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THIRD QUA RTER • 2018

NATIONAL INSTRUCTOR TRAINING PROGRAM (NITP) LAUNCHING IN 2020 WASHTENAW COMMUNITY COLLEGE TO HOST AMBITIOUS NEW TRAINING PROGRAM


ROOFERTOROOFER BY INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT KINSEY M. ROBINSON

National Roofing Industry Pension Fund Provides Good Benefits and Financial Security for You and Your Family

Y

our retirement benefits under the National Roofing Industry Pension Fund— both the National Roofing Industry Pension Plan (NRIPP) and the National Roofing Industry Supplemental Pension Plan (NRISPP)— play a significant role in your personal financial security. The Fund

read more about this exciting news on page 25 of the second quarter 2018 Journeyman Roofer and Waterproofer magazine. I am now pleased to announce that again, due to solid earnings, the NRIPP incremental benefit factor has been increased from 1.15% to 1.65% for credited service earned

Due to solid earnings, the NRIPP incremental benefit factor has been increased from 1.15% to 1.65% for credited service earned in 2017— a more than 43% increase in pension benefit earned in 2017. Trustees and professionals are committed to the goal of providing good benefits to the men and women in our industry that have worked long and hard to earn a pension. 2017 was a positive year for both pension plans, and the participants were rewarded for their hard work. Earlier this year the NRISPP, because of solid earnings, announced a return on investments in excess of 9.6% in 2017. You can

in 2017. This amounts to slightly more than a 43% increase in pension benefit earned in 2017. This increase also applies to participants who retired in the 2017 plan year (read more on page 27). The NRIPP covers 29,500 participants, including 6,847 retirees and beneficiaries that received $84 million in benefits in 2017. The NRISPP provides monthly and lump sum benefits that supplement

those benefits received from the NRIPP, allowing more options and security for you and your family at the time of retirement. In addition to providing good pension benefits, the NRIPP and NRISPP invest in commercial real estate projects with the AFL-CIO Building Investment Trust and Ullico J for Jobs. These two investment vehicles have strong labor policies and ensure that 100% of the onsite construction work, including roofing and waterproofing, will be performed by signatory contractors using only union building trades workers. These types of programs continue to demonstrate that pension plans can invest prudently, while supporting union principles and ideals. If you want to know more about your benefits, log on to the pension website at nripf.com. It is a wealth of information about your NRIPP and NRISPP retirement benefits, and it allows you to take an active part in overseeing your account. Once you are logged on, you can update your mailing address, confirm the number of hours you worked each year, check your vested service, review Plan documents and most importantly, print out benefit application forms at the time of your retirement. ■

These programs demonstrate that pension plans can invest prudently, while supporting union principles and ideals. PROUD. PROFESSIONAL. COMMITTED TO EXCELLENCE. ®


FIRST PUBLISHED IN 1925

THE JOURNEYMAN ROOFER & WATERPROOFER MAGAZINE www.unionroofers.com  •   Third Quarter 2018  •   Volume 78  •   Number 3

UNITED UNION OF ROOFERS, WATERPROOFERS AND ALLIED WORKERS ® Kinsey M. Robinson International President James A. Hadel International Secretary-Treasurer International Vice Presidents Douglas Ziegler, First Thomas Pedrick, Second Paul F. Bickford, Third Richard R. Mathis, Fourth Daniel P. O’Donnell, Fifth Robert Peterson, Sixth Michael A. Vasey, Seventh Michael Stiens, Eighth Brent R. Beasley, Ninth Joseph Pozzi, Tenth The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer is published quarterly by the United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers & Allied Workers. Subscription price $16.00 per year. Editorial and Publishing office, 1660 L. Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036-5646. James A. Hadel, Editor. Erin C. McDermott, Assistant Editor. The Editor reserves the right to condense or delete any articles receiving acceptance for publication. Preferred Standard Mail postage paid at Washington, D.C. Copyright 2010 United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers & Allied Workers.

POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address requests should be sent to: THE JOURNEYMAN ROOFER & WATERPROOFER, 1660 L Street N.W., Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20036-5646 Phone: 202-463-7663

The United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers and Allied Workers has engaged MOSAIC, an environmentally-friendly printer, for the production of this magazine. MOSAIC’s operation is 100% wind powered, carbon neutral, and employs qualified union craftsmen and women.

Printed in the U.S.A. on union-made paper.

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Roofers in the News

4

Cover Story National Instructor Training Program to Launch in 2020

8

Women in Roofing and Waterproofing

12

Departmental News   The Washington Connection by Jim Hadel  Marketing Issues by Jordan Ritenour  The Legal Aspect by Librado Arreola

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Research and Education Trust

27

National Benefit Funds

35

Summary Annual Report

36

Local Union News

40

Community Outreach

42

Outdoor Life

46

District Council Minutes

50

Quarterly Reports

54

Service Awards

55

Local Union Receipts

55

In Memoriam

56

Local Union Directory

60

Roofers’ Promotional Items

ON THE COVER: Washtenaw Community College in Ann Arbor, MI, will be the home for the National Instructors Training Program, which will launch in 2020.


ROOFERS IN THE NEWS

Roofing Professionals Gather for Western Roofing Expo

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he 44th Western Roofing Expo opened June 11, 2018, at the Paris Las Vegas Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, NV. Due to overwhelming response by industry exhibitors, the Expo extended its floorspace to maximum capacity, making this the largest Expo to date.

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The booth showcasing the Roofers Union and Research & Education Trust was a hub of activity for the many local union representatives, signatory contractors and members who stopped by to catch up on all the latest news. ■

I.V.P. Brent Beasley (center) catches up with Jose Romero and Jesus Ramirez from Local 220 signatory contractor Letner Roofing.

Manolito Contaoi, LU 221 Appr. Coord. Rick Subiono, Francis Valencia, Gilbert Ramos, Pres. Robinson, I.R. Perea and Reymund Contaoi exchange alohas from JoyAce Roofing in Pearl City, HI.

Local 135, Phoenix, AZ, signatory contractor Star Roofing brings a crew to the Expo. From left: Jeff Klein, Pete Schmautz, Int’l Pres. Kinsey Robinson, Star Rfg. owner John Plescia and Michael Reeves.

Jennifer Eugenio, Joyce Ayson and Johnny Ayson from JoyAce Roofing visit I.V.P. Doug Ziegler, LU 221 Appr. Coord. Rick Subiono and Pres. Robinson.

Int’l Pres. Kinsey Robinson, I.V.P. Brent Beasley and Int’l Rep. Gabby Perea welcome Moji Taba (2nd from right). Mr. Taba is president of Best Contracting Services Inc., a contractor signatory to Local 36 and Local 81.

Pres. Robinson, Brad Banks, I.V.P. Ziegler, I.R. Perea, I.V.P. Beasley and Skip Banks discuss roofing in Southern California. The Bankses are with Local 220, Orange, CA, contractor San Marino Roofing.

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WHAT IS NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP WEEK? National Apprenticeship Week (NAW) is a national celebration that offers leaders in business, labor, education, and other critical partners a chance to demonstrate their support for apprenticeship. NAW also gives apprenticeship sponsors the opportunity to showcase their programs, facilities and apprentices in their community. The week-long event highlights the benefits of apprenticeship in preparing a highly skilled workforce to meet the talent needs of employers across diverse industries.

GET INVOLVED! There are many ways to participate in the National Apprenticeship Week movement. Examples include:

• Apprenticeship graduations • Open houses • High school career fairs • Apprenticeship signing days • Skills competitions • Industry roundtable events

NATIONAL APPRENTICESHIP WEEK

Open House Sample Agenda 7:30 – 8:00 a.m. Registration and networking *Coffee, juice and light breakfast can be served 8:00 – 8:15 a.m. Opening remarks/welcome *Could be business leader, local government official, apprenticeship program leader, etc. 8:15 – 8:45 a.m. PowerPoint presentation *Share a PowerPoint presentation about company’s apprenticeship program, tips for other businesses, future apprentices, etc. 8:45 – 9:15 a.m. Apprentice/employer panel Q+A *Panel of 1–2 apprentices and 1–2 business representatives can answer group questions/share experiences 9:15 – 9:45 a.m. Facility tour

Please join the movement by hosting an event or participating in an event near you! Go to www.dol.gov/apprenticeship/naw/ to learn more, register your event and access helpful tools for promoting your event.

9:45 – 10:00 a.m. Closing remarks/questions

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Roofers & Waterproofers

National Instructor Training Program Ambitious New Training Program to Roll Out in 2020 at Washtenaw Community College

T OPPOSITE PAGE: Washtenaw Community College will be the home of the new National Instructor Training Program. THIS PAGE: Trust Instructors Derek Carrington and Jim Currie are immersed in the Computer Skills Training course at Washtenaw.

he Roofers & Waterproofers Research and Education Trust Fund is proud to announce that it is in negotiations to launch its National Instructor Training Program (NITP) at Washtenaw Community College in Ann Arbor, MI, during the summer of 2020. The NITP will allow for centralized training, which will offer a wide range of classes that are required and needed for all apprenticeship instructors throughout the union roofing and waterproofing industry. This program will allow instructors to take classes that will improve their instructional skills and knowledge base by attending professional instructor courses, safety and technical train the trainer courses, and JATC administrative and support courses, while also possibly receiving college credits with Washtenaw Community College. Once the National Instructor Training Program is launched in 2020, it will be a recurring event every year during the same week, allowing JATCs, local unions and employers to plan for the absence of instructors who are attending the NITP. The NITP will allow for instructors

Third Quarter 2018 •

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Once an instructor graduates from the Certificate Program, we encourage ongoing participation in the event for the purpose of continuing education and the pursuit of an Associate’s degree.

Market Development Dir. Gig Ritenour, Int’l Sec’y-Tr. Jim Hadel, Roofers Trust Employer Trustee John Embow, Int’l V.P. Dan O’Donnell, Roofers Trust Exec. Dir. Keith Vitkovich and Int’l Pres. Kinsey Robinson visit Washtenaw campus.

to attend two courses per year, with each one consisting of 22.5 hours, totaling 45 class hours per year. Some courses may consist of up to 45 hours limiting instructors to attend only one course per year once prerequisites are met. Our contractors and members have hailed safety, productivity and skills training as the most important factors that are needed. These fundamentals go handin-hand with the excellent training that we provide, and we believe that begins by providing and maintaining the highest level of training for our instructors.

PURPOSE OF THE NITP

Instructors will have access to all buildings on Washtenaw’s campus for one week per year.

The National Instructor Training Program for instructors of journeypersons and apprentices is designed to: • Increase instructors’ proficiency of instructional techniques, material, and equipment. • Acquaint instructors with the philosophy and principles of education, especially within our trade, industrial, and technical education and training. • Provide learning experiences in the principles and the fundamentals of the applied knowledge subjects. • Expand the understanding of our instructors in the technical aspects of the craft and convey information to the instructors about the latest developments in education and our trade.

INSTRUCTOR CERTIFICATE PROGRAM To receive a Certificate of Completion, Roofing & Waterproofing, instructors must successfully complete ten courses. This includes five professional courses and five safety and technical courses. Once an instructor graduates from the Certificate Program, we encourage ongoing participation in the event for the purpose of continuing education and the pursuit of an Associate’s degree.

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• OSHA 502 • Safety Culture for Frontline

Leaders TTT

• Financial Literacy TTT • Single-Ply TTT • Green Technologies TTT • Waterproofing & Building

Envelope TTT

• Steep Slope TTT • Built-Up Roofing TTT • Math, Blueprints, and

Specifications TTT

• Utilizing Job-Site Technology TTT • Foreman Training TTT

Trust Instructor Joel Gonzales takes a Planning, Teaching, and Assessing Effective Lesson Plans course for beginners.

COURSES Currently we have a list of professional courses, proposed safety and technical courses, and proposed JATC administrative support courses that will be offered, with the ability to add additional courses each year as our industry continuously advances and changes.

PROFESSIONAL INSTRUCTOR COURSES • Planning, Teaching, and

Assessing Effective Lesson Plans: Beginner

• Planning, Teaching, and

Assessing Effective Lesson Plans: Intermediate (prerequisite: Beginner Course)

• Planning, Teaching, and

Assessing Effective Lesson Plans: Advanced (prerequisite: Intermediate Course)

• Course Planning and Problem

Solving (prerequisite: Advanced Course)

• Public Speaking (recommended

to be taken in conjunction with Intermediate Course)

JATC ADMINISTRATIVE & SUPPORT COURSES • Computer Skills Training:

Beginners

• Computer Skills Training:

Intermediate

• Computer Skills Training:

Advanced

• Microsoft PowerPoint for

Instructors

• TRC & Online Training

Resources Class

SAFETY AND TECHNICAL COURSES (TTT = TRAIN THE TRAINER) • Competent Person Fall

Protection TTT

• Qualified Rigging Person TTT • Signal Person TTT

• Anti-Harassment & Diversity

Training

• Adapting Apprenticeship in the

21st Century

• Understanding Legal Issues and

Fiduciary Responsibilities

• Managing Financial Operations

of a Training Program

• GHS Haz-Com & RF Radiation

TTT

• Aerial Lift & Power Industrial

Truck TTT

• Asbestos Class TTT • ICRA TTT • Confined Space TTT • Competent Person Scaffold TTT • OSHA 510 • OSHA 500

As the National Instructor Training Program progresses and is being developed, we will be providing more information and will be looking forward to announcing our Inaugural Training Session for the summer of 2020. If anyone is to have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Executive Director Keith J. Vitkovich at (202) 463-7663 or keithv@unionroofers.com. ■

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WOMEN

in Roofing and Waterproofing A Look Towards Our Future Membership Local 97 apprentice Christina Shelmadine does air barrier work around window openings and block walls at the new addition to Cunningham Children’s Home in Urbana, IL. She is employed by Seal Pro CSI out of Penfield, IL.

Shani Alvarado is employed by Local 221 signatory contractor Alcal Hawaii. She is pictured working on Tripler Army Medical Hospital.

R

ecruit. Train. Retain.

These are the building blocks to our future—the steps that must be taken to grow and strengthen our union. The future of our union is our membership, and in order for our membership to grow, it must become more inclusive and diverse. President Robinson has committed to tripling our female membership over the next five years, and local unions are following suit. Locals that have not traditionally had women members are starting to see changes. “Local 97 has their first

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Nirmala Wati on the job at 970 Denny, a new commercial office building in Seattle. She is employed by Snyder Roofing.

Nirmala Wati, who has been roofing for 34 years with Local 54 in Seattle, WA, looks out on the numerous jobs she’s worked on during her career.

N

irmala Wati, who immigrated to the U.S. from Fiji, said she started roofing in 1984 “for the money.” Over the length of her career she has raised four kids as a single mom. She now has seven grandchildren and a great-granddaughter. Standing on top of a highrise in downtown Seattle, Sister Wati points out many of the buildings she’s worked on during her 30+ years of roofing. She loves her work but admits there have been challenges. “I experienced all kinds of stuff,” in the beginning, she said, “but I stayed with it. I fight. I take taekwondo, yoga, I exercise and stretch every day to help with lifting and bending. It’s good to know self-defense. But I don’t need it here—this job has been very good to me.”

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Christa Casimiro is an apprentice with Local 221, Honolulu, HI, working for Beachside Roofing, LLC, Maui Division, on Kaiser Medical Kahului.

female apprentice (Christina Shelmadine) in many years. I have not known of a female Roofer or Waterproofer in Local 97 since I began working in this local in 1988,” said Darrell Harrison, business manager at Local 97, Champaign, IL. Over in Hawaii, Roofers & Waterproofers Local 221 has had a recent influx of women in its apprenticeship program. Apprentice Coordinator Rick Subiono hopes this translates into long-term careers for the young women. With plenty of work across the state, Local 221 is growing and is actively recruiting more women to add to membership rolls. In progressive Seattle, having a woman on the job is nothing new. Journeyman Nirmala Wati, for example, has been roofing since 1984. But as Local 54 works to recruit and retain women, their numbers are growing, and these days women can be found on many of the union roofing and waterproofing projects in Seattle. These are just a few examples of women joining the ranks. There are many more out there, and their numbers are only getting higher. So here’s to all of you, and here’s to many more. ■

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Enjoying the outdoors, Local 221 apprentice Shashawn Kekahuna gets on-the-job experience on a new shopping center in Kapolei. She works for Alcal Hawaii.

Local 221 apprentice Catherine Sherman preps the floor for waterproofing in a new Target store at Ala Moana Shopping Center. She is employed by Tyson’s Incorporated.


Caledonia Aleman graduated from Seattle Local 54’s apprenticeship two years ago and plans to keep roofing for a long time. Here she enjoys working with her crew on Red Cedar housing development in Seattle.

Congratulations to Sisters Monique Cooper and Kaisa Prouty. Monique and Kaisa recently completed their apprenticeship through Roofers Local 33, Boston, MA, and graduated with the local’s Class of 2018.

Apprentice Phaedra Keaton puts in a good day’s work roofing King County Juvenile Justice Center.

Local 54 Organizer Tony Kimbrough and Phaedra Keaton share a smile.

W

hen the Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle offered Phaedra Keaton an opportunity for a career in the trades, she initially opted for another craft. But that craft didn’t call her back for a year. Roofers Local 54, however, called

her back right away, and she hasn’t looked back since. As an apprentice, Sister Keaton pushes herself every day to learn her trade and become a better roofer and waterproofer. It’s challenging, but the payoff is being

able to provide a better future for herself and her kid. “There were a lot of days I thought about quitting, but the money is good, the guys are good, and the apprenticeship is very supportive. I’m here to stay,” she said. Her message to other women who are considering a career in the trades: “Don’t let one bad day affect your potential prosperous future!”

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DEPARTMENTAL NEWS

The Washington Connection BY J I M H A D E L , I N T E R N AT I O N A L S E C R E TA RY-T R E A S U R E R

Understanding the International Burial Benefit

S

ince becoming International Secretary-Treasurer, I have received numerous calls from local union officers and relatives of deceased members expressing their displeasure regarding the distribution of the International Burial Benefit. In many cases, the relatives are unaware of who is entitled to receive the benefit, as well as other provisions of the Burial Benefit. As International SecretaryTreasurer, I am obligated to follow Article IV, Sections 1–12 of our By-Laws when distributing the Burial Benefit for our deceased members. One of the most misunderstood provisions of the benefit is in regards to beneficiaries. Section 7 clearly states where the deceased member has next of kin, any money remaining after the undertaker’s bill has been paid shall be paid to the next of kin of the deceased in the following order:

Many members believe that a local union beneficiary card they completed at the local level designating a beneficiary will replace the order specified above. That designation card may be used for a local union benefit, not for the International Burial Benefit. Beneficiary cards submitted to the International Union with a Burial Benefit claim form will be returned to the local union. In addition to the above provision, on rare occasions we have had claims for the burial benefit that were submitted over a year from the date of a member’s death. Section 8 of Article IV clearly states the following: A claim

1. To the spouse of the deceased.

for burial benefits shall be barred unless such claim is filed within one year from the date of death. Finally, Section 2 of this Article states, “To be eligible for burial benefits, a member must be in good standing for a period provided

2. To the child or children of the deceased. 3. To the parents of the deceased. 4. To the brothers and sisters of the deceased.

hereinafter. To be a member in good standing, all dues and other outstanding obligations of such member must be paid on or before the last day of the third month after the due date. Any member who has not paid such dues or obligations in the manner set forth above is not a member in good standing. In addition to the payment of dues and obligations, a member shall not be in good standing if he has been suspended or removed by action of any tribunal for misconduct or violation under the Constitution and By-Laws of the Local Union of which he is a member.”

A local union beneficiary designation may be used for a local union benefit, not for the International Burial Benefit. As a member of our International Union, you have worked hard to earn this benefit. Please share these provisions with members of your family, so they know what to expect when and if a benefit is to be paid. ■

BURIAL BENEFIT TIP A claim for burial benefits shall be barred unless such claim is filed within one year from the date of death.

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Marketing Issues BY J O R D A N R I T E N O U R , D I R E C T O R O F M A R K E T D E V E L O P M E N T

Recruit Now to Secure Your Future

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ecruit is a word in the English language that comes from the Latin word recrescere, which means to “grow again.” In Roofers language, it means to enroll someone as a member or worker into an organization or as a supporter of a cause. This is our job and responsibility as union members and leaders. Ladies and gentlemen, journeymen and apprentices, business managers, agents and organizers: we must recruit like we have never done in the past! Our economy is booming, much of our membership is approaching retirement age, and our shelves are getting bare. We must train tomorrow’s roofers and waterproofers today. We cannot ask what happens if the economy crashes. The economy has crashed before, and we have survived. At some point it will slow or crash again, and we will survive. We must be willing to face the fact that we are training the people who will replace us someday. This is not a callous or ruthless objective. Our replacements will be the folks who operate our local unions and JATCs, who contribute to our health insurance and pension plans, who perform the quality workmanship on which our union has built its reputation, and most importantly, who carry on the union message. So, replacing ourselves is a good thing. If we are all doing our job to the best of our ability, the next per-

son in line will see our efforts and either continue them or take them to the next level. Our goal should be recruiting members who will take them to the next level and build on the great foundation you have provided. We must not act as if we are in an emergency, but we must realize that right now we are in a great need for new roofers and waterproofers. We must act with

they’ve had in over 20 years. Keep up the good work and strive to beat that high number next year. The potential is there. You have the talent and ability to grow—you have proven that with your record growth in 2017. I have great expectations of seeing every local demonstrate record growth in 2018. I am extremely proud of our past and very excited about our future. The time is right

Our replacements will be the folks who contribute to our health insurance and pension plans, and who perform the quality workmanship on which our union has built its reputation. great urgency in our training and recruiting of new members and new contractors. This is a good time to revisit areas that in the past may not have been our strongest market share areas. The nonunion contractors in these areas need trained roofers as much as everyone else. We should work to reproduce the strong presence we once had in those markets. But remember, it is most important to take care of our current members and current signatory contractors’ manpower needs. As I stated in my last article, we had several locals that in 2017 had the highest membership numbers

for your local and our union to grow. Now is the time to improve your market share. Improving your market share will make for better contracts with higher wages, better benefits, healthier pensions and a stronger Roofers and Waterproofers Union. We need roofers and waterproofers now and in the future. Our future roofers and members will come from the training we do through our apprentice programs and recruitment of experienced roofers from the non-union. As always, if the Marketing Department can be of assistance, do not hesitate to ask. ■

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DEPARTMENTAL NEWS

The Legal Aspect BY G E N E R A L C O U N S E L L I B R A D O A R R E O L A , E S Q U I R E

NLRB Changes Standards Regarding Employer Policies and Their Effect on Employee Rights

T

he NLRB established legal precedent in 2004 (Lutheran Heritage, 343 NLRB 646) to evaluate whether an employer’s maintenance of a facially neutral rule was unlawful under the NLRA. Under that standard, the NLRB looked at whether the rule explicitly restricted activities protected by Section 7 of the NLRA, which provides that, “Employees shall have the right to self-organization, to form, join, or assist labor organizations, to bargain collectively through representatives of their own choosing, and to engage in other concerted activities for the purpose of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection. . .”. If the rule explicitly restricted activities protected by Section 7, then the NLRB would find the rule unlawful. If the rule did not explicitly restrict activities protected by Section 7, the NLRB would look to see whether: (1) employees would reasonably construe the language to prohibit Section 7 activity; (2) the rule was promulgated in response to union activity; or (3) the rule has been applied to restrict the exercise of Section 7 rights. In The Boeing Company, 365 NLRB No. 154 (Dec. 14, 2017), the NLRB changed the standard. Boeing maintained a policy restricting the use of devices with cameras on its property. Boeing designs and manufactures military and commercial aircraft at locations throughout the United States. Some of the work

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performed by the company is classified. Moreover, Boeing is concerned with espionage from its competitors and foreign governments. Initially, the administrative law judge reasoned, based on Lutheran Heritage, that maintenance of Boeing’s no-camera rule was unlawful because employees “would reasonably construe” the rule to prohibit Section 7 activity. The NLRB stated in its decision that in finding the no-camera rule unlawful, the judge gave no weight to Boeing’s security needs for the rule. Thus, the NLRB overruled the Lutheran Heritage standard and issued a new standard for evaluating the legality of employer policies.

and extent of the potential impact on NLRA rights, and (ii) legitimate justifications associated with the rule. The NLRB emphasized that its personnel will conduct this evaluation and apply a balancing test between asserted business justifications and the invasion of employee rights. This new standard now gives more importance to “business justification” reasons over an employee’s rights as guaranteed in the NLRA. To assist in the processing of these types of cases, the NLRB articulated three categories of employment policies, rules and handbook provisions: Category 1 includes rules that the Board designates as lawful to

When confronted with an employer policy that you think may violate the NLRA, it is important to consider what right under the Act may be violated and whether any employee has been disciplined pursuant to that policy. Under the new standard, when evaluating a facially neutral policy, rule or handbook provision that when reasonably interpreted would potentially interfere with the exercise of NLRA rights, the NLRB will evaluate two things: (i) the nature

maintain, either because (i) the rule, when reasonably interpreted, does not prohibit or interfere with the exercise of NLRA rights; or (ii) the potential adverse impact on protected rights is outweighed by justifications associated with the rule.


Examples of Category 1 rules are the no-camera requirement in the Boeing case and other rules requiring employees to abide by basic standards of civility. Category 2 includes rules that warrant individualized scrutiny in each case as to whether the rule would prohibit or interfere with NLRA rights, and if so, whether any adverse impact on NLRA-protected conduct is outweighed by legitimate justifications. Category 3 includes rules that the Board will designate as unlawful to maintain because they would prohibit or limit NLRA-protected conduct, and the adverse impact on NLRA rights is not outweighed by justifications associated with the rule. An example of a Category 3 rule is a rule that prohibits employees from discussing wages or benefits with one another.

In its decision, the NLRB emphasized that Category 1 consists of two subparts: (a) rules that are lawful because, when reasonably interpreted, they would have no tendency to interfere with Section 7 rights and therefore no balancing of rights and justifications is warranted, and (b) rules that are lawful because, although they do have a reasonable tendency to interfere with Section 7 rights, the Board has determined that the risk of such interference is outweighed by the justifications associated with the rules. However, if a particular type of rule is determined to have a potential adverse impact on NLRA activity, the Board may conclude that maintenance of the rule is unlawful, either because individualized scrutiny reveals that the rule’s potential adverse impact outweighs any justifications (Cat-

egory 2), or because the type of rule at issue predictably has an adverse impact on Section 7 rights that outweighs any justifications (Category 3). The NLRB emphasized that even when a rule’s maintenance is deemed lawful, it will examine circumstances where the rule is applied to discipline employees who have engaged in NLRA-protected activity. In those situations, the Board may find the discipline to violate the Act. When confronted with an employer policy that you think may violate the NLRA, it is important to consider what right under the Act may be violated and whether any employee has been disciplined pursuant to that policy. If you believe that the rule or policy does infringe upon employee rights under the NLRA, you may file a charge at your local NLRB office. ■

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RESEARCH AND EDUCATION TRUST BY K E I T H J . V I T KO V I C H , EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF ROOFERS & WAT E R P R O O F E R S R E S E A R C H A N D E D U C AT I O N T R U S T F U N D

Instructor Technology and Resource Day

O

n March 21, 2018, the Roofers & Waterproofers Research and Education Trust Fund sponsored an Instructor Technology and Resource Day at the Bay Area Roofers & Waterproofers Training Center in Livermore, CA. Instructors participated in open discussion and presentation on training resources, curriculum, the Training Resource Center and new projects that are available to all local JATCs from the Roofers & Waterproofers Research and Education Trust Fund. Topics and information that was covered included:

Helmets to Hardhats

The newly revised Single-Ply Training Manual and Instructor Guide are available for JATC instructors.

• How to participate • Recruitment resources • GI Bill • Benefits of utilization

Available Training Materials • Single-Ply Training Manual,

Instructor Guide and presentations

• Steep Slope Training Manual

and Instructor Guide

• Built-Up Roofing Training

Manual and Instructor Guide

• Green Roofing & Waterproofing

Training Manual and presentations

• Safety and Health Training

Manuals and presentations

Built-Up Roofing and Steep Slope Roofing manuals will be revised.

The Roofers Trust provides a wide array of training materials for our instructors, apprentices and journeymen. 16

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• Competent Person Fall

Protection Training Manual, Instructor Guide and presentations

Competent Person Fall Protection training is one of many training sessions available for JATCs and locals.

• RF Radiation Training

Manual, Instructor Guide and presentations

Curriculum in Development • Green Roofing Technologies • Qualified Rigging Program • Qualified Signaling Program • Recruitment Resources • Apprentice Mentoring Program

Future Curriculum Development • Roofing & Waterproofing

Principles Training Program

• Roofers Math, Blueprints

and Specifications Program

The Training Resource Center is a one-stop online portal for approved JATC instructors to view and download training materials.

• Waterproofing

& Air/Vapor Program

• Revision of Steep Slope Program • Revision of Built-Up

Roofing Program

Current Trust-Sponsored Training Sessions for JATCs/Locals

Online Apprenticeship Training Institute for Apprentices

• Foreman Training Part 1

• Release date

• Foreman Training Part 2

• How JATCs can utilize

• OSHA 30

• Benefits of utilization

• OSHA 510

• Haz-Com training

• DOL restrictions

• OSHA 500

• Competent Person Fall

• Administrative training

Current Trust-Sponsored Train the Trainer Courses

• OSHA 502 • NCCCO Rigging

and Signaling Certification class

• ICRA • CERTA • Competent Person Fall

Protection

• Instructor RF Radiation • Confined Space

Protection training

• Qualified Signal and

Rigger Person training

• ICRA training

Online Training Resource Center for Instructors

Roofers & Waterproofers National Instructor Training Program • Launching Summer 2020 • Annual event

• How to access

• Location: Ann Arbor, MI

• What resources are available

• Accreditation

• Downloading and utilization

• Instructor courses • Benefits of instructor training

Third Quarter 2018 •

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RESEARCH AND EDUCATION TRUST

The following instructors participated during this presentation on behalf of their local union training centers:

• Ben Macke, Local 106 JATC • Isaac Hernandez, Local 58 JATC • Joshua Sabo, Local 58 JATC • Pedro Rios, Local 9 JATC

• Stephen Kiebzak, Local 74 JATC • Mike Doyle, Local 74 JATC • Dan Smith, Bay Area JATC • Alvaro Garcia, Bay Area JATC • Blake Fleming, Local 142 JATC • Heath Griesmann, Local 42 JATC • Brandon Burke, Local 42 JATC • Richard Silva, Local 10 JATC • Matt Wittenborn, Local 2 JATC

Presenters consisted of: • Keith J. Vitkovich,

Trust Fund executive director

• Richard Tessier,

Curriculum Development

• Ray Slack, Local 142 JATC

• James Currie, master trainer

• Darrell Harrison, Local 97 JATC

• Bill Mulcrone,

• Derek Carrington, Local 23 JATC • Jason Barthel, Local 49 JATC • Glenn Irwin, Local 119 JATC • Joel Gonzalez, Local 49 JATC • Ikaika Naehu-Freitas,

Local 221 JATC

Helmets to Hardhats

If anyone has any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Executive Director Keith J. Vitkovich at (202) 463-7663 or keithv@ unionroofers.com. ■

• Enrique Subiono, Local 221 JATC

Instructors participated in open discussion and presentation on training resources, curriculum, and more. Roofers & Waterproofers JATC instructors visit the Bay Area Roofers & Waterproofers Training Center to learn about resources available to them through the Research and Education Trust.

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• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer


The Best of the West Coast Apprentices

S

outhern California Roofers & Waterproofers JATC was this year’s host of the 2018 West Coast Roofers & Waterproofers Apprenticeship Competition. Contestants and observers flocked into Pomona, CA, from Local 36, Los Angeles, CA; Local 40, San Francisco, CA; Local 49, Portland, OR; Local 81, Oakland, CA; Local 95, San Jose, CA; Local 153, Tacoma, WA; and Local 220, Orange County, CA. The two-day event was co-sponsored by Malarkey, Sarnafil, Derbigum and Suprema. The event was extremely well coordinated by Guadalupe Corral, with special thanks to RoofLine Supply & Delivery of Pomona, and the West Coast Union Roofing Contractors. On Friday, June 1, the training center held a meetand-greet where contestants had a chance to meet the competition, while manufacturer reps were on hand to demonstrate proper techniques and details for many of the events. On Saturday the heated competition (and it was hot!) was divided into two levels, intermediate and advanced, with each level including skills such as TPO corners and seams; flashing corners and pipes; shingles; waterproofing; coatings; torch-applied materials; and an obstacle

course based on hot asphalt. Also included were safety, knowledge, and identification exams. Awards and prizes were presented following the competition. We would like to acknowledge all the contestants and fans for the excellent turnout and sportsmanship. Congratulations to the winners of each event, level, and total overall winners. These photos and many more from the competition can be viewed at www.unionmoments.com (scan the QR code below to be taken directly to the page). ■

Apprenticeship competition overall winners Manuel Zamora-Villarreal (3rd place), Ruvim Kosovan (1st place) and Doug Aldrich (2nd place).

Third Quarter 2018 •

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RESEARCH AND EDUCATION TRUST Preventing Sprain and Strain Injuries from Manual Material Handling

L

CPWR Introduces Best Built Plans Program

ifting materials and tools and moving them to where the work will be performed are common activities on construction sites. How these activities are performed can increase or decrease your risk for injury. Sprain and strain, or overexertion injuries—particularly those resulting from manually lifting and moving materials— create a financial burden for employers, and take a human and financial toll on injured members and their families. In response, in 2017, CPWR – The Center for Construction Research and Training began looking for a way to prevent overexertion injuries. Through surveys, interviews and discussions with contractors and other industry stakeholders, CPWR learned that contractors who engage in safe materials handling practices— regardless of their size—plan for how materials will be delivered, stored, lifted and moved on each project stage, because they have found the time spent on planning contributes to their business success. In contrast, contractors who do not plan for materials handling, or only plan sometimes, tended to lack awareness of the risks and potential benefits of engaging in safer practices, the time to find the information or equipment to reduce

manual materials handling, and/or planning experience. To help address these barriers and move the construction industry, including the roofing industry, towards use of safer practices, CPWR developed the Best Built Plans Program. Recognizing that everyone in the industry can benefit from and has a role to play, the program includes something for everyone—from the apprentice entering the trade to the contractor. The resources include:

work practices. The planning section introduces the importance of storing materials off the ground, setting weight limits for lifting, using lifting equipment and having a clear pathway when moving materials. The other sections demonstrate and reinforce safe lifting practices. Users can lift and move materials and see how different practices increase or reduce the risk for injuries. The Planning Tool also includes training resources for use on the job with workers, including a Hazard Alert Card and Toolbox Talk. What makes these different is that there are two games that can be accessed by scanning a QR code

A Site Planning Tool to help contractors plan for how materials will be stored, lifted and moved at every project stage, from developing the bid to project completion, and steps to involve employees in identifying and coming up with solutions for tough material handling problems. The planning tool can be accessed directly online or as part of a downloadable PC-based program that includes interactive training and coaching resources. A PC-based Interactive Training and Coaching Resource, which can be used independently or by trainers or safety staff in a classroom setting with workers to reinforce the importance of planning for and using safe materials handling

Contractors found that the time spent on planning safe materials handling contributes to their business success. 20

• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer


on these documents. The games reinforce the safe lifting practices and planning covered in the Toolbox Talk and Hazard Alert Card, as well as in the Training and Coaching Resources. In the Lift Coach: Plan Your Route game, players plan how they will lift and move materials on a jobsite. A player’s risk of injury increases or decreases depending on the decisions they make, and as the game progresses the jobsite becomes larger and more complex. The Lift Coach: Plan Your Lift game lets a player correct the way their on-screen character lifts and moves materials. The goal is to

avoid actions that can increase the risk of injury. Players will need to pay attention to avoid building up too much strain and getting hurt. Each level increases in difficulty. The games are available for iPhone and Android users in English and Spanish, and can be downloaded through iTunes, Google Play or Amazon. (Links to the games on these platforms can be found at www.cpwr.com/do-you-know-howsafely-move-materials.) All of these materials are free and available at BestBuiltPlans.org. CPWR is currently piloting this program in order to learn what works, what doesn’t work,

and what else is needed. We are encouraging members to use and/ or review the materials and provide feedback on how to improve the program. You can share your thoughts anonymously about the materials at tinyurl.com/BestBuilt Plans-Feedback. ■

Health Communications Campaign

H

ave you seen the hashtag #RooferSafety365? It’s part of a year-long campaign launched as part of our Roofing r2p Partnership with the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) and CPWR – The Center for Construction Research and Training to raise awareness and prevent injuries and fatalities in our industry.

Preventing Falls. Protecting Roofers.

#RoofersSafety365

“The goal of this joint campaign is to remind everyone involved of actions they can take.” Each week, we are sending reminders to our members and others in the roofing industry that taking steps to work safely, such as inspecting fall protection and ladders to make sure they are not damaged before use, is important for everyone in the industry to do every day and on every job.

The need for this ongoing campaign is underscored by the numbers. Falls are the leading cause of injury and death among roofers, according to CPWR’s Construction Chart Book. 1 In 2016, falls alone accounted for 81 deaths and 1,340 injuries in the roofing industry, according to the U.S.

Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. “Our members face many hazards on the job,” says Roofers & Waterproofers Research and Education Joint Trust Fund Executive Director Keith Vitkovich. “it’s our job to make sure they are aware of the risks and are able to take steps to work safely. The goal of this joint campaign is to remind everyone involved of actions they can take.” To try and reach as many people in the roofing industry as possible with these safety tips and reminders, the Roofers Union, NRCA and CPWR are posting resources on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Help spread the work by using the hashtag #RooferSafety365 and liking or sharing the posts, because all workers deserve to go home safe at the end of each day! ■ CPWR, 2018. Construction Chart Book, 6th edition. https://www.cpwr.com/sites/default/files/ publications/The_6th_Edition_Construction_ eChart_Book.pdf

1

Third Quarter 2018 •

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RESEARCH AND EDUCATION TRUST

T

New Hazard Alerts Focus on Keeping You Healthy on and off the Job

wo new Hazard Alerts focus on two health issues of growing concern for workers in the construction industry: skin cancer and opioid deaths.

Skin Cancer One hazard you may not think about when getting ready to go to work is exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. Repeated exposure to UV radiation can permanently damage skin and cause skin cancer. Too often workers think they are not at risk if they don’t have fair skin, or if they are working on a cloudy day or during colder work months. These misconceptions have contributed to a rise in skin cancer, including the deadliest—melanoma. In 2018, it is estimated that more than 90,000 people will be diagnosed with and 9,000 will die from melanoma. Many of those diagnosed are expected to be construction workers. 1, 2 The reality is that skin cancer is a risk for everyone, and the risk does not go away when it is cloudy or cold. The good news is that with a few simple precautions skin cancer can be prevented, and early detection is easier to treat and more likely to be cured.

What should you do all year long to protect yourself? Wear a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher. Remember to reapply it every two hours, or after excessive sweating.

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• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer

Wear tightly woven and loosefitting long-sleeved shirts and pants. Stay in the shade as much as possible during work and when taking breaks. Examine your body from head to toe every month and look for the warning signs, such as a new or existing mole that has an irregular border (ragged, notched or blurred edges) or whose color is not the same throughout, is bigger than a pencil eraser, and/or is itchy or painful. Also watch for a bump, patch, sore or growth that bleeds, oozes or crusts and doesn’t heal. See a dermatologist right away if you detect any changes in your skin.

vention (CDC), one in four people prescribed opioids for long-term pain become addicted, and overdose deaths are on the rise. This Hazard Alert includes information on the risks associated with opioid use and resources to help construction workers avoid addiction and find the right treatment if they are already suffering from this illness. Remember to: • Report hazards to your

supervisor or foreman so they can be eliminated before work begins. Work shouldn’t hurt.

• Follow safe work practices to

prevent injuries, such as getting help or using lifting equipment when lifting heavy materials.

Opioids Opioid addiction does not discriminate. Throughout the U.S. workers in every profession and families at all income levels are being touched by addiction. Working in construction can take a heavy physical toll. In fact, construction workers have one of the highest injuries rates compared to workers in other industries. To treat the pain from these injuries, construction workers are often prescribed opioids, but opioids are addictive and can lead to overdoses. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Pre-

• Talk to your doctor, if you are

injured, about non-addictive medications or physical therapy to treat the pain.

• Only use opioids as the last

option, and if prescribed, use them for the shortest time possible.

• Remember, addiction is an

illness that can be treated.

Please seek help if you find you are dependent on pain medication to get through the day. Call (800) 662-HELP (4357), a confidential national hotline, to learn about treatment options near you, or visit resources.facingaddiction.org. Learn more about how to protect yourself from these (and other) hazards at www.cpwr.com/ publications/hazard-alert-cards. All of the Hazard Alert cards are available in English and Spanish. ■ 1

2

 American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts and Figures 2018. https://tinyurl.com/Cancer-FactsFigures-2018

 Rushton, L. & Hutchings, S. (2017). The burden of occupationally related cutaneous malignant melanoma in Britain due to solar radiation. Br J Cancer 116: 536–539. doi:10.1038/bjc.2016.437


HAZARD ALERT

Skin Cancer

Am I in Danger? Working outside for all or part of the day exposes you to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun, even when it’s cloudy outside. Over time, exposure to UV radiation permanently damages your skin and can cause skin cancer.

Protecting Your Skin is Easy...

1

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer. In 2018, it is estimated that more than 90,000 people will be diagnosed with and 9,000 will die from melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Cases of melanoma are on the rise, and many of those diagnosed are expected to be construction workers.1, 2 Fortunately, skin cancer is easy to prevent!

Know What to Look For Examine your body from head-to-toe every month. Skin cancer that is detected early is easier to treat and more likely to be cured. Look for these warning signs: A new or existing mole that has an irregular border (ragged, notched, or blurred edges). A new or existing mole that is not symmetrical (one half doesn’t match the other), or whose color is not the same throughout. Moles that are bigger than a pencil eraser. Itchy or painful moles. A bump, patch, sore, or growth that bleeds, oozes, or crusts and doesn’t heal. If you detect any changes in your skin, see a dermatologist right away.

PHOTO COURTESY OF NIOSH

Did You Know?

Anyone can get skin cancer, regardless of their skin tone. A common misconception is that people with darker skin tones will not get skin cancer. While skin cancer is more common in people with fairer skin, it often goes unnoticed in people with darker skin until it is at a more serious stage.3 More women develop melanoma than men before age 50; however, by age 65, the occurrence in men is double that of women, and by age 80 it is triple.1 Melanoma is one of the most common forms of cancer in people younger than 30.4 The likelihood of developing melanoma doubles if you have had more than five sunburns.5

Wear Sunscreen Avoid getting sunburned. Always wear sunscreen when working outside – even ISTOCK.COM/POWEROFFOREVER for a short period of time. Water, snow, sand, concrete, and metal reflect and intensify UV radiation and increase your chance of getting sunburned. Use a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher. A broad-spectrum sunscreen protects against UVA and UVB radiation. Reapply every two hours, or after excessive sweating.

2

Wear Protective Clothing

3

Stay in the Shade

Wear tightly-woven and loose-fitting longsleeved shirts and pants. Protect the back of your neck with a cloth flap designed to attach to your hard hat. Ask your employer for safety glasses that also provide protection against UVA and UVB radiation. They can be clear. The lens color has nothing to do with UV protection.

If possible, complete outdoor tasks earlier or later in the day to reduce sun exposure. Stay in the shade as much as possible and when taking breaks. The sun is strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. If possible, build temporary shade structures in areas where you are working.

To learn more visit: OSHA https://tinyurl.com/OSHA-Skin-Cancer NIOSH https://tinyurl.com/NIOSH-Sun-Exposure The Skin Cancer Foundation www.skincancer.org American Cancer Society https://www.cancer.org/cancer/skin-cancer.html 8484 Georgia Aveune Suite 1000 Silver Spring, MD 20910 301-578-8500 www.cpwr.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF NEIL LIPPY

If you think you are in danger: Contact your supervisor. Contact your union. Call OSHA

1-800-321-OSHA To receive copies of this Hazard Alert and cards on other topics call 301-578-8500 or visit

www.cpwr.com

Sources: 1) American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts and Figures 2018. https://tinyurl.com/Cancer-Facts-Figures-2018 2) Rushton, L. & Hutchings, S. (2017). The burden of occupationally-related cutaneous malignant melanoma in Britain due to solar radiation. Br J Cancer 116: 536–539. doi:10.1038/bjc.2016.437 3) The Skin Cancer Foundation. Dark Skin Tones and Skin Cancer: What You Need to Know. https:// tinyurl.com/Skin-Color-and-Skin-Cancer 4) American Cancer Society. Cancers That Develop in Young Adults. https://tinyurl.com/cancers-inyoung-adults 5) Pfahlberg, A., Kölmel, K.F., & Gefeller, O. (2001) Timing of excessive ultraviolet radiation and melanoma: epidemiology does not support the existence of a critical period of high susceptibility to solar ultraviolet radiation-induced melanoma. Br J Dermatol, 144(3), 471-475. https://tinyurl.com/UV-Radiation-and-Melanoma

©2018 CPWR–The Center for Construction Research and Training. All rights reserved. CPWR is the research and training arm of NABTU. Production of this document was supported by cooperative agreement OH 009762 from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of NIOSH. COVER PHOTO: ISTOCK.COM/RAINERPLENDL

www.cpwr.com Third Quarter 2018 •

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RESEARCH AND EDUCATION TRUST ICRA Instructor Training

T

he Roofers & Waterproofers Research and Education Trust Fund sponsored an Infection Control Risk Assessment (ICRA) Train the Trainer course at the Bay Area Roofers & Waterproofers Training Center in Livermore, CA, on March 19 – 20, 2018. JATC instructors from across the country participated in two days of training and testing to have the opportunity to receive their Train the Trainer cards in ICRA provided by CPWR – The Center for Construction Research and Training. These instructors gained the knowledge needed to provide this additional training to members of their home locals working in healthcare or other patient-occupied facility requirements. Students of this training learn how to: • Define ICRA and explain why

it is used

• Describe how healthcare

construction worksites differ from regular construction worksites

• Explain the importance of

following work place rules and using designated areas for breaks, as defined by ICRA

• Define Hospital Acquired

Infections (HAI) and describe the Chain of Infection

• Identify common pathogens

found in a healthcare setting and describe how they are transmitted

• Identify unique hazards specific

to healthcare construction, including hospital utility systems and medical gas lines, and methods to avoid them

• Describe the steps used in the

creation of an Infection Control Risk Assessment Plan

• Specify the specific infection

control precautions used for the four classes of ICRA construction

24

• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer

Instructors become specialized in ICRA training.

• Identify different types of

barriers used and guidelines for choosing them

• Richard Silva, Local 10 JATC • Matt Wittenborn, Local 2 JATC

• Describe the procedure for

• Daniel Ramirez, Southern

• List the two main functions

• Brandon Rodgers, Southern

• Describe appropriate methods

• Ben Macke, Local 106 JATC

entering/exiting through an anteroom of a negative air machine in an ICRA work environment for transporting trash, tools and materials from the workspace

• Identify potential hazards to

workers in a healthcare setting

• Define life safety system

and explain the use of Interim Life Safety Measures in a healthcare worksite.

The following instructors participated in this training on behalf of their local union training centers: • Peter Lang, Bay Area JATC • Mike Doyle, Local 74 JATC • Dan Smith, Bay Area JATC • Alvaro Garcia, Bay Area JATC • Blake Fleming, Local 142 JATC

California Roofers & Waterproofers JATC California Roofers & Waterproofers JATC

• Jose Padilla, Local 40 • Lorraine Marquez, Local 27 JATC • Pedro Rios, Local 9 JATC • Ray Slack, Local 142 JATC • Darrell Harrison, Local 97 JATC • Derek Carrington, Local 23 JATC • Jason Barthel, Local 49 JATC • James Currie, Research and

Education Trust Fund

• Richard Tessier, Research and

Education Trust Fund

• Glenn Irwin, Local 119 JATC • Joel Gonzalez, Local 49 JATC • Ikaika Naehu-Freitas,

Local 221 JATC

• Heath Griesmann, Local 42 JATC

• Enrique Subiono, Local 221 JATC

• Brandon Burke, Local 42 JATC

• Stephen Kiebzal, Local 74 JATC ■


HAZARD ALERT

OPIOID DEATHS IN CONSTRUCTION

Why are Construction Workers at Risk? The construction industry has one of the highest injury rates compared to other industries.1 Opioids are often prescribed to treat the pain caused by these injuries. Long-term opioid use can make people more sensitive to pain and decrease the opioid’s pain-reducing effects.

1 2

Injured Construction Workers Often... Cannot continue to work while injured. Suffer a loss in income. Even if an injured worker receives workers’ compensation, it is often not enough to make up for lost pay.* Experience anxiety, stress, and depression, which can add to the pain. *Source: The Demolition of Workers’ Comp. https://www.propublica.org/article/the-demolition-of-workerscompensation SHUTTERSTOCK.COM/RAWPIXER.COM

Overdose Deaths are On the Rise. In 2016 alone, more than 63,000 people died in the U.S. from an overdose – over 42,000 of which involved an opioid, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). One study showed that more than half of those who died from an overdose had suffered at least one job-related injury.3 Overall, overdose deaths that occurred on the job increased by 30% between 2015 and 2016.4 In Ohio, for example, construction workers were 7 times more likely than other workers to die from an opioid overdose between 2010 and 2016.5

Prevent Injuries Work shouldn’t hurt – your employer must provide a safe workplace to prevent an injury from occurring. A commitment to safety reduces the risk for injury and need for pain medication. Follow safe work practices.

Getting help lifting heavy materials can reduce the risk for injury.

Talk to a Doctor Opioids are addictive and can have side effects. Ask about: Other forms of pain medication that are not addictive and have fewer side effects. Other forms of pain management such as physical therapy or acupuncture.

ISTOCK.COM/ALEXRATHS

According to the CDC, 1 out of 4 people prescribed opioids for long-term pain become addicted.2

Protect Yourself!

Opioids should be the last option to treat your pain. If opioids are prescribed they should be used for the shortest possible time. Safely dispose of any unused medications.

3

Get Help Opioids change how your brain works. They trigger one part of your brain to take more and change another part that makes it hard to resist.6 Check with your union or employer to find out if they have a program to help, such as: an employee assistance program (EAP); or member assistance program (MAP). Or ask your doctor for help to find the best addiction treatment option for you.

Remember addiction is an illness that can be treated. Call this confidential national hotline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357) If you or someone you know needs help: Contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at https://www. samhsa.gov/ or call their confidential national hotline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357).

Find out more about construction hazards.

To receive copies of this Hazard Alert and cards on other topics, call

301-578-8500

Visit Facing Addiction’s online Addiction Resources Hub: https://resourcesfacingaddiction.org/. Contact your union. Find a list of common opioids at: https://tinyurl.com/common-opioids. Give your doctor the Physician’s Alert on Pain Management among Construction Workers from https://tinyurl.com/physicians-alerts.

8484 Georgia Aveune Suite 1000 Silver Spring, MD 20910 301-578-8500 www.cpwr.com

Sources: 1) CPWR. The Construction Chart Book. 2018. Chart 38e. 2) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Promoting Safer and More Effective Pain Management. https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/pdf/Guidelines_Factsheet-Patients-a.pdf 3) Cheng et al. Comparison of Opioid-Related Deaths by Work-Related Injury. American Journal of Industrial Medicine 56:308-316. 2013. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ pubmed/23143851 4) Bureau of Labor Statistics. Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries. News Release. 2016. https://www.bls.gov/news.release/ cfoi.nr0.htm 5) Opioid overdose deaths: Which jobs are at risk? http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2017/11/opioid_overdose_deaths_ which_j.html 6) National Institute on Drug Abuse for Teens. Out of Control: Opioids and the Brain. 2018. https://teens.drugabuse.gov/blog/post/outcontrol-opioids-and-brain

©2018, CPWR - The Center for Construction Research and Training. All rights reserved. CPWR is the research and training arm of North Ameri-ca’s Building Trades Unions. Production of this document was supported by cooperative agreement OH 009762 from the National Institute for Occupa-tional Safety and Health (NIOSH). The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of NIOSH. COVER PHOTO: ISTOCK.COM/DARWINBRANDIS

www.cpwr.com Third Quarter 2018 •

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RESEARCH AND EDUCATION TRUST CERTA Train the Trainer

Instructors undergo classroom instruction to receive their CERTA training cards.

O

n March 22 – 23, 2018, the Roofers & Waterproofers Research and Education Trust Fund sponsored a Certified Roofing Torch Applicator (CERTA) Train the Trainer course at the Bay Area Roofers & Waterproofers Training Center in Livermore, CA. Instructors from local JATCs across the country participated in two days of training and testing to have the opportunity to receive their Train the Trainer cards for CERTA provided by the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA). These instructors now have the resources needed to provide this additional training to members of their home locals. The CERTA training program is ideal for contractors whose work involves torch applications. The full-day student program trains experienced roof system installers on the safe use of roofing torches used to apply polymer-modified bitumen roofing products. CERTA training

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• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer

shows how proper roof system configuration design and application techniques can result in fire-safe installations. The following is a list of instructors who participated in this training on behalf of their local union training centers:

• Ray Slack, Local 142 JATC • Jose Padilla, Local 40 • Enrique Subiono, Local 221 JATC • Richard Silva, Local 10 JATC • Derek Carrington,

Local 23 JATC

• Darrell Harrison, Local 97 JATC

• Thomas Geiger, Local 27 JATC

• Ben Macke, Local 106 JATC

• Peter Lang, Bay Area JATC

• Gabriel Perea, International

• Heath Griesmann, Local 42 JATC • Brandon Burke, Local 42 JATC • Isaac Hernandez, Local 58 JATC • Joshua Sabo, Local 58 JATC • Blake Fleming, Local 142 JATC • Pedro Rios, Local 9 JATC

Representative

• Ikaika Naehu-Freitas,

Local 221 JATC

• Glenn Irwin, Local 119 JATC • Jason Barthel, Local 49 JATC • James Currie, Research

and Education Trust Fund ■

The CERTA training program is ideal for contractors whose work involves torch applications.


NATIONAL BENEFIT FUNDS

2017 Benefit Increase in the National Roofing Industry Pension Plan

T

he National Roofing Industry Pension Plan (the “NRIPP”) helps provide you and your family with financial security in your retirement years. Contributing employers contribute to the NRIPP on behalf of plan participants. Since January 1, 2014, for every plan year that you have earned Future Credited Service, a contribution equal to 1.15% of total contributions is credited on your behalf for that plan year. That percentage is called the Incremental Benefit Factor. (See your Summary Plan Description for full details on how your total pension benefit is calculated, including a definition of Future Credited Service.) Effective January 1, 2018, the Incremental Benefit Factor credited on your behalf for the January 1, 2017 – December 31, 2017 plan year has been increased from 1.15% to 1.65%, provided you have earned Future Credited Service in the 2017 plan year. Generally this requires that, during 2017, you have worked at least 450 hours for which contributions to the NRIPP are required. This increase applies even if you retired during the 2017 plan year (so long as you worked sufficient hours in 2017). NOTE: This increase in the Incremental Benefit Factor is effective only for the 2017 plan year; the Incremental Benefit Factor remains at 1.15% for plan years after December 31, 2017. Also, if you have engaged in Restrictive Employment (see Part III of your Summary Plan Description), you are not eligible for this benefit increase.

Example Here’s an example of how the Incremental Benefit Factor increase works.

Before the increase, let’s assume that your monthly accrued benefit as of December 31, 2017 payable at age 65 was $1,500.00. Let’s also assume that during 2017 you worked 1,800 hours at a contribution rate of $2.50 per hour. In this example, $4,500 (1,800 x $2.50) of contributions would have been made on your behalf during 2017. Because you worked more than 450 hours during the 2017 plan year, you are eligible for the benefit increase. Before the benefit increase, you would have accrued a monthly benefit in 2017 of $51.75: 1.15% x 1,800 x $2.50 = $51.75 After the benefit increase, you would have accrued a monthly benefit in 2017 of $74.25: 1.65% x 1,800 x $2.50 = $74.25

The net increase in your monthly benefit accrued for 2017 is $22.50 ($74.25 $51.75). So, the monthly benefit that you have accrued through 2017 in this example would be $1,522.50 ($1,500.00 + $22.50).

What You Need to Do No action is required on your part, but if you haven’t yet registered for the NRIPP website, now may be a good time. Once you register, just type nripf.com from a computer, iPad or mobile phone to get access to all the information you need about your pension benefits.

The National Roofers Union & Employers Joint Health & Welfare Fund has a new website! • Important plan information

• Frequently asked questions

• Summary plan description

• And much more!

WWW.NATIONALROOFERSHEALTH.COM Third Quarter 2018 •

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NATIONAL BENEFIT FUNDS

When It Comes to Preventive Care, the National Health Fund Has You Covered!

A

lmost 50% of all U.S. adults have a chronic condition, like heart disease, cancer, diabetes and arthritis. Preventive care is essential to understanding your risk for a particular illness or condition and improving your chances of catching it early on. That’s why the National Roofers Union & Employers Health Fund covers most of the cost for many preventive services—some preventive services might cost you nothing when received at an in-network Cigna provider! Be sure to check your plan materials for details about the cost of preventive services for your specific medical plan.

What’s Preventive Care? Preventive care is focused on promoting healthy behaviors and early detection of conditions. The best way to accomplish both of these is through an annual wellness exam with your primary care provider or another doctor of your choice. https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/pdf/2009Power-of-Prevention.pdf

1

2

 Subject to the terms of your plan’s pharmacy coverage, certain drugs and products may be covered at 100%.

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Your doctor will determine tests and screenings that are appropriate for you based on your overall health, family and personal healthy history, age, sex and other important factors—like if you smoke, exercise and your diet. Symptoms are not a requirement to receive a preventive exam—the purpose of the exam is to catch potential problems before you start experiencing complications. However, be sure to mention anything that has been bothering you to your doctor during your check-up.

What Isn’t Preventive Care? Preventive care occurs before you are diagnosed with an issue. If during your wellness exam your doctor finds a problem or wants to conduct further tests, that is no longer considered preventive. These diagnostic tests may cost more, depending on your medical plan and the test that is performed.

 Subject to the terms of your plan’s medical coverage, breast-feeding equipment rental and supplies may be covered at the preventive level.

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 Subject to the terms of your plan’s medical coverage, contraceptive products and services such as some types of IUD’s, implants and sterilization procedures may be covered at the preventive level. Check your plan materials for details about your specific medical plan.

HAVE A QUESTION?  If you have any questions regarding your preventive care benefits, contact Cigna at 800-768-4695. For a complete list of covered preventive screenings and their requirements, visit www.healthcare.gov/coverage/preventive-care-benefits/

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WHAT PREVENTIVE CARE IS COVERED? SERVICE

GROUP/AGE/FREQUENCY

WELLNESS EXAMS Well-baby/well-child/well-person exams, including annual well-woman exam (includes height, weight, head circumference, BMI, blood pressure, history, anticipatory guidance, education regarding risk reduction, psychosocial/ behavioral assessment)

Birth, 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 24 and 30 months Additional visit at 2–4 days for infants discharged less than 48 hours after delivery Ages 3 to 21, once a year Ages 22 and older, periodic visits, as doctor advises

ROUTINE IMMUNIZATIONS Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis (DTaP, Tdap, Td) Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate (Hib) Hepatitis A (Hep A) Hepatitis B (Hep B) Human papillomavirus (HPV) (age and gender criteria apply depending on vaccine brand) Influenza vaccine Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) Meningococcal (MCV) Pneumococcal (pneumonia) Poliovirus (IPV) Rotavirus (RV) Varicella (chickenpox) Zoster (shingles) HEALTH SCREENINGS AND INTERVENTIONS Alcohol misuse screening

All adults; adolescents age 11-21

Anemia screening

Pregnant women

Aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease; or to reduce risk for preeclampsia2

Men ages 45–79; women ages 55–79; Pregnant women at risk for preeclampsia

Autism screening

18, 24 months

Bacteriuria screening

Pregnant women

Breast cancer screening (mammogram) Breast-feeding support/counseling, supplies

Women ages 40 and older, every 1–2 years 3

Cervical cancer screening (Pap test) HPV DNA test with Pap test

During pregnancy and after birth

Women ages 21–65, every 3 years Women ages 30–65, every 5 years

Chlamydia screening

Men  

Women  

Sexually active women ages 24 and under and older women at risk

Children/adolescents

Third Quarter 2018 •

29


NATIONAL BENEFIT FUNDS

Cholesterol/lipid disorders screening Screening of children and adolescents ages 9-11 years and 18-21 years; children and adolescents with risk factors ages 2-8 and 12-16 years All men ages 35 and older, or ages 20–35 if risk factors All women ages 45 and older, or ages 20–45 if risk factors Colon cancer screening

The following tests will be covered for colorectal cancer screening, ages 50 and older: Fecal occult blood test (FOBT) or fecal immunochemical test (FIT) annually Flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years Double-contrast barium enema (DCBE) every 5 years Colonoscopy every 10 years Computed tomographic colonography (CTC)/virtual colonoscopy every 5 years – Requires precertification

Congenital hypothyroidism screening

Newborns

Critical congenital heart disease screening

Newborns before discharge from hospital

Contraception counseling/education. Contraceptive products and services2,4

Women with reproductive capacity

Depression screening

Ages 11–21, All adults

Developmental screening

9, 18, 30 months

Developmental surveillance

Newborn 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 15, 24 months. At each visit ages 3 to 21

Diabetes screening

Adults with sustained blood pressure greater than 135/80

Discussion about potential benefits/risk of breast cancer preventive medication2

Women at risk

Dental caries prevention: Evaluate water source for sufficient fluoride; if deficient prescribe oral fluoride2

Children older than 6 months Children through age 6 years

Application of fluoride varnish to primary teeth at time of eruption (in primary care setting) Domestic and interpersonal violence screening Fall prevention in older adults (physical therapy, vitamin D supplementation2) Folic acid supplementation2

All women Community-dwelling adults ages 65 and older with risk factors Women planning or capable of pregnancy

Genetic counseling/evaluation and BRCA1/BRCA2 testing Women at risk Genetic counseling must be provided by an independent boardcertified genetic specialist prior to BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing BRCA1/BRCA2 testing requires precertification Gestational diabetes screening Gonorrhea screening

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• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer

Pregnant women Sexually active women age 24 years and younger and older women at risk

Men  

Women  

Children/adolescents


Hearing screening (not complete hearing examination)

All newborns by 1 month. Ages 4, 5, 6, 8, and 10 or as doctor advises

Healthy diet and physical activity counseling

Ages 6 and older – to promote improvement in weight status; Overweight or obese adults with risk factors for cardiovascular disease

Hemoglobin or hematocrit Hepatitis B screening

12 months Pregnant women; adolescents and adults at risk

Hepatitis C screening

Adults at risk; one-time screening for adults born between 1945 and 1965

HIV screening and counseling

Pregnant women; adolescents and adults 15 to 65 years; younger adolescents and older adults at risk; sexually active women, annually

Iron supplementation2

6–12 months for children at risk

Lead screening

12, 24 months

Lung cancer screening (low-dose computed tomography)

Metabolic/hemoglobinopathies (according to state law) Obesity screening/counseling Oral health evaluation/assess for dental referral Osteoporosis screening

Adults ages 55 to 80 with 30 pack-year smoking history, and currently smoke, or have quit within the past 15 years. Computed tomography requires precertification. (coverage effective upon your plan’s start or anniversary date on or after 1/1/15) Newborns Ages 6 and older, all adults 12, 18, 24, 30 months. Ages 3 and 6 Age 65 or older (or under age 65 for women with fracture risk as determined by Fracture Risk Assessment Score). Computed tomographic bone density study requires precertification

PKU screening

Newborns

Ocular (eye) medication to prevent blindness

Newborns

Prostate cancer screening (PSA)

Men ages 50 and older or age 40 with risk factors

Rh incompatibility test

Pregnant women

Sexually transmitted infections (STI) counseling

Sexually active women, annually; sexually active adolescents; and men at increased risk

Sexually transmitted infections (STI) screening

Adolescents ages 11-21

Sickle cell disease screening

Newborns

Skin cancer prevention counseling to minimize exposure to ultraviolet radiation

Ages 10–24

Syphilis screening

Individuals at risk; pregnant women

Tobacco use cessation: counseling/interventions2

All adults2; pregnant women

Tobacco use prevention (counseling to prevent initiation)

School-age children and adolescents

Tuberculin test

Children and adolescents at risk

Ultrasound aortic abdominal aneurysm screening

Men ages 65–75 who have ever smoked

Vision screening (not complete eye examination)

Ages 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15 and 18 or as doctor advises

Third Quarter 2018 •

31


APPROVED NRIPP PENSION APPLICATIONS AT THE MEETING OF MAY 24 – 2 5, 2018 PARTICIPANT NAME

TYPE OF RETIREMENT

LOCAL UNION

Jose Arroyos-Meza

Late

200

Kenneth R. Ashner

Disability Early

John Baron

QDRO

Kevin H. Batta Donald L. Beardsley

TYPE OF RETIREMENT

LOCAL UNION

Daniel R. Holland

Late

91

2

Maximiano Huesca

Early

11

11

Steve C. Janes

Early

2

11

Christopher Kalinowski

Early

11

Normal

119

Jerry D. Kidwell

Normal

32

Chadwick C. Kirby

Ronald S. Bendixen

Late

54

Michael A. Bias

Early

40

Mark D. Biernbaum

Early

Burton Boettiger Thomas R. Booth Melvin M. Brewer Michael E. Bridgemon

Mark Barlow

Normal

34

Early

153

Ronnie Kisling

Late

20

Phil Kleminski

Early

26

22

Raymond Lamp

Normal

241

Normal

49

Michael Lass

Late

23

Unreduced

71

Randy Lausch

Normal

23

Early

20

Frank T. Lettiere

Early

11

Early

2

James R. Lewis II

Normal

220

Gary L. Brill

Unreduced

69

William Lima

Normal

33

Andrew C. Buechler

Unreduced

65

Darrell Littlefield

Disability

119

Disability

20

Patrick J. Loftus

Early

11

Normal

136

Michael Lukis

Early

11

Early

22

Richard Maier

Normal

37

Walter C. Campbell

Late

54

Sammie Matthews

Normal

2

Rodgrigo D. Carino

Disability

2

Larry Maus

Early

96

Ronnie E. Burch Bruce J. Butler Richard B. Campbell

Richard J. Cates

Normal

135

Frank A. McGuire

Early

220

Frank A. Cesaretti

Early

12

Arthur Miller

Normal

96

Douglas E. Charles

Late

11

Jeffrey Miller

Early

11

Ricky Cole

Early

195

Timothy Minson

Early

11

Carl D. Collins

Early

44

Richard Moles

Unreduced

185

William R. Combs

Early

119

Wayne Musel

Normal

96

Lee Christine Corkrean

Late

142

Ronald Noble

Early

26

Normal

69

Salvatore Nicolais

Early

242

Late

136

Robert Norville Jr.

Unreduced

69

Unreduced Early

96

William O’Leary

Late

96

Normal

49

Joseph O’Rourke

Unreduced

11

Early

20

Francisco Ortega

Late

11

Disability

81

Jesus Perez

Late

317

David E. Doty

Unreduced

92

Jay Peters

Charlie T. Dye

Early

2

Mark Randles

Anthony L. Elee

Late

317

Maximo Reyes

Late

10

Ludvig T. Ellingsen

Late

49

Dale Riccardi

Unreduced

37

Marcos Garcia

Normal

123

Sheree Richardson-Barlow

Unreduced

189

Sergio B. Garcia

Normal

220

Mark Rigsbee

Late

136

Jerry Rodriguez

Warren R. Cox Herman Daniel Jr. Robert J. Danley Richard B. Dawley Terry J. Dehn Manuel Dominguez

William Gines

Early

11

QDRO

92

Early

12

Unreduced

189

Krzysztof Gorecki

Disability

11

Robert Ross

Early

149

Richard Graunke

Normal

96

Juan Ruiz

Late

135

Daniel Hagerty

Late

2

Patrick Schuster

Early

26

Kenneth Hale

Early

20

Eric Sielfleisch

Early

2

Mark R. Hill

Early

42

William Slate

Late

49

Disability

182

Leroy Stafford

Late

317

Ronald K. Holeton

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PARTICIPANT NAME


CONTINUED – APPROVED NRIPP PENSION APPLICATIONS AT THE MEETING OF MAY 24 – 2 5, 2018 PARTICIPANT NAME

TYPE OF RETIREMENT

LOCAL UNION

PARTICIPANT NAME

TYPE OF RETIREMENT

LOCAL UNION

Richard Stiehler

Late

22

Calvin Walls

Early

2

Bobby Stovall

Late

136

Glenn Waters

Early

11

Brian Suits

Early

69

James E. Weigand

Mark Tindall

Early

2

Alan Wolfe

Guy Turner Jr.

Early

195

James C. Woodruff

Ira Tyler

Late

123

Joel Zimmerman

Normal

95

Garry Zyla

Unreduced

210

Dennis Vance Carl Waldemarson

Unreduced

37

Early

96

Unreduced

96

Early

96

Early

11

APPROVED NRIPP SURVIVOR BENEFIT APPLICATIONS AT THE MEETING OF MAY 24 – 2 5, 2018 PARTICIPANT NAME David D. Askew

LOCAL UNION

PARTICIPANT NAME

LOCAL UNION

PARTICIPANT NAME

LOCAL UNION

20

John McCoy

185

26

Lauren Goering

Galen Beem

20

John B. Goss

49

James Myer

123

Theodore J. Bishop Jr.

185

Wayne Hellerman

96

Clarence Neal

96

Carl D. Bohannan

44

David Henning

96

Anthony Paitrick

96

John W. Christianson III

96

Ricki Huber

96

Richard Poe

92

Jerry L. Dotson

189

M. C. Johnson Jr.

2

Roy Seaton

96

Hugh Eubanks

143

Donald Kellar

44

Manuel Torrez

135

John Farley

23

Crawford Larkin

36

Michael Palazzolo

Gregory Freezor

2

Arthur Mack

54

Buster Peterson

136

Gilbert Garcia

2

David Mask

147

William Richardson

195

2

Questions about your pension? If you have contributions made on your behalf to the National Roofing Industry Pension Plan (NRIPP) or National Roofing Industry Supplemental Pension Plan (NRISPP), you can contact fund administrator Wilson-McShane with any questions regarding your plan.

Visit www.nripf.com or call 800-595-7209 for information.

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APPROVED NRISPP PENSION APPLICATIONS AT THE MEETING OF MAY 24 – 2 5, 2018 PARTICIPANT NAME

LOCAL UNION

PARTICIPANT NAME

Manuel Acosta

143

Larry Hillig

20

Jay Peters

Ronald Altieri

12

Ronald Holeton

182

Brian Petrick

11

Charles Anastasia

188

William Holicz

11

Theron Pope

20

Alvin Anderson

12

David Hoovey

11

William Price

49

Lloyd Anderson

20

Maximiano Huesca

11

Roberto Rendon

11

John Barron

11

William Hughart

185

Mark Rice

32

Joseph Bedolla

49

Bruce Hysell

185

Mark Rigsbee

12

Alexander Behrens

11

Mark Jacobs

32

Rene Rodriguez

11

Roger Bell

11

John James

32

Rogelio Rodriguez Escdero

11

Eric Bernhardt

12

Eufemio Jaramillo Solario

49

Andrew Rogyom

26

Jeffrey Black

11

Michael Johnsen

20

William Rolf

11

Preston Bocook

185

Joseph Junis

32

Troy Rymer

26

Robert Bolden

11

Lawrence Kelly

32

George Sarver Jr.

97

Roy Branch

20

Dale Kiepura

26

Jamie Schacht

65

John Breneman

26

Edward Klimek

11

Patrick Schuster

26

Ronnie Burch

20

Keith Krause

65

Leonard Schwartz

26

David Burton

20

David Langland

11

Mike Sharp

188

Randy Bussey

20

Joseph Lavalle

150

Donald Shawler

32

Jaime Castro

12

Anthony Lawson

20

Joyce Shorter

11

Frank Cesaretti

12

Darrell Littlefield

119

David Smalley

49

Joe Chambers

97

Charles Livingston

26

Douglas Smith

119

Richard Chiattello

26

Roberto Lopez

119

Kerry Spix

11

Bruce Claybaugh

97

Jonathan Losli

49

Randall Stephen

97

Garry Cleverly

49

Gregory Lowe

150

Rocklan Terrill

32

Shawn Cochran

20

Michael Lukis

11

David Thompson

49

Lewis Cooper

97

Spyro Makris

11

Arnold Thornton

185

Fred Cornell

185

Terry McCubbin

20

Ronald Tomasek

11

Thomas Coxe

20

Richard McLeod

49

Jerome Tomaszewski

26

Louis Daniels

20

Adam Meyer

11

Nick Tournas

12

Terry Dehn

20

Jeffrey Miller

11

Gerald Trinka

11

David Doty

92

Michael Miller

32

Willie Tucker

11

Kevin Dunow

11

Thomas Miller

49

David Valenzuela

20

Eugene Eldridge

119

Harry Mitchell

11

Terry Vaughn

49

Daniel Feest

65

Lawrence Mitchell

20

Jeff Vaux

26

David Fletcher

32

Richard Moles

185

Ronald Vitti

12

32

Kein Von Gerichten

185

PARTICIPANT NAME

LOCAL UNION 11

97

Gary Newberry

James Fredericks

11

Salvatore Nicolais

242

David Walters

12

Daniel Fritts

106

Ronald Noble

26

Glenn Waters

11

Jose Galan

11

John Nuckles

188

Dean Watson

11

Donald Gilmore

97

Frank Olesiak

11

Michael Welch

49

Thaddeus Grzelka

11

Jose Orlanzino

11

Nick West

106

Kenneth Hale

20

Joseph O’Rourke

11

Robert Whitaker

143

John Hancock

106

Juan Orozco

11

David White

97

James Hardig

97

Rudolph Ortega

11

James Wilkerson

119

Jeffrey Hayes

150

Ismael Padilla

12

Garry Williams

143

Dennis Heath

26

Patricia Patterson

143

Harold Wilson

106

Douglas Hepting

20

Karl Perkins

26

Ruben Woods

20

Salvador Hernandez

11

Michael Persichitti

188

Craig Yonker

26

John Foster

34

LOCAL UNION


Summary Annual Report for National Roofing Industry Supplemental Pension Plan

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his is a summary of the annual report for National Roofing Industry Supplemental Pension Plan, EIN 36-6157071 for the year ended December 31, 2017. The annual report has been filed with the Employee Benefit Security Administration, as required under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA).

Basic Financial Statement Benefits under the plan are provided by Trust. Plan expenses were $1,436,458 consisting of $1,304,415 in benefit payments to participants and $132,043 in administrative expenses. A total of 5,154 persons were participants in or beneficiaries of the plan at the end of the plan year, although not all of these persons had yet earned the right to receive benefits. The value of the plan assets, after subtracting liabilities of the plan, was $54,437,073 as of December 31, 2017, compared to $41,372,478 as of January 1, 2017. During the plan year, the plan experienced an increase in its net assets of $13,064,595. This increase included unrealized appreciation or depreciation in the value of plan assets; that is, the difference between the value of the plan’s assets at the end of the year and the value of the assets at the beginning of the year or the cost of assets acquired during the year. The plan had total income of $14,501,053 including (but not limited to) employer contributions of $9,826,278 and earnings from investments of $4,674,775. You have the right to receive a copy of the full annual report, or any part thereof, upon request. The items listed below are included in that report. • an accountant’s report; • financial information and information on payments to service providers; • information regarding any common or collective trusts, pooled separate accounts, • master trusts or 103-12 investment entities in which the plan participants, and • assets held for investment purposes.

To obtain a copy of the full annual report or any part thereof, write or call the office of Mr. Mike Theirl, who is plan administrator, at 3001 Metro Drive, Suite 500, Bloomington, MN 55425; (952) 854-0795. The charge to cover copying costs will be $4.50 for full annual report or $.25 per page for any part thereof. You also have the right to receive from the plan administrator, on request and at no charge, a statement of the assets and liabilities of the plan and accompanying notes or a statement of income and expenses of the plan and accompanying notes, or both. If you request a copy of the full annual report from the plan administrator, these two statements and accompanying notes will be included as part of that report. The charge to cover copying costs given above does not include a charge for the copying of these portions of the report because these portions are furnished without charge. You also have the legally protected right to examine the annual report at the main office of the plan at 3001 Metro Drive, Suite 500, Bloomington, MN 55425 and at the U.S. Department of Labor in Washington, D.C., or to obtain a copy for the U.S. Department of Labor upon payment of copying costs. Requests to the Department of Labor should be addressed to: Public Disclosure Room, N1513, Employee Benefit Security Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. 20210.

Additional Information Si necesita asistencia en Español para entender este Sumario del Reporte Anual del Plan, puede ponerse en contacto con la oficina del fondo. La Oficina del fondo esta localizada en 3001 Metro Drive, Suite 500, Bloomington, MN 55425, y esta abierta durante las horas normales de negocio, Lunes a Viernes (con excepción de dias de fiesta). También puede ponerse en contacto con la oficina del fondo por el teléfono (952) 854-0795.

35


LOCAL UNION NEWS

Local 162 Re-roofs Silverton Casino

M

embers of Roofers Local 162, Las Vegas, NV, working for Commercial Roofers, Inc., tore off the old cellulose roof tiles on the Silverton Casino in Las Vegas. They replaced it with a standing seam metal roof of approximately 30,000 sq. ft. ■

In Golden Gate’s Glory

F

or Roofers and Waterproofers in San Francisco, CA, working in the midst of the iconic Golden Gate Bridge is just another day. Local 81, Oakland, CA, members Roberto Flores and Fidel Barajas and Local 95, San Jose, CA, member Jose Macias apply a BUR system on the Golden Gate Bridge Administration Building. ■ From left: Jose Macias, Roberto Flores and Fidel Barajas

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• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer


Chicago Grads

R

oofers & Waterproofers Local 11, Chicago, IL, held a ceremony for its Class of 2017 journeyman roofers. Congratulations to all the graduates, and kudos to Eric Nichols, who was honored as Apprentice of the Year. ■

Eric Nichols earned Apprentice of the Year.

Chicagoland graduates.

Fernando Alvarado’s new F-150 is decked out with Local 36 license plates.

Union All the Way

F

ernando Alvarado, proud member of Roofers Local 36, Los Angeles, CA, hits the road in his new Ford F-150 with custom plates! ■

Third Quarter 2018 •

37


LOCAL UNION NEWS Pierce County Graduates Apprentices

I

nstructors and staff at Pierce County Roofers JATC are beyond proud of the ten skilled apprentices who graduated this year. Each of these apprentices out of Local 153, Tacoma, WA, has worked hard to finish the program and can

now advance to the journey level of roofing. The following individuals completed their apprenticeship training: JoshuaTyler Bernard, Lamarcus Callender, Erasto Hernandez, Jorge Hernandez, Darrell Hunter,

Joseph Kalanui III, Juan Lopez, Roberto Marquez, Richard Newton and Bradley Welsh. Special congratulations go to Bradley Welsh, whose strong work ethic and excellent skills earned him the title of Apprentice of the Year. â–

Lamarcus Callender takes pride in his job.

Joseph Kalanui III does well in all fields of roofing.

Apprentice of the Year Bradley Welsh puts his mind to the task.

38

• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer


St. Louis Local 2 Swears in New Officers

R

oofers Local 2, St. Louis, MO, swore in its newly elected officers on June 4. Dan O’Donnell was reelected president and business manager, along with Dennis Marshall Jr. as financial secretary, John O’Connor as

vice president, Tommy Hamilton as recording secretary and Gary Stepka as sergeant at arms. Elected to the Executive Board were Todd Heisserer, Dennis Bello, Dan Knight, Bob Stanton and Bill Thurston. ■

Longtime member Dell King swears in (from left) Todd Heisserer, Dennis Bello, Dan Knight, Dennis Marshall Jr., Tommy Hamilton, Bob Stanton, Dan O’Donnell, John O’Connor, Bill Thurston and Gary Stepka.

Local 11 Retirees

L

ocal 11, Chicago, IL, Business Manager Gary Menzel presented service pins to retired members Jim Sharkey, Ulysses Patterson and Doug Huebner. Brother Huebner is an ex-officer and was a business representative for Local 11. ■

Ulysses Patterson receives his 45-year pin.

Doug Huebner receives his 55-year pin from Sgt-at-Arms Steve Oboikovitz (left) and B.M. Gary Menzel.

A 45-year pin is presented to Jim Sharkey.

Third Quarter 2018 •

39


COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Roofers Local 26 Members Volunteer Summer Weekends for Community Center

A

neighborhood organization’s mission to restore a Great Depression-era library into a resource center is well on its way thanks to the generosity of its community, including Roofers Local 26 in Hammond-Gary, IN. Local 26 apprentices and journeymen gave up many of their weekends this summer to tear down and install a new roof on the former Hansen Library in Hessville, IN, which sat vacant for more than a decade. The city provided a $25,000 grant and Local 26 installed the shingles for free to make the project possible. Training Director Brian Bass said he tries to not look at the dollar amount or missed weekends with family but instead how the union is bettering the community. “I stressed to them it’s more than just your average donation job. It’s for the betterment for the community,” he said. “I know it’s a very expensive job, but it’s for the veterans and children in Hammond. I try to keep our guys focused on that too.” Local 26 volunteers over the course of the project included Brian Bass, Tim Miller, Mike Myers, Jeremy Adams, Oscar Rivas, Jennifer Oldendorf, Mike Spraggins, Rob Dawson, Israel Cruz, Fundador Feliciano, David Chiattello, Randy Young, Victor Cavazos, Eliseo Gonzalez, Ryan Pastrick , Milo Stojanovic, Jason Fisk, Jordan Fisk, Jesse Kirby, Steve Escamilla, Jose Jimenez, Richard Perez Jr., Chris Bonessa, Mike Spencer, Rene Diaz,

40

• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer

Tyler Ramirez, David Cope, Dave Purser, Anthony Walker, Rusty Walker, Shawn Walker, Luis Castro and Mark O’Conner. Once complete, the old library branch will feature a veterans museum and the resource center will provide adult workforce development, student tutoring and veterans support services. Amy Radolak, president of Hessville Commerce & Community Creative, said the organization “would like to thank the United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers & Allied

“I know it’s a very expensive job, but it’s for the veterans and children in Hammond. I try to keep our guys focused on that too.” Workers Local 26 for their commitment and dedication in helping complete the roof of the former Hansen Library building. We are very grateful to all the apprentices, journeymen and their families.” ■


Local 11 Contractors Donate Services to Ronald McDonald House

Arturo Chavez, Rodrigo Quintana, Ron Teeling, Mike Lynch and Margarito Bahena donate their time and skills to the Ronald McDonald House project.

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ocal 11, Chicago, IL, signatory contractors Ridgeworth Roofing Company and Bennett & Brosseau Roofing recently donated services to help a local Ronald McDonald House. Bennett & Brosseau’s team worked on the steep slope repairs, while Ridgeworth Roofing handled the re-roofing of the house’s fourstory flat roof section. Rod Petrick, Ridgeworth Roofing’s president and owner, said that his company became involved with this project by being a member of the Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress, a collective forum of roofing contractors, manufacturers, suppliers and industry professionals who select and provide oversight of programs and funding for progressive research that contributes to the ongoing advancement of the roofing industry. “Working on the Ronald McDonald House was a very good opportunity to put our best foot forward and do something that will, in turn, help other families for many years,” said Petrick. “They will be able to utilize this facility and don’t have to worry about lodging. When our group of men worked on this project, I found out that one of my guys, before he worked for us, utilized a Ronald McDonald House when his child was sick.” “There are 184 Ronald McDonald Houses in North America,” he said. “Moving forward, I put the challenge to our members that we get all 184 houses sponsored” by the end of the year. ■

Work performed by Ridgeworth Roofing on the Ronald McDonald House.

A Local 11 volunteer fastens insulation.

Third Quarter 2018 •

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Roofer Wins a Wally Local 11 member Jim R etired Fredericks won a National Hot Rod Association Wally award at Route 66 in Joliet, IL. The Wally is considered drag racing’s most prestigious trophy. Brother Fredericks’s racing is sponsored by Sullivan Roofing Inc.

Jim Fredericks and friends after his Wally victory.

Roofer Shares Prize Fish Photo and Important PSA W

Local 33, Boston, MA, member Dylan Brown displays the 30 lb. prize striper that he caught off Race Point in Provincetown on Cape Cod, MA. Brother Brown has stage 4 colon cancer and hopes he can save a life or two by reminding everyone to get a colonoscopy.

Dylan Brown catches this great striped bass off Cape Cod.

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Duane Temple, Paul Byers and Bill Conway show off the salmon caught in Lake Ontario.

Roofers Fish Lake Ontario buddies Duane Temple and Bill Conway from Local 88, Akron, OH, R oofing and Paul Byers from Local 44, Cleveland, OH, had a great time fishing in Lake Ontario, where they hooked some impressive salmon

Ted Maleski takes good care of Hot Tar.

Hanging Out on Hot Tar Local 210, Erie, PA, President R oofers Marc Forsythe and member Ted Maleski catch fish off shore of Lake Erie while on Marc’s boat, “Hot Tar”!

It takes two to hoist John Plescia’s amazing seabass.

White Seabass Beauty 46 lb. white seabass was caught off Imperial Beach, VA, by John Plescia. John is T his the owner of Star Roofing, a signatory Local 135, Phoenix, AZ, contractor. John is also the longtime chairman of the Roofers National Health & Welfare Fund.

Marc Forsythe’s hearty catch.

Third Quarter 2018 •

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First Bear for Roofer’s Son papa Ronnie Block shares P roud this picture of his son’s first bear. Congratulations to Devon Block on shooting this 300 lb. black bear.

Devon Block with his first bear.

Local 210 Sportsmen millions of acres of public and W ithprivate lands for hunters and trappers to pursue their pastimes, Pennsylvania is a hunter’s paradise. The white-tailed deer are plentiful, and the state fosters a thriving hunting community. Roofers & Waterproofers Local 210, Erie, PA, counts many hunting enthusiasts among its members. Here are four members whose skills landed them bucks during hunting season. Adam Price and kids show off dad’s buck

Proud hunter Butch Beasley III and his buck.

Harold Klinzing with his buck in the great outdoors. Local 210 member Alan Reynolds bags a nice buck.

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DISTRICT COUNCIL MINUTES

Directory of District Councils WESTERN REGIONAL

INDIANA

MID-STATES

NORTHEAST

NORTHWEST

Brent Beasley, President Local Union #220 283 N. Rampart St. Ste. F Orange, CA 92868 (714) 939-2858

Joe Pozzi, President Local Union #26 25 W. 84th Ave. Merrillville, IN 46410 (219) 756-3713

Marvin Cochran, President Local Union #86 1384 Stimmel Rd. Columbus, OH 43223 (614) 299-6404

Shawn McCullough, President Local Union #30 6447 Torresdale Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19135 (215) 331-8770

Russ Garnett, President Local Union #49 5032 SE 26th Ave. Portland, OR 97202 (503) 232-4807

Bruce Lau, Secretary Local Union #40 150 Executive Park Blvd. Ste. 3625 San Francisco, CA 94134 (415) 508-0261

Bill Alexander, Secretary Local Union #106 1201 Baker Ave. Evansville, IN 47710 (812) 424-8641

Carlo Ponzio, Treasurer Local Union #71 2714 Martin L. King Youngstown, OH 44510 (330) 746-3020

Michael Hassett, Secretary Local Union #9 114 Old Forge Rd. Rocky Hill, CT 06067 (860) 721-1174

Gregg Gibeau, Secretary Local Union #54 2800 1st Ave., Rm. 105 Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 728-7654

MICHIGAN

NORTH CENTRAL STATES

NEW JERSEY

ILLINOIS Larry Gnat, President Local Union #11 2021 Swift Dr., Ste. A Oak Brook, IL 60523 (708) 345-0970 Steven Peterson, Secretary Local Union #69 3917 SW Adams St. Peoria, IL 61605 (309) 673-8033

John Tackett, President Local Union #70 P.O. Box 116 Howell, MI 48844 (517) 548-6554 Mark K. Peterson, Secretary Local Union #149 P.O. Box 32800 Detroit, MI 48232 (313) 961-6093

Vance Anderson, President Local Union #96 9174 Isanti St. NE Blaine, MN 55449 (763) 230-7663 Kevin King, Secretary Local Union #20 6321 Blue Ridge Blvd. Ste. 202 Raytown, MO 64133 (816) 313-9420

David Critchley, President Local Union #4 385 Parsippany Rd. Parsippany, NJ 07054 (973) 515-8500 Rob Critchley, Secretary Local Union #4 385 Parsippany Rd. Parsippany, NJ 07054 (973) 515-8500

Minutes of the Western Regional District Council

T

he meeting of the Western Regional District Council of Roofers & Waterproofers was held May 4 – 5, 2018, at the Best Western Executive Inn in Seattle, WA.

Delegates and Guests in Attendance President Brent Beasley, John Gauthier and Rudy Recendez, Local 220, Orange County, CA; Secretary-Treasurer Bruce Lau, Jose O. Padilla and Peter Lang, Local 40, San Francisco, CA; Cliff Smith, Hector Drouaillet, Norberto Gutierrez and Jesus Portilla, Local 36, Los Angeles, CA; Morgan Nolde and Carlos Opfermann, Local 81, Oakland, CA; and Robert Rios and Daniel Garcia, Local 95, San Jose, CA.

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• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer

International Guests in Attendance International President Kinsey Robinson, International Vice President Doug Ziegler, International Representative Gabriel Perea, Market Development Representatives Raul Galaz and Tim Adrian, and Robert Bohrer, collection attorney for the National Roofers Trust Funds. President Brent Beasley called the meeting to order at 8:00 a.m. A letter was received from Roofers Local 36 saying that Jesus Portilla would be attending as a delegate. Minutes of the previous meeting were reviewed and a motion was made, seconded and carried that they be accepted as presented. SecretaryTreasurer Bruce Lau and Trustees Carlos Opfermann, Jose Padilla and

John Gauthier audited the council’s books from 1/2018 to 5/2018 and found them in order. Motion was made, seconded and carried to accept the financials.

Reports of Delegates and Guests Gabby Perea, Local 27, said that work is good in the Fresno/Bakersfield area. With the help of Dan Smith from the Bay Area Apprenticeship Program, Local 27’s apprenticeship is up and running. They have around 70 apprentices, four classes/week, and are looking for a teacher. Cliff Smith, Local 36, said Local 36’s membership is at its highest point in 20 years. Their immediate goal is to find enough workers to man all the projects. They have part-


nered with the AFL-CIO’s Immigration Organizing Project and brought in a new organizer. Organizing has been a great success. He discussed a possible amendment for funding aggressive organizing campaigns. Hector Drouaillet, Local 36, said schools are doing a lot of renovation, especially the Los Angeles Unified School District. Kaiser is building new hospitals in Irwindale and Pasadena. They had a meeting at the apprentice training center in Pomona with the Los Angeles Department of Public Works and people from three bureaus that do contract compliance and explained to them the kind of work we do. Norberto Gutierrez, Local 36, said union contractors are doing the waterproofing on the new NFL stadium in Inglewood. He’s been attending job walks and working on several apprenticeship violations with the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement. He makes sure non-union contractors on public works jobs have at least 20% apprentice hours. He tells foremen in charge that they need to teach apprentices the application process, not just have them picking up trash and moving material. Jesus Portilla, Local 36, is the new organizer for Local 36. He has experience as an organizing intern with the AFL-CIO Immigration Organizing Project, where he developed a brochure showing a non-union company’s past wage violations, lawsuits and employee testimony saying they were not paid correct wages on projects. That contractor isn’t doing much work now because of the lawsuit filed by Local 36. He is currently working on several nonunion companies and has been able to recruit some roofers. Jose Padilla, Local 40, said every member is working. Local 40 is

working with the Dept. of Industrial Relations on wage enforcement, and OSHA on safety. He went to World of Concrete in Las Vegas and learned a lot about new forms of waterproofing. Journeymen should take upgrade classes to keep up with all the new waterproofing material on the market. Bruce Lau, Local 40, said 2018 is a negotiation year. Gabby Perea from the International came by to give Local 40 a “check-up.” He gave tips on how to be in compliance with the DOL and how to update the Constitution and By-Laws. Tax laws start in 2018 that eliminate union dues as a tax write off, which is a direct attack on union members who for years have been able to deduct this expense. Paul Colmenero, Local 45, said membership is up 20% and hours are up 80% from this time last year. Contractors are looking for journeymen for the upcoming work. They are looking to hire an organizer. Morgan Nolde, Local 81, said work is very good. Safety is an issue. There was an accident involving an apprentice and journeyman who were injured when a rolling scaffolding hit a power line. Stripping roofers from non-union companies can result in journeymen who are not journeyman caliber on the roof. They often return to the non-union sector rather than become a union roofer. Brent Beasley, Local 220, said employers are looking to hire. He is going to city council meetings to get PLAs passed. They have an opportunity to put pro-labor candidates into office in the next election. John Gauthier, Local 220, said he is still monitoring jobs in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. Signatory contractors are getting 95% of the work. The non-

union don’t seem to be bidding on prevailing wage work. He is training Rudy Recendez on compliance and organizing. Robert Rios, Local 95, said work is good but a little slow right now. They have two big jobs going on and a third that is going to last 10 – 15 years. Negotiations are this year and they are going to team up with Local 40. Still looking for different ways to recruit and are meeting with contractors to come up with some strategies. Daniel Garcia, Local 95, said there is a trend by tech companies to build mega projects. They are trying to find workers through the Conservation Corps. Membership has almost doubled since 2010. International Vice President Doug Ziegler said standing seam roofing is our work and we need to fight for it. Safety has to be a priority. He discussed the trusteeship at Local 162 in Las Vegas. They signed a new contractor. They are looking to buy a building, and can’t find workers. International President Kinsey Robinson said that the issues of opioids and suicide prevention in the trades need to be addressed by a government task force. The 29th International Roofers Convention will be held at the Tropicana Hotel in Las Vegas October 6 – 12, 2018. There are currently 29,000 participants in the NRIPP; there are 6,800 retirees. The National Health & Welfare Fund is doing well. The government’s Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation isn’t going to help anyone. The most you can get from that fund is $1,287 per month with 30 years of service. The NRIPP needs to be notified if a contractor goes out of business. The meeting adjourned at 4:00 p.m. ■

Third Quarter 2018 •

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DISTRICT COUNCIL MINUTES

Attending the joint Western Regional/Northwest District Council meeting, first row from left: Morgan Nolde, Gabby Perea, Tony Kimbrough, Doug Ziegler, Bruce Lau, Luke Stillings, Kinsey Robinson, Richard Geyer, Brent Beasley, Rudy Recendez and John Gauthier. Back row: Raul Galaz, Cliff Smith, Paul Colmenero, Carlos Opfermann, Gregg Gibeau, Jesus Portillo, Hector Drouaillet, Noberto Gutierrez, Tim Adrian, Steve Hurley, Leo Marsura, Tony Bergeson, Russ Garnett, Alvaro Garcia, Travis Hopkins, Peter Lang, Dan Smith, Jose Padilla, Moises Ruiz, Robert Rios, Tom Nielsen and Daniel Garcia.

Minutes of the Northwest District Council

T

he meeting of the Northwest District Council of Roofers was called to order at 8:00 a.m. on May 5, 2018, in Seattle, WA. The meeting was held jointly with the Western Regional District Council of Roofers.

Officers and Delegates in Attendance President Russ Garnett and Travis Hopkins, Local 49, Portland, OR; Vice President Steve Hurley and Secretary-Treasurer Gregg Gibeau, Local 54, Seattle, WA; Trustee Moises Ruiz, Local 91, Salt Lake City, UT; Trustee Leo Marsura, Local 189, Spokane, WA; and Richard Geyer, Local 153, Tacoma, WA.

Guests in Attendance International President Kinsey M. Robinson, International Vice President Douglas Ziegler, International Representative Gabriel Perea; International Market Development Representative Tim Adrian,

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Attorney Robert A. Bohrer, retired International Representative Paul Blaski, Local 54 Organizer Tony Kimbrough, Local 54 President Tony Bergeson and Local 54 member Luke Stilling. Minutes of the previous meeting were read. Motion was made, seconded and carried to accept the minutes as read.

Reports of Delegates and Guests Russ Garnett, Local 49, said the work load for this year is healthy. Local 49 will be sending four women to the Women Build Nations conference in Seattle this October. Officer and delegate elections are in June. The summer is already busy with $2 billion in school bonds in the Portland metro area alone. Local 49 is disputing the award of the roofing to Cobra BEC on the Facebook Data Center. They have sent letters to Facebook management and

Oregon legislature on the contractor’s lack of local hiring as well as not participating in apprenticeship training. This job would mean work for dozens of roofers for eight months. Travis Hopkins, Local 49, sees prevailing wage jobs going unbid. Manpower shortages mean sometimes journeymen get promoted to foreman too soon. With the increase in work, apprentices graduate in a shorter period of time. It takes on-the-job experience over years to really become a craftsperson. He is working on internal organizing. They created a NEAR committee of apprentices and new journeymen. This educates the new people and helps with meeting attendance and enthusiasm for union issues. Also started an organizing committee to come up with ideas to combat the lack of union market share. Local 49 signed a new minority and emerging business union contractor.


Leo Marsura, State of Washington, said Local 189 celebrated its 75th anniversary. They held a ceremony and issued completion pins to graduating apprentices and service pins to all members. This is a good practice that lets the younger members meet the older ones. House Bill 1849 is the first apprenticeship compliance bill passed since the apprenticeship utilization law came into effect in 2005. It includes incentives and penalties on contracts awarded based on apprenticeship utilization. It is the responsibility of the awarding agency to report apprenticeship utilization data. Data collection will be the key to establishing those incentives and penalties. The Spokane area is doing more school district work and has a PLA on the Penrose Hotel in Walla Walla and work on Eastern Washington University and Gonzaga University. Spokane City Council President Ben Stuckart is running for mayor. He is a great union advocate. Gregg Gibeau, Local 54, said it’s good to see younger agents and organizers at the joint meeting. It’s important to exchange ideas with the longtime council delegates and International representatives and learn that the important issues for them are the same for most all of us across the West. Moises Ruiz, Local 91, said everyone is working. Apprenticeship is doing well and they’ve had one new graduate. They are still trying to get on the second phase of the new international airport and working on the LDS Oakland California Temple. Local 91 is organizing by visiting the jobs and talking to nonunion contractors. Bob Bohrer is the collection attorney for the national pension plans.

The pension is doing very well. Payroll audits are important and necessary to assure that members receive all benefits owed them. Retired International Representative Paul Blaski discussed his work with the International on leadership training. He helped develop the new business manager class and has been using it around the country. A visit from an International Rep can help fill in the blanks and answer any questions a new business manager may have. International President Kinsey Robinson thanked Bob Bohrer for the work he does for the NRIPP and NRISPP. Bob recently oversaw a large, half-million-dollar collection for our pension. Hours were up in the NRIPP in 2017. The International burial benefit is now fully funded. We are very focused on how we spend your money. Expect very modest increases in per capita and the Research and Education Fund. Proposing a Code of Conduct for local and International officers and representatives. We get a lot of work from direct customer agreements. Large utility companies, municipalities and manufacturing companies want quality contractors with skilled, well-trained workers to build their buildings. He thanked Paul Blaski for the work he does as a trustee for the national health and welfare plan. The plan is doing well and provides necessary medical insurance to our members and their families. Finally, you all saw the cover of the last magazine with women members featured. We have been recruiting men for the last 50-60 years with limited success. It appears we need to recruit women to fill those jobs.

International Vice President Doug Ziegler said membership in Las Vegas Local 162 is up. Working on a new five-year agreement. The waterproofing on the new Raiders stadium is going to go to one of our signatories. Another trade is claiming the roof and we are working on that jurisdictional problem. The 2018 Convention is important to us. We need to bring good resolutions to the convention that protect our work. We all need to fight the problems of racism and sexism in our locals. The International is going after vacuuming, along with any and all cleanup of debris for re-roofing. International Marketing Representative Tim Adrian has been assisting International Vice President Ziegler. Still working in Colorado and now the Phoenix and Reno areas. He investigates nonunion roofing companies, engages discussions with roofers on the advantages of working union and visits roofing contractors at their places of business. In Phoenix he attends the Arizona Building Trades Council and in Reno he visits Southwest Waterproofing and Commercial Roofers Inc. Both are working at the Great Basin Hall project at the University of Nevada, Reno. Communications to the council were read. The financial statement was read and discussed. Motion was made, seconded and carried to accept the financial statement. Motion was made, seconded and carried to pay the bills. There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 5:00 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Gregg Gibeau Secretary to the Council

Third Quarter 2018 •

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QUARTERLY REPORTS

Report of International Vice President Tom Pedrick

I

begin my report in Rochester, NY, where I attended the Local 22 benefit funds trustee meeting. I also met with area contractors and Local 22 Business Manager Steve Lambert to discuss upcoming work in the area. In Philadelphia, PA, I met with Local 30 Business Manager Shawn McCullough to review the progress the local is having stripping workers from the non-union sector to supply manpower to the local’s signatory contractors. In Atlantic City, NJ, I attended the New Jersey Building Trades convention where I met with Local 4, Parsippany, NJ, Business Manager Dave Critchley and Local 10, Paterson, NJ, Business Manager Nick Strauss about work in Northern New Jersey.

In New York, NY, I spoke to Local 8, New York, NY, Business Manager Nick Siciliano and Local 154, Long Island, NY, Business Manager Sal Giovanniello about the problems we are having with other trades trying to raid our work. Next in Ottowa County, Ohio, I attended the Mid States District Council meeting. While there I met with Local 37, Pittsburgh, PA, Business Representative Mark Azzarello and Financial Secretary Jim Walton regarding another trade trying to infringe on our work jurisdiction. I also met with Local 210, Erie, PA, Business Manager Scott Johnson to review a new contractor in his area he recently signed. I conclude this report in Atlantic City, NJ, where I attended the Northeast District Council meeting. While there I spoke to Local

74, Buffalo, NY, Business Manager Nick Gechell about a problem he is having with a signatory contractor from another area. I discussed with Local 195, Syracuse, NY, Business Manager Gary Swan an issue with a member transferring from his local to another. I reviewed with Local 203, Binghamton, NY, Business Manager Phil Lester a checklist of duties in his newly elected position. I met with Local 241, Albany, NY, Business Manager Mike Rossi to go over recent legislation the New York State Building Trades might be introducing. I spoke to Local 9, Hartford, CT, Business Manager Mike Hassett and Local 12, Bridgeport, CT, Business Manager Butch Davidson about the lack of prevailing wage work being let out in Connecticut this year. ■

Report of International Vice President Michael Stiens

I

begin my report in Indianapolis, IN, where I continued the trusteeship of Local 119. While there I worked on a new contract for the local. I then traveled to Lafayette, IN, to Purdue University to meet with a crew from Korellis Roofing doing a job in Local 119’s area. I also put on a journeyman test at the local. From there I traveled to Knoxville, TN, to attend a pre-job meeting for BES Technologies doing work on the Y-12 facility. I then traveled to Atlanta, GA, to meet with Southern Representative James Scott to go over things at Local 136. I then traveled back to Local 119 in Indianapolis, IN,

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• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer

where I met with Assistant Market Development Director Frank Wall to discuss getting men for upcoming work in the area. Back to Atlanta, GA, to meet with James Scott and move all of the Local 136 office and apprentice equipment to the new office building and storage facility. Once again I traveled to Indianapolis, IN, to continue trusteeship of Local 119 where I met with contractors to finish the new contract for local. My next stop was in Cleveland, OH, as assigned by President Robinson to attend the swearing-in of new officers for Local 44. While in Cleveland I met with Business Manager Chuck Lavelle and discussed situations with a contractor in the area. I then traveled back

to Indianapolis, IN, to attend the nominations of officers for Local 119. The election for new officers will be in August, and we are going to give the local back to the members in September. From there I traveled to Local 188 in Wheeling, WV, to meet with Market Development Director Gig Ritenour and Seth Abraham of Kalkreuth Roofing to discuss manpower needs and other issues. I then traveled to Fort Lauderdale, FL, to meet with Richard Milanese, owner of Triple M Roofing, to negotiate a new two-year deal for the state of Florida. I end this report in Nashville, TN, where I met with James Scott as assigned by President Robinson to attend the TVA Convention. ■


Report of International Representative Gabriel Perea

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begin my report in Las Vegas where I was assigned to attend the Western States Roofing Contractors trade show. It was nice networking with roofing contractors and roofers from the area. While in Las Vegas I stopped by Local 162 along with Vice President Doug Ziegler to take care of the day-to-day issues at the local union. After the trade show was over I headed for Arizona were I worked from my home office. I am continually trying to organize roofers to fulfill the shortfall of journeymen needed in our industry. Construction is in full swing in California and Nevada, and finding more journeyman roofers and waterproofers has proven to be a major task. Next I headed to Fresno, CA, where I assumed my duties as trustee for Local 27. I have been very busy over the past few months with apprenticeship meetings, benefit trust meetings, organizing efforts,

and the day-to-day administration of the local union. Things continue to improve with the administrative operation of the local. We now have a bilingual secretary who is doing a great job addressing and assisting the membership with day-to-day issues. We have Thomas Geiger, who was hired as a compliance officer to increase employment opportunities for both union workers and union contractors through public works enforcement. He is also working as an organizer for the local union. We have made some big changes in the training of apprentices with the help of Dan Smith, the director of the Bay Area Apprenticeship Program. We have put a lot of work into becoming in compliance with the apprenticeship standards and the DAS office. Our record-keeping for the apprenticeship program has greatly improved and we recently were awarded an ETP grant for the apprenticeship program. We are still in search of qualified apprenticeship teachers.

I continue to check in with Local 45 in San Diego, CA. The local union in San Diego is doing much better since coming out of trusteeship. Paul Colmenero and the elected officers are moving in a positive direction. My next trip was back to Las Vegas where I met with the banker to sign some paperwork for Local 162. I checked in with International Market Development Representative Raul Galaz and the office secretary Yani Vargas. I then headed to Sacramento, CA, to appear before the ETP panel in order for the training grant to be approved. I am glad to report the Central Valley apprenticeship program was given their first ETP grant for just over $174,000. This should make things much easier to improve the training program at Local 27. I will end my report by recognizing all the people who continue to help Local 27 get back on track: local union members, colleagues, and participating employers. Thank you for all you’ve done. ■

Report of International Representative Jeff Eppenstein

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begin my first report as International Representative by acknowledging International President Kinsey Robinson and our International Executive Board for having confidence in me and thanking them for the opportunity to continue strengthening our union. Mitch Terhaar and I visited many locals so I could introduce myself to the officers and staff. We started at Local 97, Champaign, IL, meeting with Business Manager Darrell Har-

rison where we discussed the local’s bookkeeping and finances and signatory contractors securing surety bonds. We attended the Eastern Central Building Trades meeting. We then visited Local 92, Decatur, IL, Business Manager Ted Clark. We discussed the filing of their LM3 reports and the local’s finances. We reviewed upcoming projects and several out-of-town contractors working in local’s area. Next we visited Local 112, Springfield, IL, Business Manager John Nicks. We discussed

the CRRs and QuickBooks. We reviewed the local’s JATC program and John showed us the hands-on training area. Our next stop was in Peoria, IL, where we attended the Illinois State Apprentice Conference with JATC participation from locals in Indiana and Illinois. We then met with Local 69, Peoria, IL, Business Manager Steve Peterson to discuss ongoing projects, membership numbers and hours. Mitch and I next visited Local 143, Oklahoma City, OK, Business Manager Ron

Third Quarter 2018 •

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QUARTERLY REPORTS

Martin to talk about upcoming contract negotiations and assist with closing the financial report. In Kansas City, MO, we met with Local 20 Business Manager Kevin King and officers. We also visited Local 20’s JATC training center and were very impressed with the quality of hands-on training the program has the offer to young men and women in that territory. Our next visit was to Local 96 in Minnesota. We met with Business Manager Mark Conroy and officers to discuss the large territory the local covers and all the separate contracts they negotiate. We also spoke about future organizing efforts in the central and northern Wisconsin areas. The apprenticeship was hosting a career day for high school kids that day that was well attended. Local 142, Des Moines, IA, was our next stop meeting with Business Manager Ray Slack. We traveled to Omaha to attend the Nebraska Building Trades meeting and visit the new Facebook and Google jobsites. Then it was

on to Local 182, Cedar Rapids, IA, to meet with President Bill Barnes and Business Manager Bob Rowe to discuss ongoing projects and recruiting. We also visited the local’s training area. From there we traveled to Local 32, Rock Island, IL, and met with Business Manager Luis Rivera. We reviewed the local’s monthly reports, finances and dues. We spoke about the upcoming contract negotiations and area roofing projects. I then met with Local 65, Milwaukee, WI, Business Manager Gerry Ferreira to discuss organizing and work in the area. We returned to Local 112 in Springfield where John had bannering efforts against non-signatory contractors. We also visited two union jobsites employing Local 2 members. Then back at Local 92 Ted Clark and I stopped at union jobsites to card members and then had a meeting with Business Agent Todd Heisserer of Local 2 to discuss jobs in the area and which contractors have awarded public works.

Back to Local 97, Darrell had ongoing bannering efforts against non-signatory contractors so we addressed laws pertaining to job actions and visited non-union jobsites. Then returning to Local 143, Ron and I attended the Oklahoma State Building Trades meeting and I explained how to request funds from RPELF. At Local 11 in Chicago, IL, I met with Business Manager Gary Menzel and attended labor-management meetings to participate in contract negotiates. I attended the local’s regular meetings and executive board meetings. I attended the 3rd annual charity event raising money for veterans and at-need children and volunteered at the annual DAD’s Day charity event at the JATC facility. I returned to Local 32 in Rock Island where Luis and I attended the Tri-City Building Trades meeting and visited jobsites. Then it was back to Local 69 in Peoria where Steve and I discussed ongoing projects and manpower needed and visited union jobsites. ■

Like us on facebook 5 REASONS TO “LIKE”  UNION ROOFERS ON FACEBOOK: Interact · Share · Find Work · Learn · Spread the Word Visit www.facebook.com/unionroofers to access the Roofers Union official Facebook page. You must have a Facebook account to comment or post material to the Roofers page, but anyone can view the page without logging on. “Like” us today!

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Stop-Loss Program Helps Protect Roofers Health and Welfare Funds UNIQUE CHALLENGES FOR UNION INSURANCE PLANS Since the passing of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010, many self-funded multi-employer health insurance plans have faced new challenges, requiring assistance to maintain the quality health insurance coverage and benefit options their members have enjoyed. For a number of Roofers’ health and welfare funds, this assistance has come from the stop-loss insurance program at The Union Labor Life Insurance Company (Union Labor Life). Union Labor Life is an experienced leader in the stop-loss business, understanding the unique needs of TaftHartley and union self-funded plans as the only labor-owned insurance company, for nearly 90 years. With longstanding expertise and experience in serving Labor’s specific insurance needs, Union Labor Life works to assist in the management of the primary cost drivers of union health and welfare plans and help protect plan assets.

Protect Against Increased Exposure to High Claims with Stop-Loss Coverage In the past, self-funded healthcare plans mitigated the risk of large claims with annual claim limits and lifetime coverage maximums. With the ACA-mandated removal of these limits, plans have had to consider different approaches to minimizing their risk. Stop-loss coverage has proven itself to be an effective tool to protect plans from increased exposure to high-risk and high-dollar claims by providing reimbursement for claims after a predetermined amount has been paid by the plan. Union health and welfare plans can utilize stop-loss coverage to help limit liability in the same way annual and lifetime maximums limited liability prior to their elimination by the ACA. Since the passing of the ACA, Union Labor Life has seen an increase in applications for stop-loss coverage from funds which have never purchased stop-loss insurance in the past. Existing Union Labor Life

stop-loss clients continue to closely monitor their exposure and, if necessary, periodically adjust their stop-loss deductible levels to meet their risk levels. Union health and welfare funds have counted on Union Labor Life to help protect their plan assets and manage high-dollar and complicated claims that may have threatened the fund’s solvency if not for stop-loss coverage. Union Labor Life provides the benefit of an underwriting team with extensive knowledge, experience, and expertise in evaluating the risk of high cost claims to self-funded healthcare plans. When stop-loss insurance coverage is purchased from Union Labor Life, health and welfare plans have access to experts in handling large-dollar claims and cost-containment services. Funds with stop loss-coverage from Union Labor Life receive the benefit of a skilled stoploss claims team with an in-house case

For more information, please visit www.ullico.com/lh/medicalstoploss

manager. The Union Labor Life stop-loss claims team and its vendors will assess charges and negotiate discounts with healthcare providers when possible. Billing on high-dollar claims may be further reduced as a result of these efforts. Working in collaboration with our cost-containment vendors, plan administrators and healthcare providers to assess true cost of medical services, Union Labor Life strives to ensure claim accuracy and correct billing for health and welfare plans. Union Labor Life understands the challenges and exposures that selffunded healthcare plans currently face. Union Labor Life continues to support its clients by mitigating their health and welfare plan’s financial risk through insurance solutions such as medical stop-loss insurance.


SERVICE AWARDS

Honoring Those Who Made Our Union Great

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ith a sense of gratitude, The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer magazine publishes the names of members who have received service pins from their Local Unions since the previous magazine for 50 or more years of continuous membership. Our long-term members fought for and struggled for the benefits that made our union great and we now enjoy. We appreciate all that these members have done and still do to further the goals of working people and their families. Next time you see a member listed below, take the time to thank him or her for their service and dedication to our Union.

50 Years

55 Years

60 Years

Local 4

Ken Bolton

Local 4

Peter J. Cummings

Local 12

Louis L. Kaminsky

Local 195

Anthony Borruso

Local 12

Gene Paolini

Local 12

John Repko

Local 12

Dominic J. Camputaro

Local 12

Joseph A. Roberts

Local 185 Herman L. Smith

Local 12

Pasquale Carlucci

Local 12

Stephen J. Kovzel

Local 195

Lawrence S. Milligan

Local 4

Robert F. Weingardner

65 Years Local 81 Sigifredo F. Varela

THANK YOU TO OUR VETERANS On Veterans Day (November 11) we show appreciation to members of our military, past and present. This day presents a great opportunity to fly the flag, make a donation to a veterans organization, visit a VA hospital, or simply ask someone about their service. Many members of the United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers & Allied Workers have served—or are currently serving—our country. Maybe there is a veteran on the job with you right now. Please remember to take a moment to thank that person, and all veterans, for their service.

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APRIL, MAY, JUNE 2018

LOCAL UNION RECEIPTS LOCAL 2 4 8 9 10 11 12 20 22 23 26 27 30 32 33 34 36 37 40 42 44 45 49

AMOUNT

Saint Louis, MO Newark, NJ New York, NY Hartford, CT Paterson, NJ Chicago, IL Bridgeport, CT Kansas City, KS Rochester, NY South Bend, IN Hammond, IN Fresno, CA Philadelphia, PA Rock Island, IL Boston, MA Cumberland, MD Los Angeles, CA Pittsburgh, PA San Francisco, CA Cincinnati, OH Cleveland, OH San Diego, CA Portland, OR

$69,358.05 $19,886.43 $31,466.45 $19,122.06 $23,831.94 $220,076.50 $26,123.97 $76,458.13 $17,144.72 $15,361.03 $22,092.97 $18,533.82 $139,298.69 $13,663.53 $64,511.56 $2,021.91 $115,996.29 $20,298.13 $23,349.62 $19,285.38 $35,554.61 $12,014.92 $57,613.58

LOCAL 54 58 65 69 70 71 74 75 81 86 88 91 92 95 96 97 106 112 119 123 134 136 142

AMOUNT

Seattle, WA Colorado Springs, CO Milwaukee, WI Peoria, IL Ann Arbor, MI Youngstown, OH Buffalo, NY Dayton, OH Oakland, CA Columbus, OH Akron, OH Salt Lake City, UT Decatur, IL San Jose, CA Minneapolis, MN Champaign, IL Evansville, IN Springfield, IL Indianapolis, IN Fort Worth, TX Toledo, OH Atlanta, GA Des Moines, IA

$26,263.24 $12,214.73 $26,192.54 $12,430.65 $18,655.23 $10,028.40 $21,334.90 $7,167.33 $100,094.19 $9,373.04 $8,574.71 $14,964.93 $3,022.61 $31,447.14 $97,330.69 $7,675.82 $8,862.45 $6,725.35 $18,593.41 $5,312.71 $11,198.79 $4,069.25 $8,014.65

LOCAL 143 147 149 150 153 154 162 182 185 188 189 195 200 203 210 220 221 241 242 248 317

AMOUNT

Oklahoma City, OK Louisville, KY Detroit, MI Terre Haute, IN Tacoma, WA Nassau-Suffolk, NY Las Vegas, NV Cedar Rapids, IA Charleston, WV Wheeling, WV Spokane, WA Syracuse, NY Pocatello, ID Binghamton, NY Erie, PA Orange County, CA Honolulu, HI Albany, NY Parkersburg, WV Springfield, MA Baton Rouge, LA

$14,915.06 $4,254.53 $49,422.48 $3,894.00 $22,487.78 $6,140.54 $26,674.62 $12,336.76 $11,614.66 $17,420.79 $14,639.68 $5,616.65 $549.83 $1,585.19 $13,359.60 $50,882.57 $33,443.85 $15,185.48 $8,744.09 $5,384.57 $4,097.62

IN MEMORIAM MEMBER NO.

NAME

LOCAL NO.

AGE

MEMBER NO.

NAME

LOCAL NO.

AGE

40676

Charles Shute

33

100

138683

Fred Matteri

81

97

74061

Norbert W. Moskwa

149

91

144081

Kenneth R. Pagel

97

85

77514

LeRoy E. Jacobson

96

81

146508

Harvey Bradley

4

77

83712

Edward P. Himpler

195

85

146903

David E. Hoff

44

75 76

90626

Quentin Young

210

89

152878

Joseph E. Ward

30

92090

Jesse R. Short

119

80

153594

Gayle C. Bachtel

88

73

92206

Joseph A. Lehman

36

88

173090

Wayne J. Printup

74

63

93982

James W. Milligan

195

89

180400

John E. Boehrnsen

11

61

97063

Robert H. Kiefer

149

84

186052

Maynard Leitschuh

2

80

101654

Ernest W. Nunn

185

83

189443

Lawrence P. Hickey

11

58 89

104618

Joseph Sfraga

154

86

191056

Edward N. Dixon

33

106731

Robert A. Bruce

20

78

203980

Henry F. Lange

11

81

110733

Peter J. Cummings

4

87

206843

Robert B. Douglas

4

78

114538

Ray I. Verardi

112

74

211064

Thomas J. Logan

149

60

114865

Fred Salamon

4

78

225170

George A. Finney

23

65

123179

Richard L. Ewell

33

79

227739

Frank E. Nieder

96

69

124361

Robert Mitchell

134

71

232927

William T. Gregg

2

80

127755

James Bond

42

78

271102

Paul John Gardner

37

48

129706

John J. Sherrick

30

85

284384

Robert A. Geddes

74

35 63

131391

Norman A. Preble

2

84

293876

Bradley K. Weberg

96

133143

Anthony Borruso

195

79

306065

Armando Fernandez

162

30

136800

Frank McLain

30

84

322368

Shane M. Shomidie

112

29

Third Quarter 2018 •

55


LOCAL UNION DIRECTORY ALABAMA 136 | BIRMINGHAM-MOBILE C  E Trustee Michael Stiens, 374 Maynard Ter. SE, Box #4, Atlanta, GA 30316. Phone (404) 373-7081. Fax (404) 373-0926. E-mail: rooferslocal136atl@gmail.com Website: www.roofersandwaterprooferslocal136.com

ALASKA 189 | ANCHORAGE C Meets – on call. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Leo Marsura, 1727 E. Francis, #4, Spokane, WA, 99208. Phone (509) 327-2322. Fax (509) 327-2194. E-mail: roofers189@gmail.com

ARIZONA 135 | PHOENIX C  E Meets – 1917 E. Washington St., 4th Thurs. each month. Pres. Juan Escalana-Barranco, 1917 E. Washington St., Phoenix, AZ 85034. Phone (602) 254-7059. Fax (602) 254-4201. E-mail: phoenixroofers135@gmail.com 135 | TUCSON C E Pres. Juan Escalana-Barranco. Phone (877) 314-4201, (602) 254-7059. Fax (602) 254-4201. E-mail: phoenix roofers135@gmail.com

ARKANSAS 20 | LITTLE ROCK (Ft. Smith Area) C  Meets – IBEW Local #700, 2914 Midland Blvd., Ft. Smith, 1st Wed. each month. B.M. Kevin King, 6321 Blue Ridge Blvd., Raytown, MO 64133. Phone (816) 313-9420. Fax (816) 313-9424. E-mail: office@ rooferslocal20.com

CALIFORNIA 27 | FRESNO C Meets – 5537 E. Lamona Ave., Ste. 1, Fresno, 2nd Wed. each month at 7:00 p.m. Trustee Gabriel Perea, 5537 E. Lamona Ave., Ste. 1, Fresno, CA 93727. Phone (559) 255-0933. Fax (559) 255-0983. E-mail: rooferslocal27@yahoo.com 27 | BAKERSFIELD C Meets – 5537 E. Lamona Ave., Ste. 1, Fresno, 2nd Wed. each month at 7:00 p.m. Trustee Gabriel Perea, 5537 E. Lamona Ave., Ste. 1, Fresno, CA 93727. Phone (559) 255-0933. Fax (559) 255-0983. E-mail: rooferslocal27@yahoo.com 36 | LOS ANGELES C Meets – 5811 E. Florence Ave., Bell Gardens, CA, 1st Tues. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Cliff Smith, 5380 Poplar Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90032. Phone (323) 222-0251. Fax (323) 222-3585. E-mail: rooferslocal36@att.net 81 | OAKLAND C  Meets – 8400 Enterprise Way, Ste. 122, 2nd Wed. each month. B.M. Douglas H. Ziegler, Fin. Sec. Dean Wolf, 8400 Enterprise Way, Ste. 122, Oakland, CA 94621. Phone (510) 632-0505. Fax (510) 632-5469. E-mail: roofers@pacbell.net 220 | ORANGE COUNTY C Meets – 283 N. Rampart St., Ste. F, Orange, 3rd Thurs. each month. B.M. & Fin. Sec. Brent R. Beasley, 283 N. Rampart St., Ste. F, Orange, CA 92868. Phone (714) 939-0220. Fax (714) 939-0246. E-mail: rooferslocal220@yahoo.com 220 | RIVERSIDE C Meets – on call. B.M. & Fin. Sec. Brent R. Beasley, 1074 E. LaCadena Dr., #9, Riverside, CA 92501. Phone (909) 684-3645. 81 | SACRAMENTO C Meets – 2840 El Centro Rd., Ste. 117, 3rd Mon. each month at 7:30 p.m. B.M. Douglas H. Ziegler, Fin. Sec. Dean Wolf, 8400 Enterprise Way, Ste. 122, Oakland, CA 94621. Phone (510) 632-0505 or (916) 646-6754. Fax (510) 632-5469. E-mail: roofers@pacbell.net

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C National Roofing Industry Pension Plan (NRIPP)   E  National Roofers Union and Employers Health and Welfare Fund D National Roofing Industry Supplemental Pension Plan (NRISPP)

45 | SAN DIEGO C Meets – 3737 Camino del Rio S., Ste. 208, quarterly on 3rd Thurs. of month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Paul Colmenero, 3737 Camino del Rio S., Ste. 208, San Diego, CA 92108. Phone (619) 516-0192. Fax (619) 516-0194. E-mail: roofer_45sd@sbcglobal.net 40 | S  AN FRANCISCO C Meets – 150 Executive Park Blvd., Ste. 3625, 3rd Thurs. each month. B.M. Jose Padilla, Fin. Sec. & Tr. Bruce Lau, 150 Executive Park Blvd., Ste. 3625, San Francisco, CA 94134-3309. Phone (415) 508-0261. Fax (415) 508-0321. E-mail: Rooferslocal40@gmail.com Website: www. rooferslocal40.org 95 | SAN JOSE C  Meets – 2330A Walsh Ave., Santa Clara, 2nd Mon. each month. B.M. Robert Rios, 2330A Walsh Ave., Santa Clara, CA 95051. Phone (408) 987-0440. Fax (408) 988-6180. E-mail: rrios@roofer95.com 81 | STOCKTON C B.M. Douglas H. Ziegler, Fin. Sec. Dean Wolf, 8400 Enterprise Way, Ste. 122, Oakland, CA 94621. Phone (510) 632-0505 or (209) 931-6754. Fax (510) 632-5469. E-mail: roofers@pacbell.net

COLORADO 58 | COLORADO SPRINGS C  E Meets – 404 N. Spruce St., 2nd Mon. each month. B.R., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Isaac Hernandez, 404 N. Spruce St., Colorado Springs, CO 80905. Office phone (719) 632-5889. Fax (719) 632-1261. E-mail: unionroofers58@gmail.com 81 | D  ENVER C E B.M. Douglas H. Ziegler, Fin. Sec. Dean Wolf, 8400 Enterprise Way, Ste. 122, Oakland, CA 94621. Phone (510) 632-0505. Fax (510) 632-5469. E-mail: roofers@ pacbell.net

CONNECTICUT 12 | BRIDGEPORT C D Meets – 19 Bernhard Rd., 3rd Wed. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Butch Davidson, 19 Bernhard Rd., North Haven, CT 06473. Phone (203) 772-2565. Fax (203) 772-2574. E-mail: butch@rooferslocal12.com 9 | H  ARTFORD Meets – Knights of Columbus, 1831 Main St., East Hartford, 3rd Wed. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Michael Hassett, 114 Old Forge Rd., Rocky Hill, CT 06067. Phone (860) 721-1174. Fax (860) 721-6182. E-mail: mikeh@rooferslocal9.com

DELAWARE 30 | NEW CASTLE Meets – on call. B.M. Shawn McCullough, 6447 Torresdale Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19135. Phone (215) 331-8770. Fax (215) 331-8325.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 30 | WASHINGTON C B.M. Shawn McCullough, 6447 Torresdale Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19135. Phone (410) 247-0029. Fax (410) 247-0026.

FLORIDA 136 | F  LORIDA C E Trustee Michael Stiens, 374 Maynard Ter. SE, Box #4, Atlanta, GA 30316. Phone (404) 373-7081. Fax (404) 373-0926. E-mail: rooferslocal136atl@gmail.com Website: www.roofersandwaterprooferslocal136.com

GEORGIA 136 | ATLANTA C Meets – 374 Maynard Ter. SE, 3rd Wed. each month. Trustee Michael Stiens, 374 Maynard Ter. SE, Box #4, Atlanta, GA 30316. Phone (404) 373-7081. Fax (404) 373-0926. E-mail: rooferslocal136atl@gmail.com Website: www. roofersandwaterprooferslocal136.com

HAWAII 221 | HONOLULU Meets – Moanalua Elem. School, Cafetorium, 1337 Mahiole St., Honolulu, quarterly or on call. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Vaughn Chong, 2045 Kam IV Rd., Ste. 203, Honolulu, HI 96819 or P.O. Box 17250, Honolulu, HI 96817-0250. Phone (808) 847-5757. Fax (808) 848-8707.

IDAHO 189 | BOISE C  B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Leo Marsura, 1727 E. Francis, #4, Spokane, WA, 99208. Phone (509) 327-2322. Fax (509) 327-2194. E-mail: roofers189@gmail.com 189 | L  EWISTON C B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Leo Marsura, 1727 E. Francis, #4, Spokane, WA, 99208. Phone (509) 327-2322. Fax (509) 327-2194. E-mail: roofers189@gmail.com 200 | P  OCATELLO C D Meets – on call, Idaho Bank and Trust Bldg., Blackfoot, ID. B.R. & Fin. Sec. Bret Purkett, 915 Berryman Rd., Pocatello, ID 83201. Phone (208) 237-5758. Cell (208) 251-3220. Fax (208) 234-2541. E-mail: pocroof@gmail.com.

ILLINOIS 97 | CHAMPAIGN C D Meets – 3301 N. Boardwalk Dr., 3rd Thurs. each month at 5:00 p.m. B.M. & Tr. Darrell Harrison, 3301 N. Boardwalk Dr., Champaign, IL 61822. Phone (217) 359-3922. Fax (217) 359-4722. E-mail: darrell@rooferslocal97.com 11 | CHICAGO C D Meets – 7045 Joliet Rd., Indian Head Park, IL, 2nd Wed. each month. B.M., Pres. & Fin. Sec. Gary Menzel; B.R.s Larry Gnat, Bob Burch, Travis Gorman, Rich Coluzzi, Mike Lafferty and Gerardo Morales; Orgs Ruben Barbosa and Jim Querio, 2021 Swift Dr., Ste. A, Oak Brook, IL 60523. Phone (708) 345-0970. Fax (708) 345-0981. E-mail: info@roofersunion.net Website: www.rooferslocal11.com 92 | DECATUR C D Meets – 234 W. Cerro Gordo, 4th Wed. each month at 6:00 p.m. B.M. & Fin. Sec. Ted Clark, 234 W. Cerro Gordo St., Decatur, IL 62522-1634. Phone (217) 422-8953. Fax (217) 422-8955. E-mail: ted@rooferslocal92.com 11 | LASALLE C Pres. & Fin. Sec. Gary Menzel, B.R. Larry Gnat, 2021 Swift Dr., Ste. A, Oak Brook, IL 60523. Phone (708) 345-0970. Fax (708) 345-0981. E-mail: info@ roofersunion.net 69 | PEORIA C Meets – 3917 S.W. Adams St., 1st Mon. each month at 7:00 p.m. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Steven L. Peterson, 3917 S.W. Adams St., Peoria, IL 61605. Phone (309) 673-8033. Fax (309) 673-8036. E-mail: steve@rooferslocal69.com 32 | ROCK ISLAND C  D Meets – 101 31st Ave., 1st Thurs. each month at 7:00 p.m. B.R. Luis J. Rivera, 101 31st Ave.,Rock Island, IL 61201. Phone (309) 737-1890. Fax (309) 786-7490. E-mail: luis@rooferslocal32.com 32 | GALESBURG AREA C Meets – 101 31st Ave., 1st Thurs. each month at 7:00 p.m. B.R. Luis J. Rivera, 101 31st Ave.,Rock Island, IL 61201. Phone (309) 737-1890. Fax (309) 786-7490. E-mail: luis@rooferslocal32.com


112 | SPRINGFIELD Meets – 301 E. Spruce St., 2nd Thurs. each month at 7:00 p.m. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. John Nicks, 301 E. Spruce St., Springfield, IL 62703. Phone (217) 210-2044. Fax (217) 2102041. E-mail: john@rooferslocal112.com

142 | D  ES MOINES C  E Meets – 3802 6th Ave., 4th Tues. each month 6:30 p.m. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Ray Slack, 3802 6th Ave., Des Moines, IA 50313. Phone (515) 244-7017. Fax (515) 244-7404. E-mail: ray@rooferslocal142.com

INDIANA

142 | M  ASON CITY C E Meets – on call. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Ray Slack, 3802 6th Ave., Des Moines, IA 50313. Phone (515) 244-7017. Fax (515) 244-7404. E-mail: ray@ rooferslocal142.com

119 | ANDERSON C B.M. & Fin. Sec. Glenn Irwin, 2702 S. Foltz St., Indianapolis, IN 46241. Phone (317) 484-8990. Fax (317) 484-8993. E-mail: rooferslocal119@indyroofers. com Website: www.indyroofers.com 106 | EVANSVILLE C D Meets – 1201 Baker Ave., 4th Mon. each month. B.M. William Alexander III, 1201 Baker Ave., Evansville, IN 47710. Phone (812) 424-8641. Fax (812) 425-6376. E-mail: BA2483@yahoo.com 26 | HAMMOND-GARY C D Meets – 25 W. 84th Ave., Merrillville, IN, 1st Mon. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Joseph Pozzi, B.R. Marcus Bass, 25 W. 84th Ave., Merrillville, IN 46410. Phone (219) 756-3713. Fax (219) 756-3715. E-mail: roofers26@ sbcglobal.net 119 | INDIANAPOLIS C D Meets – 2702 S. Foltz St., Indianapolis, 1st Tues. each month. B.M. & Fin. Sec. Glenn Irwin, 2702 S. Foltz St., Indianapolis, IN 46241. Phone (317) 484-8990. Fax (317) 484-8993. E-mail: rooferslocal119@indyroofers.com Website: www.indyroofers.com 119 | LAFAYETTE C D Meets – 2702 S. Foltz St., Indianapolis, 1st Tues. each month. B.M. & Fin. Sec. Glenn Irwin, 2702 S. Foltz St., Indianapolis, IN 46241. Phone (317) 484-8990. Fax (317) 484-8993. E-mail: rooferslocal119@indyroofers.com Website: www.indyroofers.com 23 | SOUTH BEND C  Meets – 1345 Northside Blvd., 1st Mon. each month. B.A. & Fin. Sec. Charles Waddell, 1345 Northside Blvd., South Bend, IN 46615. Phone (574) 288-6506. Fax (574) 288-6511. E-mail: rfrs23@aol.com 150 | TERRE HAUTE C D Meets – 1101 N. 11th St., 2nd Tues. each month at 7:00 p.m. B.A., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Clinton Grayless, 1101 N. 11th St., Terre Haute, IN 47807. Phone (812) 232-7010. Fax (812) 242-2331. E-mail: clint@ rooferslocal150.com

IOWA 32 | BURLINGTON C  D B.R. Luis J. Rivera, 101 31st Ave., Rock Island, IL 61201. Phone (309) 737-1890. 142 | SIOUX CITY C E Meets – on call. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Ray Slack, 3802 6th Ave., Des Moines, IA 50313. Phone (515) 244-7017. Fax (515) 244-7404. E-mail: ray@rooferslocal142.com 182 | CEDAR RAPIDS C E D Meets – 750 49th St., Marion, 2nd Wed. each month at 7:00 p.m. B.M. & Fin. Sec. Robert Rowe, Pres. Bill Barnes, 750 49th St., Marion, IA 52302 Phone (319) 373-2575. Fax (319) 373-0289. E-mail: bob@rooferslocal182.com, info@ rooferslocal182.com. Website: www.roofers-local182.com 182 | WATERLOO AREA C E D B.M. & Fin. Sec. Robert Rowe, Pres. Bill Barnes, 750 49th St., Marion, IA 52302 Phone (319) 373-2575. Fax (319) 373-0289. E-mail: bob@rooferslocal182.com, info@ rooferslocal182.com. Website: www.roofers-local182.com 182 | DUBUQUE AREA C E D B.M. & Fin. Sec. Robert Rowe, Pres. Bill Barnes, 750 49th St., Marion, IA 52302 Phone (319) 373-2575. Fax (319) 373-0289. E-mail: bob@rooferslocal182.com, info@rooferslocal182.com. Website: www.rooferslocal182.com

KANSAS 20 | KANSAS CITY C Meets – 6321 Blue Ridge Blvd., 4th Mon. each month at 6:00 pm. B.M. Kevin King, 6321 Blue Ridge Blvd., Raytown, MO 64133. Phone (816) 313-9420. Fax (816) 313-9424. E-mail: office@rooferslocal20.com Website: www.rooferslocal20.com 20 | WICHITA AREA E  D B.M. Kevin King, 6321 Blue Ridge Blvd., Raytown, MO 64133. Phone (816) 313-9420. Fax (816) 313-9424. E-mail: office@rooferslocal20.com Website: www. rooferslocal20.com 20 | TOPEKA C  Meets – 3906 N.W. 16th, 1st Tues. of 3rd month of each quarter at 6:30 p.m. B.M. Kevin King, 6321 Blue Ridge Blvd., Raytown, MO 64133. Phone (816) 313-9420. Fax (816) 313-9424. E-mail: office@ rooferslocal20.com Website: www.rooferslocal20.com

33 | NEW BEDFORD AREA C  Meets – 53 Evans Dr., Stoughton, MA, 2nd Tues. each month. B.M. & Fin. Sec. Paul Bickford, 53 Evans Dr., Stoughton, MA 02072. Phone (781) 341-9192. Apprentice Fund - Phone (781) 341-9197. Fax (781) 341-9195. E-mail: paul@rul33.com 248 | SPRINGFIELD Meets – 55 Main St., last Tues. each month. B.A., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Eric Elliott, 55 Main St., Chicopee, MA 01020. Phone (413) 594-5291. Fax (413) 594-5391. E-mail: ericjelliott86@gmail.com

MICHIGAN 70 | ANN ARBOR Meets – 1451 Old Pinckney Rd., Howell, MI, 2nd Mon. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. John Tackett, P.O. Box 116, Howell, MI 48844-0116. Phone (517) 548-6554. Fax (517) 548-5358. E-mail: office@ rooferslocal70.com 70 | BATTLECREEK-KALAMAZOO AREA Meets – 800 E. Michigan Ave., Marshall, MI, 4th Wed. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. John Tackett, P.O. Box 116, Howell, MI 48844-0116. Phone (517) 548-6554. Fax (517) 548-5358. E-mail: office@rooferslocal70.com

KENTUCKY

70 | GRAND RAPIDS AREA Meets – 511 68th Ave. N., Coopersville, MI, 3rd Tue. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. John Tackett, P.O. Box 116, Howell, MI 48844-0116. Phone (517) 548-6554. Fax (517) 548-5358. E-mail: office@rooferslocal70.com

147 | LOUISVILLE C  Meets – 7711 Beulah Church Rd., 4th Mon. each month. B.R., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Ron McDonald, 7711 Beulah Church Rd., Louisville, KY 40228. Phone (502) 231-3344. Fax (502) 231-3373. E-mail: roofers147@bellsouth.net

70 | LANSING AREA Meets – 1451 Old Pinckney Rd., Howell, MI, 2nd Mon. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. John Tackett, P.O. Box 116, Howell, MI 48844-0116. Phone (517) 548-6554. Fax (517) 548-5358. E-mail: office@ rooferslocal70.com

106 | PADUCAH C  B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. William Alexander III, 1201 Baker Ave., Evansville, IN 47710. Phone (812) 424-8641. Fax (812) 425-6376. E-mail: BA2483@ yahoo.com

70 | JACKSON AREA Meets – 3700 Ann Arbor Rd., Jackson, MI, 4th Wed. every other month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. John Tackett, P.O. Box 116, Howell, MI 48844-0116. Phone (517) 548-6554. Fax (517) 548-5358. E-mail: office@ rooferslocal70.com

LOUISIANA 317 | BATON ROUGE C E Meets – Third Thurs. of March, June, Sept. Pres. Anthony Davis, 3260 Winbourne Ave., Baton Rouge, LA 70805. Phone (225) 355-8502. Fax (225) 355-8048. E-mail: rooferslocal317@gmail.com

MAINE 33 | BANGOR C B.M. & Fin. Sec. Paul Bickford, 53 Evans Dr., Stoughton, MA 02072. Phone (781)341-9192. Fax (781) 341-9195 E-mail: paul@rul33.com

MARYLAND 30 | BALTIMORE C  B.M. Shawn McCullough, 6447 Torresdale Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19135. Phone (410) 247-0029. Fax (410) 247-0026. 34 | CUMBERLAND C Meets – Hite (shop) Industrial Park, last Fri. every even month. B.A. Jamie McCoy, 3793 Hill Rd., Warfordsburg, PA 17267. Phone (304) 433-5998. E-mail: jamiemccoy0711@gmail.com

MASSACHUSETTS 33 | BOSTON Meets – 53 Evans Dr., Stoughton, MA, 2nd Tues. each month. B.M. & Fin. Sec. Paul Bickford, 53 Evans Dr., Stoughton, MA 02072. Phone (781) 341-9192. Apprentice Fund - Phone (781) 341-9197. Fax (781) 341-9195. E-mail: paul@rul33.com

70 | MUSKEGON AREA C  Meets – 511 68th Ave. N., Coopersville, MI, 3rd Tue. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. John Tackett, P.O. Box 116, Howell, MI 48844-0116. Phone (517) 548-6554. Fax (517) 548-5358. E-mail: office@ rooferslocal70.com 149 | DETROIT Meets – 1640 Porter St., 1st Tues. each month at 7:00 p.m. B.M. Mark K. Peterson, 1640 Porter St., Detroit, MI 48216. Phone (313) 961-6093. Fax (313) 961-7009. E-mail: Carman@rooferslocal149.com 149 | PORT HURON AREA C  D B.M. Mark K. Peterson, P.O. Box 32800, Detroit, MI 48232. Phone (313) 961-6093. Fax (313) 961-7009. 149 | FLINT B.M. Mark K. Peterson, Phone (810) 687-1368. Fax (810) 687-2647. 149 | SAGINAW-BAY CITY AREA C D B.M. Mark K. Peterson, Phone (810) 687-1368. Fax (810) 687-2647. 149 | TRAVERSE CITY AREA C D B.M. Mark K. Peterson, Phone (810) 687-1368. Fax (810) 687-2647. 149 | MARQUETTE C D B.M. Mark K. Peterson, Phone (810) 687-1368. Fax (810) 687-2647.

Third Quarter 2018 •

57


C National Roofing Industry Pension Plan (NRIPP)   E  National Roofers Union and Employers Health and Welfare Fund D National Roofing Industry Supplemental Pension Plan (NRISPP)

LOCAL UNION DIRECTORY MINNESOTA 96 | MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL C Meets – 9174 Isanti St. NE, 1st Wed. each month at 7:00 p.m. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Mark Conroy, B.R. Kelly Hannigan, B.R. Tyler Krogen, 9174 Isanti St. NE, Blaine, MN 55449. Phone (763) 230-7663. Fax (763) 230-7670. E-mail: mark@rooferslocal96.com, gene@rooferslocal96.com, kelly@rooferslocal96.com Website: www.rooferslocal96.com

189 | M  ISSOULA C B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Leo Marsura, 1727 E. Francis, #4, Spokane, WA, 99208. Phone (509) 327-2322. Fax (509) 327-2194. E-mail: roofers189@gmail.com

NEBRASKA

96 | ST. CLOUD AREA C Meets – 1903 4th St., N. St. Cloud, on call only. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Mark Conroy, B.R. Tyler Krogen, 9174 Isanti St. NE, Blaine, MN 55449. Phone (763) 230-7663. Fax (763) 230-7670. E-mail: mark@ rooferslocal96.com Website: www.rooferslocal96.com

142 | O  MAHA C E Meets – on call. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Ray Slack, 3802 6th Ave., Des Moines, IA 50313. Phone (515) 244-7017. Fax (515) 244-7404. E-mail: ray@ rooferslocal142.com

96 | BRAINERD AREA C  Meets – location varies, on call only. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Mark Conroy, B.R. Vance Anderson, 9174 Isanti St. NE, Blaine, MN 55449. Phone (763) 230-7663. Fax (763) 230-7670. E-mail: mark@rooferslocal96.com Website: www.rooferslocal96.com

162 | LAS VEGAS C  E Meets – on call. Trustee Douglas Ziegler, 4125 Arctic Spring Ave., Suites 5 & 6, Las Vegas, NV 89115. Phone (702) 453-5801. Fax (702) 453-0426.

96 | DULUTH-IRON RANGE AREA C  Meets – 2002 London Rd., Duluth, on call only. B.M.,Fin. Sec. & Tr. Mark Conroy, B.R. Vance Anderson, 9174 Isanti St. NE, Blaine, MN 55449. Phone (763)230-7663. Fax (763) 230-7670. E-mail: mark@rooferslocal96.com Website: www.roofers-local96.com 96 | SOUTHEASTERN MINN. AREA C  Meets – location varies, on call only. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Mark Conroy, B.R. Nick Brenner, 9174 Isanti St. NE, Blaine, MN 55449. Phone (763) 230-7663. Fax (763) 230-7670. E-mail: mark@rooferslocal96.com Website: www.rooferslocal96.com

MISSISSIPPI 136 | JACKSON AREA C Trustee Michael Stiens, 374 Maynard Ter. SE, Box #4, Atlanta, GA 30316. Phone (404) 373-7081. Fax (404) 373-0926. E-mail: rooferslocal136atl@gmail.com Website: www.roofersandwaterprooferslocal136.com

MISSOURI 2 | ST. LOUIS C Meets – 2920 Locust St., 1st Wed. each month. Pres. & B.M. Dan O’Donnell, 2920 Locust St., St. Louis, MO 63103. Phone (314) 535-9683. Fax (314) 535-6404. E-mail: odonnellocal2@sbcglobal.net Website: www.stlouisunionroofing.com 20 | JEFFERSON CITY C Meets – Carpenters Hall, 230 W. Dunklin, 2nd month of each quarter at 7:00 p.m. B.M. Kevin King, 6321 Blue Ridge Blvd., Raytown, MO 64133. Phone (816) 313-9420. Fax (816) 313-9424. E-mail: office@rooferslocal20.com Website: www.rooferslocal20.com 20 | SPRINGFIELD AREA C  ED Meets – 422 W. Commercial, 1st Wed. each month at 5:30 p.m. B.M. Kevin King, 6321 Blue Ridge Blvd., Raytown, MO 64133. Phone (816) 313-9420. Fax (816) 313-9424. E-mail: office@rooferslocal20.com Website: www. rooferslocal20.com 20 | ST. JOSEPH AREA C  Meets – 3002 Pear St., 2nd Wed. of the 3rd month of each quarter at 6:30 p.m. B.M. Kevin King, 6321 Blue Ridge Blvd., Raytown, MO 64133. Phone (816) 313-9420. Fax (816) 313-9424. E-mail: office@rooferslocal20.com Website: www.rooferslocal20.com

MONTANA 189 | BILLINGS C  B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Leo Marsura, 1727 E. Francis, #4, Spokane, WA, 99208. Phone (509) 327-2322. Fax (509) 327-2194. E-mail: roofers189@gmail.com

58

189 | B  UTTE C D B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Leo Marsura, 1727 E. Francis, #4, Spokane, WA, 99208. Phone (509) 327-2322. Fax (509) 327-2194. E-mail: roofers189@gmail.com

• The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer

NEVADA

81 | RENO C B.M. Douglas H. Ziegler, Fin. Sec. Dean Wolf, 8400 Enterprise Way, Ste. 122, Oakland, CA 94621. Phone (510) 632-0505 or (209) 931-6754. Fax (510) 632-5469. E-mail: roofers@pacbell.net

NEW JERSEY 30 | ATLANTIC CITY Meets – on call. B.M. Shawn McCullough, 2601 New Rd., Northfield, NJ 08225. Phone (609) 646-7888. Fax (215) 331-8325. 4 | N  EWARK Meets – Knights of Columbus, 27 Bridge St., Belleville, NJ 07233, 2nd Wed. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. David Critchley, 385 Parsippany Rd., Parsippany, NJ 07054. Phone (973) 515-8500. Fax (973) 515-9150. E-mail: roofloc4@aol.com 10 | PATERSON C  Meets – Grundler Hall, 321 Mason Ave., 4th Mon. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Nick Strauss, 321 Mason Ave., Haledon, NJ 07508. Phone (973) 595-5562. Fax (973) 595-5266. E-mail: roofer10@optonline.net 30 | T  RENTON Meets – on call. B.M. Shawn McCullough, Phone (215) 331-8770. Fax (215) 331-8325.

NEW MEXICO 123 | A  LBUQUERQUE C E B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Gig Ritenour, 3629 W. Miller Rd., Garland, TX 75041. Phone (740) 649-6578. Fax (866) 889-2774. E-mail: gigr@unionroofers.com 123 | LOS ALAMOS C  E B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Gig Ritenour, 3629 W. Miller Rd., Garland, TX 75041. Phone (740) 649-6578. Fax (866) 889-2774. E-mail: gigr@unionroofers.com

NEW YORK 241 | A  LBANY C Meets – 890 3rd St., & Fin. Sec. Michael NY 12206. Phone (518) 489-7647. E-mail:

2nd Fri. each month. B.M. Rossi, 890 3rd St., Albany, (518) 489-7646. FAX No. rooferslocal241@gmail.com

203 | B  INGHAMTON Meets – American Legion Post 401, 263 Front St., Owego, 1st Wed. each month. B.A., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Philip Lester, 32 W. State St., Ste. 206, Binghamton, NY 13901 Phone (607) 722-4073. E-mail: bingrul203plbm@gmail.com

74 | BUFFALO Meets – 2800 Clinton St., 1st Wed. Feb., Apr., June, Aug., Oct. and Dec. B.M. Nicholas Gechell, 2800 Clinton St., W. Seneca, NY 14224. Phone (716) 8247488. Fax (716) 824-7490. E-mail: rooferslocal74@ outlook.com 154 | NASSAU-SUFFOLK Meets – 370 Vanderbilt Motor Pkwy., 4th Wed. each month at 7:00 p.m. except July, Aug. and Dec. B.M. Sal Giovanniello, 370 Vanderbilt Motor Pkwy., Ste. 1, Hauppauge, NY 11788-5133. Phone (631) 435-0655. Fax (631) 435-0262. E-mail: union@ rooferslocal154.com 8 | NEW YORK CITY Meets – 7:00 p.m each month except July, Aug. and Dec., place and date to be determined. B.M. Nick Siciliano, 12-11 43rd Ave., Long Island City, NY, 11101. Phone (718) 361-0145. Fax (718) 361-8330. 22 | ROCHESTER C  Meets – 280 Metro Park, 3rd Wed. each month except July, Aug. & Dec. B.M. Steve Lambert, 280 Metro Park, Rochester, NY 14623. Phone (585) 235-0080. Fax (585) 235-1977. E-mail: 22roofer@gmail.com Website: www.rooferslocal22.com 195 | SYRACUSE C Meets – 7706 Maltlage Dr., 3rd Wed. each month. B.M. Gary Swan, 7706 Maltlage Dr., Liverpool, NY 13090. Phone (315) 699-1808. Fax (315) 699-1806. E-mail: local195@rooferslocal195.com Website: www.rooferslocal195.com

NORTH CAROLINA 136 | CHARLOTTE C Trustee Michael Stiens, 374 Maynard Ter. SE, Box #4, Atlanta, GA 30316. Phone (404) 373-7081. Fax (404) 373-0926. E-mail: rooferslocal136atl@gmail.com Website: www. roofersandwaterprooferslocal136.com

NORTH & SOUTH DAKOTA 96 | NORTH DAKOTA & SOUTH DAKOTA B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Mark Conroy, 9174 Isanti St. NE, Blaine, MN 55449. Phone (763) 230-7663. Fax (763) 230-7670. E-mail: mark@rooferslocal96.com Website: www.rooferslocal96.com

OHIO 88 | AKRON & CANTON D  Meets – 618 High Ave. NW, 4th Tues. each month. B.M. & Fin. Sec. Barbara Dixon, 618 High Ave. NW, Canton, OH 44703. Phone (330) 453-4900. Fax (844) 272-7942. E-mail: roofers88@sbcglobal.net 42 | CINCINNATI C Meets – 1010 Yale Ave., 3rd Wed. each month at 6:30 p.m. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Rodney Toole, B.A. Brandon Burke, 1010 Yale Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45206. Phone (513) 821-3689. Fax (513) 821-5726. E-mail: toole2009@hotmail.com 44 | CLEVELAND C Meets – 1651 E 24th St., 2nd Mon. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Chuck Lavelle, 1651 E. 24th St., Cleveland, OH 44114. Phone (216) 781-4844. Fax (216) 781-7663. E-mail: roofers44CL@sbcglobal.net 86 | COLUMBUS C Meets – 1384 Stimmel Rd., 2nd Tues. every odd month. B.M. & Fin. Sec. Marvin Cochran Jr., 1384 Stimmel Rd., Columbus, OH 43223. Phone (614) 299-6404. Fax (614) 299-6453. E-mail: roofers86@sbcglobal.net 75 | DAYTON D Meets – 6550 Poe Ave., 2nd Tues. each month at 6:30 p.m. B.M. & Fin. Sec. James R. Stiles, 6550 Poe Ave., Dayton, OH 45414-2527 Phone (937) 415-3869. Fax (937) 415-5674. E-mail: rooferslocal75@sbcglobal.net


134 | TOLEDO D Meets – 4652 Lewis Ave., 3rd Thurs. each month at 7:00 p.m. B.M. & Fin. Sec. Mike Kujawa, 4652 Lewis Ave., Toledo, OH 43612. Phone (419) 478-3785. Fax (419) 478-1201. E-mail: rooferslocal134@bex.net 71 | YOUNGSTOWN C Meets – 2714 Martin L. King, 2nd Tues. each month. Fin. Sec. & B.M. Nancy Weibel, 2714 Martin L. King, Youngstown, OH 44510. Phone (330) 746-3020. Fax (330) 746-6020. E-mail: njw071@aol.com

OKLAHOMA 143 | OKLAHOMA CITY C E D Meets – 111 NE 26th St., 2nd Mon. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Ronald Martin, 111 NE 26th St., Oklahoma City, OK 73105. Phone (405) 524-4243. Fax (405) 524-5859. E-mail: office@ rooferslocal143.com

OREGON 49 | EUGENE C D B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Russ Garnett, 5032 SE 26th Ave., Portland, OR 97202. Phone (503) 232-4807. Fax (503) 232-1769. E-mail: russg@roofersunionlocal49.com 49 | PORTLAND C  D Meets – 5032 SE 26th Ave., 2nd Thurs. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Russ Garnett, 5032 SE 26th Ave., Portland, OR 97202. Phone (503) 232-4807. Fax (503) 232-1769. E-mail: russg@roofersunionlocal49.com

PENNSYLVANIA

TENNESSEE

WEST VIRGINIA

2 | N  ASHVILLE C  E Pres. & B.M. Dan O’Donnell, 2920 Locust St., St. Louis, MO 63103. Phone (314) 535-9683. Fax (314) 535-6404. E-mail: odonnellocal2@sbcglobal.net

185 | CHARLESTON C D Meets – 3130 7th Ave., last Sat. each month except Nov. and Dec. B.R. & Fin. Sec. Jeffrey A. Mullins, 3130 7th Ave., Charleston, WV, 25312. Phone (304) 346-9234. Fax (304) 346-9623. E-mail: roofers185@suddenlink.net

TEXAS 123 | D  ALLAS-FT. WORTH C E Meets – quarterly as called by B.M. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Gig Ritenour, 3629 W. Miller Rd., Garland, TX 75041. Phone (740) 649-6578. Fax (866) 889-2774. E-mail: gigr@unionroofers.com 123 | HOUSTON C E Meets – quarterly as called by B.M. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Gig Ritenour, 3629 W. Miller Rd., Garland, TX 75041. Phone (740) 649-6578. Fax (866) 889-2774. E-mail: gigr@unionroofers.com 123 | SAN ANTONIO C  E Meets – quarterly as called by B.M. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Gig Ritenour, 3629 W. Miller Rd., Garland, TX 75041. Phone (740) 649-6578. Fax (866) 889-2774. E-mail: gigr@unionroofers.com

UTAH 91 | SALT LAKE CITY C E Meets – 2261 South Redwood Rd., 2nd Tues. each month. B.M. Moises Ruiz, 2261 S. Redwood Rd., Ste. N., Salt Lake City, UT 84119. Phone (801) 972-6830. Fax (801) 975-9003. E-mail: mruiz52@yahoo.com

VERMONT

242 | P  ARKERSBURG C D Meets – 728 Tracewell Rd., 2nd Mon. each month. B.A. Danny McCoy, 728 Tracewell Rd., Mineral Wells, WV, 26150. Phone (304) 489-2111. Fax (304) 489-2155. E-mail: rooferslocal242@frontier.com 188 | WHEELING C D Meets – 2003 Warwood, 4th Sun. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Matthew Sparks, 2003 Warwood Ave., Wheeling, WV 26003. Phone (304) 277-2300. Fax. (304) 277-2331. E-mail: roofers188@comcast.net

WISCONSIN 96 | E  AU CLAIRE C B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Mark Conroy, B.R. Nick Brenner, 9174 Isanti St. NE, Blaine, MN 55449. Phone (763) 230-7663. Fax (763) 230-7670. E-mail: mark@ rooferslocal96.com Website: www.rooferslocal96.com 96 | F  ONDULAC AREA C B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Mark Conroy, B.R. Nick Brenner, 9174 Isanti St. NE, Blaine, MN 55449. Phone (763) 230-7663. Fax (763) 230-7670. E-mail: mark@ rooferslocal96.com Website: www.rooferslocal96.com 65 | MILWAUKEE C  Meets – 16601 W. Dakota St., 2nd Mon. each month. B.M. & Pres. Gerry Ferreira, 16601 W. Dakota St., New Berlin, WI 53151. Phone (262) 785-9720. Fax (262) 785-9721. E-mail: gerry@rooferslocal65.com

210 | ERIE C Meets – 4901 E. Lake Rd., 1st Thurs. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Scott Johnson, 4901 E. Lake Rd., Erie, PA 16511. Phone (814) 453-4503. Fax (814) 455-4340. E-mail: bzmgr210@gmail.com Website: www.rooferslocal210.org

248 | VERMONT B.A., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Eric Elliott, 63 1/2 Main St., Chicopee, MA 01020. Phone (413) 594-5291. Fax (413) 594-5391. E-mail: ericjelliott86@gmail.com

VIRGINIA

65 | R  ACINE-KENOSHA AREA C D Meets – 16601 W. Dakota St., 2nd Mon. each month. B.M. & Pres. Gerry Ferreira, 16601 W. Dakota St., New Berlin, WI 53151. Phone (262) 785-9720. Fax (262) 785-9721. E-mail: gerry@rooferslocal65.com

30 | HARRISBURG C  B.M. Shawn McCullough, 6447 Torresdale Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19135. Phone (215) 331-8770. Fax (215) 331-8325.

30 | NORTHERN VIRGINIA C B.M. Shawn McCullough, 6447 Torresdale Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19135. Phone (215) 331-8770. Fax (215) 331-8325.

11 | MADISON AREA C  Pres. & Fin. Sec. Gary Menzel, 2021 Swift Dr., Ste. A, Oak Brook, IL 60523. Phone (708) 345-0970. Fax (708) 345-0981. E-mail: info@roofersunion.net

30 | PHILADELPHIA Meets – 6309 Torresdale Ave., 4th Tues. each month except June, July, Aug. & Dec. at 7:00 p.m. B.M. Shawn McCullough, 6447 Torresdale Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19135. Phone (215) 331-8770. Fax (215) 331-8325.

WASHINGTON

96 | WAUSAU C B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Mark Conroy, B.R. Nick Brenner, 9174 Isanti St. NE, Blaine, MN 55449. Phone (763) 230-7663. Fax (763) 230-7670. E-mail: mark@ rooferslocal96.com Website: www.rooferslocal96.com

30 | READING & ALLENTOWN Meets – on call. B.M. Shawn McCullough, 41 South Maple St., Kutztown, PA 19530. Phone (610) 683-3666. Fax (215) 331-8325. 37 | PITTSBURGH C Meets – 230 Lincoln Ave., Bellevue, 4th Mon. each month except June, July, Aug. & Dec., B.R. Mark Azzarello, 230 Lincoln Ave., Bellevue, PA 15202. Phone (412) 766-5360. Fax (412) 766-5363. E-mail: roofers.local37@verizon.net 30 | SCRANTON C B.M. Shawn McCullough, 6447 Torresdale Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19135. Phone (215) 331-8770. Fax (215) 331-8325.

RHODE ISLAND 33 | PROVIDENCE C B.M. & Fin. Sec. Paul Bickford, 53 Evans Dr., Stoughton, MA 02072. Phone (781)341-9192. Fax (781) 341-9195 E-mail: paul@rul33.com

54 | BELLINGHAM C  B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Steve Hurley, 2800 First Ave., Rm. 105, Seattle, WA 98121. Phone (206) 728-7654. JATC (206) 728-2777. Fax (206) 448-3362. E-mail: steve@rooferslocal54.com 54 | SEATTLE C  Meets – 2800 First Ave., 1st Wed. each month. B.M. Steve Hurley, 2800 First Ave., Rm. 105, Seattle, WA 98121. Phone (206) 728-7654. JATC (206) 728-2777. Fax (206) 448-3362. E-mail: office@rooferslocal54.com

WYOMING 81 | CHEYENNE-CASPER C B.M. Douglas H. Ziegler, Fin. Sec. Dean Wolf, 8400 Enterprise Way, Ste. 122, Oakland, CA 94621. Phone (510) 632-0505. Fax (510) 632-5469. E-mail: roofers@pacbell.net

189 | SPOKANE C Meets – 1727 E. Francis, #4, 1st Fri. each month. B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Leo Marsura, 1727 E. Francis, #4, Spokane, WA, 99208. Phone (509) 327-2322. Fax (509) 327-2194. E-mail: roofers189@gmail.com 189 | YAKIMA C  B.M., Fin. Sec. & Tr. Leo Marsura, 1727 E. Francis, #4, Spokane, WA, 99208. Phone (509) 327-2322. Fax (509) 327-2194. E-mail: roofers189@gmail.com 153 | TACOMA C Meets – Hall “D” IBEW Bldg. 3049 S. 36th St., Thurs. following 1st Tues. each month. B.R. & Fin. Sec. Richard Geyer, 3049 S. 36th St., Rm. 213, Tacoma, WA 98409. Phone (253) 474-0527. Fax (253) 474-6877. E-mail: rooferslocal153@qwestoffice.net Website: www.rooferslocal153.com

Third Quarter 2018 •

59


PROMOTIONAL ITEMS

ORDER FORM

SEND ORDER TO: Roofers Promotional Department, 1660 L Street, NW – Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20036-5646

NAME

SHIPPING ADDRESS

CITY

E-MAIL OR DAYTIME TELEPHONE (IN CASE THERE IS AN ISSUE W/ORDER)

LOCAL UNION #

Item 1

Merchandise available to local union members only. Contractors: please place any merchandise orders through your local union representative. Due to pricing and product availability, we will no longer be able to accept order forms from past issues of the magazine. Any past-issue merchandise order forms we receive may be returned, along with your payment, at our discretion. If you need a copy of the most recent order form, contact the International at 202-463-7663. (This form is valid through December 31, 2018.)

60

Product

ZIP

MEMBERSHIP #

Size Qty

Price

POLY MESH SHIRT LIGHT BEIGE  XL - 2X - 3X - 4X BLUE  2X

$25.00

STONE  2X 2

3

4

CHECKS/MONEY ORDERS PAYABLE TO:

United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers & Allied Workers

STATE

“LEGACY” ROOFERS UNION RINGS 10K GOLD

Call  for  Price

GOLD PLATED

$260.00

STERLING SILVER

$260.00

NEW! “MODERN” ROOFERS UNION RINGS 10K GOLD

Call  for  Price

GOLD PLATED

$260.00

STERLING SILVER

$260.00

PEEL AND STICK LOGOS A. NEW! MODERN LOGO

$2.00

B. HARD HAT/BUMPER STICKER COMBO

$1.00

5

SWEATSHIRT  XL

6

ROOFERS WRIST WATCHES

7

 $35.00

A. MEDALLION FACE

$130.00

B. 14K/DIAMOND

$210.00

COTTON TWILL ROOFERS HAT A. RED w/ BLACK

$20.00

B. BLACK w/ YELLOW

• All Prices Include Shipping •

Grand Total:

Total


eig Light B

ROOFERS SWEATSHIRTS ARE ALMOST GONE... A.

e

Blue

Stone

1. BAMBOO CHARCOAL POLY MESH SHIRT Ultra soft material with moisture management polyester on the outside makes this one of the most cool and comfortable shirts you will ever own. Shortsleeved solid polo shirt with Roofers logo embroidered on front. 46% bamboo charcoal, 54% polyester. Machine wash. Made in the U.S.A. Sizes: Light Beige — XL, 2X, 3X, 4X Blue — 2X Stone — 2X

2. ROOFERS’ UNION RINGS – LEGACY DESIGN Available in 10K gold, gold plated or sterling silver.

3. N  EW! ROOFERS’ UNION RINGS – MODERN DESIGN Available in 10K gold, gold plated or sterling silver.

$25

B.

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4. PEEL AND STICK ROOFERS’ UNION LOGOS A. 6" logo, plus 3 2" logos and tagline B. 4" x 8" bumper sticker plus 1½" square

5. “BLAZING” ROOFERS SWEATSHIRT This cotton blend, navy blue sweatshirt is perfect for days when you need an extra layer against the elements. A drawstring hood tops it off. “United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers and Allied Workers” in small print on front, while back sports a blazing Roofers logo. 80% cotton, 20% polyester. Machine wash. Union-made in the U.S.A. Sizes: XL

6. MEN’S AMERICAN TIME QUARTZ WRIST WATCHES

A. Red w/ Black

B. Black w/ Yellow

A. w/Union logo medallion face.

B. 14K gold-filled dial w/Roofers logo, diamond chips at 12 and 6.

7. ROOFERS HATS 6 panel cotton twill, structured front, sewn eyelets, fabric strap.


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The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer 3rd Qtr 2018  

A quarterly publication for members of the United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers & Allied Workers

The Journeyman Roofer & Waterproofer 3rd Qtr 2018  

A quarterly publication for members of the United Union of Roofers, Waterproofers & Allied Workers

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