did in 1215. It has gained importance because those who have fought for liberty and justice against bad rulers have used it as an argument for their causes. The Magna Carta is a foundation stone of our idea of justice and the rule of law. Historian: John Langdon-Davies. The

In May 2001, Pope John Paul II formally apologized to the Archbishop of the Eastern Orthodox Church for the sacking of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade. Use these documents and Broadsheets to study the Crusades and their lasting impact in Europe and the Middle East. Discuss the Pope’s apology to demonstrate the continuity of history and current consequences resulting from events that occurred centuries ago. The exhibits allow you to travel the routes of the Crusades and learn about the key persons involved. Historian: Adriane Ruggiero. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

King John (1167-1216) Barons and Feudal Lords Magna Carta: What It Was, and Was Not The Signing of Magna Carta King John and History England in 1215

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Facsimile of Magna Carta from Lincoln Cathedral. Translation of Magna Carta. Facsimile of a Charter Roll, 1199. Facsimile of a Pipe Roll, 1130. Two pages from a Bestiary of the late 12th century. King John’s tomb in Worcester Cathedral (photographs). Color poster of the Royal Standard from King John’s reign to the present day. Costumes at the time of King John. Sketch map explaining the story of how King John lost his treasure in the Wash.

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Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Idea of Crusade Takes Hold The First and Second Crusades—A Contrast Muslim Leaders Take the Offensive and Europe Responds Later Crusades

Who’s Who & Timeline: 1095–1453 Exhibits ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Pope Urban II calls forth the First Crusade. A description of Peter the Hermit. A Byzantine princess remembers a Crusader. Medieval manuscript page: Siege of Antioch. The Siege of Jerusalem. Taxes of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Latins in the East. A negative view of the Crusade. The Fourth Crusade and the Sack of Constantinople. The Battle of Hittin. Routes of the Crusaders. Jerusalem at the time of the Crusades. Medieval manuscript page: Muslims entering al-Mansura.

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71

World History

Magna Carta


WORLD HISTORY

World History

Black Death: The Plague

The Black Death

Grades 6–7 Dramatic documents will add to your students’ fascination with this subject. When they see the “Plague Banner” and “Dance of Death” posters, you will have their full attention. Use the Broadsheets to add perspective and understanding of the religious beliefs and historical significance of the bubonic plague in 14th-century Europe. Historian: E.R. Chamberlin, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Plague Reaches Europe Trying to Defeat the Plague The Church and the Plague The Rebirth

Timeline: 1542–1665 Map: The Path of the Plague, 1347–1350 Historical Documents Illumination from a 15th-century Book of Hours. 14th-century Inquisition Writ. 14th-century report on an Inquisition. The Lübeck “Dance of Death.” Plague banner. Pages from A passing gode lityll boke necessarye & behoveful agenst the Pestilence. ❖ Engraving from Johan de Ketham’s Fasciculo Medicinae. ❖ Two plague crosses. ❖ Poster: The Artist as Witness. ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Grades 8–12 Dramatic documents will add to your students’ fascination with this subject. When they see the “Plague Banner” and “Dance of Death” posters, you will have their full attention. Broadsheets add perspective and understanding of the religious beliefs and historical significance of the bubonic plague in 14th-century Europe. Historian: E. R. Chamberlin. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Path of the Plague Diagnosis Rules and Regulations The Dance of Death The Witnesses The Economic Effect

Historical Documents Illumination from a 15th-century Book of Hours. 14th-century Inquisition Writ. 14th-century report on an Inquisition. The Lübeck “Dance of Death.” Plague banner. Pages from A passing gode lityll boke necessarye & behoveful agenst the Pestilence. ❖ Engraving from Johan de Ketham’s Fasciculo Medicinae. ❖ Two plague crosses. ❖ Poster: The Artist as Witness. ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Reproducible Student Activities

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WORLD HISTORY

The Peasants’ Revolt Students will be intrigued with this account of the first popular revolution, led by John Ball and Wat Tyler. At the beginning of the 14th century, the Black Death had killed more than a third of the population of England, and for the first time the peasants became people of value, for manpower was very short. It was the beginning of the end for the feudal system, but the nobility was determined to suppress any democratic rising and did so ruthlessly. The story is told from primary sources of contemporary chronicles and poetry. Historian: Douglas Hill. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Peasant’s Lot Suppression by the Law Rebellion The Revolt Spreads The Nobles Strike Back

Historical Document­s ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Page from psalter showing peasants working. Page from manuscript of Piers Plowman. Extract from Court Roll for 1373. Costume of peasants and nobility, with the statute of 1363 concerning apparel. John Ball’s sermon from the Chronicon Angliae, with an illustration of Ball preaching. The death of Wat Tyler, an illustration from Froissart’s Chroniques. Poem on the death of Jack Straw. Map showing the main areas of rebellion and plan of contemporary London.

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Grades 5–8 Explore the world of Marco Polo, the first European to travel clear across Asia and all through China, and describe sights, inventions, peoples, and cities never written about before. The life and adventures of this remarkable man, as well as the historical impact of his controversial book, The Travels of Marco Polo, are examined through eight intriguing primary source documents, including panels from the fourteenth-century Catalan Atlas, reproduced in full color; a Mongol passport; reproductions of paintings depicting scenes from Polo’s journey; pages from early printed editions of Polo’s book, including one with notations by Christopher Columbus; and Polo’s last will. Historian: Robert Sugar. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature: Support Materials ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustrated Broadsheet Essay Timeline Critical Thinking Questions Recommended Reading List

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

French miniature depicting Polo’s departure from Venice, 1400. Mongol passport, Yuan Dynasty, 1260-1368. Chinese handscroll of the city of Kinsai, Ming Dynasty, 1368-1644. Fourteenth-century Persian illustration of a Mongol siege catapult. Title page from the first printed edition of The Travels of Marco Polo, 1477. The Catalan Atlas, c. 1375, and “The Story of the Catalan Atlas.” Marco Polo’s last will, 1323. Page from the Latin edition of The Travels of Marco Polo, c. 1485, with notations by Christopher Columbus.

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World History

Marco Polo and His Journey to China

Grades 8–12


WORLD HISTORY

World History

Silk Road

The Conquest of Mexico

Grades 5–8 With this Jackdaw, students will learn what it was like to travel and trade along the Silk Road—a 5,000 mile-long route over unmarked desert tracks and the highest mountains in the world—which served as the main highway between China and the West from the 1st century B.C. to the 14th century A.D. Using an enchanting narrative style that is certain to engage students, the Broadsheet and exhibits describe how and why the Silk Road began, why silk was so mysterious and so valuable, the excitement and dangers of caravan life, the importance of spices, the languages Silk Road merchants used to communicate, and the astonishing variety of goods, inventions, and ideas that were exchanged between the vastly different worlds of China and the West. Historian: Robert Sugar. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Silk Road Silk: The Great Secret Technology Travels the Silk Road The Languages of the Silk Road

Timeline: 3200 B.C. to A.D. 1497 Exhibits ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Map: Silk Road routes and goods traded. Life cycle of the silkworm. Caravans. Excerpts from Chapter II of Pegolotti’s merchant handbook (Pratica della

Mercatura). ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Spices. Lost mail on the Silk Road: A Sogdian letter. Constantinople. Technology. Marco Polo: from Venice to the Silk Road. The Catalan Atlas, c. 1375, and “The Story of the Catalan Atlas.” Decorative plate depicting Silk Road caravan scene.

Grades 8–12 Share one of history’s most exciting and improbable true adventures with your students—the conquest of the mighty Aztec Empire by Cortés and his small army. In the savage battles, which gained the Aztec Empire for Spain, Cortés and his followers destroyed a magnifi­ cent ancient civilization. This Jackdaw presents the evidence of that civilization and describes the way in which it met its end. Your students will be intrigued by “Cortés’ plan of Tenochititlan” and other hands-on documents. Historian: Irene Nicholson. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Two Cultures Mingle Ancient Mexican Civilization Cortés Scales the Mountains The Spaniards Defeated Cortés Fights Back Aftermath

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Pages from the Codex Laud, Mexican folding book. Songs from the Florentine Codex. Dürer engraving of Hernán Cortés’ plan of Tenochtitlán. Poster: Mexican gods and temples. Pages from the Codex Mendoza manuscript. Pages from the Lienzo de Tlaxcala manuscript. Page from Díaz del Castillo’s True History of the Conquest of New Spain. Pages of letter from Hernán Cortés to Emperor Charles V. Maya stone lintel depicting a religious penance.

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WORLD HISTORY

Cortés and the Aztecs

Incas: A Cultural History

Share one of history’s most exciting and improbable true adventures with your students—the conquest of the mighty Aztec Empire by Cortés and his small army. In the savage battles, which gained the Aztec Empire for Spain, Cortés and his followers destroyed a magnifi­ cent ancient civilization. This Jackdaw presents the evidence of that civilization and describes the way in which it met its end. Your students will be intrigued by “Cortés’ plan of Tenochititlan” and other hands-on documents. Historian: Irene Nicholson, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Two Leaders Welcome Quetzalcoatl The Peace Ends The Spanish Try Again

Timeline: 1485–1547 Map: Hernán Cortés Expeditions—1519–1535 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Pages from the Codex Laud, Mexican folding book. Songs from the Florentine Codex. Dürer engraving of Hernán Cortés’ plan of Tenochtitlán. Poster: Mexican gods and temples. Pages from the Codex Mendoza manuscript. Pages from the Lienzo de Tlaxcala manuscript. Page from Díaz del Castillo’s True History of the Conquest of New Spain. Pages of letter from Hernán Cortés to Emperor Charles V. Maya stone lintel depicting a religious penance. Illustrations showing instructions given to Mexican children.

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Grades 6–9 This Jackdaw offers students a profile of one of the greatest empires ever developed from its origin to its conquest by a small army of Spaniards. Students will look into the Incas’ culture, government, religion, and amazing social and physical achievements. Hands-on documents describe the intricate Inca road system, which rivaled that of the Romans, and the remarkable Inca courier communication network that linked their vast empire, which ranged from southern Chile to Colombia, 3,200 miles north. A full-color photo-poster of spectacular Machu Pichu will further spark your students’ interest, as will a large poster of Inca artifacts, ready for classroom display, and the story of Kon Tiki’s significant voyage and impact on Inca history. Historian: David A. Urias. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Incas: An Introduction Birth of the Incas The People Society and Religion Achievements of the Incas Art and Architecture Conquest of an Empire

Glossary of Broadsheet Terms Timeline: 30,000 B.C. to A.D. 1542 Chronology of the Inca Dynasty: c. A.D. 1200–1549 Exhibits ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Map: distribution of pre-Inca cultures. Inca architecture: cyclopean buildings, megalithic stones. Map and photos: Inca road system. Recordkeeping: the quipu. Communications: chasquis and tambos. Poster: Pre-Inca and Inca Art. Inti Raymi: Festival of the Sun. Photo essay: Machu Picchu. Paper confirming the conquest of Peru. Kon-Tiki: the Peru/Polynesia connection.

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World History

Grades 5–8


World History

WORLD HISTORY

Columbus & Explorers Come to the New World

Columbus & the Age of Explorers

Grades 5–8

This Jackdaw sheds new light on Columbus the entrepreneur, the native peoples that he and others encountered, and prior European explorations of the North American continent. Through the historian’s revealing perspective on the explorers’ contacts and their encounters and relationships with the natives, students studying both history and geography, using the maps and other documents, will gain a fresh view of the age of exploration. Historian: Louis De Vorsey, Jr. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

This Jackdaw sheds new light on Columbus the entrepreneur, the native peoples that he and others encountered, and prior European explorations of the North American continent. Through the historian’s revealing perspective on the explorers’ contacts and their encounters and relationships with the natives, students studying both history and geography, using the maps and other documents, will gain a fresh view of the age of exploration. Historian: Louis De Vorsey, Jr., adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The World in 1492 Columbus Sets Sail Europe’s First Explorers Naming the New World

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustration from Topographia Christiana by Cosmas of Alexandria. Portrait of Christopher Columbus by Laurens Lotto, 1512. Martin Behaim’s globe gores. The first engraving of Martin Behaim’s world map, 1730. “Oecumene” of Claudius Ptolemy, 1482. World map engraved for Giuseppe Rosaccio, c. 1610. Engraving by Theodor de Bry from Americae pars quarta. Map of America engraved by Cornelius de Jode, 1593. Suma de Geografia, Martin Fernandez de Encisco, 1519. Map of the Aztec capital Tenochtitlán, 1521. Reproduction of Yale Vinland Map. Page from 13th-century manuscript Icelandic Saga. Champlain’s chart of the Gulf of Maine in full color. Reproduction of Martin Waldseemuller’s map.

Grades 8–12

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Columbus’ World and Enterprise Contacts, Encounters, Relationships Encounters Before Columbus Naming America

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Illustration from Topographia Christiana by Cosmas of Alexandria. Portrait of Christopher Columbus by Laurens Lotto, 1512. Martin Behaim’s globe gores. The first engraving of Martin Behaim’s world map, 1730. “Oecumene” of Claudius Ptolemy, 1482. World map engraved for Giuseppe Rosaccio, c. 1610. Engraving by Theodor de Bry from Americae pars quarta. Map of America engraved by Cornelius de Jode, 1593. Suma de Geografia, Martin Fernandez de Encisco, 1519. Map of the Aztec capital Tenochtitlán, 1521. Reproduction of Yale Vinland Map. Page from 13th-century manuscript Icelandic Saga. Champlain’s chart of the Gulf of Maine in full color. Reproduction of Martin Waldseemuller’s map.

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WORLD HISTORY

Elizabeth I

Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

The impact of the Reformation, which brought an end to the unity of Catholic Christendom, is still felt in our own time. Luther’s teachings and writings radically altered the course of religious and secular history. This Jackdaw outlines and illustrates his life, examines the development of his thoughts and ideas, and describes the events and personalities most closely involved with the crisis his teaching provoked. Historian: E. R. Chamberlin. The contents of this Jackdaw

This Jackdaw examines Elizabeth’s intelligence, energy, and influence in governing England and in conducting affairs of State and diplomacy. Students will use replicas of rare documents only to be found in British museums—such as Elizabeth’s handwritten letter to Queen Mary and her handwritten speech to Parliament—to study in depth this unique monarch and learn the details of Elizabeth’s life from childhood to girlhood, as Elizabeth the Queen, and through her conflict with Mary, Queen of Scots. Students will further be intrigued by the poster featuring portraits of and quotations about Elizabeth, and they will see how her leadership and insight were evident in colonization throughout the world. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Luther’s World Martin Luther The Sale of Indulgences The Diet of Worms The Reformation Spreads The Counter-Reformation

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

A copy of Luther’s Ninety-five Theses, 1541. Translation of Ninety-five Theses. Portrait of Martin Luther, painted by Lucas Cranach, in 1526. A Reformation woodcut satirizing the nature of the Church. A letter of safe conduct issued to Luther by Charles V to enable him to attend the Diet of Worms. Pages from Lucas Cranach’s Passional. The first and last pages of the agreement signed at the Marburg Colloquy. A handbill attacking John Calvin. A page from an early Lutheran hymnbook, 1533. True and false religion, a full-color woodcut by Cranach, c. 1545.

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Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Childhood Girlhood Elizabeth the Queen Marriage Mary Queen of Scots Old Age

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Letter from Lady Bryan to Secretary of State Thomas Cromwell, 1536. Letter from Princess Elizabeth to the Lord Protector, 1549. Letter written by Elizabeth on her way to the Tower to Queen Mary, 1554. Pen and ink drawing of Elizabeth’s coronation progress. Draft for a speech to Parliament on the Succession, 1567. Part of an inventory of Elizabeth’s jewels, 1570. Pages from a pamphlet revealing details of plots on Elizabeth’s life. Warrant for the execution of the Earl of Essex. Ballad on the death of Queen Elizabeth. Funeral roll showing Elizabeth’s coffin in procession. Selection of portraits of Elizabeth.

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77

World History

Martin Luther


WORLD HISTORY

The North-West Passage

World History

Drake and the Golden Hinde Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

This Jackdaw recounts Drake’s life from his youth sailing on Henry VIII’s ships through his flamboyant naval career to his death from dysentery in 1596. Hands-on documents bring Drake’s voyages alive— plans of galleons, nautical charts, and routes of the “sea dogs” and a replica of Drake’s 1579 brass plate found, amazingly, in San Francisco in the 1930s. Then there’s all about life aboard the Golden Hinde, and the fears and superstitions of 16th-century seamen. The defeat of the Spanish Armada is shown on a full-color poster. Finally, learn about building and sailing a modern-day Golden Hinde. Historian: Robert Lacey. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

It is believed that Greek explorers were the first to sail to islands in the far north, c.300 B.C. Europeans thought the north was completely covered by ice until the 1400s, when John Cabot suggested there must be a direct link from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean via a route that became known as the North-West Passage. During the 16th century, Europeans began to investigate a passage in the northwest that would provide a convenient, safe sea route to the Orient. Known routes, far south, around Cape Horn and the Cape of Good Hope were open to attacks from sea powers—Spain, Portugal—operating in those waters. The search for a north-west passage lasted over 300 years and exposed seamen to some of the worst weather conditions in the world. Many explorers lost their lives from sickness, starvation, and sometimes from attack by Natives living in the region. This Jackdaw, with Broadsheet essays and through facsimiles of historic maps and charts, as well as highly relevant documents, tells the story of the search for the North-West Passage. Historian: Richard Howard. The

Historical Documents Sir Francis Drake—the man. Drake’s men o’war: how the galleons were built. The Golden Hinde reborn. The World as it was imagined before Drake sailed around it. Perils of the deep: the sea-monsters Drake’s seamen feared. Life on board. Plan for Drake’s voyage of 1577 and part of the treasure list on return in 1580. Drake’s circumnavigation depicted on a contemporary map. Francis Drake, empire builder: Drake’s plate of brass. “The Master Thief of the Unknown World.” Drake’s backers and colleagues, and a modern map comparing his voyage to those of Magellan and Cavendish. ❖ “Singeing the King of Spain’s beard.” Chart Drake used when he raided Cadiz in 1587, pictures of the Spanish Armada. ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Study Guide / Lesson Plans – Reproducible Activities Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6166-0—$92.67/$69.50

contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Passage to Cataia A Fool’s Errand By Sun & Moon Into the Bay Maps & Bearings

Historical Exhibits ❖ Northwest section of the globe by Gemma Frisius, 1527. ❖ John White’s painting of Frobisher’s party attacked by Eskimos, 1577. ❖ Map of archipelago of “Meta Incognita” from George Best’s True Discourse, 1578. ❖ Map inscription written by Dr. John See for Queen Elizabeth, 1577. ❖ Letters from John Davis to Francis Walsingham reporting on first northwest expedition, Oct. 3, 1585. ❖ A new version of the map of the world by Edward Wright, 1599. ❖ Hessel Gerrtiz’s Printed version of Henry Hudson’s chart, 1612. ❖ Ships of the Sea Dogs: illustrations of ships and ship construction. ❖ James Robin’s drawing of route map for search of North-West Passage, 1576-1631,

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WORLD HISTORY

Young Shakespeare

Shakespeare’s World and the Theatre

Bring Shakespeare to life for your students with this account of his boyhood and the places and events that were influential in his development. Seven Broadsheets and seven documents will help students’ knowledge grow as they travel with young Shakespeare from home to school and London. Historian: John Langdon-Davies. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Home School Shakespeare Learns to Write Heroes Books Games Young Shakespeare Goes to London

Historical Documents

Grades 5–8 This fascinating Jackdaw focuses on the Elizabethan theatre itself— The Globe, the Fortune, the Hope—through an array of historical documents that includes a royal proclamation on the licensing of performances, a costume inventory for the Admiral’s Company, pages from the First Folio editions, and a conjectural model of an Elizabethan playhouse. Shakespeare is presented in terms of his life story, his colleagues, and patrons. This Jackdaw is an ideal introduction, or companion, to the study of Shakespeare’s plays. Historian: Howard Loxton, adapted by Muriel L. Dubois. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

A History of English Theatre The Search for a Permanent Theatre The King’s Men Theatre in Shakespeare’s Time

❖ Engraving of football as it was played in Italy in the 16th century. ❖ Page from Holinshed’s Chronicle, 1577, illustrating the source of Shakespeare’s Macbeth. ❖ John Norden’s maps of London and Westminster, 1593. ❖ Composite photograph of Elizabethan buildings known to Shakespeare. ❖ Page from The Book of Sir Thomas More, thought to be in Shakespeare’s own hand. ❖ Engraving of Shakespeare by Droeshout from the First Folio of 1623. ❖ Examples of contemporary handwriting and writing-books.

Timeline: 1564–1623

Reproducible Student Activities

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Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6139-4 — $92.67/$69.50

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Proclamation against “al maner Iterludes,” 1559. Pages from A Groatsworth of Wit bought with a Million of Repentance, 1592. The Revells Book, 1605. Pages from First Folio editions, 1623. Contract for building the Fortune Theatre, 1599. Transcript of contract for building the Fortune Theatre together with transcript of a contract for building the Hope Theatre, 1613. Poster: “The Development of the Theatre.” Conjectural model of an Elizabethan playhouse. Inventory of costumes owned by the Admiral’s Company, c. 1598. Transcript of a property list for the Admiral’s Company, c. 1598. Platt of the Secounde Parte of the Seven Deadlie Sinns, 1591–1592. “The Players: A Portrait Gallery.”

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World History

Grades 8–12


WORLD HISTORY

Cromwell’s Commonwealth and Protectorate

World History

Shakespeare’s Theatre   Grades 8–12 This fascinating Jackdaw focuses on the Elizabethan theatre itself— The Globe, the Fortune, the Hope—through an array of historical documents that includes a royal proclamation on the licensing of performances, a costume inventory for the Admiral’s Company, pages from the First Folio editions, and a conjectural model of an Elizabethan playhouse. Shakespeare is presented in terms of his life story, his colleagues, and patrons. This Jackdaw is an ideal introduction, or companion, to the study of Shakespeare’s plays. Challenge your students to find lines and scenes in the plays that reflect writing for these theater buildings and for contemporary staging and actors. Historian: Howard Loxton. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Elizabethan Theatre The Chamberlain’s Men and the Globe Theatre The King’s Men and a Private Theatre What Was a Performance Like?

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Proclamation against “al maner Iterludes,” 1559. Pages from A Groatsworth of Wit bought with a Million of Repentance, 1592. The Revells Booke, 1605. Pages from First Folio editions, 1623. Contract for building the Fortune Theatre, 1599. Transcript of contract for building the Fortune Theatre together with transcript of a contract for building the Hope Theatre, 1613. Poster: “The Development of the Theatre.” Conjectural model of an Elizabethan playhouse. Inventory of costumes owned by the Admiral’s Company, c. 1598. Transcript of a property list for the Admiral’s Company, c. 1598.

Reproducible Student Activities

Grades 8–12 Your students will respond to this hands-on history presentation of the execution of a reigning king and the plotting and intrigues surrounding Cromwell’s Commonwealth. Letters to and from Oliver Cromwell, a contemporary ballad sheet, and journal pages from the House of Commons recreate these exciting events. Historian: John Langdon-Davies. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The “Cruel Necessity” and After The Protectorate Honest John John Milton Ireland and Scotland Abroad The End of It All

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Cromwell trampling on Error and Faction—an engraving. Letter to Cromwell from John Lilburne and Richard Overton, 1649. “Strange Predictions”—a contemporary ballad sheet. Pages from the journal of the House of Commons recording the dismissal of the Long Parliament. Letter from Oliver Cromwell to Praise-God Barebone. Petition from John Milton to Commissioners for Sequestration. “A Looking-Glasse for a Drunkard”—a broadside. Dr. Dorislaw’s Ghost, Presented by Time to un-mask the Vizards of the Hollanders—a broadside. “A List of all the Victories, and successful Achievements of the Parliament’s fleet”—a broadside. Royalist playing cards satirizing the Commonwealth and leaders.

Study Guide / Lesson Plan – Reproducible Activities

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WORLD HISTORY

The Plague & Fire of London

The Spanish Inquisition Grades 8–12

Students will witness, through documents and Broadsheets, two calamitous events in the middle of the 17th cen­tury—the Plague in 1665 and the Great Fire in 1666—which changed the City of London more rapidly than any other period in history. This Jackdaw recalls the horror and calamity of those years with eyewitness accounts and an examination of the legends that grew out of the turmoil. Historian: John Langdon-Davies. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Historical documents help your students explore the attitudes and conditions of the Spanish Inquisition in Europe during the Middle Ages. This Jackdaw discusses a classic example of religious intolerance and the abuse of power with terrible consequences for the victims. It provides a basis for class study on similar instances of abuse throughout history. Historian: John Langdon-Davies. The

Broadsheets

Broadsheets

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The Plague Hits Old London How They Fought the Plague Fleas and Plague Pepys and the Plague The Fire Begins The End of It All

contents of this Jackdaw feature: ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

What Was the Inquisition? The Spanish Inquisition How the Spanish Inquisition Worked Who Were the Victims? Auto de Fe The Spanish Inquisition and Witchcraft

Historical Documents

Historical Documents

❖ A letter from a Cambridge undergraduate, July 18, 1665, describing London during the Plague. ❖ A Bill of Mortality. ❖ A page in code from Pepys’s diary and an explanation of the code. ❖ Wenceslaus Hollar’s picture of London before and after the Fire. ❖ The Orders conceived and published by the Lord Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London, concerning the Infection of the Plague. ❖ Portrait of Samuel Pepys by John Hayls—it is referred to in Pepys’s diary.

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A procession to an auto de fe. Engraving. Description of an auto de fe at Toledo in 1692 with a list of the condemned. The festive auto de fe at Madrid in 1680. Engraving. Designs for the ritual robes of the condemned. Engravings. Engravings from Francisco Goya’s Caprichos. An Edict of Faith issued in Valencia in 1512. A bond, written by a nun, making a pact with the Devil. “The Loyal Martyrs,” an English ballad sheet.

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World History

Grades 8–12


WORLD HISTORY

The French Revolution

World History

Joan of Arc Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

Students will be intrigued by this up-close study of the charismatic, controversial maiden who inspired a nation. Her life and character, as well as the attitudes and world of her contemporaries, come to life through the historical documents. Historian: Kathrine Sorley Walker.

This Jackdaw effectively teaches the story of the Revolution from events leading up to the storming of the Bastille by the people of Paris to the complicated government and terror of the “Revolutionary Tribunal” that followed. Hands-on replicas of key historical documents—eyewitness accounts, London newspaper reports, copies and translations of “The Declaration of Rights” and “Law of Suspects,” and even a poster with grisly details of “La Guillotine” and the fate of Louis XVI—transport students back to France during this turbulent time. Historian: Robert Lacey. The contents of this Jackdaw

The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Domremy The Voices of the Mission The Siege of Orleans Coronation at Rheims Prison and Trial A Saint or a Witch ... Restoring a Reputation

Historical Documents ❖ Letter signed by Joan of Arc. ❖ Triptych of three miniatures: Siege of Orleans, portrait of Joan in armor, the coronation of Charles VII. ❖ Pictorial map showing the division of France and places associated with Joan. ❖ Display illustrating arms and armor of the period. ❖ Page from the trial record bearing margin note, “responsio superba.” ❖ Letter from Bedford to Henry VI describing the siege of Orleans. ❖ Page from Holinshed describing Joan. ❖ Portraits of Joan’s friends and enemies: Charles VII, Duke of Bedford, Earl of Warwick, Dunois, Cauchon.

Reproducible Student Activities

feature:

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The “Ancien Régime”: the situation in France prior to storming the Bastille. A chronology with quotes from eyewitnesses. Letter from the Marquis of Breze to the Third Estate. An account from the London Chronicle of July 21 to 23, 1789. The Bastille: a contemporary plan, illustrations, and eyewitness accounts of its fall. Pages from The Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, November 3, 1789. Voting list on Louis XVI’s death, including the signatures of Robespierre, Danton, Marat, Desmoulins, David and Thomas Paine, with comments. Poster: “Massacre of French King,” published in England, 1793. Decree of the National Convention instituting “Law of Suspects,” September, 1793. Portrait gallery.

Reproducible Student Activities

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WORLD HISTORY

Charles Dickens: 1812-1870

The Rise of Napoleon

Grades 8–12

Acquaint your students with the real Napoleon, one of the most fascinating and influential figures in history. Seven Broadsheets trace his blazing career from humble Corsican birth to his rise to self-proclaimed Emperor of France to exile and then his return to power. Newspaper accounts, correspondence, sketches, portraits, and letters provide reality to this sweeping saga. Historian: Robert Lacey. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

The harsh conditions of Dickens’ childhood laid out in this Jackdaw will add immeasurably to your students understanding of his novels and his lifelong activity as a social reformer. The hands-on documents chronicle Dickens’ rise from poverty to office boy, novelist, actor, journalist, and worldwide acclaim. When students touch and read these replicas of historical documents—pages from The Pickwick Papers, a newspaper report on “The Great Boz Ball,” and a plan for David Copperfield—they will find themselves carried back to Dickens’ domain. Historian: Ivor Brown. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Early Years Life Under the Directory Napoleon Seizes Power From Consul to Emperor The Man and His Letters Napoleon the Military Genius Napoleon the Tyrant

Timeline: 1769–1804 Historical Documents

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Charles Dickens The Man with a Pen Crime and Punishment Hard Times In America The Actor

Historical Documents

❖ Earliest surviving portrait of Napoleon, sketch, 1785. ❖ Note from Napoleon to Gen. Carteaux, Siege of Toulon, 1793. ❖ Page from the Treaty of Campo Formio, Napoleon negotiated, 1797. ❖ “The Siege of Acre,” 1799—rare battle sketch by Napoleon. ❖ The Times, June 1, 1799, reporting setbacks for French forces in Europe. Reports prompted Napoleon’s return from Egypt. ❖ Coup d’etat of Brumaire, Nov. 1799. ❖ Stern letter from Napoleon to the French royal family. ❖ Napoleon becomes Consul for Life, 1802—voting list from the Prefecture of the Seine. ❖ “Napoleon becomes Emperor”—sketch by Louis David for painting of coronation of Dec. 2, 1804. ❖ Leaf of a fan depicting schemes for crossing the Channel to invade and defeat Britain. ❖ The Legion of Honour—decree bestowing orders on leading artists of Napoleon’s Empire.

❖ Note to A. Thomas Esq., written when Dickens was at Wellington House Academy. ❖ The Pickwick Papers, pages from the original part publication with illustrations by Robert Seymour. ❖ Mr. Shaw’s business card, advertising the original of Dotheboys Hall. ❖ The Great Boz Ball, as reported in the New York press, 1842. ❖ Portrait sketch of Charles Dickens by George Cruikshank. ❖ A letter from Dickens to his publishers, Bradbury & Evans. ❖ Letter on capital punishment for publication in the Daily News. ❖ The chapter plan for an issue of David Copperfield. ❖ Page from the manuscript of David Copperfield. ❖ Pages from Household Words with proof corrections to Hard Times. ❖ Program for Every Man in His Humour with a sketch of Dickens in his role by David Maclise. ❖ Dickens’ design for the lectern made for his readings. ❖ A ticket for a reading by Charles Dickens. ❖ A letter from Dickens to his sister-in-law, Georgina Hogarth.

Reproducible Student Activities

Study Guide / Lesson Plan – Reproducible Activities

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World History

Grades 8–12


WORLD HISTORY

Assassination at Sarajevo

World History

The Brontës Grades 8–12

Grades 8–12

Many of your students will relate personally to this Jackdaw. The wild and passionate world created by the Brontës reflected not only the landscape of the moors but intense emotions for which their lonely and remote lives provided little other outlet. At an early age, the Brontë girls, Emily, Anne, Charlotte, and their brother, Branwell, created a fantasy world called Angria, which became an important part of their lives. Through hands-on replicas of personal letters and diaries, and pages from their manuscripts, the life of this extraordinary and talented family is presented as only Jackdaw documents can do. Historian: Phyllis Bentley. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

On June 28, 1914, a young man named Gavrilo Princip stood on Grebet Street in the Bosnian city of Sarajevo and aimed a pistol at an automobile that carried His Imperial and Royal Highness Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Princip’s shot, which killed the Archduke, was heard around the world, for it set in motion a series of events that plunged the great powers of Europe into World War I. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Parentage Childhood Education Literary Life Solitude and Society Marriage and Death

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Pages from the History of the Young Men by Charlotte Brontë. Diary paper written by Emily and Anne Brontë, June 1837. Page from the manuscript of Jane Eyre. Extract from review of Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre in the “Quarterly Review,” 1847. Letter from Anne Brontë to Ellen Nussey, written a month before Anne died of tuberculosis. Manuscript poem by Emily Brontë, “Cold in the Earth.” Letter from Charlotte to her publishers describing the death of Emily. Letter from Charlotte to Ellen Nussey describing a walk taken with her husband. A picture sheet of the Brontë family.

Study Guide/Lesson Plan – Reproducible Activities Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6114-1—$92.67/$69.50

Broadsheet Essays ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Assassination at Sarajevo The Victims The Assassins Ultimatum Europe’s Reaction The British Reaction

Historical Documents ❖ Photographs of the events of June 28, 1914, in Sarajevo. ❖ Photograph of Gavrilo Princip and his fellow conspirators at trial ❖ Declaration of war by Austria on Serbia, as transmitted by telegram (with English translation). ❖ Typewritten letter, in Serbo-Croatian, from condemned conspirator Veljko Cubrilovic to his young daughter (with English translation). ❖ Full-page Neutrality League advertisement from the Manchester Guardian, August 4, 1914. ❖ Selection of press clippings from British newspapers regarding outbreak of war, August 1914. ❖ Part of handwritten draft of telegram sent by British foreign secretary to British ambassador to Austria in response to Austria’s declaration of war on Serbia. ❖ Handwritten minutes of meeting of British foreign office in response to the crisis, July 25, 1914. ❖ Handwritten note of British diplomat to British foreign secretary, July 27, 1914, regarding Serbia’s response to Austria’s ultimatum. ❖ English translation of message of Germany’s chancellor to German ambassador to Britain announcing that Germany is now at war with France, August 3, 1914.

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WORLD HISTORY

The Easter Rising: Dublin 1916

The Russian Revolution

Since the 1600s Ireland has been colonized, much to their disliking, by the English. Students will learn about the Irish-English problem and what happened in 1916 to eventually change the map of Ireland. This Jackdaw relates the days of Sinn Fein’s armed uprising in Ireland with hands-on historical documents including newspaper pages, personal notes, posters, an illustrated diary of events, and even actual-size replicas of raffle tickets. It thoroughly acquaints students with the background leading up to the Rising and chronicles the fight for independence into the 1920s. Historian: Anthony Comerford. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Irish Problem Men and Movements Years of Crisis Patriots and Legends The Rising The Aftermath

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Recruiting poster for the Fianna Eireann, 1914. Letter: Francis Skeffington to Thomas MacDonagh, May 1915. Ticket for raffle in aid of Irish Volunteers’ Equipment Fund. The Proclamation of the Irish Republic, put out “on behalf of the Provisional Government” on April 24, 1916. Order from Commandant-General James Connolly. The Irish War News, Vol. I, No. 1, issued by the rebels, 1916. Surrender signed by the leaders of the rising, April 29, 1916. Pages from the Irish Independent, April 26 to May 4, 1916. Appeal drafted by Eamon DeValera “To the President and Congress of the United States,” June 18, 1917. Sinn Fein manifesto for the 1918 General Election: censored and uncensored versions. Easter Week: a pictorial diary of events.

Grades 8–12 With this Jackdaw you can teach your students about Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin and the violence that brought the Communists to power in Russia. The interesting hands-on documents—such as Lenin’s own handwritten resolution proposing an armed uprising—and Broadsheets will help students understand the major events that led to the creation of the USSR. Historian: Anthony Cash. The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The February Revolution The July Days The Bolshevik Revolution The Constituent Assembly Civil War Russia Since the Revolution

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Background to the Revolution: an illustrated poster. Copy of Stalin’s police file found in Tiflis. Draft of Lenin’s April Theses in his own handwriting. Resolution in favor of armed uprising by the Central Committee of the Bolshevik Party on October 23 in Lenin’s own handwriting. Two passes issued to American journalist John Reed in 1917. Two pages of the Manchester Guardian, November 9, 1917. Decree on peace published by Izvestia, November 9, 1917. Secret report by the Military Attaché in Petrograd, December 1917. Pamphlet issued by the Bolsheviks to enlist the support of British soldiers sent to Russia during the Civil War. Two banknotes issued by the Soviet government during the Civil War, overprinted by the White authorities. Handbill published in 1917 and three Civil War propaganda posters.

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World History

Grades 8–12


World History

WORLD HISTORY For related photo collections, see p. 97

For related photo collections, see p. 98

The Coming of War: 1939

Anne Frank’s World

Grades 8–12 Hitler’s rise to power, England’s failed attempt at appeasement, and other important events leading to World War II in September 1939 are portrayed and analyzed in this powerful Jackdaw. Maps, photos, official German and British documents, and Broadsheets trace Hitler’s ominous rise to power and the inevitable steps to war. Historian: Martin Gilbert. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Hitler’s Rise to Power Europe Watches Germany The Road to Munich Last Steps to War

Historical Documents ❖ Maps illustrating the relationship of Germany to the rest of Europe, 1919-39. ❖ A confidential report describing the meeting in May 1933 between Sir Horace Rumbold and Adolf Hitler. ❖ A booklet of pictures and quotations illustrating the spread of fascism and Hitler’s rise to power. ❖ The certificate, signed by Hitler, which accompanied the medal awarded to the British diplomat Basil Newton in commemoration of the Olympic Games held in Berlin in 1936. ❖ A handbill advertising a Mosley meeting which was handed to Randolph Churchill as he came out of a theater. ❖ Front page of the News Chronicle, September 15, 1939, announcing Chamberlain’s departure for Munich. ❖ Statement signed by Chamberlain and Hitler, September 30, 1938. ❖ A page of the Evening Standard, October 1, 1939, reporting Duff Cooper’s resignation from the government. ❖ A poster announcing the provision of gas helmets for babies. ❖ Minutes of the Cabinet meeting held on September 2, 1939, at which it was decided to issue an ultimatum to Hitler. ❖ Front page of the Daily Herald, September 4, 1939, announcing the outbreak of war.

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Grades 6-12 Through personal narratives, photographs, diary pages, and other documents, this Jackdaw surveys the world outside the secret annex—the fate of Anne’s friends, the resistance and deportation of the Jews of Amsterdam, the escape of some, and the help of many in the Christian population and the betrayal by others. It follows Anne after her arrest, from the Westerbork camp in Holland, to the death camp Auschwitz to Bergen-Belsen, where, with her sister Margot, she perished and from where—through her famous diary—she entered world history as the personification of all the Jewish children murdered in the Holocaust and as a universal symbol of the human spirit. Historian: Robert Sugar. Mr. Sugar escaped Nazi persecution on a Kindertransport (Children’s Transport) from Vienna to Great Britain. The contents of this Focus Jackdaw feature:

Support Materials ❖ Illustrated Broadsheet Essay ❖ Timeline ❖ Critical Thinking Questions

Historical Documents ❖ Photo-poster documenting the German invasion of the Netherlands and the resistance and deportation of the Jews. ❖ Excerpts from Dora Unger’s (Scheinowitz) memoir of crossing the border to Holland. ❖ Photographs of the secret annex, including the movable bookcase that concealed the entrance. ❖ Pages from Anne Frank’s diary. ❖ Red Cross document listing the Frank family in last transport from Westerbork to Auschwitz. ❖ Photograph and profile of Miep Gies, main protector of the secret annex inhabitants. ❖ Interview with Ed Silverberg, Anne’s friend “Hello,” about his escape from Holland. ❖ Photo-poster documenting the fate of Anne, Margot, and Anne’s friends Hanneli (Lies) and Sanne.

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WORLD HISTORY For related photo collections, see p. 98

The Balkans: Ethnic Conflict

The Holocaust

Grades 8–12

Students will realize the tragedy of overwhelming moral magnitude and great historical significance that was the Holocaust. The handson historical documents are powerful: the chronology from Yad Vashem, a Reich Citizenship Law stripping Jews of all rights, photos of the horrors of the Holocaust, Hitler’s directive by Bormann on the “Jewish Question,” and extraordinary maps labeled with countries and numbers of Jews to be sent to death camps. This Jackdaw examines the evolution of anti-Semitism from its origin to its fatal culmination in the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question.” Historian: William Phillips.

The difficult subject of ethnic conflict in the Balkans and the historical and political background of the area are clarified through Broadsheets, historical documents, photographs, and illustrations. A history of the Ottoman Empire and explanations of such concepts as ethnic cleansing and nationalism facilitate student understanding of the tragic events that occurred following the breakup of Yugoslavia. Historians: Norman Itzkowitz and Enid Goldberg. The contents of this

The contents of this Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Origins of Antisemitism Hitler and the Rise of Nazism The Final Solution The Response of the Free World The Legacy of the Holocaust

Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Chronology of the Holocaust, 1933-1945. Page of Der Sturmer, radical anti-Semitic tabolid, 1938. Reinhard Heydrich directive of 21 September, 1939. Letter from Herman Goering to Reinhard Heydrich on the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question.” Reich Citizenship Law proclaimed by Hitler, Sep. 1935. Newspaper accounts of Nazi terror, 1938-1942. Portions of the Wannsee protocol, Jan. 1942. Hitler’s secret directive signed by Martin Bormann, July 1943, banning discussion of the “Jewish Question.” Five maps, “The Geography of Genocide,” 1918 to 1945. Photo and invoice for Zyklon B gas used in death camps. Aerial photograph of Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp. Collection of photographs on the horrors of the Holocaust.

Reproducible Student Activities Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6013-7— $92.67/$69.50

Jackdaw feature:

Broadsheets ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Nations, Nation-states and Nationalism History of the Balkans Through 1918 The Ottoman Influence The Balkans After 1918 Ethnic Cleansing

Timeline: 540–1995 Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

16th-century scenes of the Battle of Kosovo. Portrait of Sultan Bayezid I. Excerpt from Serbian folk poem, The Battle of Kosovo. Maps of the Ottoman Empire: 1353 and mid-17th century. Excerpt from the Timar Register. 18th-century painting of Ottoman Grand Vizir receiving a foreign ambassador. Maps illustrating the impact of nationalism on Europe. Excerpt from Mazzini’s nationalist oath. Excerpt from Gladstone’s Bulgarian Horrors. Serbian, Russian, and British documents on events leading to Congress of Berlin. Documents pertaining to the creation of Yugoslavia. Signatures and seals of the signers of the Treaty of Lausanne. Poster: World War II and the rise of Tito. Map: territorial division of Bosnia-Herzegovina under the Dayton Accords.

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World History

Grades 6–12


WORLD HISTORY

World History

Christmas Grades 8–12 This Christmas story is unusual and educational. Students will get a whole new perspective on Christmas customs with this Jackdaw. Enchanting and intriguing hands-on documents visit the roots of Christmas and its customs around the world. Students and teachers will learn Christmas was once illegal but then learn further about customs, ceremonies, folklore, and festivities. All will enjoy the wonderful Victorian illustrations, games, and even full models of a puppet and a mask. Historian: Howard Loxton. The contents of this Jackdaw feature: Historical Documents ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Christus Natus Est — a Christmas broadsheet published in 1631. Parliamentary Proclamation of 1652 forbidding the celebration of Christmas. Verses for the Year, 1831 — broadside given out by a London watchman to solicit Christmas gifts. The Christmas Play of St. George and the Dragon, 1833. The first Christmas card, issued 1843. Toby Tott and Christmas Pudding—a card game, 1845. Polichinelle et Arlequin—Punch and Harlequin for a puppet Harlequinade. Queen Victoria’s Christmas Tree, 1848, as described and illustrated in the Illustrated London News. Christmas Gambols—a broadside of 1823 with verses and character cards for Twelfth Night games. Decorations for your Christmas tree. Crowns for the Twelfth Night king and queen. Dragon’s mask for the mummer’s play of St. George.

Study Guide / Lesson Plan – Reproducible Activities Order Jackdaw 978-1-5669-6141-7—$92.67/$69.50

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS

JACKDAW

PHOTO COLLECTIONS Photo Collections

Jackdaw Photo Collections consist of extra-large 17� x 22� black-andwhite photographs illustrating an important historical subject. The photos are printed on glossy, heavy-duty stock and are easily displayed in classrooms, libraries, hallways, and offices. Each photograph is truly thought provoking and directly involves the viewer. A detailed caption fully describes each photo and its source. Each photo collection includes a folder with a useful visual index, plus a reproducible broadsheet essay and student photo-analysis worksheet. The worksheet helps students delve into the photos and find interesting things they might have otherwise missed. These ready-to-use Photo Collections are a great way for your students to relate to historical events in a more personal and powerful way.

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS All Ancient Civilization Photo Collections include (4) 17” x 22” Photos Pyramids

Egyptians at Work

978-1-5669-6239-1

978-1-56696-6236-0

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Photo Collections

Pyramids of Giza

Daily Life in the Egyptian World 978-1-5669-6237-7

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Warrior on Horse

Sphinx of Giza

Canopic Jars

Offerings to the Pharaoh

978-1-5669-6232-2

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Delphi 978-1-5669-6233-9

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Egyptian Funerary Stele with Hieroglyphs

978-1-5669-6234-6

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Porch of the Maidens

Stadium at Delphi

978-1-5669-6221-6

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Forum Overview

Throne Room of King Minos at Knossos

Greek Coins

Gold Death Mask of Agamemnon at Mycenae

Tower of Winds at Athens

The Roman Forum: Epicenter of the Roman World

978-1-5669-6235-3

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Lion gate at Mycenae

Treasury of the Athenians

The Parthenon Frieze

Aegean Civilizations: Knossos, Mycenae, and Troy

Woman Storing Clothes in a Trunk

Theatre at Delphi

Parthenon

Daily Life in the Greek World

Temple of Apollo

Acropolis

Boat for Transporting the Dead

Milking a Cow

Sculptors Working on a Statue

The Acropolis at Athens

Sarcophagus

Scribe

Servant Women Making Perfume Obelisk at Heliopolis

978-1-5669-6238-4

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Bread Maker

Piling Provisions in Storage

Stepped Pyramids

Journey to Afterlife

Daily Life in the Roman World

Roman Architecture and Engineering

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978-1-5669-6222-3

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Street of Abundance

Colosseum

The Trojan Horse of Troy

Famous Leaders of the Roman World 978-1-5669-6224-7

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(Rome, Italy)

(Pompeii)

Wine Merchant’s Shop

Temple of Saturn

Pantheon

(Herculaneum)

(Rome, Italy)

Julius Caesar Arch of Titus

Lararium in garden of House of Mosaic Atrium Temple of Vesta

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(Herculaneum)

Hadrian

Pont du Gard

Kitchen/ Cooking Utensils

(Nîmes, Gaul)

Appian Way (Rome, Italy)

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS

Marchers, NYC, 1915

Voting – NYC, 1917

Italian Renaissance Architecture Italian Architecture Order Renaissance 978-1-5669-6287-2 — $95.33/$71.50 

Santa Maria del Fiore, Santa Maria del Florence Fiore, Florence

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This tion Thciosllecctioorn l !! coilnlecolo r o c in Gates of

Maria del Fiore, Florence

Photo Collections

Gates of Paradise, Paradise, Baptistery, Baptistery, Florence Florence

Dome DomeScaffolding Atop Santa Maria Scaffolding del Fiore, Florence Atop Santa

San SanLorenzo, Florence Lorenzo,

Florence

St. St.Peter’s Peter’s Basilica, Rome Basilica,

Rome

Santa SantaMaria Novella, Maria Florence Novella,

Detail Detailof Santa Maria of Santa Novella, Maria Florence

Florence

Novella, Florence

PalazzoPalazzo Farnese, Rome Farnese, Rome Tempietto, Tempietto, Rome Rome

San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice

San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice

Villa Villa Rotonda, Rotonda, Vicenza Vicenza

Ponte da Rialto,da Venice Ponte Rialto, Venice

Civil War Album

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85-96.indd 91

7/20/07 1:07:54 PM

Union Soldiers in Trenches

Refugees Leaving War Area Dead Confederate Soldiers

Confederate Fortifications

Union Mortar “Dictator” Federal Observation Balloon

African-American Band Confederate Submarine Aground

Federal Telegraph Battery Wagon

Union Troops Move Confederate Ammo Zouave Ambulance Crew

Wounded Union Soldiers

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS Civil War: Young Soldiers

Union Drummer Boy

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Photo Collections

Teen-age Private, GA Infantry

Youngest Wounded Soldier

Twelve-year-old Shiloh Veteran “Powder Monkey”

Union Colored-Infantry Drummer

Youthful Confederate Cavalryman

Private Wm. Askew, GA Reg.

Private George Graffam, Maine Infantry

Federal Soldier

Abraham Lincoln

Private of Michigan Infantry

Slavery

❖  Four Theme Posters Order 978-1-5669-6227-8 — $30.00/$22.50

❖  Four Theme Posters Order 978-1-5669-6228-5 — $30.00/$22.50

❖ Portrait of Abraham Lincoln, president-elect, with scenes and incidents in his life. ❖ The inauguration of Abraham Lincoln as president of the United States, March 4, 1861 ❖ The second inauguration of Abraham Lincoln in front of the Capitol, March 4, 1865 ❖ Funeral honors to President Lincoln, New York City, April 25, 1865

❖ Stampede among the Negroes in Virginia—their arrival at Fortress Monroe. ❖ Cotton campaign in South Carolina (gathering, ginning, packing/shipping cotton crops). ❖ The Emancipation of the Negroes, January 1863—the past and the future. ❖ House of Representatives scene on news of Constitutional amendment abolishing slavery.

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS Slavery in America Album

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Slave Pens at Auction

Slave Auction and Sale Building

Photo Collections

Cotton Pickers and White Boss

Free Blacks Cutting Sugar Cane Whipping Post and Pillory

Young Slave

Slave Quarters on Plantation

Slave With Slash Marks

Branded Slave

Harriet Tubman and Freed Slaves Escaped Slaves, “Contrabands”

Slaves 90 FugitivePHOTO COLLECTIONS

Ex-Slaves, c. 1936

Whaling: The Hunt for Oil

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Sunbeam Looksfor for Whales Sunbeam Looks Whales

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Fitting Out

Bringing Tons of Whale Aboard

Whaleboat at Sea

Making Casks for Carrying Oil

Line Aboard Ship

Fitting Out

Whaleboat at Sea

Chow Line Aboard Ship Chow

Cutting Blubber

Bringing Tons of Whale Aboard

Cutting Blubber

Blubber Rendering

Making Casks for Carrying Oil

Spermaceti Oil and Ambergris Spermaceti Oil and Ambergris

Whale Oil Lamp

Blubber Rendering

Whaling Ships and Oil on Wharf

Whaling Ships and Oil on Wharf

International Whaling

Whale Oil Lamp

International Whaling

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS Mills: Early Textile Workers

Photo Collections

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Beaming and Yarn Inspection

Spinning Room

Fine Roving Frames

Crowded Spinning Room

“Doffer Girl”

“Doffer Boys” and Sweeper

Small Youngsters, Large Machine Cloth Inspection

Mill Baseball Team

Flat-bed Knitting Machines

Field to Fabric

Modernized Mill

American Indians: Early Boarding Schools Order 978-1-5669-6181-3 — $82.00/$61.50 

On Arrival & After Becoming Students

Shoshone and Arapaho Students

First Day at School, 1897

Sign Language

Basketball Team, 1912

Math Class, 1903

Class, 1904

Washing, 1890s

Tin Making, 1900s

Dining Lessons, 1900

Pueblo Girls, 1880s

Graduating Class, 1897

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS Cowboys: The Old Trail Days

Order 978-1-5669-6175-2 — $82.00/$61.50 

Chuck Wagon, 1886

The Range Boss, 1908

“Rounding Them Up,” 1900

Little Joe, Wrangler, 1908

Black Cowboys, 1911

Branding Time, 1900

Odd Jobs in Camp, 1909

Line Camp, 1910

Main St., Miles City, Montana, 1879

Settling the Dust, 1907

“Bronco-busting,” 1904

Photo Collections

Dakota Cowboy, 1888

Transcontinental Railroad: Built by Immigrant Labor Railroads Meet in Utah

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Curving Iron Rails

Drilling Mountains

Laying Tracks

Steam Shovel, Utah

Chinese Workers’ Camp

Construction Train Was “Home” Graders Level Mountains

Clearing Snow in Sierras

Trestle Bridge

Payday

Train & Wagon Train

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS Immigrant Life: 1890-1920

Photo Collections

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Immigrants, Battery Park, NYC

English Coal Heaver’s Home

Chinese Doctor, Los Angeles

Selling Drinks, Syrian Quarter, NYC

Bridget Club, Kansas

Boston Street Corner

Sweatshop, NYC

Mule Drivers, Scranton, PA, mines

Italian Rag Pickers, NYC

Polish Worker’s Quarters, RI

Blessing of Bells, Minneapolis

Bride Escorted by Brother, Iowa

Ellis Island: The Immigrants’ Experience  Order 978-1-5669-6158-5 — $82.00/$61.50 

Crowds of Immigrants on SS Amerika

Immigrants on Ferry in NY Harbor

Ellis Island from NY Harbor Statue of Liberty

Gathering Luggage, Ellis Island

Endless Lines Await Immigrants

Detained Immigrants in Dining Room

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Dreaded Medical Exam

Children Examined for Typhus

Irving Berlin, Immigrant Leaving Ellis Island for New York City

Moving On by Rail

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS Angel Island: Immigration Gateway Order 978-1-5669-6265-0 — $82.00/$61.50 

Immigrants Waiting for Ferry to Island

Immigrants Wait for Hospital Processing

Photo Collections

Aerial View of Immigration Station

Men and Boys’ Physical Exam

Chinese Women in Traditional Clothing

Inspectors Conduct Interrogation Session

Asians and Europeans Arrive at Angel Island

Japanese Picture Brides on Immigration Ship

Busy Corner, San Francisco’s Chinatown

Russian Refugees from Bolshevik Revolution

Immigration Officers Process Picture Bride

Monument Honoring Detainees

Life in America: Circa 1900

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On the Beach

First World Series

Traffic Violation

Traffic Jam, Chicago

Street Vendors

Bargain Counter

Threshing Wheat

Rural School

Judge Roy Bean’s Court

Texas Oil Boom

Wright Brothers’ First Flight

After San Francisco Earthquake

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS Early 20th Century Medicine

Ambulance Crew

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Photo Collections

Ward at State Hospital Teaching Occupational Therapy

Physician’s Office

Fumigating Ship

Dr. Mayo Operating

Pharmacist at Work X-ray at University Hospital

Air Ambulance Service

Visiting Nurse

School Dental Clinic

Immunizing Immigrants

Early Flights: Wright Bros. to World War I Order 978-1-5669-6206-3 — $82.00/$61.50 

Wright Brothers’ Glider, 1902/3

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First Powered Flight, 1903

Huffman Prairie, Ohio, 1904

First Airplane Fatality, 1908

France, 1908

Glenn Curtiss, 1908

Stunt Flying, 1911

Harriet Quimby, 1911

Stinson Sisters, 1912

Ormer Locklear, 1910s

First Aerial Bomb, 1911

Airmail Service, 1918

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS World War I: War in the Trenches Order 978-1-5669-6176-9 — $82.00/$61.50 

Photo Collections

Supplies to the Front Americans in Trenches

British Infantry Moves Up

Artillery Ready in Argonne

Wounded American Gets Helping Hand Ready to Send Gas Alert Field Artillery Along Meuse River

Canadian Troops in Trenches

Allied Advance During Gas Attack Transport for Wounded Americans

German Offensive in Spring

German Attack on Allied Lines

World War I: Home Front

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Red Cross War Fund Stand

Tank on Recruiting Duty

African-American Men Leaving for Army

“Fighting 69th” on Way to France

Patriotic Service League

Women Making Weapons

Woman Training on Turret Lathe

March for Domestic Food Conservation

Children Working Vegetable Plots

Children Holding AntiGerman Signs

Woman Auto Mechanic

Homecoming Parade for 42nd Division

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS Woman Suffrage: The Fight for Equality Order 978-1-5669-6179-0 — $82.00/$61.50 

Photo Collections

Parading for Suffrage, 1908 Reading Anti-suffrage Announcements, 1915

Practicing Suffrage Speeches, 1913

Suffrage Headquarters, Ohio, 1912

Dressed for Parade, 1913

Breaking Up Parade, 1913

“Miss Liberty,” 1913

Suffrage Newsgirls, 1915

“College Day” Pickets, 1917 Mary Church Terrell, 1863-1954

Marchers, NYC, 1915 Voting, NYC, 1917

Faces of the Depression: Small Towns/Family Farms Order 978-1-5669-6307-7 — $82.00/$61.50 

Checkers

Small Town Grocery Stores

The Barbershop

Getting Together by the Drugstore

Softball, Local Pastime

Fourth of July Parade

Post Office and Meeting Place

Farmer and Lamb

Tractor Power

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Farmers Meeting

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4H Club Fair

Rural School


PHOTO COLLECTIONS Faces of the Depression: Migrant Workers Order 978-1-5669-6309-1 — $82.00/$61.50 

Three Migrant Brothers

Keeping Warm in California

Fruit Pickers Relax

Waiting for Pay

Bindle Stiff on the Road

Young Strawberry Picker

Experienced Hops Pickers

Migrant Worker’s Home

Roadside Camp

Family Hitchhiking a Long Way

Photo Collections

Mother and Baby on the Road

Black Dust Clouds Chase Car

Faces of the Depression: City Life Order 978-1-5669-6308-4 — $82.00/$61.50 

Watching the Planes

Boarding House

Man-drawn Cart

Looking for a Job

Blind Beggar

Hangin’ Out

Abraham Lincoln Died Here

Waiting for a Church Parade

Young Urchin

Capital Slums

Apartment for Rent

Shantytown Home

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS Depression Hits Home

Photo Collections

Order 978-1-5669-6157-8 — $82.00/$61.50 

Woman with Belongings in Texas

Black Tuesday, Wall Street

Migrant Woman and Children in Lean-to

Dust Storm, Kansas

Men Lying on San Francisco Street

Apple Seller

Breadline Near Brooklyn Bridge

Marathon Dancers

The Soup Kitchen

Boys at Movie Marquee

“Ride the Train”

Woman Teaching at Home

Dust Bowl

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School Children in Dust Storm

Dust Storm Suffocates Town Dust Storm, Easter Sunday

Farmer & Sons Walking in Storm

Empty Barn and Idle Truck

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Farmer with Horses

Depression, Drought, Storms Wrecked Town

Man Caught in “Black Blizzard”

Trees and Buildings Covered by Dust

Remains of Farm

Oklahoma Family Heads to California

Market in Cotton Farming Town

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS New Deal: America Goes Back to Work Order 978-1-5669-6180-6—$82.00/$61.50 

Lining Up for Jobs

Building Dam TVA

Artist/WPA Worker Sculpting

CCC Bridge Construction

WPA Workers Repair Tracks

Receiving Surplus Commodities

Registering for Unemployment

Enjoying Hot Lunch at School

WPA Carpenter Laying Concrete

Lineman Stringing Wires for REA

Working the Soil

Photo Collections

CWA Malaria Control Project

World War II: European Theater Order 978-1-5669-6296-4 — $82.00/$61.50 

Depth Charge Attack on German Submarine

American Tanks in Tunisian Offensive

Standing for Inspection

Bombing Raid on German Factory Rangers Fighting in Italy

Chow Is Served

D-Day on Omaha Beach

Bombers with Fighter Plane Escort

Paratroops and Gliders Behind Enemy Lines

Under Fire in Germany

German Prisoners of War

Returning Troops

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PHOTO PHOTO PHOTO COLLECTIONS COLLECTIONS COLLECTIONS87 87 87 PHOTO COLLECTIONS 87 PHOTO COLLECTIONS 87 PHOTO COLLECTIONS 87

PHOTO COLLECTIONS

Holocaust Holocaust Holocaust Children Children Children Holocaust Children Holocaust Children Holocaust Children

Holocaust Children Order 978-1-5669-6162-2 — $82.00/$61.50  Order Order Order B-PC105 B-PC105 B-PC105 Order B-PC105 Order B-PC105 Order B-PC105 $45.95 $45.95 $45.95 $45.95 $45.95 GhettoGhetto $45.95 GhettoGhetto

Mother, Mother, Mother, Mother,

Mother, Mother, Son, Son, Son, Mother, Son, Son, Son, “Jew”“Jew” Labels “Jew” Son,“Jew” “Jew” “Jew” Labels Labels Labels “Jew” Labels Labels Labels

Photo Collections

Children in England

Jews Forced JewsForced Forced from Shelters fromShelters Shelters JewsJews Forced fromfrom Shelters Jews Forced from Shelters Jews Forced from Shelters Jews Forced from Shelters

Ghetto Beggars Beggars Beggars Ghetto Beggars Beggars Beggars

Ghetto Beggars

To ToToDeath Camp Death Camp Trains Camp Trains Trains ToDeath Death Camp Trains DeathCamp CampTrains Trains ToToDeath To Death Camp Trains

Gypsy Gypsy Prisoners Gypsy Prisoners Prisoners Gypsy Prisoners GypsyPrisoners Prisoners Gypsy Gypsy Prisoners

Kristallnacht Kristallnacht Kristallnacht Kristallnacht Kristallnacht Prisoners Kristallnacht Prisoners Prisoners Prisoners Arrive Arrive at Arrive Kristallnacht Prisoners Arrive at atat Arrive at Buchenwald Buchenwald Prisoners Arriveatat Buchenwald Buchenwald Prisoners Arrive Buchenwald Buchenwald Buchenwald

Walking Walking Walking toto toto Walking Walking to Gassing Gassing Gassing Walking to Gassing Walking to Gassing Gassing Gassing

Young Young Young Young Young Survivors Survivors Survivors Young Survivors Survivors Survivors

Roll-call Roll-call Roll-call Roll-call Roll-call Roll-call

“He “He “He ItSaw Saw It ItAll” All” “HeSaw Saw ItItAll” All” SawItIt All” “He“He Saw All” “He Saw All”

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Refugee Refugee Refugee Refugee Refugee Children Children Children Refugee Children Children inin England ininEngland England Children in England England in Refugee England

Boarding Boarding Boarding Boarding Boarding Boarding Train Train toto Train Camp totoCamp Camp Boarding Train Camp Train to Camp Train to Camp Train to Camp

Young Survivors

Roll-call

Survivors Survivors Survivors Survivors ininSurvivors inin Survivors in Barracks Barracks Barracks in Barracks Barracks Barracks Survivors in Barracks

Holocaust: Kristallnacht to Liberation Holocaust: Holocaust: Holocaust: Kristallnacht Kristallnacht Kristallnacht to Liberation to toLiberation Liberation Holocaust: Kristallnacht to Liberation Order 978-1-5669-6266-7 — $82.00/$61.50  Holocaust:Kristallnacht Kristallnacht toLiberation Liberation Holocaust: to Order Order Order B-PC154 B-PC154 B-PC154 — $45.95 ——$45.95 $45.95

Jews Jews Jews JewsJews Captured Jews Captured Captured Captured Jews Captured During Captured During During During Captured During Ghetto During Ghetto Ghetto Ghetto During Ghetto Uprising

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Ghetto Uprising Uprising Uprising Ghetto Uprising Uprising Uprising

Jews Jews JewsJews Jews Forced Forced Forced Jews Forced Forced into into into Forced into intoDeportation Deportation Deportation into Deportation Jews Forced Deportation Train Train Train Deportation Train into Hungarian Jews Arrive at Auschwitz Train Train Deportation Train

Prisoners’ Prisoners’ Prisoners’ Barracks Barracks Barracks Prisoners’ Barracks at atatDachau Dachau Prisoners’ Barracks Prisoners’ Barracks atDachau Dachau Dachau atatDachau

Women, Deloused, Women, Women, Women, Deloused, Deloused, Deloused, Women, Deloused, Shaven,Shaven, March toShaven, Work Shaven, March March March to Work totoWork Work Women, Deloused, Women, Deloused,

Shaven, March to Work Shaven, Shaven,March MarchtotoWork Work

Hungarian Hungarian Hungarian Hungarian Jews Jews Hungarian Hungarian JewsJews Arrive Arrive at Arrive Jews Jews Arrive at atat Auschwitz Auschwitz Auschwitz Arrive Arrive at at Auschwitz Auschwitz Auschwitz

Forced Forced Forced Forced Forced Labor in Labor Labor in Labor Forced Forced LaborQuarry in inin Quarry Quarry Quarry Labor in Labor in Quarry Quarry Quarry

Prisoners Prisoners Prisoners with with with Prisoners with Triangular Badges Prisoners with

Triangular Triangular Triangular Badges Badges Badges Prisoners with Prisoners with Triangular Badges Triangular TriangularBadges Badges Auschwitz Auschwitz Auschwitz Auschwitz Gas Chamber Gas GasChamber Chamber Auschwitz Auschwitz Gas Chamber and and and Gas GasChamber Chamber and Dachau Dachau and andDachau Dachau Crematoria Crematoria Crematoria Dachau Dachau Crematoria Auschwitz Gas Crematoria Crematoria

Prisoners Prisoners Prisoners Produce Produce Produce Rifles Rifles Rifles Prisoners Produce Rifles Former Former Former Prisoners Prisoners ininSS inFactory inSSSSFactory Factory Prisoners Produce Rifles Prisoners Produce Rifles Former Prisoners Stare atPrisoners Liberators Prisoners Produce Rifles Former Prisoners SS Factory Stare Stare atat Stare Liberators atatLiberators Liberators in SS Factoryin Former Prisoners Former Prisoners inSS SSFactory Factory Stare Liberators Stare StareatatLiberators Liberators

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS World War II: Pacific Theater Order 978-1-5669-6294-0 — $82.00/$61.50 

USS Yorktown at Battle of Midway

Bataan Death March

US Bomber on Way to Japan

Assault on Butaritari

Photo Collections

Burning Battleships at Pearl Harbor

Japanese Freighter Under Attack

Troops Unloading Landing Craft

Tanks Providing Cover for Infantrymen

Stars and Stripes over Iwo Jima

Portable Surgical Unit

Marines in Beach Trenches

MacArthur’s Return to the Philippines

Bombing of Pearl Harbor

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Capsized and Burning Ships

Pearl Harbor During Attack Japanese Planes Over Pearl Harbor

Ammunition Magazine Explodes

Panorama of Japanese Attack Mid-attack Rescue

Civilian Casualties

Damaged Ships After Attack

USS Arizona Burning

Downed Japanese Plane

Seamen Decorate Sailors’ Graves

USS Arizona Memorial

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS World War II: War at Home

Order 978-1-5669-6170-7 — $82.00/$61.50 

Photo Collections

Family Celebrates Military Service Merchant Seaman’s Funeral

Children Buy Defense Stamps Red Cross Workers Wrap Bandages

Gas Rationing Hits Home

Citizens Line Up at Rationing Board

School Children Collect Scrap Metal Citizens Raise Money for War Effort

Female Railroaders Keep Trains Running

Bomber Noses Fill War Plant

Wall Street Celebrates Victory

Rosie the Riveter

Japanese-American Internment: Life in Camps Order 978-1-5669-6163-9 — $82.00/$61.50 

Heart Mountain, Wyoming

Flag-raising at Relocation Camp

Agricultural Workers in Idaho Nisei Football in Utah

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Night School for Internees

Skating Rink in Wyoming

Relocation Camp Mural Tells Story

Community Store in Wyoming

Barber Shop in Idaho

Communal Dining, Tule Lake

Easter Egg Hunt in Arkansas

Family of Five in Barracks Home

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima & Nagasaki Order 978-1-5669-6240-7 — $82.00/$61.50 

60,000 Feet Above Nagasaki

The Enola Gay

Street of Temples, Hiroshima

Woman with Burns

Hiroshima Before & After the Bomb

A City Destroyed

Aftermath, Hiroshima

Tending to the Wounded

Shrine Gate, Nagasaki

Mother and Son

The Dome

Korean War

Order 978-1-5669-6314-5 — $82.00/$61.50 

American Tanks Withdraw

Civilians Attempt to Escape

General Douglas MacArthur

LSTs Unload

Machine Gun Crew

Men of the Marine Division

Panic-Stricken Civilians

United Nations’ Forces Retreat

Armistice Negotiations

The Struggle for Survival

Divided Korean Families

Evacuation of a Wounded Soldier

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Photo Collections

Little Boy & Fat Man on Trailer


PHOTO COLLECTIONS Segregation: Before Civil Rights

Photo Collections

Order 978-1-5669-6178-3 — $82.00/$61.50 

Hauling Cotton Bales, 1898

End of the School Day, 1937

Segregated Cafe, 1940

Cotton Planting, 1932

Cross Burning, 1905

Rioting at Housing Project, 1942

Chain Gang, 1905

Segregated Movie Theater, 1939

African-American Platoon, 1944

Chemistry Laboratory, 1900

Bus Station, 1940

Pickets at Movie Theater, 1940

Struggle for Civil Rights: 1954-1968 Order 978-1-5669-6253-7 — $82.00/$61.50 

Rosa Parks and Bus Boycott

Integration of University of Mississippi

Crisis in Little Rock

Freedom Riders, 1961 Non-violent March on Washington Birmingham Children’s Crusade, 1963

Lunch Counter Sit-in, Mississippi March on Washington

Selma-toMontgomery March

St. Baptist Church Bombing

Freedom Summer Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS Second Great Black Migration Order 978-1-5669-6295-7 — $82.00/$61.50 

Impoverished Sharecroppers

Young Cotton Picker

Apartment Building in Black Neighborhood

Mechanical Cotton Picker

Race Riot

Wall Separating Black and White Neighborhoods Crowded Kitchenette

War Industry Job Trainee

Protest Against Hiring Practices

Segregated High School

Urban Musicians

Vietnam War: 1964–1975

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South Vietnamese Refugee

Agent Orange Spraying

Navy Seals

Sniper Fire

Ambush by Viet Cong

American Ground Troops

Burning Rice Basket

Foxholes at Sunrise

US Military Advisors Instruct South Vietnamese Soldiers

March to the Capitol, May

Vietnam Memorial

Burning Draft Card, Selective Service Headquarters, Washington, D.C.

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Photo Collections

Wartime Ship Welders


PHOTO COLLECTIONS 1910s: Urbanization and World War Order 978-1-5669-6293-3—$82.00/$61.50

Photo Collections

African Americans Doing Yard Work

Female Motorcyclists

Woolworth Building

Harvesting Grain

Baggage Inspection at Ellis Island

Ford Factory Assembly Line

Rural Family

President Wilson on Opening Day

Women’s Suffrage Activists

Tearful Goodbye

Silent Film Crew

Patriotic Display

1920s: Roaring Twenties

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Charles Lindbergh & Spirit of St. Louis Flappers Dancing the Charleston

Driving for Fun: Ford Motor Car

Charlie Chaplin in The Gold Rush

Lou Gehrig & Babe Ruth

Marble Championship, Philadelphia

Terror in US: Ku Klux Klan, NY

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Scientist George Washington Carver

The Wireless: Listening to Radio

Prohibition Agents Raid Still: Washington, D.C.

Women Demand Vote, and Get It

Start of the Great Depression

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PHOTO COLLECTIONS 1930s: Great Depression to World’s Fair Order 978-1-5669-6286-5— $82.00/$61.50 

FDR Campaigning

Putting People Back to Work

Homeless Shantytown, “Hooverville” Dust Storm Approaching Western Town

Jesse Owens at Olympics in Berlin

Homeless, Jobless

Albert Einstein

First Airline Stewardesses

Radio Studio Drama

Opening Day, Golden Gate Bridge

New York World’s Fair

1940s: War and Peace

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New Cultural Phenomenon: Teenagers

Joe DiMaggio: Baseball Legend

Japanese American Internment Bombing of Pearl Harbor

Wartime Rationing

War Manufacturing

End of World War II Franklin D. Roosevelt & Harry S. Truman

Atomic Bomb Testing GI’s Go to College

Dawn of the Computer Age

First Mass-Produced Housing

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Photo Collections

Sorting Food for Needy Families


PHOTO COLLECTIONS 1950s: A Time of Change

Order 978-1-5669-6245-2 — $82.00/$61.50  McDonald’s Hamburger Stand

Korean War

Photo Collections

Drive-in Theater

Dr. Jonas Salk Vaccinates

Elvis Presley

Opening Day, Disneyland, CA

Dr. Seuss

Rosa Parks on Bus

Alaska & Hawaii Achieve Statehood

Althea Gibson, Tennis Champ

Hula Hoop Demonstration

“Golden Age” of Television

1960s: Triumph & Turmoil

Order 978-1-5669-6246-9 — $82.00/$61.50  Dance Craze “Twist” Sweeps America

President John F. Kennedy Woolworth Sit-in The Vietnam War

Jackie Robinson Joins Hall of Fame

Martin Luther King Jr., “I Have a Dream” Speech

Anti-war Movement

Beatles Wave to Screaming Fans Sesame Street Debuts

First Super Bowl

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Woodstock Music & Art Fair

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“Apollo II” Astronauts Land on Moon


Sesame Street Debuts First Super Bowl

PHOTO COLLECTIONS

“Apollo II” Astronauts Land on Moon

Landmark Decision: Roe v. Wade

1970s:Coming Coming of 1970s: of Age Age

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Photo Collections

18-year-olds Gain Voting Rights

18-year-olds Gain Voting Rights Landmark Decision: Roe v. Wade

Birth of Disco Birth of Disco Generation Generation

Aaron Breaks Record Aaron Breaks Ruth’s Ruth’s Record

Three Mile Island Nuclear Accident Three Mile Island

Nuclear Accident

Final Evacuation Final of Vietnamof Evacuation War Vietnam War Court Mandated School Busing

Invention of the Microprocessor

Invention of the Microprocessor

Court Mandated School Busing

Ann Meyers UCLA Basketball, Title IX

America Celebrates the Bicentennial America Celebrates the Bicentennial

President Resigns President Nixon Nixon Resigns

Oil OilCrisis Crisis of 1973

Ann Meyers UCLA Basketball, Title IX

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7/20/07 12:19:16 PM

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BOOKS

Picture the Middle Ages

Picture the Renaissance

Grades 5–8

Grades 5–8

Picture the Renaissance is an activity-based resource book. It is a valuable tool for middle and secondary school teachers interested in creating social studies and language arts units. It can be used year after year; its reproducible pages can be duplicated as needed, and its solid binding and heavy paper make it a long-lasting addition to every teacher’s library. Picture the Renaissance is easy to use. It is a clearly organized resource book that highlights period artists, architects, writers, craft workers, philosophers, scholars, and public officials. The city of Florence, birth place of the Renaissance, and Rome, its enlightened counterpart, are focal points. Picture the Renaissance is self-explanatory. Historical facts and examples are provided for discussion and research on matters of importance and interest in social studies, history, literature, music, and art. Selected stories, literature, and primary sources document the major movements and thinking of the period and serve as inspiration for creative language exercises. Major architectural designs and innovations are presented. Paintings and sculptures are displayed with suggestions for art activities. Scientific discoveries are highlighted. Picture the Renaissance is self-contained. Teachers need no additional material to complete a successful and exciting unit on the period.

Books

Twelve Fascinating Chapters ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Renaissance: Historical Overview Architecture and Architects Exploration and Explorers Inventions and Inventors Literature and Authors Music and Musicians Painting and Painters Sculpture and Sculptors Science and Scientists Reformation and Counter Reformation Renaissance Lifestyles A Renaissance Festival

Dozens of Reproducible Activities ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Maps Timelines Architectural Plans Art Activities Costume Designs 98 Pages overall including illustrations, photos, designs, games, music, and reproducible masters.

Picture the Renaissance 978-1-5669-6154-7—$52.67/$39.50 Pi ct ure th e R e n ai s s anc e w as co m pi l ed a nd w r i t ten by Ro ber t M . Wilhelm, Ph.D. Dr. Wilhelm has worked ex tensively with middle school teachers to develop curriculum and resources for teaching the classics and about the ancient Greek and Roman worlds.

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Picture the Middle Ages is an activity-based resource book for upper-elementary and middle school teachers interested in creating a social studies or language arts unit on the Middle Ages. Picture the Middle Ages is a valuable tool that can be used year after year. Its reproducible masters can be duplicated as often as needed, and its solid binding and heavy paper make it a long-lasting addition to every teacher’s bookshelf. This easy to use resource book is organized around a poster depicting four major population centers in the Middle Ages: the town, the castle, the monastery, and the manor farm. A large pullout poster is included with the resource book to color and hang in the classroom or to enlarge further with a copier and use for several suggested learning activities. What’s more, a second copy of the poster is bound in the book and keyed to the descriptive text.

Thirteen Stimulating Chapters ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

A Picture of the Medieval World with Keyed Poster The Middle Ages: Historic View The Town: Craftsmen & Guilds The Castle: Lords & Ladies, Knights & Chivalry Heraldry & Coats of Arms The Monastery: Monks & Nuns The Manor: Farming, Food & Feasting Making Costumes and Armor Music & Dance Artists & Art Literature A Medieval Festival Timeline, Activities & Reading List

Engrossing Reproducible Activities ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

Costume Patterns People & Possessions Helmet & Breastplate Pattern Shield Pattern Travelers & Destination Map Heraldic Coats of Arms Food Lists & Recipes Craftsmen’s Guild Signs Grocery Bag Castle Designs Maze & Timeline 162 pages overall including 56 pages with illustrations, photos, patterns, games, music, and reproducible masters plus large pullout timeline and poster.

Picture the Middle Ages 978-1-5669-6025-0—$52.67/$39.50 Picture the Middle Ages was written by Linda Honan; poster created and drawn by Ellen Kosmer. The Music & Dance chapter is by Karen Hastie-Wilson.

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BOOKS American Lives: Cultural Differences, Individual Distinction Grades 7–12

The study of diverse American lives, presented firsthand by those who lived them, is an excellent way for students to become more thoughtful about their own lives as American citizens. This anthologyreader is composed of substantial excerpts from eleven autobiographies written by distinguished men and women from diverse ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic backgrounds: Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Jacob Riis, Mary Antin, Booker T. Washington, Dick Gregory, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Richard Rodriguez, Maxine Hong Kingston, Theodore Roosevelt, and Malcolm X. This book is ideal for social studies and literature curriculums or as a resource for character or moral education. Author: Amy A. Kass, Ph.D. Order American Lives 978-1-5669-6093-9—$56.67/$42.50 490 pages

Cooperative Learning Basics

 Strategies & Lessons for U.S. History Teachers Grades 7–12

Ready-to-use practical applications—use cooperative learning techniques immediately. Chronologically organized, the activities span the entire scope of U.S. history. You will become familiar with the fundamentals of collaboration. You may create activities using the lessons as models. The chapters are clearly written and easy to follow. Here is what you’ll learn and use: ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖ ❖

The Benefits of Cooperative Learning The Core Elements of Cooperative Learning The Structures of Cooperative Learning 23 Classroom Ready Lessons How to do it yourself!

Authors: Robyn Hallowell Griswold and Audrey Green Rogers. Order Cooperative Learning 978-1-5669-6086-1—$52.67/$39.50 300 pages Books

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INDEX

Index

Title Page 1066 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 1910s: Urbanization and World War . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 1920s: America Enters the Modern Age . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 1920s: Roaring Twenties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 1930s: Great Depression to World’s Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 1940s: War and Peace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 1950s: A Time of Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 1960s: Triumph & Turmoil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 1970s: Coming of Age . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 A History of Political Parties in America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Abraham Lincoln . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Alfred the Great . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 All Ancient Civilization Photo Collections include (4) 17” x 22” Photos . . . . . . . . 84 American Imperialism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 American Indians: Early Boarding Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 American Lives: Cultural Differences, Individual Distinction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 American Revolution, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 American Revolution: Women on All Fronts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Angel Island: Immigration Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Anne Frank’s World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Anne Frank’s World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Archaeology & Slav e Life at Mount Vernon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Assassination at Sarajevo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Assassination of President Kennedy, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Atomic Bomb, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima & Nagasaki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Balkans: Ethnic Conflict, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Band Music in American Life: A Social History: 1850-1990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Black Death, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Black Death: The Plague . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Black Voting Rights: The Fight for Equality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Blues in America: A Social History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Bombing of Pearl Harbor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Boston Massacre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Boston Tea Party . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Boston Tea Party to the American Revolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Brontës, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Byzantine Empire: A Cultural Legacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 California Gold Rush 1849 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 California State History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Charles Dickens: 1812-1870 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 China Trade in Growing America: 1783-1843 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 China: A Cultural Heritage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Chinese Exclusion Acts: 1882–1943 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Christmas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Civil War, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Civil War Album . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Civil War: Young Soldiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Cold War , The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Cold War and the Super Powers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Colonial Immigration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Columbus & Explorers Come to the New World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Columbus & the Age of Explorers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Coming of War: 1939, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Coming of War: 1939, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Conquest of Mexico, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Cooperative Learning Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Cortés and the Aztecs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

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Title Page Cowboys: The Old Trail Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Cromwell’s Commonwealth and Protectorate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Crusades, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Cuban Missile Crisis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Custer’s Last Stand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Depression, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Depression Hits Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Development of Writing, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Drake and the Golden Hinde . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Dred Scott Decision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Dust Bowl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Early 20th Century Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Early Flights: Wright Bros. to World War I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Early Industrialization of America: “From Wharf to Waterfall”, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Easter Rising: Dublin 1916, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Eleanor Roosevelt: First Lady of the World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Electoral College, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Elizabeth I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Ellis Island: The Immigrants’ Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Emancipation Proclamation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Emerging Nation: America 1783-1790, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Erie Canal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Faces of the Depression: City Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Faces of the Depression: Migrant Workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Faces of the Depression: Small Towns/Family Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 First Transcontinental Railroad, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Four Theme Posters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Four Theme Posters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 French Revolution, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Great Depression in America, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Great Irish Potato Famine, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Hadrian’s Wall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Harlem Renaissance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Holocaust, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Holocaust, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Holocaust Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Holocaust: Kristallnacht to Liberation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Immigrant Life: 1890-1920 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Immigrants Come to America: 1870–1930 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Immigrants to a Growing Nation: 1800-1880 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Immigration in Colonial Times . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Immigration: 1870–1930 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Incas: A Cultural History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Indian Resistance in Growing America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Indian Resistance: The Patriot Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Indians & the Oklahoma Land Rush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Indians of North America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Industrial Revolution Comes to America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Italian Renaissance Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Jamestown Colony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Japanese-American Internment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Japanese-American Internment Camps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Japanese-American Internment: Life in Camps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Jim Crow Era . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Joan of Arc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Korean War . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Korean War . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Ku Klux Klan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Labor Movement in America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38

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INDEX Title Page

Entries in green represent photo collections

Story of the Declaration of Independence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Struggle for Black Voting Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Struggle for Civil Rights: 1954-1968 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Struggle for Women’s Rights in America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Texas: A Lone Star History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Trail of Tears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Transcontinental Railroad: Built by Immigrant Labor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Triangle Shirtwaist Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Tutankhamun & the Discovery of the Tomb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Underground Railroad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Vietnam War, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Vietnam War: 1964–1975 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Vikings, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Votes for Women: The Fight for Suffrage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 War Between the States: Civil War . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 War of 1812, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Whaling: The Hunt for Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Witch Hysteria Comes to Salem Village . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Wolfe at Quebec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Woman Suffrage: The Fight for Equality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Women in the American Revolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Women’s Rights in the United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 World of Islam, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 World War I: 1914-1918 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 World War I: Home Front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 World War I: War in the Trenches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 World War II: Atomic Bomb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 World War II: European Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 World War II: Life at Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 World War II: Pacific Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 World War II: The Home Front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 World War II: War at Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Wounded Knee Massacre and Ghost Dance Religion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Writing: Cave Painting to Printing Presses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Yellow Journalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Young Shakespeare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

Index

Lewis & Clark Expedition: 1804–1806 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Lexington & Concord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Life in America: Circa 1900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Louisiana Purchase and its Legacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Magna Carta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Making of the Constitution, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Manifest Destiny . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Marco Polo and His Journey to China . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Martin Luther . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Mayflower & The Pilgrim Fathers, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Mexican-American War, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Middle East: The Land & Its People, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Mills: Early Textile Workers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Modern Immigration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Money: Denarius to Decimal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Mountain Men & the Fur Trade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Nat Turner’s Slave Revolt – 1831 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 New Deal, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 New Deal: America Goes Back to Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 New York State History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 North-West Passage, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Oregon Trail, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Panama Canal: Building the 8th Wonder of the World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Patriots & Loyalists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Peasants’ Revolt, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Photo Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Picture the Middle Ages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Picture the Renaissance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Pilgrims and the Mayflower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Plague & Fire of London, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Populism and the Election of 1896 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Presidency, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Prohibition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Rationing in World War II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Reconstruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Reconstruction after the Civil War . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Remember the Maine! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Rise of Napoleon, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Russian Revolution, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Salem Village and the Witch Hysteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Santa Fe Trail, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Secession . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Second Great Black Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Segregation: Before Civil Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Senator McCarthy’s Witch-hunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Shakespeare’s Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Shakespeare’s World and the Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Silk Road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Slave Trade & Its Abolition, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Slavery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Slavery Comes to America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Slavery Comes to the New World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Slavery in America Album . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Slavery in the United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Spanish Inquisition, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Spanish-American War . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Stock Market Crash of 1929 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Story of the Constitution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

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CATALOGING & PROCESSING OPTIONS We provide catalog cards and barcode/data diskettes for a variety of formats. Please use the processing form below and on the next two pages to indicate the materials and formats you require. Enclose this form with your purchase order or advise your sales representative of your requirements at the time your order is placed. FREE cataloging materials on all orders over $750 (does not include shelf-ready processing) Cataloging materials are always drop shipped separately from the book shipment unless shelf-ready processing requested.

CUSTOM CATALOG CARDS & DISKETTES

GRS

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AR

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Joey Pigza loses control Author: Gantos, Jack Reading Level: 4.9 Point Value: 7 Quiz Number: 45124 Accelerated Reader

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AR Spine Label

RL 4.9 PTS 7

AR Label Set

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q Use next sequential barcode number from last order What symbology and check digit do you use? q Code 3 of 9 / No check digit q Codabar / No check digit q Interleaved 2 of 5 / No check digit q Code 3 of 9 / Mod 10 check digit q Codabar / Mod 10 check digit q Interleaved 2 of 5 / Follett check digit (Follett Classic) q Don’t know (Attach sample label or photocopy) q Code 3 of 9 / Mod 43 check digit Starting barcode number for this order only ________________________________ Barcode range to keep on file: ______________________________ to ______________________________ (please provide a range of 1,000 numbers) How many barcode labels per book? ______ Assign barcode #s to eBooks? ______

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3) CATALOGING CLASSIFICATION OPTIONS FOR CATALOG CARDS AND BARCODES/DISKETTES Check the desired option in each column. If no option is marked, the standard option, listed first in each column, will be used.

CLASSIFICATION PREFIX

Individual Biography q Follow nonfiction prefixes

specified page 2 (standard option)

q None

Easy Books (Fiction Grades K–3) q None (standard option) q J above call number q j above call number q Juv above call number q JUV above call number q Other constant _________

CLASSIFICATION OPTION

NUMBER OF MAIN ENTRY LETTERS

q B (standard option) q 92 q 921 q None q Other constant__________ q Dewey by subject

q 3 Biographee letters (standard option) q 2 Biographee letters q 1 Biographee letter q None q Biographee’s last name

q E (standard option) qF q Fic q FIC q None q Other constant__________

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

q F (standard option) q Fic q FIC q None q Other constant__________

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

Processing

Fiction Grades 4–8 q None (standard option) q J above call number q j above call number q Juv above call number q JUV above call number q Other constant__________

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EXAMPLES

Standard Options 2nd, 3rd, 5th Options

B Joh

921 Johnson

Standard Options 4th, 2nd, 1st Options

E Seu Standard Options

F Blu

Juv F Seu 5th, 1st, 2nd Options

JUV F Bl

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3) CATALOGING CLASSIFICATION OPTIONS (continued) CLASSIFICATION PREFIX

CLASSIFICATION OPTION

[ OFFICE USE

CUST_________________ ORD_____________ ]

NUMBER OF MAIN ENTRY LETTERS

EXAMPLES

Standard Options Fiction Grades 9 & above q None (standard option) q Other constant_________

q F (standard option) q Fic q FIC q None q Other constant__________

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

Standard Options

Nonfiction Grades K–3 q None (standard option) q J q above Dewey q in front of Dewey qj q above Dewey q in front of Dewey q Juv q above Dewey q in front of Dewey q JUV q above Dewey q in front of Dewey q E q above Dewey q in front of Dewey q Other constant__________

q Dewey number (standard option) q None

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

q Dewey number (standard option) q None

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

Nonfiction Grades 4–8 q None (standard option) q J q above Dewey q in front of Dewey qj q above Dewey q in front of Dewey q Juv q above Dewey q in front of Dewey q JUV q above Dewey q in front of Dewey q E q above Dewey q in front of Dewey q Other constant__________

F Fre

599 Bur

Standard Options

598 Car

3rd, 2nd Options

FIC Fr 2nd (above), 1st, 1st Options

J 599 Bur 3rd (front), 1st, 2nd Options

j598 Ca

q Use fiction workman lengths specified above (standard option)

Nonfiction Grades 9 & above q None (standard option) q Other constant__________

q Dewey number (standard option) q None

Graphic Fiction q None (standard option) q Graphic q GN q Other constant__________

q 741.5 (standard option) q Use fiction classifications specified above

Graphic Nonfiction

Standard Options

1st, 3rd Options

796.332 Ros

796.332 R

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

Standard Options

2nd, 1st, 3rd Options

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

Standard Options

Standard Options

q 4 Main entry letters q 3 Main entry letters q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

741.5 Jos

q Use fiction classifications specified

Collective Biography

q 920 (standard option) q BC q 92 q None q Other constant__________

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

q F (standard option) q Fic q FIC q 808.8 q SC q None q Other constant __________

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

q Dewey by language (standard option) q Dewey by subject

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

Standard Options

q Dewey by language (standard option) q Dewey by subject

Standard Options

q Dewey number

q 3 Main entry letters (standard option) q 2 Main entry letters q 1 Main entry letter q None q Author’s last name

q Follow nonfiction prefixes previously specified (standard option)

q None

Story Collections q Follow fiction prefixes previously specified (standard option)

q None

above (standard option)

q 741.5

Foreign Language q None (standard option)

(circle # of letter for next two options)

q 1 2 3 4 letters (3=Spa, 2=Sp, etc.) q 1 2 3 4 letters all caps (4=SPAN, etc.) q Whole name (Spanish, German, etc.) q Whole name capped (SPANISH, etc.)

Foreign Language Bilingual (English/Spanish): q Use English call number options on bilingual books

q Use Spanish call number options on bilingual books

Reference (Dictionaries and Encyclopedias) q None (standard option) q R above Dewey number q Ref above Dewey number q REF above Dewey number q Other constant __________

973.3 Jos

920 Jos Standard Options

F Kna

Standard Options

468 Mor

468 Mor

423 Mer

2nd, 1st, 3rd Options

741.5 J 2nd, 1st, 3rd Options

920 J 2nd, 4th, 2nd Options

808.8 Kn

2nd, 2nd, 2nd Options

Spa 613 Mo 2nd, 2nd, 2nd Options

Spa 613 Mo

Processing

q None (standard option) q Graphic q GN q Other constant__________

Fic J

4th, 1st, 3rd Options

REF 423 M

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119


3) CATALOGING CLASSIFICATION OPTIONS (continued) eBook Media Prefix q General Materials Designation (GMD) (standard option) q None q Other ____________________________________________________________ OTHER OPTIONS

All Main Entry Letters for this order to be q Upper/lower case (standard option) q All capitalized

Subject Headings for cards

Subject Headings for data disk

(pick one from list below)

(pick any or all from list below)

q Sears (standard option) q Library of Congress q Library of Congress Children’s (LCAC)

q Sears (standard option) q Library of Congress q Library of Congress Children’s (LCAC)

All Dewey numbers for this order to be q Abridged Dewey number (standard option) q End abridged Dewey number—please provide number of places after decimal point: _________________ .

SHELF-READY PROCESSING OPTIONS School/Library Name

Library Phone Number

Purchase Order Number

Library Fax Number

Contact Name

Library email address

Best time to call

If you purchased your cataloging attached, clear label protectors will be applied to all barcode and spine labels on books.

Outside Cover

FF

EE E

Inside Cover

AA A

BB B

J JJ

N K KKN N

O OO

CC C

DD D

L LL

MP P MM

Q QQ

II I

Sample 3 Horizontal

Sample 1

Sample 2

G GG

Reading bottom to top Reading top to bottom

HH H back

front

BARCODE 1 ATTACHMENT

BARCODE 2 ATTACHMENT

ACCELERATED READER LABEL ATTACHMENT

q A–Q _______________ q Book Pocket q Above Book Pocket

q A–Q _______________ q Book Pocket q Above Book Pocket

Reading Program Label (small)

Direction

Direction

Reading Program Label (large)

q Horizontal (SAMPLE 3) q Vertical Top to Bottom (SAMPLE 2) q Vertial Bottom to Top (SAMPLE 1)

q Horizontal (SAMPLE 3) q Vertical Top to Bottom (SAMPLE 2) q Vertial Bottom to Top (SAMPLE 1)

QR CODE ATTACHMENT

DATE DUE SLIP ATTACHMENT

QR Code 1 q A–Q _______________ q Back flyleaf q Front flyleaf

q Back flyleaf q Front flyleaf q Inside front cover q Inside back cover

back

q Above Spine Label q A–Q: _______________ q Above Spine Label q A–Q: _______________

SPINE LABEL ATTACHMENT

POCKET ATTACHMENT

q (1.5” from bottom) q (2” from bottom) q (.25” from bottom) q Other

q Back flyleaf q Front flyleaf q Inside front cover q Inside back cover

Processing

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS

120

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Purchase Order No.

Purchase Order No.

School

School

Attention

Attention

Address

Address

City

State Zip

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City

Tel# Fax#

State Zip

Tel# Fax#

email

email ISBN

$1.00–$100.00 $101.00–$500.00 $501.00–$1000.00 $1000.00+

Product

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QTY

SALES TAX (if applicable)

No returns accepted.

SHIPPING

Additional terms/charges for shipments outside the U.S.

TOTAL

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q

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Price

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