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July 18, 2012

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Going, going, nearly gone WORK to demolish the remaining parts of the Falmouth Beach Hotel has been continuing, with the flame scarred lift shafts removed. Workers, hampered by some wet and windy weather, have been knocking down and removing sections of the burnt out building. Both lift shafts were removed over a few days. A giant hole has appeared in the middle of the building, as the worst damaged section of the lower floor is opened up.

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n The burnt out shell of the former Falmouth Beach Hotel is demolished stage by stage Buy this picture at thepacket.co.uk picture code: Falmouth Beach Hotel

Pictures: GREG FOUNTAIN

Common land dispute

Club’s grant boost FALMOUTH Sports Club has been given a £49,000 grant to help improve its facilities for future generations. It has been given as part of a £135 million fund from Sport England, which is designed to leave a legacy from the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games being held in the UK this year. The Falmouth club now has plans that include new squash court floors, re-plastered squash court walls, modernising changing rooms and showers, a new boiler to warm the clubhouse and a secured storage area. Club chairperson Clyfflynn Banfield said: “We are delighted to have secured this investment, which means we can upgrade the quality of our premises to match the quality of the sports played here. “It is the cornerstone of our strategy to have an outstanding club for the 2012 Olympics’ legacy.” Sport England’s chair Richard Lewis said the National Lottery investment would create a “lasting sporting legacy” for Falmouth,” adding: “For hundreds of clubs and tens of thousands of people, 2012 will be the year their local sports facilities got better.” Falmouth Sports Club is one of hundreds of projects across England benefitting from lottery investment through the second round of the Inspired Facilities Fund. Sports England has launched a further £10 million funding round to help community sports groups to upgrade their facilities, with bids accepted from July 23. For more information visit www.sportengland.org/inspir edfacilities.

Beer blame for crash

A SIX acre piece of common land in Stithians, which has been the subject of a “thorny” dispute, will be discussed at the parish council next week. The ownership of Tregolls Common is debated and an Action Group, set up by a group of local parishioners, wants the council to take over its management. The council have been investigating their legal duties and will present a report at the meeting, on Tuesday from 7pm in the Stithians Centre.

Green flag for reserve SWANPOOL Nature Reserve has been recognised for its high standard and good management. It is one of 1,424 sites around the UK that have been given a Green Flag Award – the national award for public and community parks and green spaces. Pete Lochrie, chairman of the Swanpool Forum, said: “It’s good for our forum to get some recognition for the husbandry, care, input and enthusiasm for Swanpool Local Nature Reserve that we have exercised over the years. “This award gains us a higher profile and will be a helpful aid when we are seeking funding for the upkeep of the reserve.”

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n Close friends held balloons and lit lanterns that they then floated into the sky to send their best wishes to baby Bailey in advance of an important operation Buy this picture at thepacket.co.uk picture code: Bailey Lanterns

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Sky high hopes for little baby Bailey A LANTERN lighting event has taken place in Falmouth’s Kimberley Park for a poorly baby. Little Bailey Lee Buckley was born weighing 4lb 1oz and with no pulmonary artery in his heart. He has been at Bristol Royal Hospital for Children since his birth in November last year.

Since then friends and family of Bailey’s parents, Leah Lucas and father Anthony Buckley, have been holding fundraising events and last week were in Kimberley Park to give their support ahead of an important operation. Around 20 close friends held balloons and lit lanterns that they then floated into

the sky, in the hope their love and wishes would reach Bailey in Bristol. The event was arranged by Sabina Hall.Writing on the Facebook page Wish Upon a Star Bailey Button, as Bailey is affectionately known, his mum Leah said: “Our little boy is a fighter and he has done so well.”

THE three pints of Spingo which Falmouth man Ross Pike drank on the night of Mazey Day in Penzance must have been stronger than he thought, his solicitor Curtis Lewis told Truro magistrates. Pike, aged 20, of Swanpool, had blanked out after having it and had no recollection of what led to his crashing his car on the way home. Pike pleaded guilty to drink driving, having tested at 63 mcg alcohol in breath, nearly twice the legal limit. Alison May, for the CPS, said Pike had told the police at the scene of the crash: “It is my car, I am really sorry.” He said he had been to the Mazey Day festival and then gone drinking with friends in a pub. He could remember the early part of the day, but nothing afterwards. He had no previous convictions. Mr Lewis said the whole experience had been thoroughly shocking to him. He suspected someone must have slipped something in his drink. “But presumably Spingo is stronger than he thought,” added Mr Lewis. Guitar teacher Pike was fined £100 and £35 costs and surcharge and banned from driving for 18 months.

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Concern over hotel plans n By RORY FONG editorial@packetseries.co.uk

Olympic yacht display AN Olympic yacht with royal heritage has gone on display at the National Maritime Museum in Falmouth Restored, re-painted and brought out from retirement, Bluebottle, a winner at the 1956 Olympic Games, has taken pride of place outside the Maritime Museum awash with banners wishing good luck to Team GBR. Ben Lumby, exhibitions manager said: “Following the hugely successful Sail for Gold exhibition we just had to continue celebrating this very exciting Olympic year. We have Ben Ainslie’s Laser from the Sydney games on display inside the museum and various other Olympic medal winning boats and artefacts including an Olympic torch from the 1948 London games, but we wanted to put something outside the museum to wish all our Olympic sailors good luck. “Bluebottle, a wedding gift to Her Majesty the Queen and His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, won bronze in the 1956 games in Melbourne.” Bluebottle, a Dragon class wooden yacht, beautifully crafted over 60 years ago will be on display outside the Maritime Museum in Falmouth throughout the Olympics and Paralympics.

MORE than 60 hoteliers and residents attended a meeting in the Falmouth Hotel last Wednesday to voice their opposition to a new Premier Inn for the town. If the proposals from New Cornwall Developments go ahead it will see a 74-bedroom hotel built on the site of the Campbeltown Way car park near Events Square. Original plans for the development were withdrawn last year after concerns were raised over the design of the new hotel and its impact on parking and traffic in the area. But at a recent town council meeting a company spokesman insisted the hotel would not impact on local hotels and B&Bs, adding that traffic assessments undertaken by the company had shown the hotel would have little or no impact on parking issues in the town centre. Many hoteliers and local residents have major concerns over the proposed development, however, including the potential risk of it flooding. Jane Carmichael from the Lugo Rock Hotel said: “If developers actually get the go ahead and start digging down the four metres necessary for the footings of the underground car park planned, they will meet with a lot of water. “Documents lodged with the application but not scrutinised by Falmouth Town Council planning committee show that the test bore holes encountered water filling the holes at only 3.8 metres, and they were filling at the rate of 30cm per hour.” Another particular worry is the size of lorry delivering to the prospective hotel. Mrs Carmichael added: “These will be 18 metres long and weigh 40 tonnes. The only way these lorries can negotiate the turn into the underground car park is to back up the slope, reverse across a busy access

n The planned 74-bedroom hotel will be built on the site of the Campbeltown Way car park near Events Square road onto a pedestrian only area. These lorries will also just add to the usual parking and traffic nightmare.” Developers have predicted that only guests from 15-20 of the 74 planned rooms will be arriving to the hotel by car and require parking. Many hoteliers in the immediate area, however, said they would be happy to provide figures to support their claims that the majority of their guests arrived by car and not by public transport. New Cornwall Developments, who are also the company behind much of the construction of Events Square, have further infuriated campaigners by applying to the council to remove an obligation to provide 21 parking spaces, which was agreed in 2006 before the building that now houses Tesco Express and Zizzi was built. The new Premier Inn’s restaurant will

be for residents only and some of the people present at the meeting felt that this was not a feasible business plan, as many guests would most likely choose to eat in one of Falmouth’s many restaurants. They claimed that this might seem like an advantage for local restaurants, but they suspected that the Premier Inn’s restaurant would later be opened to the public, thus taking away from the local economy. Mrs Carmichael said: “Organisers of the meeting are now planning further action to get the building of the Premier Inn stopped at all costs.”

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Rotary reading scheme is celebrated FALMOUTH Rotary Club members have joined staff and pupils to celebrate 15 years of the rotary reading program at Falmouth Primary School. The reading scheme was proposed by the then infant school head teacher Maisie Keay after asking Falmouth Rotary Club if they could help the school. Her first request was for help refurbishing the play park and with £750 from rotary members, and £750 raised by the school’s PTA, a steam engine, a packet boat and a Wendy house were built. John Pearce from Falmouth Rotary Club said: “Her second request was much more difficult. Her concern was that because there were no male teachers in the school, particularly amongst the boys, the importance of reading was being lost, so could some of our members come into school for half an hour a week and read to the classes.” For the last 15 years between ten and 14 Rotarians and some wives have done just that. He said: “In the first instance it was only to the infant school and I am sure that there are many who will remember Nigel McLusky and his hedgehog puppet, not to mention his lion when needed. When the schools were merged to become Falmouth Primary School some of the team stayed reading with the younger children while the rest of us moved over to support reading in KS2. It is always a great satisfaction for us to see how the children’s reading improved over the year. He added: “The current head teacher Claire Smith is a strong supporter of the scheme. She feels that children really benefit from having the additional support with

their reading. The children enjoy spending time with the adults who come into school and are always keen to read with a Rotarian. The additional benefit is that the children do have wide range of positive role models with whom they interact and the children really appreciate having someone showing a keen interest in their learning.”

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n Nigel McLusky, with his hedgehog puppet, and John Pearce, together with some of the children who have been involved with the scheme this year

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Main toilets stay open A DECISION on the future of Penryn’s public toilets had to be made this week, following pressure from Cornwall Council who are removing funding from the service. Town clerk Michelle Davey said county hall was not prepared to pay for both sets of toilets – on Exchequer Quay and in Permarin Car Park – and was only offering a grant for Permarin toilets for the full cost of maintenance less half the cleaning costs. The suggestion was for the town council to let the toilets on a 99-year lease for £1 a year, taking on responsibility for repairing and insuring the facilities. Options put before councillors ranged from closing both toilets at zero cost to the taxpayer to keeping both open at the current arrangements, which would cost £10,669 a year. Councillor Ted Wilkes said: “I think this is Cornwall Council just passing the buck again. We already pay in our tax for these services and I think it’s a cheek. I don’t think we should do it, Cornwall Council is paid enough to do it.” Mrs Davey said: “The suggestion came from Cornwall Council to just keep the disabled toilet on Exchequer Quay open because although it is for disabled people that does not mean that able bodied people won’t be allowed to use it. Councillor Mark Snowdon said: “The way I look at it is although Cornwall Council maybe passing the buck, at the end of the day we are being offered a grant to maintain the main one – the Permarin one. “I personally think the one down on Exchequer Quay, you have a cafe down there that has been there for many years and the people who run that cafe need our support, so even if it goes down to one disabled one it’s better than nothing.” Councillors voted to keep the toilets at Permarin Car Park open with a disabled toilet only at Exchequer Quay. The total estimated cost to the precept with this option will be £4,500.


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July 18, 2012

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n Falmouth Sea Scouts assemble of The Moor before joining other local groups taking part in a march to the Church of King Charles the Martyr

Pictures: GIACOMO TILLI/CARTEL PHOTOS

Sea Sunday event grows in stature n By RORY FONG editorial@packetseries.co.uk

n Falmouth’s mayor Geoffrey Evans makes his way to the church

n Left to right are Jack Tarr, parade marshall and former Sergeant Major Steve Westley and bugler Bill Bishop

THE annual Sea Sunday parade and church service has taken place in Falmouth recognising the town’s maritime connections. The event was co-ordinated for the 29th successive year by the Falmouth branch of the Royal Naval Association, on behalf of Falmouth Town Council and the Church of King Charles the Martyr. Over the years, the event has grown in stature, to an extent that it has become one of the major events in the civic and social calendar. It attracts participants from all over the South West, and from as far afield as London. The association’s honorary secretary Ron Burdekin said: “It was particularly pleasing to see so many youth organisations taking part this year, including Falmouth and Penryn Sea Cadets, Royal Marine Cadets from Truro, the 6th Falmouth Sea Scouts and Falmouth Police Cadets, together with civic guests from all over Cornwall.” Led by the volunteer band of HMS Seahawk (RNAS Culdrose), the parade marched from The Moor, via Market Street and Church Street, for

n The parade sets off from The Moor and heads along Webber Street

the service at 4pm. Three Royal Navy standards and that of the Merchant Navy were laid on the altar, with others in attendance. The service was led by the Rev Stephen Tudgey of King Charles the Martyr Church, who is also chaplain to Falmouth Royal Naval Association. The address was given by Simon Sherrard, a trustee of the Missions to Seafarers, who gave an insight into the work of the mission, both internationally and in Falmouth. The lessons were read by the Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall, Colonel Edward Bolitho, and RNAS Culdrose’s commanding officer, Captain Willie Entwisle. RNA branch president, Commondore Tony Hogg, read Nelson’s Prayer. As always, the service included a short act of remembrance and bugler Bill Bishop sounded Last Post and Reveille. Following the service, the parade re-formed and marched to Events Square. The salute was taken en-route by the Lord Lieutenant and the mayor of Falmouth, Geoffrey Evans. Following “Sunset” the parade was dismissed and participants and invited guests enjoyed a buffet reception at the National Maritime Museum Cornwall. n Sea Sunday is celebrated nationally on the second Sunday in July each year.

n Rich Allen, Petty Officer Jo Rooke and Steve Westley of HMS Seahawk Royal Navy Volunteer Band


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Garden and crafts on show n By RORY FONG editorial@packetseries.co.uk VILLAGERS of Budock came together on Saturday to celebrate this year’s garden and handicraft show. Chairman Robert Wilson was forced to seriously consider postponing the show after a series of unfortunate weather conditions, but thankfully decided to persevere and the event went ahead without a hitch. He said: “I was standing in my garden on Thursday with the rain hammering down and I thought to myself that it would be impossible for anyone to have anything ready for Saturday’s show, but the people of Budock did us proud. “Even though the weather leading up to show day was poor, the quality of the flowers and vegetables on display at the village hall was absolutely remarkable.” Rex Saddler, who in 2008 was awarded an MBE for his services to local government, opened the show by remarking on how wonderful everything looked and the importance of the show within the community. The village hall was decorated with a display of entries from St Francis School, which included drawing of the Queen, Tudor portraits, African masks and Heraldic shields. Some classes in the floral art section were so good two entries had to be awarded first prizes, with judge Mrs Jennings stating that both were “perfection.” Hillary Watson went home with the award for best exhibit and Edwin Watson received the most points in the show.

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n Curtis Popo, 1st Prize winner of Lillies in a pot

n Sarah Wilson, overall winner of Floral Art

n Chairman Scott Wilson congratulates Edwin Watson on winning four trophies. Edwin recieved the Flower Cup, the Fruit Cup, Most points in vegetables and the Most points in Show

n Noel Lord receives two 1st prizes for his rose blooms, winning him the Rose Bloom trophy n (Above) Oliver, 11, wins first prize for his item from recycled materials. (Right) Kensa, 11, wins first prize for her decorated potato head and Rosie, 9, first prize for her vegetable animal

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Starting off with a raft of fun PENRYN Week started with a splash on Saturday when the annual raft race was held in the town. Despite only two rafts turning up to compete this year, there was plenty of enjoyment to be had for the many spectators that lined the sidelines. The first moment of truth came at the start of the race as the two teams, Penryn Town Council and The Golden Barrels, tested their rafts to see if they could even stay afloat. Once they were confirmed as seaworthy, the rafts were launched from Exchequer Quay and then manoeuvred around a watery course before returning to the finish line. The Golden Barrels, comprised of Gavin, Sara, Dave, Abbie and Cat, ultimately finished the race victoriously, beating Penryn Town Council into second place. Mayor of Penryn Gill Grant said: “It was a very entertaining afternoon with lovely weather and lots of enthusiastic spectators.

n By RORY FONG editorial@packetseries.co.uk “Thank you to everyone who helped organise the event; my only wish is for there to be more entries. Twenty years ago 20 rafts would compete. All the pubs and clubs used to enter. It is such a shame but such great fun.” Penryn Week now continues with a range of activities to suit all ages and tastes. Tonight, Wednesday there will be bingo in the Temperance Hall at 7.30pm, while the Kings Arms hosts a quiz with a £50 first prize at the same time. Entry costs £5 for a team of four and Phil Julian will act as quiz master. Tomorrow, Thursday, heralds the return of Penryn’s Got Talent in the town hall from 7.30pm, with prize money available for the winner. At the same time Gray’s Wharf on Commercial Road will play host to an Arts Alive Show and Tell event called

“Don’t Wear Black” with Richard Holliday (Stone Carver), through to 9pm. Places are limited and tickets can be booked from Derek Godridge on 01326 373838. The grand finale of the week will be on Friday, when five events are planned, starting with the Friday market at 10am. From 2pm until 4pm local writer Patricia Finney will hold an adult’s poetry performance workshop in the library and at 6pm a fun sports evening starts on Glasney Field with go karts, bouncy castle, tug-o-war and refreshments. For a more sedate experience, a one and a half hour Penryn Old Boundary Walk with Chaz Wenmoth will meet outside the town hall at the same time. Finally, the Famous Barrel pub will round off the schedule with the Lemonaires Barbershop Choir from 8.30pm.

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n The Golden Barrels team before the raft race begins. (From left) Cat, Abbie, Gavin and Sara Buy these pictures at thepacket.co.uk picture code: Penryn raft race

n Shelley and Ben from Penryn Town Council prepare to race their raft

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n Gavin from The Golden Barrels team in fancy dress

n The Penryn Town Council team keep smiling as they head to the finish line

n Kevin from Penryn Town Council gets ready to race

n Onlookers cheer from the safety of dry land with Cllr Mary May on megaphone duties

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Anchorman and women from San Diego win Gylly tide race n By RORY FONG editorial@packetseries.co.uk JUST over £150 was raised for local charities at the annual Falmouth and Penryn Lions Club tide race on Sunday. For those not familiar with the event, this involves teams building a sandcastle and then standing on it as the tide approaches, with the last team washed off declared the winner. There is no limit to the team size, provided all the members can stand on the castle as the tide comes in. This year 25 teams turned up for the start of the day at 11am and began digging by noon. Teams ranged from a father and his small child to a large group of nine grown men. In the end, an American team from San Diego were able to anchor themselves and withstand the tide. They took away a variety of prizes donated by the Gylly Beach Cafe. Christopher Spink, of the Falmouth and Penryn Lions Club, said: “The turnout was excellent, the weather held up and everyone had a splendid time. “From all the different accents you could hear, it was clear that a mixture of different people got involved. It was a good day all round.” The Falmouth and Penryn Lions Club is always looking for an extra hand and would be pleased to see anyone of any age helping out in the future. Call Christopher Spink directly on 07974 960501.

n Team 9 stand on top of their substantial sand castle during Sunday’s race Pictures: GIACOMO TILLI/CARTEL PHOTOS

n Some local boys join in the fun at the tide race at Gyllyngvase Beach on Sunday

n Thanks for stopping by Anchorman and women... this year’s winners were a team from San Diego

n A family team at the Falmouth and Penryn Lions Tide Race at Gylly Beach on Sunday

n A team attempted to use spades to help withstand the incoming tide but to no avail

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n Some England fans feel the pressure as the tide creeps up on their sand castle during Sunday’s tide race at Gylly Beach

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Helstonbury returns HELSTONBURY music festival returns for the 12th year running this weekend to the Blue Anchor Pub. The event, run by Helstonbased naval man Paul Turton, raises money for local charities and good causes over a weekend of live music. Friday night kicks off with Kids Like to Rock, a veritable feast of young, home-grown musical talent, arranged and mentored by local music teacher Al Rideout. Saturday will see live acts throughout the afternoon and evening playing for the first time on a new outdoor stage. Entertainment includes the return of classic metal group The Quaterpounders, Johnson and the Believers, and the Boogaloo Dudes. The acoustic stage will enjoy a more intimate setting this year, in the pub’s skittle alley, where Helston girl Holly Turton will join a variety of unplugged acts in the line up, including Shannon Farmer and Blue Horyzon. The festivities continue on Sunday with rhythm and blues from Blue on Back and the classic rock of the Black Country’s Crazy Horses. The acoustic stage will also welcome its very own military wives’ choir, the ‘Culdroses’ along with festival favourites Champagne Charlie and Bob Love. Over the past 12 years Helstonbury has raised in excess of £37,000 thanks to the overwhelming support of the local community and the Blue Anchor Pub, which has been the festival’s ‘spiritual home’ for the last ten years. Last year’s weekend raised nearly £6,000, attracting record numbers of festivalgoers and setting the bar higher once again. For more information visit www.helstonbury.com.

n The Mounts Bay Inn singers led a sing-a-long of Cornish songs

Celebrating all things Cornish ST Piran flags and black and gold balloons adorned a marquee in the centre of Mullion to celebrate all things Cornish. The evening included special performances from St Keverne Band and Mullion’s own Inn Singers. The chairman for the evening was Cornish bard Richard Ormond, who entertained the large crowd that braved the rain. His performance included the Cornish language and his famous rendition of the “Cornish Alphabet”. St Keverne Band, led by their musical director Gareth Churcher, opened with Goff Richards’ “Calling Cornwall,” which would be familiar to early listeners of Radio Cornwall. Kelvin Retallack’s trumpet solo of “My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose” was much enjoyed. The Inn Singers then led the audience through some well known Cornish songs before pasties and saffron buns were served and the raffle was drawn.

Lizard’s wild weekend THE National Trust, Natural England, RSPB and the Cornwall Bird Watching and Preservation Society all teamed up to host two days of fun for all the family at The Lizard Wildlife Weekend. Based on the green at the heart of The Lizard village the event was a huge success with both local and visiting families. On offer were a range of guided walks introducing the local wildlife, the highlights of which were seeing a young family of choughs near Kynance Cove, watching peregrine falcon scour the cliffs, and finding some of The Lizard’s rarest plants such as fringed rupturewort and longheaded clover. Other activities included green woodworking demonstrations, pond dipping, children’s nature crafts, owl pellet dissection and Cornwall’s very own premiere of ‘Birchett-Swan’s Barn Owl Box Cinema’, allowing visitors to peer inside the secret world of an owl nest box and watch recorded highlights. Children and adults alike were mesmerised by the footage of owl chicks, recorded locally in nest boxes by naturalist Matt Birchett. For more information visit: www.cornishchoughs.org

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n By NATALIE LIDBETTER editorial@packetseries.co.uk The band’s second set featured several arrangements of spirituals and a piece composed by Gareth Churcher, but the highlight of this half for the audience was “Bare Necessities” from the Jungle Book, with the soloist in a full bear costume – much to the amusement of everyone else. The Inn Singers, under conductor Graham Walker, performed for a second time, harmonising arrangements of popular songs such as “Harbour Lights” and “Cornwall My Home”. They ended with the ever popular “My Grandfather’s Clock”. Horticultural chairman Rex Bray presented thank you plaques to Gareth, Graham and Richard. Everyone then stood to sing “Trelawny” to conclude the enjoyable evening.

n Soloist Kelvin Retallack played a haunting tune while (below) Compare Dickie Mint takes a break from telling jokes to treat himself to a hot pasty

n Pauline Rowse, Mary Gilbert and Rosemary Bray were just some of the members of Mullion Horticultural Society who served up pasties and drinks to the audience


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Play boost for port n By EMMA FERGUSON emma.ferguson@packetseries.co.uk NEW play equipment has been unveiled at Porthleven School, paid for thanks to fundraising efforts by the PTA and the generosity of businesses in the port. Fundraising for a new children’s playground started in September 2011, with eager youngsters ready to try it out joining friends of the school at a grand unveiling on Monday morning. Porthleven and Helston south Cornwall councillor, Andrew Wallis, who opened the play area said: “This is a fantastic addition to the school. What is really impressive is that all this money came from fundraising led by the school’s PTA. “The fundraising started in September 2011 and in a short period

the PTA raised nearly £12,000, with £9,000 of that money being spent on the play equipment. Money also came from businesses in the port including £2,000 from the Harbour and Dock Company and £1,000 from Porthleven’s surf club, with Mr Wallis also donating £500 from his Cornwall councillor fund to help boost the final total. He added: “It is great to see such a strong and dynamic PTA which is always coming up with new and interesting ways of fund-raising for the school. Porthleven’s PTA can be rightly proud of their achievements, and with the team they have, nothing will stop them from making the school better for the children and families.”

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n Cllr Andrew Wallis and Damelza Storbeck from the Porthleven Harbour and Dock Company open the play area

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n Youngsters jump at the chance to have a play on the new play equipment at Porthleven School

Minister is off to new pastures HELSTON’S longest running Methodist Minister Reverend Andrew Hill is leaving for East Cornwall. After making the move from Tiverton, Devon to Helston in 1999, Rev Hill has been in charge of the Methodist church in Helston for the last 13 years. During this time, Rev Hill oversaw the complete redevelopment and refurbishment of Degibna chapel, including the introduction of a prayer garden. Rev Hill said: “It was great to see that. The chapel was wondering what its future was for a long time and now it has a great, long lasting one.

“I’ve also enjoyed being able to visit local schools and be a part of their assemblies. They have always been very welcoming.” Rev Hill will be moving to Looe and will be responsible for five churches in the Liskeard and Looe circuit. He added: “I am very pleased to be moving somewhere within Cornwall. “Although this is a big move for me, this will be an even bigger move for my wife Barbara, who has been teaching in Helston’s St Michael’s School for the last 30 years.” Rev Hill’s final Sunday n Rev Andrew Hill (centre) with former Bishop of Truro Bill Ind and Canon David Millar of service will be held on July Helston’s St Michael’s Church 29 at 6pm.

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Penrose owner dies A RETIRED naval commander who went on to own the Penrose Estate between Helston and Porthleven has died. A funeral service for Lieutenant Commander John Peverell Rogers will now take place tomorrow, Thursday (July 19) at 11am in St Bartholomew’s Church, Porthleven. This will be followed by a private, family cremation service. Donations made in lieu of flowers will be split between St Bartholomew’s and children’s hospice Little Harbour. Lt Cdr Rogers, 86, was a staunch supporter of St Bartholomew’s throughout his life and at one time was a lay reader there. Up until his death he remained involved, assisting with the weekly service. Lt Cdr Rogers was born in 1925 and joined the Royal Navy, leaving in 1962 on becoming invalided. He came to the Penrose Estate 50 years ago, with his wife Angela and their two sons Nigel (now deceased) and Charles. He ran the estate for around ten years, having taken it over from his uncle Lionel Rogers. The estate has been in the Rogers family for many generations. In 1974 he handed a large part of the estate, including farms, properties and woodland, to the National Trust and continued to run the remainder himself. Up until the week before he died Lt Cdr Rogers still had a weekly meeting with his estate manager Philip Care, to discuss estate matters. Mr Care, of Care & Company, described him as “very hands on”, adding that until the week he died Lt Cdr Rogers had never missed a meeting. He had then phoned to say he was feeling unwell and just a few days later had been taken into hospital. Lt Cdr Rogers died at Truro’s Royal Cornwall Hospital on Saturday, July 7. Mr Care said: “He was a well known gentleman with a great sense of humour. He was very astute – business wise – and an excellent person to work for, and with.” Alastair Cameron, National Trust property manager for the Lizard and Penrose, said that Commander Rogers had given the bulk of the Penrose Estate to the National Trust in 1974, which included over 1,600 acres of farmland and woodland surrounding Loe Pool, Cornwall’s largest freshwater lake, along with four miles of coast. Describing it as a “generous gift,” Mr Cameron said that as a result of the donation Penrose was now regularly used by walkers, cyclists and visitors and was “a great asset to the local community and for wildlife.” Mr Cameron added: “Commander Rogers maintained a keen interest in the estate and the Trust always enjoyed a good working relationship with him, and he was fondly regarded by staff both past and present.”


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n Falmouth Gig Club reaped three of the trophies on the day

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n Porthleven Gig Club's mixed crew look forward to their race

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Winds make it tough for rowers n By RORY FONG editorial@packetseries.co.uk

n Cadgwith Ladies B crew are pleased to be first across the finish line

n Porthleven Ladies A crew give it all they have in the difficult seas

GIG rowers from across Cornwall took to the water on Sunday for a successful Porthleven Gig Day. It marked only the second day of racing in the local gig calendar, after so many events had to be cancelled due to bad weather conditions. The previous day many of the same clubs had gathered to compete in Coverack’s event at Porthoustock Beach, braving heavy downpours of rain. One gig rower said: “If we don’t get biblical amounts of rain at Porthleven, we’ll already be up on the deal.” In Porthleven, still challenging sea conditions made for some exciting racing as 17 gigs lined up for the first race. Falmouth clinched first place in the Men’s A, Men’s B and the mixed races, and Charlestown came first for Ladies A, Cadgwith for Ladies B with Flushing and Mylor winning the veterans’ category. After recently gaining a large number of new and fairly inexperienced rowers to the club, Porthleven managed to finish in the middle of the pack for most races. While the sun shone all afternoon, the wind out

to sea made for some very rough water for the rowers and it was decided to cancel races for the under 18s, as it was felt that the sea was just too rough for their safety. At the end of the afternoon a special trophy was presented to Simon and Lisa Clark for their continued support of Porthleven Gig Club, despite now living some distance from the village. Simon operated the finish line all day while Lisa worked hard on the hot food stall. Porthleven club secretary Julia Burns said: “A great day was had by all, great racing and a great atmosphere. “Porthleven Gig Club would like to thank everyone for their continued support and in particular, the Harbour and Dock Company for allowing the club to use the Harbour Head and shipyard.” Owners of the four support vessels were also thanked, for making it possible to run the event. Porthleven Gig Club is funded by its members and relies heavily on support from local sponsors, who donate raffle prizes or have advertising boards on gig trailers. The annual gig day event is an important fundraising day for the club, as money raised goes towards the running of this sport in the port. Members, former members, friends and family all pitched in to help the day go smoothly and were all delighted to have raised almost £1,000.

n Falmouth Men's B crew fly home in first place


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Monty’s festival visit TV PRESENTER Monty Halls, pictured, will be one of the star attractions at this year’s Falmouth Oyster Festival in October. The star, who spent months in Cornwall filming ‘The Fisherman’s Apprentice’ last year, will present an evening talking about his travels, experiences and adventures. The annual festival takes place between Thursday, October 11 and Sunday, October 14, and celebrates the rich history and heritage of the oyster fishermen on the River Fal. Other highlights at the event will include a variety of cooking demonstrations, music, comedian Johnny Cowling and free oyster tasting at the Opening Bash. Mr Halls will be appearing on Saturday, October 13 in Event Square. He said: “I'm very excited to be part of this year’s Falmouth Oyster Festival. It's a great chance to visit Cornwall again and find out more about the fascinating history of the oyster fishery.” Opening on Wednesday, October 10 with a Gourmet Night at St Michael’s Hotel and Spa, the festival marquee on Events Square hosts the four days which starts with a Grand Opening Bash, cookery demonstrations, live music from The Tinners and an evening in aid of Precious Lives Appeal with renowned Cornish Comedian, Johnny Cowling. Whilst over the weekend of October 13-14, The Moor hosts a weekend of acoustic music and local produce with a food and folk event funded by Falmouth BID. For full programme details log on to www.falmouthoysterfestival.co.uk

Mum wins her appeal A FALMOUTH mum whose little girl looked to be barred from going to her first choice of school is celebrating winning her appeal this week. Ruth Collett’s four-year-old daughter, Rebecca, was headed for St Mary’s Catholic Primary School in Falmouth before an administrative mixup stopped her in her tracks. Although she is a Catholic, Cornwall Council refused Rebecca a place at St Mary’s because they claimed her mum had not finished the application process properly. “I did actually win the appeal,” said Ruth this week. “Basically, it was found that the school carried out everything correctly but they decided that the way the way the application was processed by the council was unreasonable, in the legal sense of the word.

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Green lung site is allowed to breathe FEARS that one of Falmouth’s “green lungs” could be choked by development were put to rest this week, when the town’s mayor stepped in to protect a copse of trees. An application to build 12 flats on a plot of land between Melvill Road and the railway line was first put before planners in August 2010. This was knocked back at the time because the new flats would have been within the so-called “blast zone” for the potentially explosive ammonium nitrate fertiliser store at Falmouth Docks. Earlier this year however the Health and Safety Executive removed their objection, which was effectively blocking development of the site, after they agreed with dock-owner A&P Falmouth to shrink the size of the blast zone by limiting the amount and the way that fertiliser was stored in the docks. An application for the flats was then resubmitted in January and because all planning criteria are now satisfied there is no legal reason for the plans not to get the go ahead. But nearby residents and the council’s own tree officer are still concerned that this will sound the death knell for what one objector described as the “last remaining wooded area” at the docks end of town. Penny Phillips contacted the Packet

n By GREG FOUNTAIN greg.fountain@packetseries.co.uk because she was surprised to see the application going forward, given the number of objections it had received from residents first time around. She said: “This area is the green lungs of the docks-end of town and is the last remaining wooded area. “We hear owls there at night and many, many types of wildlife use the woods - we have seen bats in our garden adjacent. “Many objections were put in when the first application went in and we all believed the development had gone away however, this is not the case!” Graham Hall lives on the other side of the railway line from the proposed flats and is dismayed at the loss of greenery. He said: “If I had been the council when this first came up for sale I would have bought it and turned it in to a park – that would have benefitted everyone in the area. “All Cornwall Council seems to think is ‘let’s build, let’s develop’ and Falmouth seems to be losing its identity. “Most of those homes that are being built, it’s not as if it’s for the local people. These are homes for people coming down

to buy them as holiday homes or to use as second apartments.” Concerns over the loss of trees prompted town mayor and councillor for the area, Geoffrey Evans, to investigate. He said: “I tried to see if I could get a TPO [Tree Protection Order] for the whole site, but because of where it is and the railway line it was hard to turn it into land for community use.” There were no grounds to refer the application to Cornwall Council’s central area planning committee, Mr Evans said, “because it’s within all the regulations” and “ticks all the boxes.” Instead, he is pushing for a “clause” to be added to the planning consent – also known as a planning condition - which will protect the trees to the east and west side of the site and include a requirement for new planting to the rear of the building, as well as “management” of the remaining wooded areas. “I’m quite please with that to be honest,” Mr Evans said. “I have done everything I could have done. If I can get an extra clause to screen those trees off before they start building I will do. I want them protected.”

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Stolen sat nav returns DETERMINED policing led to a happy surprise for a Falmouth driver last week, when police returned his stolen SatNav without him having even reported it missing. Design engineer Rafal Kmiec had parked up overnight in Woodlane about three weeks ago. “I must’ve left the car open,” he said. “There was no sign of a break-in to the car and inside nothing was damaged - I actually didn't realise straight away but after two days, when I wanted to use it, the GPS [Global Positioning System, or SatNav] wasn’t there.” Rafal thought of going to the police, but he didn’t because no damage had been done and he wasn’t sure of exactly when the crime took place. He said: “I thought I would just cause hassle for them and the value was not that great - although it was quite a good model. “So you could imagine how surprised I was when after a week a policeman came to my work and he had my GPS with him!” PC David “Edd” Clarke had found the GPS after following three teenage boys on mopeds. They were acting suspiciously and riding erratically around Falmouth one night. The errant riders eventually abandoned their vehicles in the Sainsbury’s car park at Ponsharden but when the police caught up with them and searched their mopeds they discovered Rafal’s GPS. He said: “It was like a miracle, as I hadn’t reported it stolen so the police didn’t know whose GPS it was. “So they interrogated the boys and they eventually admitted it wasn’t theirs but they only remembered that it was from a green Audi. “The police then looked through the

n Rafal Kmiec with the stolen sat nav which was returned

favourite addresses on my GPS and they found my work address - so they visited my work place and ask who owned a green Audi and that’s how my GPS was returned to me. “It made my day. That was a very impressive police job.” PC Clarke said: “When I went to the

work address the SatNav stopped me on the main Helston road. Just on the off chance I went down a side road and happened to come across the company he worked for. “It was like ‘bingo’ and the guy’s face lit up when I walked into the room because he certainly didn’t expect to see it again.” Sergeant Dave O’Neill, from Falmouth Police Station, said: “Edd did some good work there. “It all stems back to three youths stealing a motorbike, from that they found a car had been broken into and we had a GPS but no owner.” PC Clarke inspected the GPS and “eventually tracked the owner down and returned the GPS – a TomTom – to him,” Sgt O’Neill said. “It’s good work and it’s determined work as well. He kept following a single lead he had got, eventually finding the owner of the TomTom, who had not reported it to us. “He was delighted and we were happy to have detected the crime.” PC Clarke advised drivers to never leave valuables unattended in their car and to always remove the “suction cup” that holds a SatNav/GPS to the windscreen. Rafal added: “My own piece of advice is it’s worth reporting stolen goods to the police, even if they are not of massive value because that actually might help them later on to investigate the case.”

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Dad injured in high speed jet ski crash t From Page 1

(Tuesday): “It’s a crucial time now, there are so many important decisions to be made - It was a major accident. “He’s the best dad in the world. It’s hard to see him like this when he’s in so much agony. I just want him to get better soon.” Samantha said her dad wanted to get better for his granddaughter, Ellie Grace, and that the family’s phones had “been going none stop,” as Alan is so wellknown and well-liked around Falmouth. His niece, Becky Cocks, said: “My uncle does so much for the community, he helps put up the Christmas lights and he’s such a good guy, he has a heart of gold.” Falmouth Harbour Commissioners, who are responsible for marine safety around the harbour, said an investigation would be carried out into the cause of the incident and whether further action is required. A harbour spokesperson warned: “Falmouth Harbour is used by a variety of craft and can, particularly in the summer months, be a busy place. “There are regular movements of commercial shipping operating with or without tug assistance which must be treated with caution by other craft.” Samantha added that she was keen to see her dad get the “best treatment available” in Plymouth and thanked his rescuers. She said: “We do want to say a big thank you to the coastguard for looking after him. One of the coastguards got hurt as well so a big thank you, a really big thank you – they were brilliant. “It was just a completely freak accident – there’s no blame at all.”

Spate of burglaries THE police have issued a warning to Penryn businesses after a spate of commercial break-ins and safe thefts recently. As many as 14 burglaries, linked by location, have taken place over the past six to eight weeks. Detective Sergeant Dave O’Neill, from Falmouth Police Station, said the thieves were “predominately targeting safes and cash tins” and warned businesses to make sure their alarms are serviced and working properly. He said: “I know for a fact that the alarm company will call people and they don’t turn up, so if you get a call please attend because there might be an evidence gathering opportunity missed. “A couple of the places that have been broken into have had keys to safes easily accessible. “If you are going to leave the key to a safe on the premises, you must make sure it’s not easily accessible – perhaps in a key coded safe.” Investigations are currently ongoing into the burglaries.

Olympic supplement DUE to a production error in last week’s Olympic supplement some of the editorial was repeated on facing pages. We apologise for any confusion this may have caused.


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Gardeners will be ‘growing for gold’ OLYMPIC athletes won’t be the only people hoping to win this Saturday (July 28). On the first real day of action of the Games, members of Falmouth and District Allotment and Garden Society will be “growing for gold” themselves, competing in their annual summer show. Previous shows have attracted a bumper number of entries and the society is hoping that, despite the erratic weather, this year’s show will be no exception. Gigantic cabbages, massive onions, long runner beans and a host of other vegetables will jostle for space with cut flowers, pot plants, domestic produce and special classes for novices and juniors at the Emmanuel Baptist Church Hall in Western Terrace, Falmouth. The show will be open to the public, with no charge for entry, from 1.30pm. The presentation of prizes and trophies at 3pm will be followed by an auction of show produce at 3.30pm.

Cadets’ cash for banner THE Falmouth Army Cadets have reached nearly a third of their fundraising target for a new banner in just one day of collecting at a local supermarket. Members spent last Saturday at Sainsbury’s in Falmouth, and collected £142 towards the £500 needed.

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Community group row n By DAVID THOMAS david.thomas@packetseries.co.uk AN ANGRY row broke out at Falmouth Town Council on Monday over plans to create a “Community Interest Company” (CIC) to control entertainment on the Prince of Wales pier. Councillors slammed the creation of the organisation, which they labelled “undemocratic”. Cornwall Council’s community network manager for Falmouth, Charlotte Chadwick, told the meeting that a steering committee had already been set up to create the new organisation, which will be known as the “Falmouth Community Interest Company.” It would be formed with a board of volunteer directors, who would be chosen from a field of suitable volunteers. David Pollard, who is on the steering group, addressed the council. He said: “Around two weeks ago Cornwall Council issued a tender for running entertainment on the Prince of Wales pier for the next five years, and applications have to be in by August 14. “That will attract a lot of commercial interest from outside the county and there is a real danger the running of the pier will be handed to someone who has nothing to do with the town. “The CIC would do exactly what it says on the box, it would be a non-profit making organisation working in the interests of the community, and would be an ideal vehicle for people in the town to look after their own interests.” Councillor David Sterratt said: “I feel we are being railroaded into a position where we are expected to support something we

n Councillors slammed the creation of a Community Interest Company, which they labelled “undemocratic” have not been given the opportunity to vote on.” He added: “We are elected and have to come forward every four years for election, and I am concerned those same rules will not apply to the CIC. “The pier is publically owned land and I do not want to see a CIC running it.” Councillor Marie Ryan also questioned the validity of the CIC, saying: “I cannot understand how people can be given this responsibility while being unelected.” Councillors were told the steering group currently included several members of Falmouth Town Forum, including Mr Pollard, Cornwall Councillor Mike Varney and National Maritime Museum director Jonathan Griffin. Councillor Sterratt said: “I feel this is tied in with the town centre forum, which is full of unelected people with their own

interests. We have to declare our interests before every meeting as councillors. There are things happening in this town behind closed doors that people do not know about.” Mayor Geoffrey Evans, who was chairing the meeting, suggested sending a delegation of councillors to meet the steering group to discuss a way forward, but the motion was defeated on a vote. Charlotte Chadwick expressed her disappointment in the result. She said: “Personally I would like to have seen Falmouth Town Council on the steering group working hand in glove to make this something exciting and dynamic for the town.” A second motion, calling for urgent talks between Cornwall Council and town councillors over the future of pier, was approved by the council.

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Tax may increase COUNCIL tax payers could face a 13 per cent increase in their bills from Falmouth Town Council once new government legislation comes into effect. The issue was raised at a meeting of the council on Monday evening, where a letter from the Cornwall Association of Local Councils regarding the issue was shown to councillors. The letter, written to all six Cornwall MPs, warns that the new rules could see a doubledigit percentage rise in tax base levels as councils adjust for a reduced rate of support from central government. Falmouth clerk Mark Williams told councillors: “This will depend on whether Cornwall Council will send the cost of this down the line to the district councils. “If it does come down to us we will have to wait and see the impact, but there are some figures to suggest a ten to 13 per cent increase in precept.” Councillor David Sterratt said: “Looking at recent history you would think they will look to take the money from us, and I believe it would be unfair for us to give people a 13 per cent increase.” Mr Williams responded: “It could actually be worse than that, if you suggest an increase of over set amount, you have to hold a referendum, which we would have to fund as well.”

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‘One and only’ Chesney Hawkes to headline at Falmouth Week THE line-up for this year’s Falmouth Week has officially been confirmed. Fazer from N-Dubz has been announced as the headline act for Wednesday, August 15, supported by Britain’s Got Talent boy band The Mend. The week of festivities begins on August 10 and will run until August 19. Other highlights for this year include the ‘one and only’ Chesney Hawkes, who will give party-goers a blast from the past for the 80s vs 90s extravaganza on Friday, August 17. UK 90s Garage legend Artful Dodger will close the party and raise the roof that night with an exclusive ‘Nod to the Nineties’ set, with a live performance from MC Alister. This will feature all the classics: ReRe Wind, Woman Trouble and Movin To Fast, plus a selection of the biggest dance and garage tracks from the decade. ABBA fans will be in their element on August 14 when the world-famous Bjorn Again will bring the music of the one of most renowned bands in the world to Falmouth for the first time. This event will be open to all ages and everyone is invited to wear fancy dress. New for 2012 is B-Side Communion, which has built a steady following at Bunters Bar in Truro each month and will bring Josh Kumra, Saturday Sun, Matthew and Me, Emily and the Woods and Kezia to the stage in Falmouth on August 11. Somerset’s finest Scrumpy-guzzling quartet will make a welcome return for the Wurzell’s hog roast and cider night on August 12, as will The Soul Survivors on August 13 and South West Ska legends Rude’s Message on August 16. This year the Caribbean night towards the end of the week will feature the smooth grooves of Legend, who bring the life and times of the late and great Bob Marley and the music of The Wailers in their upbeat show, The Bob Marley Experience, for which fancy dress is again welcome. Closing this year’s proceedings will be Kernow King, providing entertainment for all the family plus a free Rowe’s pasty for everyone in attendance.

n Ninety’s pop star Chesney Hawkes will be giving party goers a blast from the past Also new for 2012 is a Bedouin-themed private VIP area, which is available for private hire each night, complete with private bar, capacity for up to 150 people and a raised uninterrupted view of the stage. Organisers have said they are not fazed by possible unpleasant weather conditions, as all the shoreside festivities take place under the cover of a marquee on Event’s Square. Full event details, ticket prices and information can be found on www.southwestbarsandevents.co.uk with tickets on sale for all nights now on www.seetickets.com. Simply type the name of the main act followed by “Falmouth” for direct links to tickets. Tickets will also be on sale from the Box Office Shed in Events Square from July 29 and the Falmouth Visitor Information Centre on Prince of Wales Pier from the same date. For instant information and further announcements join the Facebook event “Falmouth Week 2012” and follow on Twitter @falmouthweek12.


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Dragon boat racing THE annual RNLI Dragon Boat Challenge will take place during Falmouth Week on August 19. The event will be raising money to support the work of the RNLI’s volunteer lifeboat crews and lifeguards, helping them to save lives around the Cornish coastline. Dragon boats are 40ft open boats built on the lines of the traditional Chinese design and are powered by up to 16 competitors using paddles. The boats race against each other and are steered by a helmsman on the stern using a long oar. A drummer, positioned precariously on the bow of the boat as they race along a course set in Falmouth Inner Harbour, provides the rhythm for the paddlers. As well as over 400 competitors taking part in the competitive racing, it is hoped that many more people will go down to Events Square to watch the racing and enjoy the carnival type atmosphere. Dave Nicoll, RNLI area manager said: “This is a great day out for all the family so why not enter a team, which in turn will help raise money to ensure our volunteer lifeboat crews and lifeguards have the training and equipment they require to save lives around our Cornish coast?” Anyone interested in taking part in this event should contact Dave Nicoll on 07810 850926 or email cornwall@rnli.org.uk.

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Historic station artwork n By GREG FOUNTAIN greg.fountain@packetseries.co.uk AN artwork designed by Penryn schoolchildren bound for the wall of the town’s train station was welcomed by the town council, who voted to adopt it last week. The 35 metre long “timeline,” which will be constructed out of the same material as the “Angel of the North” statue in Gateshead, was created in collaboration between Penryn College, Penryn Junior School and the University College Falmouth (UCF). It aims to tell the history of Penryn, from the town’s earliest beginnings and the foundation of Glasney College right down to the modern buildings and wind turbines that grace Jubilee Wharf. Cornwall Council is putting £10,000 towards the scheme and the artwork is planned to be installed by September, in time for the return of the students next term. Sam Hudspith, who led the project on behalf of the UCF, said: “We set the children homework each week and we got them drawing and sketching their favourite parts of the town. “We worked with about 20 year nine students from Penryn College and years four and five from Penryn Junior School and went about a process of developing a design that takes on their ideas.” A mural was considered for the blank wall, next to the bus stop on Station Road, but fears that it might be ruined by spraypaint or graffiti led the students to design a sculpture made out of “weathering steel.” This material, also known as “CORTEN” steel, was developed by an American company and is designed to form a

n An artist’s impression of how the Penryn timeline will look when it goes on display at the town’s train station later this year protective rust-like coating on its surface, which protects the steel underneath from further corrosion. Sam said: “It’s going to sit there, in Penryn, hopefully for a long time - a lot longer than some of us are going to be around because that’s the nature of the material. “It’s taken a long time to get to this stage; there’s been a lot of back and forth with the design itself. “But the children from both schools have worked on it and spent time on it and it’s their work. I have made sure that has been a real part of the process, that the kids have had a say on it the whole way.” Town mayor Gill Grant welcomed the artwork, saying: “I think it’s absolutely wonderful. It’s a really good design. I like it and I think it will add a bit of interest around the station.” Councillors Mary May and Ted Wilkes were more apprehensive about the new addition, however. Mrs May said: “I feel

you are cramming too much on that wall. It looks very graffiti-ed to me with that design on it.” Mr Wilkes added: “The only problem I have got is how much is this going to cost us once it’s up if there’s vandalism or graffiti or something like that. “This is going to end up costing the council money in the end. At the vote, in the council’s planning meeting last Monday, councillor Mark Snowdon spoke in favour of the project: “I don’t think you can make anything vandal proof. But it is strong and it is sturdy,” he said. “I think it’s inventive, there’s no one else who has done it or thought about it locally and I think it would be good to do. All councillors present, with the exception of Mr Wilkes, voted in favour of adopting the artwork.

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Choir’s first concert JUST ten months after they first formed, Falmouth’s newest choir is set to perform publically for the first time this weekend. The 40 members of the Falmouth Community Choir will be singing at All Saints’ Church on Saturday at 7.30pm. They will be joined by members of Truro Community Choir for the performance to make a choir of about 100 voices for the concert. The programme includes a wide range of music from the 15th Century to the present day, including folk songs, show tunes, popular melodies and lighter classical pieces. The Falmouth Community Choir rehearses on Wednesday mornings from 10.30pm until noon at the King Charles The Martyr Church Hall. New members are welcome and can simply turn up at a rehearsal. Tickets for the concert are £5 and are available at the door.

Thumbs up for flats A NEW development of nine two-bedroom apartments look set to be built on land at North Parade after the thumbs up from Falmouth town council planners. The proposals were discussed by the authority’s planning committee on Monday evening.


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Scheme to reduce county’s fuel bills HOUSEHOLDERS in the Falmouth and Helston area could save hundreds of pounds on their fuel bills after the launch of a “game-changing” new collective purchasing scheme this week. Called “Cornwall Together,” the scheme aims to help residents across the county boost their purchasing power by working together to negotiate cheaper energy bills. It is the brainchild of the people behind the St Austell-based Eden Project. Project director Matt Hastings, from the Eden Project, said: “The idea of the whole of Cornwall joining forces to negotiate as a single unit is revolutionary. “This is an exciting opportunity to unite Cornwall and reduce energy bills for tens of thousands of people. “Cornish households spend around £1.2bn on energy per year, and we estimate potential savings of £3.7m could be made, most of which would likely be put back into the Cornish economy.” Interested residents can visit the

n By GREG FOUNTAIN greg.fountain@packetseries.co.uk Cornwall Together website at www.cornwalltogether.com and register their details to become a member of the scheme. If 20,000 people sign up, it is estimated they could reduce their energy bills by up to 15 per cent. Although initial negotiations will only be for gas and electricity, heating oil will also be negotiated at a later date. Cornwall Council, the NHS, sustainable energy company “Community Energy Plus” and collective purchasing pioneers “Community Buying unLimited” are all behind the scheme, as well as renewable energy promoters “energyshare” and price comparison website uSwitch.com. Lucy Darch, from uSwitch.com said: “Cornwall Together could be a complete game changer. “Six in ten households have never switched and three quarters of people are sitting on old fashioned and expensive standard

tariffs – a group purchasing scheme targeted at these people and giving them the support and confidence they need to switch could be the boost to competition and the local economy that’s needed.” Under the scheme, ten per cent of all revenue generated from each switch will be invested in a fund designed to address fuel poverty. Those registering on the website will also have the chance to see if they are eligible for free loft and cavity wall insulation. Cornwall Council chief executive Kevin Lavery said: “Our vision is for Cornwall to lead the UK and Europe in developing sustainable energy. “When we started working with partners to develop the concept of Cornwall Together we could see its potential to communities in Cornwall Together, to consider their energy usage more carefully and deliver real economic, social and health benefits.”

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n A snorkeler inspects the underwater world in Maenporth Cove

Picture: STEVE KING

Snorkel safari at Maenporth THE wonders of Maenporth’s underwater world were revealed at the first ever “Snorkel safari” organised by Cornwall Wildlife Trust last week. Ten aspiring Jacques Cousteau’s went out on the course, supported by Dive Newquay, which aims to teach the skills needed to successfully and safely snorkel around Cornwall’s coast. Abby Crosby, from Cornwall Wildlife Trust said: “Thanks to Maenporth beach supporting the recent activity, the snorkelers had an amazing dive gliding over shoals of sand eels and peering into the mouths of bar-

nacles within the safe bay. The divers were taught how to duck dive down to get closer to marine life, which included a lovely blenny peering out of its living space in the reef and a beautiful strawberry anemone feeding on the rocks down below.” From forests of kelp gently swaying in the current to colourful fish peeking from behind an urchin’s delicate spines, the highlights of a snorkel safari are many and varied, Abby said. She added: “There is amazing underwater marine wildlife right on our doorstep, which is

free for everyone to experience. It is just waiting for us to duck dive down and glide by to watch it in fascination!” The trust has three more snorkel safaris planned for this year with spaces available on: Saturday, August 11; Thursday, August 23 and Saturday, September 8. A full day course, from 9am to 5pm, costs £30 and booking is essential. For more information contact Abby Crosby, marine conservation officer, on 01872 273939 extension 208 or email abby.crosby@cornwallwildlifetr ust.org.uk

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n Members of Falmouth’s marine band performing at the Brest Maritime festival in France

Marine band entertain at festival MEMBERS of Falmouth’s famous marine band have spent four days sampling the delights of the Brest Maritime festival in France. The trip was funded by the festival committee, with the only expenditure for the 38 band members being liquid refreshments.

The musical talent of the band went down extremely well with the vast crowds, especially when their famous canon was put to use. In excess of 100,000 people attended the festival each day and ran for a total of six days. Member of the band, Lionel MacDonald said: “The festival was

absolutely fantastic. It was very well organised. “We all had a great time and look forward to the next one in four years time.” Watch out for the band on carnival day in Falmouth on August 11 where the band will be unveiling their brand new uniform.

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Sun shines on garden show THE sun came out just in time for Constantine Cottage Garden Society’s annual summer show on Saturday. The event saw many entrants leaving with a flurry of prizes and trophies. Both young and old competed in various categories, including baking, cooking, fruit and vegetable growing, painting, photography and pot plants. Constantine Cottage Garden Society’s vice-chairman, Roy Keverne, left the event grasping a trophy for best exhibit for his pot

n By RORY FONG editorial@packetseries.co.uk

n Gwen Rowe received trophies for best exhibit in art and design and floral art

plant, and Gwen Rowe was awarded two trophies for best exhibit in art and design and floral art. Val Bolt, society secretary, said: “It was the best weather we have had for four years. Attendance was very good and everyone sat outside in the sun and had ice cream. “The exhibits were very good. It was a happy occasion with all the village there.”

n Hollie Chinn, 16, won a first prize for her Cornish pasty

n Aimee Smith, eight, won first prize for her painting

n Max Rowe, six, won a first prize for his gingerbread man

n Daniel, six, with his prizewinning blueberries

n Jemima Haywood, nine, won first prize for a model animal made from fruit or vegetables.

n Sue Kuruber won best exhibit in show

n Roy Keverne won a first prize for pot plants and a trophy for best exhibit

n Maureen Shipman who received first prize in the visually impaired category

Show results Most points in horticulture: M. Mitchell. Onions, shallots and leeks: H. Metcalf. Vegetables: M. Mitchell. Fruit: M. Mitchell. Dahlias: M. Dunstan and M. Mitchell. Fuchsias: F. Kuruber. Flowers: M. Mitchell. Floral art: G. Rowe. Home produce: H. Chinn. Arts and crafts: L. Rufe. Pot plant: K.

Kuruber. Art and design: senior, G. Rowe; junior, Alfie van Veen. Best exhibit of horticulture: S. Kuruber. Plant in pot: R. Keverne. Specimen roses: M. Mitchell. Collection of fruit: M. Mitchell. Dahlias: M. Dunstan. Cut flowers: S. Kuruber. Floral art: G. Rowe. Novice floral art: S. Dunstan. Table

decoration: C. Agnew. Men’s home produce: R. Olds. Most attractive front garden: 34 Fore St. Most attractive small front garden: 45 Fore St. Best hanging basket: 7 Glebe Terrace. Photography: tankard, John Richard and H. Bolt; shield, M. Nicholson. Arts and crafts: S. Scatchard. Children’s

home produce: 11 and under, Darcy Pascoe; 12 and over, Rosie Chinn; aggregate, Darcy Pascoe. Division 12: under five, Olan Rambaud; five to seven, Olivia George; eight to 11, Jehminah Haywood, Eleanor Sleesby, Martha Ellemann and Megan Hart. Division ten: Rhos Pascoe. Best paining / drawing:

Amy Smith and Molly Adams. Best front garden in Fore St.: 1, 34; 2, 45; 3, 52. Best garden in Penbothidno St.: 1, 25; 2, 23; 3, 13. Best garden in Wheel Vyvyan and Glebe Terrace: 1, 2 Glebe Terrace; 2, 1 Glebe Terrace; 3, 1 Wheel Vyvyan.


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Helston OAP’s mystery injuries t From Page 1 Tuesday – standard practice at crime scenes still under investigation. Claire Taylor, district manager for The Clies, said: “I can confirm that a police investigation is ongoing so it would be inappropriate to comment further apart from to stress that our customers’ welfare is always paramount.” Police are appealing to anyone who saw or heard anything unusual during the early hours of Monday morning, and who would have been close to where the incident took place, to come forward. They should call police on 101 and quote log 82 of July 23, 2012 or call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555111.

Sunshine sparks business boom n Culdrosers wives’ choir rehearses at HMS Seahawk Churchband master ‘Bandy’

Picture: RNAS CULDROSE

‘Cudroses’ going for a song WORKING at one of Europe’s largest helicopter bases, navy personnel at RNAS Culdrose have been more accustomed to hearing the whirr of aircraft blades than Alicia Keys tunes emerging from the station’s Anglican Church. Yet the formation of “The CuldRoses,” an all female choir consisting of servicewomen and civil servants alongside the wives and girlfriends of navy servicemen, has ensured that this is about to change. After becoming inspired by the rise of the now famous Military Wives, several ladies at the Helston naval base decided to form their own choir. The group’s first meeting attracted 35 ladies, but since then they have gained ten more members. Despite being a self sufficient group they have accepted the air station’s offer of the base’s Anglican

n By RACHEL HADDY editorial@packetseries.co.uk Church as a practice and recording venue. Culdrose Chaplain Rev James Francis said: “I am delighted that Culdrose could help the new choir to get started and hope that they found the use of my church useful. Music always brings people together and this is a great opportunity for the wives at Culdrose and the wider community.” The station bandmaster has also offered his professional services by encouraging the ladies to incorporate harmonies into their singing. The choir, whose members range from 20 to 60 years of age, made their debut at “Helstonbury,” the town’s

Monty Halls makes return AFTER spending an entire year living the life of a fisherman in Cadgwith for TV series The Fisherman’s Apprentice, Monty Halls can’t seem to stay away from all things Cornish. As part of the TV show Monty immersed himself in the art of lobster and crab fishing, alongside learning the hardships that the last remaining small boat fishermen in the UK face today. During his time in the cove, Monty made a friend in Nigel Legge, a local fisherman on the Lizard Peninsula who was willing to offer the marine biologist a helping hand. Nigel showed him the ropes and made sure he rose to the challenge in this very demanding sink or swim environment. Monty said: “It was an absolutely extraordinary eight months of my life. Nige was responsible for me and because I had never set foot on a fishing boat before, he was endlessly patient and took great care of me. “I am so grateful to have learnt just a fraction of what Nige knows because it would take generations and generations for me to know everything he knows. “Every single fisherman I met was hospitable. It was a very, very positive experience all round.” Monty has taken the popular TV series even

n By RORY FONG editorial@packetseries.co.uk

further by writing an accompanying book of the same name to be promoted today, Wednesday, at the Penzance Literary Festival. Monty added: “Personally, of all the literary festivals I am promoting my book at, the Penzance Literary Festival is the most important to me. It is the most significant, applicable and pertinent because it is within the heart of the fishing community where the book is set. “It is going to be fantastic meeting the people who are interested in the book. I believe that the discussion is going to be filled with fishermen who are really going to know the realistic, rigorous aspects of fishing.” Monty will also be appearing at the renowned Falmouth Oyster Festival in October for an evening packed with tantalising tales of travels, experiences and adventures. Monty said: “I’m very excited to be part of this year’s Falmouth Oyster Festival. It’s a great chance to visit Cornwall again and find out more about the fascinating history of the oyster fishery.”

annual music festival on Sunday. They performed the Bill Winters classic “Lean On Me,” along with tunes made famous by Alicia Keys and The Pointer Sisters. The choir was extremely well received and the performance went “brilliantly” according to member Helen Brown. The CuldRoses look forward to exploring different genres of music in the future, including jazz and gospel. They are also excited by the prospect of singing at a charity event due to be held at The Falmouth Hotel later this year, designed to raise funds for the treatment of female cancer sufferers.

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THE sudden arrival of sunshine in Cornwall has sparked a boom start to the peak season for businesses across Helston and The Lizard. Outdoor tourist attractions and cafes alike have seen a sudden rise in customer numbers due to the recent good weather. Cafes appear to have benefitted the most from this week’s rise in temperature. Ross Hosking, owner of Poldhu Beach Cafe, said he had seen “a huge increase” in customer numbers and has gladly welcomed the “rush of people” which the sunshine has brought to the cafe. Luke Donovan, manager of Kyance Beach Bar, described the impact the weather has had on business as “massive”, claiming that he “couldn’t have asked for more”. “We are really busy,” Mr Donovan said, adding: “Everyone’s gone mad.” Cafes such as these have witnessed a drastic turn around in trade since the end of the rainy spell which marred the start of July. This has provided relief for large numbers of cafe owners for whom the wet weather can influence custom to a heavily detrimental extent. Manager of the Polpeor Cafe, Adam Browning, admitted that the “worst summer on record” has severely affected the cafe’s takings. “It’s been tough up to the last few days,” Mr Browning said, “but we are hoping that it stays sunny.” Outdoor tourist attractions in Helston have flourished in the recent sunshine. Marketing Manager at Flambards theme park, Susie Hale, is looking forward to several events at the attraction, which she fully “expects to be busy”. Similarly, Eileen Keeling, operations manager at the Cornish Seal Sanctuary, said that the summer sun has encouraged visitors to take “full advantage of the sanctuary and all its facilities.”

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n Above: Everybody got into the spirit of the event during the festival n Alvin Sawdust gets them rocking

n 11-year-old Jowan Bosustow practiced being a star

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Musical delight MORE than a thousand people rocked up to Helstonbury music festival over the weekend to jam out at the Blue Anchor to an endless line up of live acts. Over the past 12 years Helstonbury has raised in excess of £37,000 thanks to the overwhelming support of the local community and The Blue Anchor Pub, which has been the festival’s ‘spiritual home’ for the last ten years. This year’s festival, organised as always by Helston-based naval man Paul Turton, raised a staggering £5,600 for local charities and good causes.

After selling all 1,400 wristbands, an estimated 1,500 enthusiastic music lovers attended the event. A highlight from the weekend was Helston’s very own military wives choir, The CuldRoses, making their first ever public performance. Paul said: “Heltonbury was an overwhelming success. The weather held up and all the bands played for free and were all well received. Everyone had a good time, it was fantastic. “I am very pleased. Actually the word ‘pleased’ doesn’t even capture how thrilled I am with how the festival went and I am very much looking forward to next year’s bash.”

n Kirsty, Glyn, Emma and Gill were soaking up the atmosphere Buy this picture at thepacket.co.uk picture code: Helstonbury7

n Paula Kelynack and Penny Mitchell raise a glass at the event Buy this picture at thepacket.co.uk picture code: Helstonbury6

Picture: CHRISTINE HOSEY

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n (Left to right) Eden, Charlie, Scott and George were enjoying the sunshine, music and beer Buy this picture at thepacket.co.uk picture code: Helstonbury1


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Mullion pupils prom celebration MULLION School pupils dressed to the nines to celebrate the end of their GCSE exams and their departure from the school with a traditional year 11 prom. This year’s event was once again held at the Tregenna Castle Hotel in St Ives and proved to be a very glamorous affair, despite the inclement weather. Going against the convention of limousines and party buses, pupils from the Lizard arrived on the very same bus that they have travelled to and from school in over the past few years. This time, however, the bus had been

n By RORY FONG editorial@packetseries.co.uk appropriately decorated with bunting to reflect the joyous occasion. Many months of planning had gone into what the youngsters would wear, with the girls wearing ball gowns and dresses whilst the boys donned tuxedos or very smart suits. Many members of staff also attended the celebrations and helped the students mark the end of their time at Mullion School.

n Pupils from Mullion School dressed up to the nines for their prom


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Honk is an ear splitting triumph THERE was a standing ovation for Mullion school’s end of year production of the musical ‘Honk!’ The play is based on the well loved, traditional story of the Ugly Duckling, with Rosie Tregonning as the lead character. Headteacher Mike Sanford said: “The school are grateful for the support of a number of local professional musicians who played alongside current and former students in a six-piece band which contributed to the high quality of the overall performance. “The cast and staff have worked incredibly hard at this, with well over 150 hours of rehearsal, but it has all been worth it. “It has been particularly encouraging

n By RORY FONG editorial@packetseries.co.uk to see so many lower school students involved and this bodes well for the future.” One audience member said: “What a superb performance. Every time we come to one, it seems to be the best but Honk! was without doubt, for me, the best of all. “Having watched many a school play and quite a few professional ones, this is one that is very special. I haven’t laughed and cried so much in years.”

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n Pupils and staff from Mullion School put on a performance of Honk

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French naval attache’s farewell CROSS channel collaboration is alive and well in Helston as the first French Merlin flight commander completed a successful Culdrose tour. Commander Fabrice Dehandschoewercker arrived in Culdrose in April 2008 to convert to Merlin aircraft, having previously flown the Agusta NH90. The French Naval Attache Captain Yves Le Corre visited the base recently to say farewell to Cmdr Dehandschoewercker, who has completed a successful four and a half years operating with the Fleet Air Arm. On completion of training he joined 829 Squadron in July 2009. Highlights of his tour included acting as flight commander in anti-piracy operations from HMS Somerset and leading and co-ordinating a NATO Anti Submarine Warfare (ASW) exercise at Hyeres in June 2010. He has successfully fired eight “Stingray” torpedoes and has acted as French liaison officer for 814 Squadron while exercising in the Mediterranean near to French airspace. He said: “I have thoroughly enjoyed my

n By GREG FOUNTAIN greg.fountain@packetseries.co.uk time working with the Royal Navy in a wide range of demanding operational and training flights. “I am particularly honoured to have been the first Frenchman to fly a front line Merlin from a Royal Navy ship on operational deployment. “I look forward to taking that experience back to France so that our navies can work together even more closely.” Married and with children at Helston College and St. Michael’s School, Cmdr Dehandschoewercker and his family have completely integrated into the local community and will leave behind many friends. His next appointment will be at Hyeres in the south of France where he will be the executive officer at the helicopter expertise unit of the French Navy.

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Face on the base: Paul Turton PAUL Turton, 46, is one of two deputy unit manpower controllers with the Maritime Aviation Support Force (MASF) and entertainments’ manager for the warrant officer and senior rates mess. He lives in Helston and is founder of the annual Helstonbury music festival. Paul tells the Packet about his day-to-day role, as well how he helps entertain the personnel – both on and off the base. My specific role is looking after manpower for the RFA Argus and RFA Fort Victoria. I probably look after between 80 and 100 personnel. We have got three watch systems on the Argus. Previously it was two and there was no time for leave – personnel were tending to be deployed all the time. Argus has roughly 40 to 50 personnel on there [permanently], from a senior naval officer down to engineers and logistics. We have got two teams on Fort Victoria and they do a four-month rotation. I’m a liaison. The Argus look after their own – they have all the required people. What I do is if there’s a manpower change I’m the middleman. It’s people-juggling – make sure people have got the right courses, etc. Before anyone deploys we give a briefing, making sure they have got jabs and done the risk courses. It’s an important part. We are like a temping agency: we get requests that say ‘Can you provide us with an air traffic controller,’ for example. Like everyone elsewhere we had to make cut-

backs, for the Defence Review – a reduction from 280 to 220 staff. We’re a lot leaner than we were. I also have a role in the mess. I used to be called social secretary, now it’s entertainments’ manager for the warrant officer and senior rates mess. Throughout the year we lay on functions. We’ve just had a summer ball, we have a Christmas ball, Trafalgar Night and a St Piran’s Party. We also have member dining nights and then balls and cheese and wine nights. People can bring guests. I’ve just finished a two-year foundation degree in event management. I’ve been doing this for three years and I’m standing down shortly, as I have careers courses. This was my last summer ball, but it’s not just a one man show; I have a ball committee. My background has always been music. Before I joined the Navy I wanted to be the next Jimmy Page. Then I joined and never thought I would get in a band – but I did, the Bone Shaking Babies. We used to play a bit at the Blue Anchor and as time went on we got a little bit more professional; we got ourselves a drummer. Then we got married and had children and all that died down. But we have had more comebacks than probably Take That and we still play. We have played Helstonbury over the years – the Blue Anchor is my Wembley Stadium.

Culdrose staff Olympic duties STAFF from RNAS Culdrose will be helping with security at the Olympic and Paralympic games. Royal Navy Merlin’s from 814 Naval Air Squadron (the Flying Tigers) have arrived at Royal Navy Air Station Yeovilton in preparation for their key role in contributing to maritime security operations in support of Dorset police. The squadron’s personnel, home-based at RNAS Culdrose in Cornwall, have been preparing for their Olympics role for many months and have already taken part in a series of demanding training missions. They have been working alongside other Royal Navy and Royal Marine units and other Government agencies. In addition to conducting maritime surveillance in the Weymouth Bay area, 814 Squadron crews will be on call to respond to any incident as directed by Maritime Force Commander Dorset, the Commanding Officer HMS Bulwark. The Merlin helicopter is the world’s most potent submarine hunting helicopter, using state-of-the-art active sonar and passive sonobuoys, but is equally adept at a broad range of traditional maritime helicopter duties. These include sea surveillance, search and rescue, and the transfer of passenger and equipment. More specialist roles have

also been added since the aircraft entered frontline service in 2000, most notably maritime sniping, fast roping and ISTAR. This combination of capabilities has made the Merlin Mk 1 the aircraft of choice for this particular element of the Fleet Air Arm’s support to the Olympics security plan. The Commanding Officer of 814 Squadron, Commander Christopher Stock said: “A lot of hard work has gone behind the scenes by both my engineers and aircrew over many months to ensure aircraft and flying crews are ready for OP OLYMPICS. “The squadron has been very busy liaising very closely with the police and other agenicies, and conducted a comprehensive and dedicated work-up package so that the “Flying Tigers” can contribute to a safe and secure Olympic and Paralympic games.” The 814 Merlin’s will be based out of RNAS Yeovilton for the duration of the Olympic and Paralympic games. They will also fly to and from HMS Bulwark which is positioned in Weymouth Bay, close to the Olympic Sailing Regatta. The move from Culdrose enables them to be closer to their operating areas.

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Navy recruits pass out at Culdrose FIFTEEN Royal Navy recruits passed out of training and into the Fleet Air Arm as fully qualified Aircraft Handlers at a ceremony held at the Royal Navy School of Flight Deck Operations (RNSFDO) at RNAS Culdrose on July 20. The recruits started their course on October 17, 2011 and during their time at RNSFDO have learned how to safely move aircraft on a ship’s flight deck. They have also learnt how to fight fires both ashore in domestic and aircraft emergencies and on board Royal Navy ships. Now, 40 weeks later, these 15 young men have proudly passed into the Royal Navy, watched by their family and friends and the instructors and staff from RNSFDO who have worked with them during their training. Guest of Honour, Commanding Officer of RNAS Culdrose, Captain Entwisle awarded certificates and badges to the Naval Airmen (NA) and two trophies. The Brian Marsden memorial trophy was presented to NA Jake Adams for being the best student on the aircraft handling phase of the course. The Peter Veevers memorial trophy was presented to NA David Hood for being the best student on the fire fighting phase of the course. This award was presented by Jackie Meyers, the sister of Peter Veevers, an

n By STAFF REPORTER editorial@packetseries.co.uk aircraft handler who tragically died in 1976. Following the passing in ceremony, the Naval Airmen changed from Number One uniforms into their working rig to give a demonstration of how aircraft are moved around a ship’s flight deck as they are prepared to take off. This was followed by another change of clothes; into their protective fire fighting equipment and the Naval Airmen then demonstrated how to fight a domestic fire. NA Matt Probert, 24, from Redruth is a proud third generation member of the Fleet Air Arm. His father, Nick Probert, has been in for 34 years and his grandfather, Tom, served for 37 years. Matt said: “I feel much prouder passing out here than at HMS Raleigh because here I feel I have accomplished something in training for a job.” NA Tom Scott, 22, from Holyhead, North Wales said: “I am very happy that I joined the Royal Navy and couldn’t imagine being in a branch other than Aircraft Handler.” They will now go to fire stations at RNAS Culdrose and RNAS Yeovilton for a month of on job training before being drafted into the Fleet to put their training into practise.

n Mrs Grindley (left) with her newly qualified son Dean who won the award for Special Endeavor and proud father Brian (right) Buy this picture at thepacket.co.uk picture code: CULDROSE

n A “damsel in distress” calls for help from a first floor window

Pictures: CHRISTINE HOSEY

n Pauline Adams (left) and Kevin Adams (right) with their son Jake who won the award for Best Aircraft Handling Buy this picture at thepacket.co.uk picture code: CULDROS

n The Harrier is directed on the deck showing the skills learned

Pictures: CHRISTINE HOSEY

n The new airmen prepare to move a Harrier aircraft on the deck of an “aircraft carrier”


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n They all receive praise for their achievements

n They finish the job off with the hoses

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Pictures: CHRISTINE HOSEY

n They demonstrate how to hook the aircraft to the aircraft towing tractor

n Nick Probert (left) with his son Matt Probert (right) who is the third generation of Naval Airmen Proberts having just completed his seven months airman training


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