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ROSE & IVY JOURNAL WINTER 2015

no.

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ROSE & IVY JOURNAL EDITOR ALISON ENGSTROM DESIGNER MONICA PICCA

carly martin P H O T O G R APH E R tim woo

CONT R I B U TI NG A RT IS T CONT R I B U TI NG

For advertising, press, product consideration or to contribute to the spring issue please contact alison@roseandivyjournal.com


A LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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elcome to the winter issue of ROSE & IVY! After five months of hard work, I am pleased to bring you the second issue. It is no doubt that we live in a highly visual world, where our ideas of beauty constantly evolve. My mission is to continue to push this publication and include inspiring content, since we all seek beauty in its many forms. And with that, you might notice a few design changes from the first issue that launched in October, thanks to Monica Picca, a talented friend and designer who worked tirelessly to achieve a fresh perspective for this issue. I hope that you love it as much as I do.

At ROSE & IVY, we are passionate about beauty and passionate about passions. The winter issue is inspired by the heart that goes into the art of the craft. For this issue, I journeyed to Northern California, Napa and Sonoma, to the heart of California olive country to discover how olives are harvested from the trees and pressed into one of nature’s healthiest potions, olive oil. One of the highlights of this trip was visiting Tallgrass Ranch and assisting Nancy and Tony Lilly with their annual olive harvest. Back in Brooklyn,

the artisanal movement is one trend that continues to grow. Living in this thriving borough, I am constantly in awe of the creative talent that unfolds at every corner. With this talent comes unparalleled quality, which is exemplified by Toby’s Estate Coffee, Counter Culture and Raaka Chocolates, all featured in the issue. I also visited the light-filled Brooklyn studio of floral designer Ariel Dearie, an artisan that I have long admired for her dreamy bouquets that resemble a still-life painting. With cold days ahead, it is comforting to know that spring is around the bend. For the upcoming season I am eager to wear the rainbow of sorbet shades that adorned the runway, especially the pieces included in the ‘Light and Bright’ feature. I wish everyone a luxuriously cozy season ahead and be sure to follow the ROSE & IVY Journal blog for a daily dose of curated beauty. The spring issue will arrive in May, but in the meantime, I would love to hear from you. Please do not hesitate to contact me for questions, or to just say hello!

CH EERS,


56 WINTER TEA

M A R K E T S T U DY

64 A serene winter tea setting sure to warm-up any winter day.

7 STYLE NOTES

A compilation of all things style - from resorts best pieces, accessories on our radar to catching up with London-based ready to wear designer Edeline Lee.

23 BEAUTY NOTES

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Our favorite beauty winter finds from Kjaer Weis, Hourglass, Sisley and more.

HILLS OF PLE A journey to Northern California’s olive oil country, for an olive harvest.


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A BURST OF SUNSHINE

THE COFFEE RITUAL

Zesty citrus recipes guaranteed to brighten any dessert.

Discovering the art of the perfect cup.

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LIGHT & BRIGHT Springing forward with crisp white fashion paired with vibrant bursts of color.

NTY

100 109 R O YA L B O T A N I C A L S

A peak inside Brooklyn-based f lorist Ariel Dearie’s sun-drenched studio.

THE GOLDEN ELIXIR

Reimagining the use of olive oil by incorporating it into tempting recipes.

A SWEET MORSEL

119 W I N T E R’S WA R M T H

Delicious and hearty soup recipes that will warm you from the inside out.

Uncovering the world of bean to bar chocolate with Brooklyn based Raaka Chocolate.

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ST 6


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M A R K E T S T U DY

written, styled, photgraphed by

YL E

ALISON ENGSTROM


M A R K E T S T U DY ST Y L E N OT ES

L AURENCE DACADE

THE GOLDEN ANGLE This season we are being tempted by the luxurious shade of gold from Parisian accessory designer Laurence Dacade. Whether artfully splattered resembling a Jackson Pollack or overtly gilded and textured, these boots are bound to make a statement for the season ahead.


F E R R A R I F L AT B O O T I E

available at browns

B L AC K S U E D E B O O T I E W I T H G O L D S PL A S H

available at bergdorf goodman

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M A R K E T S T U DY ST Y L E N OT ES

IN THE NAVY This winter our go to handbag color is navy, either in the form of a bucket bag, the bag shape of the moment, or a sleek textured satchel.


H AY D E N S AT C H E L I N N AV Y

available at gigi new york

GIGI NE W YORK J E N N B U C K E T BAG I N N AV Y

available at gigi new york

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M A R K E T S T U DY ST Y L E N OT ES

DESIGN ER DE TA ILS

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EDELINE LEE

ith an impressive design background of working at the ateliers of Alexander McQueen, John Galliano and Zac Posen, it was only a matter of time before Edeline Lee ventured out on her own. It was through her work with jewelry designer Cora Sheibana, who commissioned her to design a collection to display her jewelery, that private orders began coming in and thus her namesake collection was born. ROSE & IVY caught up with the London-based designer to discover where she draws her inspiration, the upcoming fall collection and how she defines beauty.

I MA G ES

courtesy of the designer

Before you launched your eponymous line, you had an impressive résumé apprenticing at Alexander McQueen and John Galliano. How did their approach to design influence your own line’s aesthetic? I learned that nothing was impossible, that an idea could be followed through to the finest point. I still believe in telling a story through a collection, and that is what we do in our presentations each season. Women have so many layers and facets; for me, it is a way to capture the spirit of the woman that wears the clothes and ultimately gives them life.

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M A R K E T S T U DY ST Y L E N OT ES

DESIGNER D E TA I L S

How have you seen your collections evolve since your design debut in 2012? Each collection has been a reflection of something that I believe in and care about, while at the same time my skills and vision as a designer have been evolving. Running your own small label is an interesting thing. You have so many restrictions and limitations with time and resources. Yet, you have this amazing platform to say something each season. It really tests your ability as a designer to produce something good, while at the same time you are juggling 20 balls. I feel like I have so much more that I want to say and I hope that I will have the opportunity to keep on doing this for a long time. Each of your pieces is handmade in England, which is incredibly refreshing. Why is the hand-touch so important to you? I believe in slow fashion. A dress that is cut and made with years of experience, love and craftsmanship has integrity and a soul. I believe clothes should be appreciated, so we can buy less, but buy better. Your spring col-

I BELIE V E IN SLOW FA SHION. A DR ESS TH AT IS CU T A ND M A DE W ITH Y E A R S OF EX PER IENCE , LOV E A ND CR A FTSM A NSHIP H A S IN TEGR IT Y A ND A SOUL .

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M A R K E T S T U DY ST Y L E N OT ES

DESIGNER D E TA I L S

lection incorporates a beautiful array of colors and feminine silhouettes. Where did you draw your inspiration for the collection? I was inspired by the process of restoring and decorating my Victorian flat in East London. I took down a couple of walls on my own, a seriously empowering thing to do! And I discovered that building construction is not all that different from construction in clothing. There is the foundation, and then the structure, the lining, the layers and the seams. Then there is the way that you join the seams, the mitred joints, the measurements, the careful use of colour, the composition of a space, and the attention to detail in the finishing. I collaborated with the British heritage paint company Little Greene to choose my palette for the season and build the house sets to display them in. The film for this season (directed by Lily Silverton) juxtaposes images from my house with the clothes. Can you give us any hints for what is to come for the fall 2015 collection? I've been working on an anthropological study of the Edeline Lee woman! At Rose & Ivy Journal we are passionate about beauty and seek it in all of its forms. How do you define beauty? Beauty is integrity. It’s something internal.

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BEAUTY IS INTEGR ITY. IT'S SOMETHING INTER NAL. ”

“I BELIEVE CLOTHES SHOULD BE APPRECIATED, SO WE CAN BUY LESS, BUT BUY BETTER.


M A R K E T S T U DY ST Y L E N OT ES

R E S O R T READY While the majority of the world is under a blanket of snow, the idea of slipping away to a tropical destination sounds like pure luxury. Right now, we are craving shades of blue and white from the latest resort collections.

ONE

band of outsiders stripe eyelet cotton chambray jumpsuit

j & yoni p tulle-trimmed cotton-jersey dress embroidered cotton blend skirt FIVE

FOUR

SEVEN

steve

tory burch cecile

topshop lace overlay sundress

suno embroidered cotton canvas mini skirt cotton shirt dress

THREE

T WO

SIX

alexander wang oxford

sea cutout embroidered cotton-voile top

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M A R K E T S T U DY ST Y L E N OT ES

D E N I M REFRESH During the spring collections, denim received a high-fashion makeover, from embellished jewels at Dolce & Gabbana to roomy overalls at Sonya Rykiel. For the season ahead denim is softer, textured, printed and even collaged, breathing new life into this wardrobe staple.

ONE

suno floral print denim culottes

denim dress

THREE

T WO

preen line alabama embroidered

sea japanese railraod denim overcoat

FOUR

alexa chung

for ag jeans the kety denim skirt F I V E m missoni bow embellished denim top SIX

jimmy choo attila denim effect suede point toe flats

composite denim top skirt

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EIGHT TEN

SEVEN

rachel comey

vince collarless denim dress N I N E tibi denim midi

sibling distressed denim pencil skirt


BE A 22


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M A R K E T S T U DY

written, styled, photgraphed by

UTY

ALISON ENGSTROM


M A R K E T S T U DY B E AU T Y N OT ES

ON THE VANITY

R O YA L B O TA N I C A L S

available at R OYA L B O TA N I CA L S .C O M

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elaxing in a bath is one of our favorite indulgences. The only element that makes the bathing ritual more luxurious is a product that induces relaxation and boasts healing properties. The Rose Geranium Bath Soak from Royal Botanicals is currently our go to product for long winter soaks. We love its uplifting aroma. Started by Brooklyn-based florist Ariel Dearie (see her profile on page 87), the line encompasses soothing bath products in vintage apothecary style packaging that are definitely worthy of display.

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M A R K E T S T U DY B E AU T Y N OT ES

kjaer weis pretty in pink

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hen it comes to organic makeup, you typically have to sacrifice a pure formula with packaging that might reflect this stripped-back beauty approach. Kjaer Weis is our newest beauty crush for that reason; not only are her products certified organic, but they are packaged in sleek mirrored compacts making good for you products and beautiful packaging not mutually exclusive. This February, she is launching an exclusive lip tint trio with Net-A-Porter in the prettiest of shades ranging from a light pink to a deep aubergine hue.

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available exclusively at N E T-A- P O R T E R


M A R K E T S T U DY B E AU T Y N OT ES

sisley winter beauty French beauty brand Sisley is on our radar this season, from a multi-tasking lotion to a dark spot vanisher, all which will allow you to put your best face forward. essential skincare lotion Sisleÿa Essential Skin Care Lotion is the newest

addition to our skincare regimen and the answer to our winter skincare woes. This lotion acts as a sheer veil that your daily beauty products can be layered upon. Formulated with Marshmallow Extract, which helps to protect the moisture barrier, while Gingko Biloba Extract tones and revitalizes lackluster skin promoting radiance. (available march 2015) intensive dark spot corrector This product holds the key to help-

ing reduce unwanted dark spots on the complexion due to excessive sun exposure or oxidative stress – all with the touch of a rollerball. This miracle-worker is formulated with a patent-pending Lightening Complex, which includes a continuous release Vitamin C derivative and rhubarb extract, which both help to combat dark spots. phyto 4 ombre in mystery We love to make a statement and what better

way than with your eyes? Phyto 4 Ombres in Mystery delivers high-impact color in shades like Gun, a moody gray, to Denim, a deep sapphire blue.  Formulated with green tea leaf, white lily petals and camellia oil, this formula glides effortlessly on the lid with a luxurious velvet texture that feels like a cream.  phyto-lip twist Phyto-Lip Twist  is the hybrid that we crave when

it comes to lip color. It delivers a brilliant color, while imparting a healthy dose of shine. The shades span the rainbow from a barely there nude to crimson red. Right now we are loving Cherry, an intense red, which bridges the perfect line between crimson and merlot.  

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M A R K E T S T U DY B E AU T Y N OT ES

available at BA R N E YS

sunday riley effortless breathable tinted primer

I

n our hectic and fast-paced lives, it is essential to stop and breathe. The same goes for the foundation that you blend into your skin every morning. You want a product that will allow your skin to inhale and products that will not weigh you down. Sunday Riley’s Effortless Breathable Tinted Primer is an oilfree and oxygen-rich pigmented primer that works overtime. It increases the skin’s elasticity and collagen levels, while simultaneously replenishing the skin’s moisture, which is crucial during the winter. It comes in three shades (light, medium and dark) and practically melts into the skin.

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available at sephora H O U R G L A S S M O D E R N I S T E Y E S H A D OW PA L E T T E F E AT U R E D I N M O N O C H R O M E ( R O S E )


M A R K E T S T U DY B E AU T Y N OT ES

hourglass the modernist eyeshadow palette

E

very once in while an eyeshadow palette comes around that makes us do a double-take. This is the case with Hourglass’s new Modernist eyeshadow palette. Each compact features five different shades that blend into each other beautifully, like a rippling sand dune. This finely milled powder feels like a cream and blends effortlessly into the lid without creasing. With an array of shades to choose from, we love the Monochrome Palette, pictured here, which includes shades like warm ivory, dusty rose and dark chocolate.

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ROS IVY


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E & WINTER 2015 JOURNAL


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HILLS OF

P L E NT Y AN OLIVE HARVEST written and photgraphed by

P

ALISON ENGSTROM

icture this: rolling green hills dotted with towering cypress trees, olive trees perched on a hill and rows of meandering grape vines delicately kissed with shades of crimson and gold. One would think that they had their passport stamped and were visiting a land with a foreign tongue.  But alas, you are in Northern California, along the outskirts of San Francisco in the undulating valleys home to Napa and Sonoma.


I ARRIVED I  arrived in San Francisco at the end of November, just as the morning fog was beginning to lift from the city known for its steep hills. My goal of this trip was to learn about the heart that goes into the art of maintaining an olive grove, harvesting olives and milling them into the highest quality extra virgin olive oil. For this excursion, I partnered with the California Olive Oil Council (COOC), an esteemed organization that educates and oversees the production and certification of oil from the harvests that are yielded each year. With high standards and with over 400 members, including growers and producers, the COOC ensures that you will be consuming the highest quality olive oil with the maximum amount of health benefits. My guide for the weekend was Lisa Pollack, the Marketing Director for the COOC. She lives and breathes olive oil on a daily basis. She taught me how to taste olive oil (see page 107) and how to discern the different qualities that merit a quality oil.

She also served as my trusty guide to help me uncover the beauty in Napa and Sonoma. lives arrived in California with the Spanish missionaries in the late 18th Century and were planted between San Diego and Sonoma. They thrived due to the similar climate in Spain. In the 20th century, olive oil demand went down and it wasn’t until a new generation of health-conscious consumers allowed for the industry to thrive once again.

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A BO V E

the captivating landscape of the capay mountains

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The olive is a fruit that is extremely high in antioxidants, polyphenols and healthy monounsaturated fats that give way to many health benefits including staving off heart disease and various types of cancers.

toasts. There we meet the Other Brother, two first-generational farmers that planted olive trees on their family’s property fifteen years ago. Started by Ben Herrmann and Evan Loewy, who are to the contrary not ur first mission is to discover actually brothers, were both working California olive oil that is incor- for large corporations, Ben at Google porated in restaurants and cafÊs and Evan at Nike. Like so many, they around San Francisco. We began were not completely fulfilled with the at The Mill, a bakery and coffee corporate life and decided to take the shop that mills their own flour and leap and turn their passion for food is known for their mouth-watering into their own brand three years ago.

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W H AT ’ S I N T H E N A M E ?

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decoding your olive oil

t can be quite confusing when choosing an olive oil, with labels and names that often times are not necessary to what is inside

the bottle. The COOC has developed stricter standards than international requirments by employing a Taste Panel, where the oils are rigorously tested and only those that are free of defects are certified extra virgin. Be sure to look for the COOC seal on the packaging, to ensure that you are purchasing the highest grade oil. Below is a guide that will take the guesswork out of purchasing your next bottle. And take note, there are three things that are detrimental to olive oil – light, air and heat, so make sure the product that you purchase is in a light sensitive bottle.

FIRST COLD PRESSED

First cold pressed is actually a marketing term, which means the olive was pressed once; however, unlike extra virgin olive oil, this does not signify that the oil was not exposed to excessive heat or multiple presses.

EXTRA VIRGIN

This variety is the highest grade that an oil can be awarded. It is free of defects, such as taste flaws and is produced without any chemicals or extreme heat.


“From the first white flowers that appear on the tree in June, to the fruit that begins to grow and ripen from a rich shade of olive green to deep purple , both Herrmann

and Loewy are fully involved in the olive oil making process.”

From the first white flowers that appear on the tree in June, to the fruit that begins to grow and ripen from a rich shade of olive green to deep purple, both Herrmann and Loewy are fully involved in the olive oil making process. They take part in the planting and maintaining until the very last olive is harvested and pressed in November.

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ur first stop outside the city was Séka Hills, a sprawling farm located on 13,000 acres of land at the foothills of the Capay Mountains, belonging to the Native American Tribe, Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation. The word ‘Séka’, means ‘blue’ in the Patwin language, the tribe’s indigenous dialect, which was named after the bluish tint that the mountains turn when the sun casts down upon their peaks. Jim Etters is the Director of Land Management at Séka Farms and provided us with a tour of the olive grove and a walk-through the process

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herrmann and loewy

R IG H T

B E L OW

the stunning vista from tallgrass ranch


of creating a bottle of olive oil from har- O L I O N U O V O vest to bottle. Their olive oil, in addition to honey and wine from their vineyards, can be purchased at their newly opened ‘Olio Nuovo’ or ‘new oil’ is the first Tasting Room, a bright space made of oil press of the season. It has a reclaimed wood (the bar is made from greenish hue, versus golden and it’s vintage wine barrels) that looks out onto polyphenol content is unparalleled. newly planted olive trees. Together we Typically, olive oil is pressed and traveled down a winding road, past per- then left to set in large barrels for fectly lined walnut and almond trees to the sharp flavors to mellow out. This a dirt road that led us to the olive grove. version is pressed and then bottled Typically, olive trees are free-standing and meant to be consumed within 6 and planted in a row, however on that months after opening the bottle. particular day he introduced a new form of olive growing known as the super high-density method. This approach allows for the olives to be harvested by machine versus by hand. Like grapes, the olives grow into tall bushes and become entwined with one another, which allows for an easier harvest. Etters assures us that this yields the same quality of olive oil, as if the fruit had been harvested by hand. The Séka Hills philosophy is to honor the legacy of their ancestors that inhabited the land before them and preserve the landscape and natural balance of the land, while placing a focus on conservation and sustainability.

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he next stop on my tour is Grove 45, located in the Chiles Valley on a picturesque farm in a remote section of Napa. Owners Nena Talcott and Bonnie Storm were on the cusp of retirement, when over lunch in 2009, they agreed to share responsibility of Storm’s farm, which included an olive grove. In 1994, Storm imported 1,000 Tuscan olive trees from Italy including Frantoio, Leccino, Maurino and Pendolino varieties and originally sold the oil under the

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name Storm Olive Oil. She grew tired of the marketing element and ended production, but not before receiving many accolades and gold stars. Together they decided to bring to market small-batch olive oil that went from the tree directly into the bottle. They would call it Grove 45, after the year they were both born. Packaged in a sleek silver package, each bottle is hand-filled and hand-labeled on Storm’s farm breathing new life into the word handcrafted.

ON MY FINAL O

n my final day we visited Sonoma - an idyllic terrain with undulating hills, grazing cattle, vineyards and olive trees. It is home to Tallgrass Ranch, located on a breathtaking 14,000 acres with sweeping views of the San Francisco Bay. Driving up the three-mile road to the grove you

feel as if you are driving into paradise, something

otherworldly.

Sand

col-

ored wild grasses cover the hills while shadows create a dramatic look and

deepen the colors from light to dark.

We arrived bright and early to assist

in the olive harvest, an annual gath-

ering with friends and family to usher in the end of harvest season. When we

arrived, the nets were gently laid below the trees and dogs are frolicking in the grove perched on a hillside that resembles Italy’s Cinque Terre. The trees are heavy with fruit and consist of the Tuscan varietals Frantoio and Leccino and the French variety Columella and Aglandau. A group of about 40 people, some who had traveled from across the country and even ocean, were already hard at work eagerly picking the purple and green olives, which were still fresh from the morning dew and dropping them into buckets. There were many trees to harvest; the ranch has 250 in total. While harvesting, it was impossible

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Y L

a shady knoll at tallgrass ranch; grove 45, the bucolic olive farm in the chiles valley TOP t o BOTTOM


not to turn around every few minutes to look at the vista that surrounded you, since you were enveloped by nature’s beauty every way that you turned. Nancy and Tony Lilly, the owners of the ranch inherited the land from her late-father who purchased it in 1940. Nancy serves on the COOC Taste Panel. Today, she and her husband have a functioning vineyard on the rolling hillside and land where Black Angus cattle graze in the winter season. After the harvest, we gather at the top of the hill to help with the sorting. We are instructed to remove the stems from the olives and discard any that had been damaged by fruit flies. We then pile the olives, a myriad of vibrant shades of green and purple, into a yellow bin to get carried away to the mill to be pressed the next day.

AFTER THE HARVEST Our final stop is The Olive Press, located just outside the Sonoma town square, where


“ While harvesting, it was impossible not to turn around every few minutes to look at the vista that surrounded you, s ince you w ere env elo p ed b y na ture’s b ea uty e very w ay that y o u turned .”

a rainbow of french and italian olives

BEL OW


A BO V E

the olive harvest at tallgrass ranch

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we meet with miller Chris Gilmore, a New York City transplant. The Olive Press, the first olive oil mill to open in Sonoma and Gilmore is giving us a tour. He demonstrates how the olives are washed and careen along the conveyer belt and make their way to the hammer mill where the pits, skins and twigs are removed. The olives are then turned into a paste and are heated between 80 and 82 degrees Fahrenheit in a machine called a malaxer. This device begins the separation of the paste which is when the oils are released. Next the oil goes into the separator and removes all of the water which yields the final product olive oil.

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ack in New York a few weeks later, I received a package that included the Tallgrass Ranch olive oil from the olives that I had helped harvest. I opened the bottle, placed it into my blue tasting glass, warmed it in my hand and gently slurped down the oil. Its golden hue and distinct taste warmed my throat. It was peppery, buttery and laced with green nuances. It was a wonderful reminder of the beauty of that exists in Northern California and the heart that goes into the art of crafting each bottle of olive oil.

a special thanks to CA L I F O R N I A O L I V E O I L C O U N C I L

BACK IN


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WINTER

tea

T

he cold winter months call for an inviting setting where warming textures, like cozy wool and plush velvet, in dusty tones, come together to create a serene and airy vignette.

available at h&m home similar available at h&m home

L I G H T P I N K T H R OW V E LV E T W H I T E C U S H I O N C OV E R


written, styled, photgraphed by ALISON ENGSTROM

V I N TAG E W H I T E C H A I R S

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courtesy of rent patina


Delicate pink quince blossoms are set against a brightly lit corner allowing the season’s gentle light to shine down on a table set for tea.

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QUINCE BLOSSOMS

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uince blossoms grace local flower markets from January until May. They are adored for their feminine and graceful pink and white flower clusters that blossom effortlessly from their branches. They are a great addition to a table setting since only a few branches are needed to create a lovely focal point. In this setting, five trimmed branches are arranged in a galvanized metal vase perfectly accentuating the hue of the petals.

available at jamali garden S AU C E R S vintage

A N T I Q U E D Z I N C F R E N C H VA S E F LO R A L T E A C U P S &

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B L AC K I R O N T E A P O T

similar

MARIAGE FRÈRES

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ur hearts have fallen for mariage frères, the oldest tea house in Paris, known for both its elegance and creativity. They also established the concept of French tea, amidst a sea of espresso drinkers. Founded in 1854, Mariage Frères is France’s premier tea house, still in existence on rue du Bourg-Tibourg in the charming Marais section of Paris. With over 600 tea varieties that have been carefully selected from 36 countries, each shop is outfitted with a tea sommelier. Just like wine, they have vintages, unique harvests and special editions. Packaged in a signature sleek black tin package, each blend is carefully crafted to achieve the highest quality.

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We recommend the marco polo black tea blend that incorporates Chinese and Tibetan flowers that lends a mysterious, velvety taste.

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The paris-marais is a refreshing green tea blend that incorporates spicy ginger notes that meld together with fresh rose petals and uplifting citrus making for the perfect afternoon tea.

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T H E A R T O F T H E PE R F E C T C U P O F

tea

T

ea is associated with ritual. Creating the perfect cup depends on local and individual tastes. To help guide you, Mariage Frères has developed the following guidelines to help you achieve the perfect cup, every time.

WAT E R Q U A L I T Y & T E M P E R AT U R E

Water should be pure, so opt for filtered water that is just simmering (around 90° Celsius or 203° Fahrenheit). Incorporating boiling water will result in damaged tea leaves that could have a negative impact on the aroma and flavor. It is also essentail to preheat the teapot by rinsing it with boiling water before using. QUANTIT Y

Investing in a cast iron tea kettle is highly recommended for an authentic tea experience. Place one teaspoon of tea in the warm strainer and let it set for a few moments, allowing the steam to release the aroma of the leaves. METHOD

Pour the simmering water on the tea so that the leaves become saturated. Let the tea steep for 3 to 5 minutes depending on the desired intensity. Remove the strainer and pour the tea into a cup. Stir the tea to evenly distribute flavors.

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A SWEET ADDITION

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airing warm fragrant tea with something beautiful and sweet will make the setting complete. We are partial to French desserts that are artfully arranged and accented with plump berries and dusted with powdered sugar. Here, sweet confections from Mille-feuille Bakery & CafĂŠ in New York take center stage. A millefeuille is a flaky puff pastry layered between decadent vanilla pastry cream. The Ispahan is a mouth-watering treat with a vibrant pink macaron exterior that is filled with heavenly flavors of lychee, rose and raspberry, perfectly complimenting the fruity and floral aromas in the tea.

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available at west elm available at h&m home

B O R D E R S T I T C H N A PK I N S I N PL AT I N U M / S L AT E G O L D M E TA L CA K E S TA N D


LIGHT

and

BRIGHT styled by

ALISON ENGSTROM

photographed by

T I M WO O


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TRANS

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D R O PPE D S K I R T L AC E D R E S S

available at veronica beard

S PA R E N T

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EON THE NEON PINK AND NUDE EMBROIDERED SHIF T DRES S

available online at veronica beard

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PERFORATED

K I M H A L L E R E M I LY D R E S S

available online at opening ceremony


LACE

T H E W H I T E M A R I N E R PI N T U C K E D T E E

available at Veronica Beard


BEAUTY NOTES A D D A P O P O F PI N K W I T H

smashbox’s be legendary lipstick in electric pink T H E Y E L LOW A N D W H I T E L AC E C U LO T T E

available spring 2015 at veronica beard

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F R I N G E D E TA I L S

CRISP WHITES S E A F R I N G E D C O T T O N T- S H I R T D R E S S

available at net-a-porter 77


FUSCHIA K I M H A L L E R K E L LY D R E S S

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SIMMON ORANGE LINEN SHORTS

available spring 2015 at veronica beart S H O R T S L E E V E D L AY E R E D S I L K T E E

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A

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PRICOT

LIPS BEAUTY NOTES

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L AU R A B U R N S

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and

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artwork by

CA R LY M A R T I N

written, styled, photgraphed by

ALISON ENGSTROM

SU


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N S HIN E O

n winter days when it feels like the sun’s warmth is months away, it is comforting to know that you can add a little zest and sunshine into your life by just adding citrus. From a pomelo, with its chartreuse exterior and watermelon-hued interior to a fiery Sumo mandarin with textured skin, citrus adds color and sweetness to the season. These vibrant fruits, packed with vitamins and minerals, are versatile and can be incorporated into sweet or savory dishes, like buttery pound cake and perfectly tart citrus shortbread cookies dusted with powdered sugar.

RECIPE ON NEXT PAGE

citrus vanilla bean pound cake with a blood orange glaze


C ITRU S VA N IL L A B E AN P O U ND C AK E WITH A B L O O D OR A NG E G LAZ E Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Generously grease a loaf pan* and set aside. Place butter in a large bowl and beat with mixer until fluffy. Add sugar and salt and continue to beat until combined. Add the eggs, vanilla bean, zest and orange juice. Slowly add the flour and mix until combined. Pour batter into pan. Bake for 40 minutes or until a knife can be inserted into the middle and comes out clean. Let cool in pan on a rack. Once cooled gently remove cake from pan. To make glaze: Place juice, zest and powdered sugar in a small bowl and stir together. Add milk one tablespoon at a time. Continue to add milk until desired consistency is achieved. Drizzle over pound cake. Garnish with orange slices if desired before serving. * makes one large loaf or three mini loaves


P O U N D CA K E

2 sticks unsalted butter, softened 1 cup sugar ½ teaspoon salt 5 eggs 1 vanilla bean, seeds removed zest of one orange one orange, juiced 1 ½ cups flour B LO O D O R A N G E G L A Z E

juice of one blood orange zest of one blood orange ¾ cup powdered sugar 2 tablespoons milk*, whole or skim

*orange slices, for garnish


P O M EL S P R I TZ 1 large pink pomelo, juiced 1 cup water ½ cup sugar chilled sparkling water, to taste sliced lemon for garnish sugar for garnish

*serves 2

Place 1 cup of water and sugar in a heavybottomed saucepot over low heat. Allow sugar to dissolve. Let chill in the refrigerator. presentation Divide pomelo juice into two

glasses. Add desired amount of simply syrup and seltzer. Garnish with a lemon slice rolled in sugar.


O ER

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for lemon curd Combine yolks, sugar,

juice and zest in a heavy bottomed saucepan. Over medium heat whisk constantly until mixture thickens and can coat the back of a wooden spoon. Stir in butter and return to heat until butter has melted. Pour through a fine sieve, to remove any egg that might have cooked, and place into a jar. Place a layer of plastic wrap on top of curd to prevent hardening. Chill until curd has completely cooled. for shortbread cookies Preheat oven to

375 degrees. Using an electric mixer, beat softened butter until fluffy. Add sugar, lemon juice and zest. Beat until combined. Add flour and continue to mix until dough is combined. Chill dough in the refrigerator if you are not immediately ready to use it. If ready, flour a working surface. Roll dough until it is 1/8 inch thick (more or less depending on how you prefer your shortbread). Using a circular cookie cutter, cut out dough. Place onto a cookie sheet. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or just until set. You do not want to over-bake since you want the cookies to be soft. Let cool completely on a rack. for cookie assembly Place 1 tablespoon

of chilled lemon curd in the center of a cookie. Place another on top to create a sandwich. Repeat until finished. Dust with powdered sugar before serving.

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C I TRUS SHO RTBREAD C O O KI E SANDWI C HES SHORTBREAD

2 sticks unsalted butter, softened juice from ½ a lemon zest from 1 lemon ½ cup sugar 2 cups flour LE M O N C U R D

6 egg yolks ¾ cup sugar ½ cup lemon juice from about 2 lemons zest from 1 lemon 1 stick unsalted butter, diced

*makes 18 sandwich cookies *powdered sugar, for garnish, if desired


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THE COF F E E RITU A L N

estling into a coffee shop is one of the little luxuries in life. Enveloped by the aroma of freshly ground beans, the sound of quiet chatter and the clinking of coffee cups being placed on the saucer; this is the café life.  Today, there are a growing number of coffee TODAY, THERE ARE A GROWING lovers that seek out not only NUMBER OF COFFEE LOVERS THAT the coffee shop experience, SEEK OUT NOT ONLY THE COFFEE but also great tasting coffee. SHOP EXPERIENCE, BUT ALSO Long gone in their vocabulary GREAT TASTING COFFEE ... is the term ‘burnt’ coffee.  In cities, big and small, you are still surrounded by the inevitable chain, but today, more and more independent shops are opening to showcase their expertise and passion.  There is one constant amongst all - there is a lot of heart that goes into sourcing, roasting, brewing and even the latte art.


written, styled, photgraphed by

ALISON ENGSTROM

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NESTLING IN TO A COFFEE SHOP IS ONE OF THE LIT TLE LU XUR IES IN LIFE ...” ROSE & IVY set out to uncover the world of coffee, from sourcing the beans sustainably to roasting them and brewing the perfect cup at home. toby’s estate coffee is a thriving Brooklyn coffee shop

(with locations also in Manhattan). It is known for its curated walls (think vintage mason jars and trinkets) and a bustling café scene of eager coffee goers, both local and foreign, eager to slip into their plush seating. Every Tuesday, the shop hosts a dynamic cupping session. In these sessions, coffee enthusiasts learn how to not only taste coffee, but also discern the various notes that swirl inside of each cup. The session was held by Michael Sadler, Toby’s resident Coffee Educator, who guides us through the process of tasting the coffee that they roast at the shop.  In front of us are four different types of coffee - the Wyeth, El Tambor, Konga and the Flat Iron blend along with food samples that emulate the notes in each coffee. When tasting coffee there are three characteristics that we are told to look for: sweetness, brightness and balance. Coffee containing all three of these characteristics yields a quality cup.  Sadler places freshly ground coffee in a small bowl, which he then saturates with hot water. He demonstrates how to ‘break’ the coffee, something specific to the industry in which you let the gasses rush out and allow for the hot aroma hit your nose. Do we smell green

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“...Enveloped by the aroma of freshly ground beans, the sound of quiet chatter and the clinking of coffee cups being placed on the saucer; this is the cafĂŠ life.


grapes? Earl Gray tea? Salted caramel or walnuts, he asked with each corresponding blend. Unearthing the exact aroma was a bit challenging, but we are told that it gets easier once you actually sip it. Next, we tasted the coffee by doing it the way that the coffee professionals do. We slurped it in quickly with conviction using a spoon and letting the flavors dance around on our tongues.  It is there that you can truly taste the flavors that he had on the table – ah yes, the tartness of a green grape breaks through and tempers with the full-bodied saltiness of caramel, which can be found in their El Tambor blend.  Having the palette

to taste coffee is like developing a palette for anything – wine, chocolate or olive oil. The more that you taste it the easier it will be to discover the nuances in each. Later that week, I arrive at counter culture Coffee’s bright and airy new education space on Broome Street, in the heart of Soho. I, along with about fifteen other coffee enthusiasts are eagerly awaiting their Friday morning public cupping session to begin and to kick my caffeine consumption into high gear. The session is led by Meister, a coffee professional who walks us through the blends that we would taste. Based in North Carolina, Counter Culture, who celebrates their 20th anniversary this year, sources their beans from farmers with whom they have developed a close relationship, which is essential for developing consistent quality. Meister advises that when we taste the blends, we should be looking for three things: the sparkle, or the brightness of the roast; the body, how it feels in the mouth and the aftertaste. In this session, we are tasting the Underdog, a new limited-edition coffee that blends beans from Papa New Guinea and Burundi – the latter is new on the specialty coffee map. This roast is created using the natural sundried approach, which is an ancient method where the cherry fruit dries around the seed and is left to bake in the sun. This approach yields a coffee that has fruitier notes like tart strawberry and sweet raspberry.   Roasting coffee plays another critical role in the overall experience of each blend. 


Clark Le Compte, is the head roaster at Toby’s Estate in Williamsburg. His job entails roasting the beans as he sees fit and then supplying them to various locations.  Coffee roasting is a craft that he honed while working as an assistant brewer until he joined Toby’s Estate last October. The art of roasting is a craft that has to be massaged and meddled until the perfect taste is created. Le Compte is gaining ground in the industry by winning the Southeast regional Brewers Cup. He will be competing for title of U.S. Champion Brewer later this year. While there isn’t a specific formula to creating the perfect cup, since some coffee drinkers prefer varying degrees of strength, there are certain guidelines to help you create a memorable cup from the first sip to the last. ROSE & IVY gathered the fundamentals for brewing the perfect cup.

THE ART OF THE PERFECT CUP

Grinding your beans just before using them is the first step to guaranteeing that you will have the best cup every time, advises Sadler. Also, use freshly roasted beans. Many companies list the roast date on the bottom of the package. INVEST IN A GOOD GRINDER.

Brew coffee with filtered water that has been heated between 195 to 205 degrees.Sadler advises that using filtered is the best because coffee is 98% water. WAT E R Q UA LI T Y C O U N T S .

Use one ounce of freshly ground coffee per 16 fluid ounces of water. If you like stronger coffee add more grounds. THE COFFEE TO WATER R ATIO FACTOR.

S T O R AG E . Store

coffee beans in an airtight container. Avoid sunlight or extreme heat, cold or moisture. Never store beans in the freezer or refrigerator; this can lead to the beans absorbing other aromas. 

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ROYAL a conversation with

W

ARIEL DEARIE

alking into Ariel Dearie’s sunlit Brooklyn studio you are immediately greeted by bouquets of flowers. Barely there peach garden roses, yellow peonies, as bright as the sun, and hardy white tallow berries are in the fray on that particular day, just waiting to be arranged by her skilled hand. She is sought after for her still-life inspired arrangements that gently cascade from a stone urn or smaller bouquets that are artfully arranged. She is one creative adding beauty to this world one flower at a time.  With a growing floral business and bath line, Royal Botanicals (see the profile on page 22), ROSE & IVY caught up with the floral designer and learned where she draws her inspiration from and how she defines beauty. 


artwork by

CA R LY M A R T I N

written, styled, photgraphed by

ALISON ENGSTROM


THE DESIGNER

Y

our flowers are like a painting and floral arranging is definitely an expression of art, where do you draw your inspiration? When creating arrangements, I try to find the most beautiful flowers, plants and other botanical elements. I then look to these elements for their most outstanding quality and try to emphasize that, whether it be the line of the stem, the petals or the shape of the bloom.

W

hat were your first experiences with flowers that made you decide to make it your craft and profession? When I was managing Five Leaves restaurant, the owner would occasionally ask me to do the flowers when she went out of town. I remember thinking what a great job it would be.

“W HEN CR EATING AR R ANGEMENTS, I TRY TO FIND THE MOST BEAUTIFUL FLOW ER S, PL A N TS A ND OTHER BOTANICAL ELEMENTS.” 103


“I LOV E MOST THINGS JA PA NESE . R A N U NCULUS A ND A NEMONES BEING PA RT IC U L A R FAVOR I T E S .�

W

hat are the key elements to creating one of your signature arrangements? I focus a lot on creating a sculptural shape and then creating air and movement within that shape.

Y

our work features a lot of great textures and colors; do you have a general rule when combining different flowers and foliage? There are certainly no set rules, but I do try to limit an arrangement to 3-5 different elements total. I think that this allows the eye to focus on the textures and colors without being distracted.

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I

am sure that it is hard to play favorites, but is there a particular flower that is your favorite? I love most things Japanese. Japanese Ranunculus and Anemones being particular favorites.

Y

ou are very lucky to be surrounded by beautiful flowers everyday; how do you define beauty? I feel very lucky to work with such a beautiful medium, especially in a city like New York, where nature is such a rarity.

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T H E B AT H L I N E

W

hat prompted you to start Royal Botanicals? What came first, flowers or the BATH line? I started the flower studio in the Spring of 2011. Later that year, I found myself with a little bit of downtime between wedding seasons and was ready for an additional project that would be complimentary to the flower studio. My friend Katy Smail (an amazing illustrator ) and I were talking about it and came up with the idea of botanical bath soaks. The packaging is beautiful with a retro nod. what inspired the design of the bottle? I wanted to create a product that felt beautiful and classic and could stand on it's own, as something lovely that you'd want to have in your bathroom. What is your philosophy on beauty rituals? How do you want people to feel experiencing your products? I think beauty rituals are a thing of luxury and should be treated as such. One reason I love our bath soak is that using it forces you to slow down, relax and pamper yourself. What is unique about the line? We spend a lot of time developing the scents and try to create ones that are pleasing and unique, but also have aromatherapeutic properties. Where is Royal Botanicals sold? Are there plans to expand the lines offering? Royal Botanicals is sold online (royalbotanicalsnyc.com) and at stores around the US. We just worked with Catbird on an exclusive bath soak for their store called thousand rose. It's a lovely scent that combines the softness of rose with the velvety spice of sandalwood. We have several ideas for new products for the (hopefully) near future. We cannot wait to see what is unveiled next.

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written, styled, photgraphed by

ALISON ENGSTROM


olive oil

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the golden

SECRET INGREDIENT

O

live oil has been in existence for centuries. In fact, it is believed that the olive was first cultivated nearly 6,000 years ago. The ancient Romans and Greeks used this golden elixir as a cleanser, while various religions incorporated it into ceremonial rituals. Today integrating extra virgin olive oil into your diet and even beauty regime will yield favorable results. Rich in polyphenols, oleic acid and phytonutrients, olive oil can reduce inflammation in the body and fendoff heart disease, cancer and even premature aging. When cooking or baking it is perfectly acceptable to substitute olive oil in place of butter (some exceptions may apply) for a healthier alternative. When it comes to beauty, olive oil is the ultimate healer. It can moisturize split-ends (while simultaneously adding shine), cuticles and can easily remove makeup. Here are three new recipes that make this ingredient shine.


A GUIDE TO TASTING

J

ust like any delicacy – wine, chocolate or coffee, there are three key elements that distinguish the good from the bad, the same holds true when tasting olive oil. The first component is fruitiness, which refers to the aroma of the freshly picked fruit. Next, is the level of bitterness, which is one of the primary flavor elements of fresh olives (you will know this if you have ever tasted an olive plucked straight from the tree). Finally, pungency, which is the sensation that you get in your throat and gives olive oil that bite also known as ‘coughers’, because that is what you actually do, cough. Olive oil has many nuances when tasted. For example, some might have hints of eucalyptus, pine, green banana to a more floral, nutty or black pepper presence.

I

f you are looking to really taste your olive oil like the pros, you can do so by following these steps: swirl, sniff, slurp and swallow. First, take about a tablespoon of oil in a small shot glass and place it in your palm. Cup your hand and place the other hand on top of the glass. Gently rub the glass against your hand to warm the oil, which allows the aroma of the molecules to be released (optimal heating temperature is 82 degrees). Next, inhale the secent to note how it smells, then slurp it in to allow for the oil to mix with the air. Finally, swallow. This is where you will be able to taste all of the components that were previously mentioned.

ol


live oil has many


Caramelized leeks pair with nutty gruyère cheese in this delicious tart, perfect for a weekend brunch.

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CRUST

2 ½ cups flour ¾ cup extra virgin olive oil 1 egg 1 teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons ice cold water F I LLI N G

6 eggs 1 cup milk, whole or 2% 1 cup grated gruyère cheese 3 leeks, sliced (white parts only) salt & pepper to taste

leek and gruyère quiche with olive oil crust 113

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place flour, olive oil, egg and salt in a bowl. Mix together. Add ice water and form into a flat disk. Wrap in platic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Once chilled, place dough on a floured surface and roll out until it is 1/8 inch thick. Gently lay into a tart tin. Bake for 20 minutes or until crust is just set. Remove from oven and let cool slightly. Meanwhile, place chopped leeks, 2 tablespoons olive oil, salt and pepper in a sauté pan. Let leeks caramelize. Set aside. Place eggs, milk, grated Gruyère, salt and pepper in a bowl, whisk together then fold in leeks. Pour mixture into the pre-baked shell. Bake for 40 minutes or until center is set. Let cool slightly before serving.


orange olive oil body scrub

SCRUB

1 ½ cups coarse sea salt 14 drops orange essential oil zest of one orange ½ cup olive oil

Place salt, essential oil, orange zest and olive oil in a bowl. Stir to combine. If not ready to use immediately, store in an airtight container for up to one week. Oil will settle at the bottom, stir to combine before using.

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e e l y b

Frigid winter air can lead to chapped and dry skin. Incorporating an oil-based beauty product such as this Orange Olive Oil Body Scrub will not only slough–off dead skin cells, but also leave the skin moisturized and protected from the elements. When olive oil is massaged into the skin, it immediately softens the surface and leaves the skin glowing.

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chocolate ganache tart with chocolate olive oil crust CRUST

2 1/2 cups flour 4 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder 3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons sugar pinch of salt

Chocolate is layered upon dark chocolate and finished with sea salt flakes, in this decadent dessert.

To make crust, place flour, cocoa powder, olive oil, sugar, salt and eggs in a bowl. Mix together. Slowly add the eggs and water.Form into a disk. Place into plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least one hour. Once chilled, place dough onto a floured surface. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Roll dough until it is 1/8 inch thick. Gently lay onto a tart pan*. Poke holes into the bottom of crust. Bake for 15 minutes until crust is just set. Let cool completely. For ganache, place heavy cream into a heavy-bottomed sauce pan. Place chopped chocolate into a bowl. Bring cream to a simmer. Pour over chocolate and let set for 5 minutes. Whisk together and add salt. Pour into cooled tart shell and refrigerate until set. Let tart come to room temperature before serving. Sprinkle generously with sea salt. *tart pan sizes can vary. this recipe can make one large tart recipe or 4 medium tarts

2 eggs 4 tablespoons ice water G A N AC H E

14 ounces semi-sweet chocolate, chopped 2 cups heavy cream 1/2 teaspoon salt

*sea salt flakes for garnish

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written, styled, photgraphed by

ALISON ENGSTROM

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WINTER’S

WA R M T H B

righten up a cold winter day with soups that warm you from the inside out. Whether purĂŠed and served as a first course or a heartier stew option, these recipes are sure to take you through the colder months.


I

ncorporating a flavorful broth is a key building block for building a delicious soup. Making your own broth is very easy and tastes much better than the store bought version since it will only incorporate the purest ingredients.

RECIPE ON NEXT PAGE

chicke n brot h


9 cups water 1 1/2 pounds chicken legs 5 carrots, peeled and chopped 4 celery stalks, plus leaves if possible 2 medium onions, roughly chopped 3 whole garlic cloves, peeled 1 tablespoon black peppercorns 3 bay leafs 1 bunch fresh thyme, 10 to 12 springs 1 handful fresh parsley 1 teaspoon salt a splash of extra virgin olive oil

Place all ingredients in a large pot. Add water. Cook over medium heat for at least 1 hour and up to 3 hours covered, stirring occasionally. Once done, place a colander over a large bowl. Pour broth into colander separating the vegetables and chicken from the liquid. Refrigerate and store broth in an airtight container until ready to use.

Step One THE FUNDAMENTALS

Bui l d i n g a Fl a vo rf u l B r o t h

C H I C K E N BROTH

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Step Two Rew ork i n g t he basics R O A S T E D G A R L I C & P A R M E S A N B R O T H

Regular chicken broth gets reimagined with the help of roasted garlic and aged Parmigiano-Reggiano rinds, creating a rich broth perfect for any soup base. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Cut the tops off of two garlic bulbs. Place in tin foil. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper and roast for 40 to 45 minutes until garlic is completely tender. Let cool slightly before handling. Place chicken broth in a large soup pan. Gently squeeze the roasted garlic until the softened cloves are removed. Add ParmigianoReggiano rinds. Cook over medium heat for 45 minutes to allow for flavors to meld. Remove rinds and pour broth into a food processor (this might have to be done in batches) until roasted garlic is completely pureed. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator until ready to use.

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6 cups chicken broth, see reverse 2 heads of garlic bulbs olive oil, to taste salt & pepper, to taste 3 medium parmigiano-reggiano rinds


Traditional bean and kale soup is given a luxurious upgrade by allowing it to simmer in a rich Roasted Garlic Parmesan Broth. Over medium heat, place olive oil, carrots, celery, onion and bay leaf in the bottom of a soup pot . Cook for about five minutes or until mixture becomes translucent. Add broth and beans. Allow to come to a simmer. Add kale and cook for 5 minutes, or until tender. Garnish with freshly shaved Parmigiano-Reggiano before serving.

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 bay leafs

4 carrots, peeled and diced

6 cups roasted garlic parmesan broth

4 celery stalks, diced

16 ounces cannellini beans

1 large onion, diced

1 cup coarsely chopped kale

W H I T E B EA N & K A L E S O U P I N A R OA S T ED G A R LIC PA RMES A N B RO T H

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CHICKEN CHILI

A new twist on a classic chili recipe, where shredded chicken is stewed in chicken broth with tomatoes, beans and smoky chili powder to create a hearty meal. Over medium heat place olive oil, onion, garlic, jalape単os, salt and pepper in the bottom of a soup pot. Cook for 5 to 7 minutes until mixture becomes translucent. Add chicken broth, beans, shredded chicken, cumin and chili powder. Cook for an hour over low heat to allow for flavors to meld. Top with cheese if preferred just before serving.

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6 cups chicken broth 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 large onion, diced 4 garlic cloves, minced 3 jalape単os, diced seeds removed salt & pepper to taste 3 cups canned beans (black, navy or cannellini) 24 oz. diced tomatoes 2 cooked chicken breasts, shredded 1 tablespoon cumin 2 tablespoons chili powder*

*adjust depending on taste


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ABOVE

LEFT

roasted winter vegetable soup

potato, leek & broccoli soup


R O A S T E D W I N T E R V E G E TA B L E S O U P

A winter vegetable medley of roasted turnips, parsnips and celery root combine to create a luxuriously textured soup that is both healthy and delicious. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Place turnips, parsnips, celery root, cauliflower, shallots and garlic in a roasting pan. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper. Roast for 50 minutes or until vegetables are caramelized and tender. Let cool slightly. Place chicken broth in a soup pot over medium heat. Allow for broth to come to a simmer. Add roasted vegetables and cook for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and pour into a food processor to puree. Drizzle with olive oil before serving, if desired.

3 turnips, chopped into quarters 2 parsnips, peeled and chopped 1 celery root, peeled and chopped 2 cups cauliflower, chopped 3 shallots, quartered 3 garlic cloves 6 cups chicken broth


Caramelized leeks meld with potatoes and broccoli to create a light meal. For a more filling recipe, add grilled or poached chicken. Place olive oil in the bottom of a large soup pot over medium heat. Add leeks, garlic, salt and pepper. Let cook until leeks become tender, about 5 to 7 minutes. Add broth, potatoes, and broccoli. Cook until potatoes are tender, about 30 minutes. Once tender, place into a blender and purĂŠe until desired consistency is achieved. Place micro greens on top of soup just before serving. Drizzle with olive oil, if desired. To make this soup into a meal, serve poached or grilled chicken on top.

6 cups chicken broth 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 3 large leeks, light green & white part only, sliced 2 garlic cloves, minced

1 head of broccoli, stalk & florets chopped salt & pepper, to taste microgreens, like winter purslane, for garnish if desired

3 medium potatoes, peeled and chopped

P O TAT O , L E E K & B R O C C O L I S O U P

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written and photgraphed by

ALISON ENGSTROM

M


133

A SWEET MORSEL O

n a recent winter afternoon, I arrived at the Raaka Chocolate production facility just off Van Brundt Street in the industrial section of Redhook, Brooklyn. When it comes to awakening the senses, nothing can do it quite WHEN IT COMES TO like walking into a chocolate AWAKENING THE SENSES, factory where you are quickly seduced by the sweet aroma of NOTHING CAN DO IT QUITE LIK E WA L K IN G IN TO A cocoa. I have a deep-rooted love CHOCOLATE FACTORY. for chocolate and I am eager to learn the process of creating small batch chocolate. Founded by Nate Hodge and Ryan Cheney in 2010, they developed their passion and craft through a process of trial and error. Hodge serves as my guide and categorizes himself as a foodie and an individual that is obsessed with learning about processes and how things are created.


Pure and community-focused are just two words to describe the unique approach behind Raaka Chocolate, a bean to bar cocoa operation. Hodge and Cheney both set out with the same goal in mind, to craft a bar that would stand out amongst the rest. Unlike other brands, Raaka does not roast the beans nor incorporate any additives or preservatives, all which take away from the complex, natural flavors of the beans. In addition, they are vegan, nutfree, gluten-free, soy-free and organic. We begin with the basics. Hodge explains that chocolate comes from the seeds of the cocoa fruit, which grows along the equator where temperatures are balmy and moisture in the air is plentiful. The cocoa fruit is harvested typically in March and again in June and July. The fruit can be the size of a honeydew or a football and yield about 15 to 20 seeds per pod. Once the fruit is harvested they rest for about 4 to 7 days to allow the juices to ferment. After the fermentation, the beans are left to aerate in sweat boxes and then dried on wooden slats.

“PURE and COMMUNITY-FOCUSED are just two words to describe the unique approach behind Raaka Chocolate, a bean to bar cocoa operation.

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The facility is separated by different rooms and stations. We begin in the space where the cocoa nib is removed from the shell by a winnower machine. Each piece is then hand-sorted and examined with great detail to ensure that only the nib remains. The nibs are then refined for three days, which allows for the fats to be broken down and then the necessary sugar is added. While flavoring chocolate has been a gourmand trend as of late, Hodge opposes adding flavors that might compete with the flavor of the bean. Rather, he enhances the bar by adding notes that already exist in the chocolate to deliver a more

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H o d g e o p p o s e s a d d i n g f l avo r s t h a t might comp ete with the FL AVOR OF THE BE A N...� flavorful impact. The Vanilla Rooibos bar incorporates unfermented rooibos tea and a toasted marshmallow note, bringing out the warm fruitiness of the chocolate. While the bourbon cask aged bar incorporates beans that have been cask-aged which yields a bar with soft caramel and vanilla notes. Being fully emerged in the production would not be complete without closely managing the origin and the relationship with their farmers and growing cooperatives to ensure consistent quality. That is one approach and philosophy that we can easily get behind. Raaka offers chocolate tours, chocolate making classes, in addition to first nibs, a chocolate of the month subscription program perfect for all of those gourmand seekers wanting to savor the art of hand-crafted chocolate.

click here to learn more about R A A K A C H O C O L AT E S

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or to plan a visit


ROSE & IV Y JOUR NAL

S P R I N G 2015

A R R I V I N G M AY 2 0 1 5

F O R DA I LY U PDAT E S F O L LOW T H E R O S E & I V Y

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ROSE & IVY Winter 2015 Issue No 2  
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