Issuu on Google+

A voice for the students since 1945

VOL. 73 ISSUE 11 MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2017

ROOSEVELT HOLDS ANNUAL BLOOD DRIVE FOR COMMUNITY

PHOTOS BY DOMINIC GWINN

Students donate blood during the annual blood drive sponsored by the Center for Student involvement. DOMINIC GWINN STAFF REPORTER

On Thursday, February 2, Roosevelt held its annual blood. Sponsored by the Center for Student Involvement, the blood drive served as a part of Community Service Week, a week long event that encouraged Roosevelt students, faculty and staff to become involved in the greater community. Despite an initially slow turn out, the event was seen as a success according to Keela Gray, Keela Gray, the South Region Collections Supervisor for LifeSource, Chicago

area blood collection agency, who worked in conjunction with Roosevelt to facilitate the blood drive. “It started off a little slow but it’s starting to pick up now.” said Gray. “It’s great, a lot of students had classes earlier this morning; when classes ended we saw a pick up in the traffic of donor flow.” Participants ranged from regular donors to “first timers,” according to Gray, and included numerous students and staff. “I’ve never done it before,” said 18 year-old

Isabelle Street, a freshman Biology major after donating for the first time. “Every single time in highschool I’d chicken out. I said, ‘I need to do this.’ I’m trying to do more good than bad this year.” Despite the willingness of many donors, Gray says that nurses are trained to make sure that patients are not only willing, but healthy enough to donate. “For our first time donors that are a little bit nervous we talk to them, walk them through the process,”

said Gray. “Give them a chance to ask any questions that they may have. We try to soothe their anxiety in any way that we can. So, if it’s telling a joke, making them laugh, whatever it takes to make the donor comfortable.” Twenty year-old Carl Cannon, a Junior majoring in Mechanical Engineering, has been donating blood for several years since graduating high school. Cannon, who donating a double count of whole blood, explained how his first experience

convinced him to become a regular donor. “They said I was O+,” said Cannon, squeezing a small red ball while a large machine hummed next to him. “I’m not going to be able to donate for a month or two, but it helps get to people faster, so I figured why not?” Other students, like Alex Hanley, a Senior majoring in Psychology, and Madleen Naser, a 20 year-old Criminal Justice major, stressed the importance of donating, and offered some advice for prospective donors.

“I think it’s fun to think about how many people the blood impacts,” said Hanley as she relaxed at the small cantina eating some snacks after her donation. “Literally just breathing through it and relaxing when it happens makes it a lot more bearable.” “I think everyone should,” said Naser. “Everyone who’s eligible to give blood should because you can save lives. You feel dizzy, but great after.”

SGA holds meeting, plans agenda

Good Stuff Eatery review

Lakers win

PAGE 2

PAGE 2

PAGE 3


NEWS

2 | The Roosevelt Torch | February 13, 2017

SGA HOLDS FIRST MEETING OF SPRING SEMESTER DOMINIC GWINN STAFF REPORTER

The Roosevelt Student Government Association held their first meeting of the Spring 2017 semester. Topics discussed ranged from updating the Roosevelt student handbook, continuing an outreach initiative to attract additional students to the SGA, and garnering attention and support for a rally at the Illinois state capitol in Springfield in support of higher education funding through MAP grants. “We’re going through a lot of changes, administrative as well as financial, so it’s important that the student body is on the same level,” said SGA Vice President, James Davis. “SGA needs to be the hub for that, where students can come together and talk about these changing issues in a common space.” For the coming year, the SGA would like to

focus on policies specific to expanding Roosevelt’s ongoing mission of social justice, says Davis, and the annual release of Roosevelt’s student handbook is a key tool in instituting that mission among students. “As we start doing more productive changes I think more people will start noticing us and will hop on board,” said SGA President Nathan Stoll about the organization’s efforts to attract more students for involvement in student government. “I thought it was very interesting to see the various student bodies express their concerns with what goes on in the school,” said Charles Harris, a recent transfer student and political science major who attended the SGA meeting. “I thought that it was very interesting to see that the student

government body would have this much of an impact in such a big school to affect the stability of the students as a whole. I thought that was pretty cool.” Other topics discussed was a planned meeting with the administration to discuss certain aspects of the food service available in the cafeteria so that the administration is aware of students concerns, and the planning of additional events throughout the semester. The SGA also urged that students come forward and voice concerns through active participation in student government. “If they don’t feel comfortable coming to us in a public meeting, that’s totally acceptable, said Stoll. “The best way to make your voice heard is to come to the meetings, let

PHOTO BY DOMINIC GWINN

us know that you want to bring something and we’ll set aside some time for you to speak your peace.” Students with questions, comments and suggestions for the SGA can leave a message in a sug-

gestion box at the Center for Student Involvement in WA 317, or attend SGA meetings, now held in the Spertus Lounge, AUD 244. contact SGA, or CSI..

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT A BIG BITE ZACHARY WRIGHT STAFF REPORTER

Good Stuff Eatery offers exactly what the name suggests: good stuff. From huge burgers to delicious milkshakes to greasy French fries, there may be something for you at this narrow but modern restaurant. Good Stuff Eatery specializes in hamburgers where the ingredients are all farm to table. This essentially means that each ingredient that goes into the meal is locally grown and raised. The selection is slim but one good thing about this restaurant is that you can swap out hamburger for chicken, as well as the bun for a lettuce wrap.

So despite the slim selection, you still have plenty of options. Customers can also order three different types of French fries, as well as a side of fried cuts of onion. Drinks: Besides serving regular Coca-Cola products, Good Stuff Eatery offers a small but tasty selection of milkshakes. Each milkshake only has two relatively small sizes but it is more than filing, especially after eating the huge sandwiches you ordered. The milkshakes are thick too so that may be a downside if you aren’t a fan.

ETC: Good Stuff is located a few steps South of Madison and Wabash,making for a short walk from the Gage building. The employees are very friendly so that is a plus. The lot itself is narrow, but it is very modern and feels very casual. Also, the place is very clean, even the restroom is too. One downside is that they play music loudly to the point you may have to repeat yourself numerous times. Prices are relatively cheap for how much food you get. You really do not have to worry about the meal breaking the bank for those who want a

change from the Cafe in the Wabash building or mom’s cooking.

ROOSEVELT TORCH STAFF

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Megan Schuller MANAGING EDITOR

Lauren Grimaldi BUSINESS MANAGER

Joe Molina

COPY EDITOR

Katherine Gage MANAGING EDITOR OF SOCIAL MEDIA AND WEB CONTENT

Rachel Popa

STAFF REPORTERS

Dominic Gwinn Ian Jackson Zachary Wright

PHOTO COURTSEY GOOD STUF EATERY

PUBLICATION POLICY CONTRIBUTING REPORTERS HANNA BONDARENKO

David Vilegas

FACULTY ADVISOR

Billy Montgomery

Views expressed are those of the authors and are not an expression of Roosevelt University policy. The Roosevelt Torch prides itself in its dedication to addressing news that affects the Roosevelt community while uncovering stories that both enlighten and entertain. All advertising is subject to acceptance.The business department can be reached at torchbu@roosevelt. edu

CONTACT US 312.281.3242

/roosevelttorchnews @RUTorch

PLEASE SEND MAIL TO

The Roosevelt Torch, 18 S. Michigan Ave., Room 515 or rutorchnews@gmail.com


SPORTS The Roosevelt Torch | February 13, 2017 | 3

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM IAN JACKSON STAFF REPORTER.

The Roosevelt women’s basketball team fell to the 16th ranked Cardinal Stritch University Wolves 45-73. Paige Gallimore led the Lakers with 11 points. Emily Duckhorn added three three-pointers, while Taylor Sterkowitz tallied eight points. “I think we need to work on not giving up so fast and also if the shots that we normally take don’t work then we need to find other ways of scoring,” Sophomore Guard Becca Bergman said. Roosevelt was outrebounded by 26, with the Wolves thriving on the offensive glass with 26 boards on that end to get many more chances, and the Lakers saw Stritch score 32 points in the point. “Stritch just came out hard knocking down

shots and playing really good defense. Honestly for me I just try to go hard every play. Things won’t always go your way and you just have to shake it off and keep playing,” Bergman said. Stritch constructed a seven-point lead after one quarter before taking a huge lead with a 21-10 lead in the second quarter. “Communicating is something as a team we need to work on,” Sophomore Forward/Center Chelsey Crippen said. The guests shot 60 percent during that span, and they did not let up as in the third quarter they increased the margin with another 11-point outburst to create even more distance. “I think just the lack of scoring and sticking to the gameplan is what cost us the game and helped

Cardinal Stritch to come nament,” Newell said. out hot in the beginning of the game,” Crippen said. “Too often we make excuses and put blame on referees when they are not the ones playing the game. We try as best as we can to focus on what we can do to be better and not rely on outside factors.” Coach Keisha Newell said. Just a few more games left in the regular season before the big conference tournament, the Lakers look to end the regular season on a high note before heading into the tournament. “We got to keep pushing. We got a big road win on the 4th and we are right back at it on the 8th against Robert Morris. This is the biggest game of our season. It will be a key game in our pursuit of the conference tour-

PHOTO BY IAN JACKSON

LAKERS PREVAIL AGAINST CARDINAL STRITCH IAN JACKSON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER.

The Roosevelt Lakers won a hard fought game vs Cardinal Stritch 73-65. With that win, it was the Lakers first ever win over Stritch after falling 11 previous times. “The focus was it was a must win, and their guys prepared exceptionally well and competed very hard,” the team’s head coach Joe Griffin said. The first half of the game showed a battle between defenses as the score’s lead altered back and forth throughout, separated by a single point. The second half began with the Lakers starting the period and outscoring the Wolves 25-9 to eventually take a 15-point lead. “During halftime we talked up some strategies and really enforced sagging back on defense on guys that couldn’t shoot well, forcing the opponents that had poor shooting percentages to either shoot or make tough passes to guys that are almost double teamed,” Senior Guard/Forward

Damian Zalewski said. Kevin Day and Jake Ludwig scored a gamehigh 16 points each, Day canned a pair of critical three-point buckets during his career-high performance, and Ludwig did his damage at the charity stripe by going 14-for-14. “The key factors were our defensive strategy, our communication on both sides of the ball, and the contributions of our bench, with several reserves hitting big shots and giving us meaningful minutes,” Griffin said. Carson Hughes added 11 points and Kyle Bumbalough scored 10. The Lakers rejoiced with the return of Joshua Dillingham who collected seven rebounds in his first game back from injury. “Whenever you have your bench heavily involved in the game, it’s a good sign. We really had a lot of momentum seeing some guys play out of their shells and it was the reason we were able to walk away from the game with the win,” Senior Guard Jason Markus said. The next two Wednesday

games coming up are the matchups between (10) Robert Morris University and Judson University. “We still need to do some work if we are to qualify for the CCAC tournament. We need to take it one game at a time, and we have two more big home games the next two Wednesdays, it would be great for our campus community to come and show some support,” Coach Griffin said.

PHOTO BY IAN JACKSON


Vol73 issue11 (1)