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Porsche Club Victoria

1975 - 2015 THE FIRST 40 YEARS

1975 - 2015

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PCV The First 40 Years


Porsche Club Victoria

1975 - 2015 THE FIRST 40 YEARS

1975 - 2015

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PCV The First 40 Years


40th Anniversary Run to Rochford Wines Sunday 20th1975 September - 2015 2015 5


Contents Publisher: The Porsche Club of Victoria Inc. PO Box 911, Kew, Victoria 3101 web site: www.pcv.com.au email: pcv@pcv.com.au

Editor Will Darvall Editorial Committee Richard Batchelor Michael Browning Andrew Bonwick

Foreword... 7 1. In the Beginning

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Appropriately, given that it was the birthplace of Porsche in Australia, the first recorded gathering was at Albert Park in 1958, when a group of 356 owners met in the car park to watch the 1958 Australian Grand Prix.

2. Clubbing Together

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The formation of the Porsche Club of Victoria. The Club’s first Vice President, Kerry Reynolds, recalls . ...

Barbara Darvall Michael O’Brien

3. The First PCV Event

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Kerry Reynolds Ron Widdison

The first Club event was very different to the well-oiled social and competition activities the PCV runs today.

Contributing Photographers

4. Getting Serious

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Ron Widdison Felix Rieniets Tristan De Carro Mark Clair

The Club was then a testing ground for Porsche daily drivers to explore the capabilities of their cars – and themselves. However with new and faster Porsche models arriving every year and the natural competitiveness of PCV members, things soon began to get serious!

Michael Browning Graeme Andrews

5. Motorkhanas 36

Artwork & Printing

Motorkhanas were seen as a relatively gentle point of entry to Club Competition and because dirt was generally the preferred surface for this type of event, there would be little stress on the cars.

Composite Colour 4/347 Bay Road, Cheltenham 3192 Ph: 03 9555 6665 email: info@compositecolour.com.au www.compositecolour.com.au Disclaimer: Advertisers should be aware of the laws prohibiting misleading and deceptive conduct. No liability is assumed by the publisher for any losses which any person may sustain as a result of any misleading or deceptive advertisement or article published in this magazine. Copyright: © 2015 by The Porsche Club of Victoria Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in any electronic format or transmitted in any form by any means without the written permission of the publisher.

Porsche Club of Victoria Administration: Carly Pasco Phone: 9817 6911 Fax: 9397 8991 e: administrator@pcv.com.au Post: P O Box 911, Kew 3101 www.pcv.com.au ISBN 978-0-646-94562-0

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PCV The First 40 Years

6. Chronology of Motorkhanas 48 The earliest PCV Motorkhana event was held after an invitation from Triumph Sports Owners Association in March 1976, at Broadford and was called an Autocrosse. A similar event was held in 1977.

7. Spit and Polish

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The Concours d’ Elegance has been described by critics as ‘elevating of the carwash to an art form’, but, to the adherents, this act of cleaning and polishing is an inner experience and approaches the symptoms of an obsessive compulsive disorder!

8. The Club Grows and Divides 62 The Club’s band of dedicated 356 owners, with support from other early Porsche enthusiasts, decided to set up their own Register in 1986.


9. For Richer or PORA

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18. Tall Tales. . . but True!

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‘Super Sprints’ became so successful that a meeting was called by the late Don Watson at the offices of Bob Street in Doncaster to discuss forming a race series for Porsche owners.

Long time PCV member Richard Batchelor recalls.

10. Game Changer

“The primary objective of the Club’s Social Committee is to organise events and activities at which members may gather in the spirit of goodwill and friendship based on their shared enjoyment in owning a Porsche”.

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By the early 1990s there was concern that owners of unmodified, or earlier model Porsches, were being disadvantaged by some of the Club’s competition rules.

11. The Bigger Playground

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Many of our members also embarked on other motorsport events. This tended to be focused on either circuit racing or bitumen rallies. I went the rally route.

12. Competition Evolution

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Getting Serious and The Bigger Playground describes how PCV members graduated from ‘dipping their toes in the water’ to jumping right in to competition, both within the Club and abroad, in a multitude of ways and events. Cars and Classes have changed dramatically, particularly since the millenium.

13. Economy Runs

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19. Feeling Social

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20. The Rise of the Registers 162 In the beginning, it was really simple: most members of the PCV in the 1970s owned either a 356 or a 911.

21. Porsche Parade

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The Club sure has seen a lot of changes in the past 40 years and none more so than that in the Club Magazine “Porsche Parade”.

22. PCV People

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What is a Club without people? Non-existent! Here we honour them.

23. Run to Rochford Winery

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Club founder, keen organiser and participant in all Club activities, Kerry Reynolds, remembers the Economy Runs in the seventies.

The Club celebrated its 40th Anniversary with a lunch in the fabulous Rochford amphitheatre.

14. National Meetings

PCV Committee 1975 - 2015

184

2015 - 2016 Members List

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24. The Future

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The first Interstate social event was held in Mount Gambier in 1977, jointly arranged by the Porsche Clubs of Victoria and South Australia. This event was so successful that a National Meeting was suggested. And so it came to pass.

15. Ladies First

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Women had key roles on the first PCV Committees and have been strongly represented on it ever since; the PCV had one of Australia’s first female car club presidents in the 1990s.

16. Holler for a Marshal!

President Andrew Bonwick reflects on PCV’s past, changes and evolution, leading to its future:

Roll Of Honour

192

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As PCV competition hotted up and the trophies became bigger, a new focus on the rules, supervision and safety became paramount.

17. Tracks 140 The Club is blessed by its access to tracks. From the king of venues, Phillip Island, to complex hill climbs and the twisty Winton. They are the centre of attention for the Prince of Sports car Marques, in the largest competition calendar in CAMS.

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PCV The First 40 Years


FOREWORD From the outset, the PCV’s unwavering aim has been to provide opportunities for members to share the pleasure of their Porsche ownership and use, whether in competition or social events, while enhancing their driving experience and skills through a greater understanding of their cars and of Porsche history. So it was a pleasant surprise when Porsche Parade Editor Ron Widdison rang me in February, to tell me that the PCV Committee wanted to produce a book chronicling the history of PCV for the 40th Anniversary of the Club in August and asked me if I would do it. Interested, but a little hesitant, I enquired as to the proposed parameters. Initially, it was envisaged that I could trawl through the digitised library of Porsche Parade, containing every copy since inception, to create a historical narrative via articles and photos. Following further discussions with Ron and President Andrew Bonwick, it became obvious that this method could not produce an interesting result, particularly as there were few colour photos before 2007 and that there would not be adequate personal input to describe the life and people of the developing Club. Thus, I agreed to form and coordinate a 40th Anniversary Book Editorial Committee, using widely experienced talents from the past, present and future of the Club.

This Committee considered the direction, logistics, sources and production of the 40th Book, with Michael Browning enthusiastically creating a framework of chapter headings, for which Committee members were responsible, in sourcing authors, articles and photographs. As well, all PCV members were called on to contribute stories and pictures. At least 40 authors contributed, with their names being credited in the text. Many people also provided photos for consideration, with Graeme Andrews, who provided hundreds from the early years, worthy of special mention. Michael Browning, Ron Widdison and I were responsible for final collation, editing and layout. With a challenging time line, the Committee, PCV members and all contributors have managed to create what we hope will be an entertaining and interesting history, as much as it was fascinating and memorable to produce, particularly for the “old timers� on the Committee! My warmest thanks to the Editorial Committee and all contributors. We hope you enjoy the result and the next 40 years! Will Darvall, on behalf of the Editorial Committee. August 26, 2015

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Porsche recommends

If you were infected with Porsche enthusiasm in 1975, you probably caught it from us. Congratulations to the Porsche Club of Victoria on your 40th from the Melbourne home of Porsche since 1951. It’s the shared appreciation of design, art, performance and petrol that has bound us from the beginning, when just a few Porsches graced Australian shores. From our early days of Hamiltons to the establishment of Porsche Centre Melbourne on Victoria Parade, we’ve shared our enthusiasm, our passion and our pure love for driving these unique sports cars with every member of the Porsche Club of Victoria. We look forward to many more years of celebrating these vehicles together.

Porsche Centre Melbourne

TRP PM1746

109 – 111 Victoria Parade Collingwood VIC 3066 Tel: 03 9473 0917 LMCT 3140 www.porschemelbourne.com.au

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PCV The First 40 Years


Porsche Parade 1975

P OR SCH E

CLU B

OF

V I C T OR I A OCTOBER, 1975

NEWS LETTER NO. 1 Secretary

Mr. Garnet luckins, P.0. Box 222, KEW, Vic. 3101. Telephone: 920198 ENTHUSIASTIC FIRST MEETING

August 26th saw the Rally Room of the Light Car Club filled to capacity with Porsche owners for the first meeting. Michael Stillwell welcomed the pec.,ple present and outlined the aims and activities of the new Porsche Club of Victoria. He then presented the names of the Committee and the members approved them. The his!·ory of Porsche in AustraI ia was then unfolded by the guest speaker, Mr. Norman Hamilton. People listened almost spell-boun� as the story of Dr. Porsche in post-war Germany and the manufacture of the first right-hand drive models was told. Members then mingled amongst one-another and immediately mumbles of car stories and makes, models, tyres etc. filled the room. Treasurer, Vin Jacono then signed people up and the evening closed on an enthusiastic note. II

The Porsche CI ub of Victoria is underway! 11

MEET THE PRESIDENT It is not hard to imagine why Michael Stillwell's boyhood drea'ms revolved around owning a Porsche. Being the son of famous racing driver Bib Stillwell and growing up in a car-orientated family had everything to do with it. Boys do grow up and Michael is contemplating his fourth Porsche purchase at this time. Amongst his previous cars was the well known 11 Sweetpea11 green 911. This car competed in the East Africa Safari and came to Australia in the London to Sydney Rally. Allan Hamilton drove the car in the 1970 Ampol Round Australia Trial and Michael used the car for transport and in local rallies for two years • At the same time he was making a name for himself as a Formula Ford and Touring Car driver. He is currently preparing an Escort to race at Bathurst with co-driver Geoffrey Brabham. Michael is married to Porsche Club Social Secretary Jill and is a fleet salesman with the family Ford Agency.

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 1. In the Beginning

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PCV The First 40 Years


The PCV was not Australia’s first Porsche Club. Since the late 1950s, the collective passion of Porsche owners has brought owners together to share the pleasure of owning and driving their cars as Professor Ferdinand Porsche expected them to do. Appropriately, given that it was the birthplace of Porsche in Australia, the first recorded gathering was at Albert Park in 1958, when a group of 356 owners met in the car park to watch the 1958 Australian Grand Prix. It was an exclusive gathering in those days, when Australian Porsche sales were less than 80 cars per year – a far cry from the 4,000plus Porsches now sold annually. Encouraged by Porsche’s founding Australian agent Norman Hamilton, that enthusiasm was crystallised into the Porsche Club of Australia and New Zealand formed in the early 1960s.

However the task of administering the affairs and activities of a small International club spread sparsely between two countries proved too great a task and the initial enthusiasm soon waned, leading to the formation of State-based clubs in most Australian States and Territories and in New Zealand. The Porsche Club of New South Wales, formed in September 1963, was the first of these, followed almost simultaneously in the mid-1970s by the Porsche Club of Queensland, the Porsche Owners Club of South Australia and, in August 1975, by the Porsche Club of Victoria. Forty years on, the PCV is the largest and most active Porsche club, not only in Australia, but also in the Southern Hemisphere – a tribute to its founders, successive custodians and the unparalleled passion of Porsche enthusiasts in Victoria, the founding home of Porsche in Australia.

FACING PAGE AND BELOW 356 enthusiasts gathered at Albert Park in 1958 in the days before the formation of Australia’s first Porsche club.

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Porsche owners in the early days enjoyed driving their cars in hillclimb and circuit events, where they frequently embarrassed drivers of much more powerful cars.

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PCV The First 40 Years


Bruce Harris, who went on to become a six-time PCV Champion, pictured competing at Melbourne’s Templestowe Hillclimb with his 356 in the early 1960s.

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2. Clubbing Together

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PCV The First 40 Years


The formation of the Porsche Club of Victoria. The Club’s first Vice-President, Kerry Reynolds, recalls . . . . In late 1974 I bought a new 911 from Hamiltons, the Porsche distributor for Australia and New Zealand. It disappointed me that there was no Porsche club, where owners would have the opportunity to get together socially and in competition, if they wished. I expressed this view to Tony Jones, the then Sales Manager of Hamiltons. He warmed to the idea and he suggested that I should contact Michael Stillwell, another Porsche enthusiast, whom he felt would be equally keen to see a club formed. Norman Hamilton and his son Alan also supported our plan, but preferred to be independent of any direct involvement, so Michael and I then proceeded to assemble a Steering Committee of nine Porsche owners. After several meetings and making contact with as many potential members as possible, we held the first pre-PCV meeting on 26 August 1975 at the Light Car Club in Queens Road, South Melbourne, opposite the Albert Park Lake and current Grand Prix circuit. Elections were held at this meeting, resulting in Mike Stillwell becoming President, myself as Vice-President/Competition Secretary, Garnet Luckins as Secretary and Vin Jacono as Treasurer, while Roger James and Jill Stillwell were elected general committee members. We were the 52nd official Porsche Club worldwide and our annual membership fee was $10. Subsequent PCV meeting venues included the Greyhound Hotel in St Kilda and later, the offices of the Bob Jane Corporation in Queensberry Street, North Melbourne.

Our first club event on 12 October did not go as planned, because the location at which it was due to be held, (without going into detail), was double booked. Nevertheless over 40 Porsches and their owners turned up to what was necessarily a makeshift location – a country lane adjacent to the Lilydale Airfield. Undeterred by the surroundings, everyone enjoyed a barbeque and a very convivial, but somewhat wet afternoon. Because there was quite a high level of interest by new members in not only the social aspect, but also in competition, we sought invitations from both the Light Car Club and the Triumph Sports Owners Association to attend their events. This resulted in some club members competing in the Light Car Club circuit sprint event on Cup Day in November 1975 and then being invited to attend the exciting Broadford Autocrosse meeting organised by the TSOA in March 1976. At both these events Porsche drivers showed a high level of skill and took out a number of the awards. The success of these events and the number of Porsches competing resulted in the club organising its own events, the first of which was a sprint meeting at Winton in August 1976 that attracted 41 entries, with both 911 and 356 models represented. Later in September 1977, the Club organised the first of its motorkhanas at the Highpoint West Shopping Centre. Because motorkhanas were seen to be a good entry point for those wishing to do competition, the Club, through one of its members, Ian Nadenbousch, had access to land in

Tonimbuk, where from April 1978 until the early 1980s many dirt motorkhana events were held. There was also an interest shown by a number of members in hill-climbing, and as a result, the Club organised two events at Lakeland Park near Lilydale, until it closed down in the late 1970s. Current member and ex-President Will Darvall was a standout performer here. It was therefore not surprising that a number of drivers who were prominent in early PCV events went on to further their ambitions at both State and National levels. These drivers included Peter Fitzgerald, John Latham and Ross Mathieson, who all featured prominently driving Porsches in Sports Car racing, with all three going on to become National Champions. Things were simple in the early days, with the Club Drivers’ Championship having only two classes – one for six cylinder Porsches and the other for four cylinder Porsches and the annual membership fee was $10. Many enduring friendships were formed in these early days, when I think it is true to say that solid foundations were set for what is today one of the foremost motoring clubs and the largest Porsche Club in the country.

FACING PAGE The PCV’s first Vice-President, seen extracting the most from his 911 at an early Club sprint event. BELOW Enthusiasm was never in short supply at early PCV Competition events!

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Barbara Darvall recalls the initial attraction of the Club: When Brian Clearihan and I bought our first Porsche– a 1965 912 – in 1969, every other Porsche owner you saw on the road would flick their headlights, saying ‘hello’. By driving a Porsche, you were part of a special ‘club’, although in those pre-PCV days it had no formal structure. Cars were serviced at Hamilton’s, or Spyder Automobiles and we were all friendly with the Hamilton’s people and Spyder’s John and Jean Gregory. So we tended to socialise with them and other Porsche owners.

ABOVE Harris in the 934 through the S’s at Winton.

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PCV The First 40 Years

By 1975, we knew a lot of other owners and when we heard of the proposal of a club in 1975, we were very excited. The Light Car Clubroom was filled to standing that night and it was the first time I’d met people on the steering committee, who would become firm friends over the years. The next year I joined the committee and thoroughly enjoyed our involvement in all areas of Club events. The cars were simpler, racing tyres hardly existed, we all drove up to Winton with our kids in the back seats, brought picnics, and drove home that night, to use the car for shopping the next day! They really were family days.

With a membership of more than 50 enthusiastic members in a matter of weeks, we were probably Australia’s fastestgrowing one-make car club at that time. There was enormous enthusiasm, split between those who wanted social events and those looking for competition challenges, so the question asked itself was, ‘What will we do first?’

BELOW The Lilley 911 pushing hard at Winton 1980.


ABOVE Will Darvall at Mt Tarrengower 1976.

BELOW A 908 and Four Cam Carrera 356 at Winton.

ABOVE Right on the limit at Winton 1981.

ABOVE Darryl Louey at speed in his RS at Morwell 1982.

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PCV The First 40 Years


Porsche Parade 1977

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3. The First PCV Event October 1975

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PCV The First 40 Years


The first Club event was very different to the well-oiled social and competition activities the PCV runs today. Unlike today, when PCV competition and social events are planned and executed with a military precision that is the envy of all other car clubs, the very first PCV event on 12 October did not go exactly as planned. Without going into detail, the venue for a social run was double booked. Nevertheless 47 Porsches and their owners turned up and happily relocated to a makeshift location â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a country lane adjacent to the Lilydale Airfield. Undeterred by the surroundings, everyone enjoyed a barbeque and a very convivial, but somewhat wet afternoon.

Prizes awarded on the day included the Smartest Car (Max Errington), the most courageous driver (John Edwards, for braving the elements in his cloth-topped 356 Speedster), the Most Used 911 (John Robinson) and the Oldest Porsche (Greg Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keefe). There was also a prize for the owner who risked arrest to be there, a member who was driving an unregistered 911 after collecting it from the docks a couple of days earlier. How times have changed!

Ross McKinnon recalls: Cars ranged from a very early 356 to the latest 911 (1975). By 2015 standard, the level of presentation was good, but not excessive, as most cars then were used to go to work as well as for weekend fun.

THIS AND FACING PAGE The very first event, Lilydale Airport, October 1975.

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ABOVE Willl Darvall in his ‘73 RS at South Australia’s Collingrove Hillcilmb 1978.

4. Getting Serious! 24

PCV The First 40 Years


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Early PCV Committee members were motorsport enthusiasts, most with competition experience from other clubs. Presidents in the 1970s were Mike Stillwell, Roger James, Kerry Reynolds, Ken Foo and John Benson, supported by Vin Jocono, Garnet Luckins, Trevor Newnes, Ross McKinnon, John Edwards, Alan Coleman, Jill Stillwell and ‘Barbara Davies’, now Barbara Darvall, in 1976. The Club was then a testing ground for Porsche daily drivers to explore the capabilities of their cars – and themselves. However with new and faster Porsche models arriving every year and the natural competitiveness of PCV members, things soon began to get serious! The PCV’s first competition events were held in conjunction with other clubs, but members’ success in these events and the growing number of Porsches competing soon resulted in the Club organising its own competition activities.

Barbara Darvall recalls: At the first competition events, there were no racing suits or driving shoes. Seats were standard, tyres were road-going, classes were four or six cylinder and the choice of wheels was equally simple: 15in or 16in. By the 1980s, technology was changing the face of competition. The cars were getting faster; new, larger and stickier tyres were being developed and club members began playing with suspension settings, all of which meant that the cars were often less suitable for day-to-day driving or not quite so friendly for wives and children. Porsche was a howling success in local and international racing and road-going ‘brothers’ of these cars were being produced.

As they filtered into Australia, they started appearing in club events. Graham Stockley’s new RSR 3.0 and Bruce Harris’s 934 were show-stoppers, well driven and shouted ‘bring it on’ to the other drivers. So classes needed revision, as the original division of 4-cylinder and 6-cylinder cars no longer did the job. Classes required differentiation, as to encourage new members, the Club had to find ways to keep the standard models from being sidelined from trophies. Modifying Porsches had not really happened to any extent until then, but now the Club felt it was necessary to make sure base models didn’t get pulled apart and lost to the future. So the ‘Modified’ classes came into being, along with power-to-weight classifications and more. As the number and range of events grew, so did demands on organization and we soon realized we needed to conform to CAMS rules and requirements.

The first of these ‘stand alone’ events was a Sprint meeting at Winton on 1 August 1976, which attracted 41 entries out of a then total membership of 107 Porsches, which at that stage comprised 40 four cylinder and 67 six-cylinder cars. Things were simple in those early days. The Club’s Drivers’ Championship had only two classes – one for six cylinder Porsches, the other for four cylinder Porsches and there was no real limit on modifications.

ABOVE 356 Speedster at Calder 1982.

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PCV The First 40 Years

BELOW Porsche 356s were still active in PCV Competition events up to the early 1980s, but by then they were consistently being outclassed by their more powerful 911 siblings.


ABOVE ‘Yes Virginia I have 730 HP’ Greg Lovett’s 934 Clone at Calder 1982.

Founding member and past President John Benson recalls how things quickly started to get serious: Over the five years following its formation in 1975, the PCV became a ‘band of brothers and sisters’ conducting oftencombined competition and social events internally, while also initiating activities with ‘sister’ Porsche clubs in South Australia (Mt Gambier) and NSW (Albury). The PCV end-of-year dinners became one of the social highlights of the Club calendar, with presentations of all descriptions and long-lasting friendships being formed. Interestingly, the PCV was, towards the late ‘70’s, becoming a club of two halves

with the older 356 cars and owners being ‘left behind’ by the later 911 owners, who seemed more interested – in some cases obsessed – with competition events, powerto-weight ratios, fastest laps, fastest time of day and general ‘pot hunting’. As a result, the size of the trophies became a topic of conversation as some strived to keep their egos intact as they came to grips with their new toys. In 1978, with a membership of around 300, then-President Kerry Reynolds approached me to become President and this position was made easy, as Kerry had set the foundation with some terrific people on the PCV Committee.

The late Alan Coleman offered PCV the Bob Jane conference facilities in Drummond Street, Carlton for a good number of our monthly club meetings and we were also very thankful for the support of Alan Hamilton, who assisted the club with a host of facilities, and some magnificent trophies, now treasured possessions to those who’ve won them. To this time the fledging PCV had functioned well, but was not incorporated. With competition activities increasing and members anxious about the possible litigious scenarios, it became imperative to seek incorporation, and with the help of club member (the late) Bruce Lilley, the PCV became incorporated in 1980.

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PCV The First 40 Years


FACING PAGE Kerry Reynolds, first Club Hillclimb Lakeland 1976.

ABOVE Paul Mauger at Lakeland Hillclimb in his 2.4S 1980. BELOW Paul Mauger in his Turbo at Calder 1982.

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ABOVE Alan Hamiltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 908 needs a push start at Calder 1982.

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PCV The First 40 Years

BELOW Bruce Harris in his 924 Carrera GT on the limit at Calder 1982.


Will Darvall also remembers those early competition days: Kerry Reynolds and I initially were using the mid-‘70s 911 2.7 models which had the new K-Jetronic engine. Kerry’s 2.7 was putting out about 150hp and my 911S had 175hp, but the people reigning on the track were using the mechanically fuel injected 2.7 litre 210hp Carreras. ABOVE Kerry Reynolds in his 2.7RS at Calder 1982.

ABOVE John King in his 912 at Winton 1980. Richard Batchelor recalls his first Porsche Club competition experience:

ABOVE John Gregory 2.8 911 at Oran Park Sydney Nat 1981.

ABOVE Geoff Taylor at Calder 1980.

ABOVE Bruno Hess in his very fast 2.4S at Winton.

ABOVE Alfie Costanzo in Austin King’s RS at Calder 1982.

It is Cup Day, 1975 and the rain is bucketing down at the first competitive event attended by the recently formed Porsche Club of Victoria, the Light Car Club’s annual Cup Day Meeting at Sandown. As the Porsche Club’s newsletter noted, “Driving conditions could not have been worse with the track often a torrent of water, however to some extent this helped our cars with their superb roadholding and traction qualities”. According to the Newsletter, the 10 Porsche Club entrants “carried the flag of the club in a most spectacular manner”. Our 10 competitors came armed with two Carreras, three 911 2.7s, a 2.4S, a 2.2S, a 356B and a 2.4E, with two entrants sharing one of the Carreras. Bruce Harris (911S 2.7) won the hill climb outright, Diana Foo (Carrera) took out the quarter mile sprint and Kerry Reynolds (911 2.7) came third in the slalom, to almost make a Porsche clean sweep of the Light Car Club’s trophies. In 1975 the cars used in our club events were true daily drivers, standard specification road registered Porsches, used to transport their owners to the workplace, social events and used on the school run. In many cases they were the only car in the family. As early as 1977, Jeff Dutton recorded the fastest time at a Winton sprint in a Carrera RSR – a limited edition factory racecar. However Barbara Darvall nominates 1978 as the year when a significant number of competitors made the switch to dedicated track cars. Will Darvall, Kerry Reynolds and Daryl Louey were among those members to make the transition from ‘family’ Porsches to specialised models, such as the 1973 Carrera RS. That year also saw some very competitive people such as Paul Mauger and Graham Stockley joining the Porsche Club. Will Darvall was active from 1975 until the end of 1978, when he was out of action for a long time recovering from injuries sustained in a hillclimb accident at Maldon’s Mt.Tarrengower.

The one-year-old PCV was invited to join the Marque Sports Club at the Lakeland Hill Climb on 19/9/1976. 20 members attended, driving 15 911s, including 2 Turbos and 5 356s. I had a ‘74 2.7S Targa. It was my first ever competition event, only having previously been a traffic light tearaway or Bulleen Road drag racer. What we got away with in the 50’s and 60’s! However, all those practice starts came in handy. I performed well and decided to compete in Open company in the 8 round Victorian Championship, held at Lakeland, Morwell, Mt. Leura, Mt. Tarrengower and Ararat, beginning in late ‘76, running in Production Sports. There was a great camaraderie amongst the hillclimbing fraternity as we travelled around the state. In mid-’77 I purchased an immaculate private import ‘73 2.7 RS in Sydney and campaigned that in stock standard condition, (apart from stripping some trim and fitting racing buckets), using Michelin TB5 or grooved SB9 tyres, which were used also on the road. Trips to the picturesque Collingrove track in ‘78 were successful, with wins in the SA Production Sports title and later the Australian title, both in record time. Other Production Sports records were set at Lakeland, Mt. Tarrengower and Ararat, a very fast long course. My brilliant career came to an abrupt halt against a large gum tree on a hot day in late November ‘78, trying to win the last round of the Victorian Championship against a very fast hotted-up Bolwell (which was no Production car!), causing terminal body injuries to the car and almost the same to me. However, we both gradually got rebuilt with new bodies over the years and drove happily ever after. The other good news is than in the 20 years to 1995, the Carrera RS and the mechanically similar 2.7 litre Carreras of 1974-75 probably racked up more Open and Class wins in PCV events than all other Porsche models combined. It was the car of choice for the serious competitor, like the GT3 is today.

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Kerry Reynolds, who was runner-up in the Drivers’ Championship in 1977 and 1978, noted:

larger than 3.0 litres was the V8-engined 4.5 litre 928). The new Class system was a game changer.

In the early days, a set of Michelin TB5s, which effectively were racing tyres for the road, was the hallmark of a serious competitor.

During the 1980s competition hotted up and lap times tumbled. Graham Stockley acquired his RSR 2.8 and then a later 3.0, while Bruce Harris fielded his fearsome 934 RSR turbo that had recently won the Australian Sports Car Championship.

The PCV’s Class system was similarly basic by today’s standards. There were only two – one for four cylinder and the other for six cylinder cars. This resulted in many points being awarded to drivers of the most powerful cars, who were not necessarily the most talented drivers. Consequently, a model where driving skill became a more significant factor in determining the championship outcome was under constant discussion a committee level. The change came in 1981, when new classes based on engine capacity and factory power-weight called A, B, C and D, were introduced, further divided into Under 2-litres and 3-litres and over (bearing in mind then that the only production Porsche with an engine

Peter Fitzgerald also acquired a RSR that he modified heavily, using it in club events as well as open racing. Other talented engineer/ drivers such as Bruno Hess built RSR clones. Given their power, Open Class cars were permitted to use racing slicks, while in the road-registered classes, the tyre to have was the Yokohama A008. Dennis O’Keefe joined the Club around 1980 and one of the club’s most competitive drivers, the late Don Tryhorn, immediately took him under his wing.

LEFT Racing Porsches, Graham Stockley’s 2.8 RSR and Alan Hamilton’s 908 at Calder 1982. BELOW John Gregory tunes Don Tryhorn’s Carrera at the Mallala National Meeting 1983.

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LEFT Vin Smart in his 3.0 RSR at Winton 1980. RIGHT High flying at Morwell in 1982. BELOW Winston Kim in his 908 at Winton.

ABOVE Graeme Redman exiting Gloweave corner at Calder 1982.

BELOW Greg Lovett on his way to FTD at Winton in November 1981.

BELOW Will Darvall at Lakeland hillclimb in 1978.

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Dennis O’Keefe remembers: With zero experience I spun out on most of the corners at my first event at Calder, but I was hooked. After that Don and I would practice before each event – sprints, motorkhanas and hill climbs. For bitumen motorkhanas we would practice in an industrial estate at nighttime, but only for a maximum of 30 minutes due to the reaction time of ‘Mr Plod’. At one of our practice sessions at the old Hume Weir circuit, Don’s car left the road and became beached in a clay depression in about 30cm of water. Don sat on his car’s roof while waiting for it to be recovered! Our attitude then was not ‘win at all cost’, but we were certainly trying to compete to the best of our ability.

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ABOVE Garry Tierney pushing hard at Lakeland Hillclimb 1980. BELOW PCV members pictured at Hume Weir 1980.


ABOVE Neil Prittie at Morwell Hillclimb 1981.

ABOVE Wet start at Morwell Hillclimb 1981.

RIGHT Graham Stockley talks with Graeme Redman at Morwell 1981. BELOW ‘If Bruce Harris can do it, I can do it one handed’ Greg Lovett in his home built 2.7 Turbo at Scrub Corner Hume Weir Meet in 1980.

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Aporschapart congratulates The Porsche Club of Victoria on its 40th Anniversary

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Porsche Parade 1978

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5. Motorkhanas

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BELOW LEFT Trying VERY hard in a motorkhana at Somerton 2002. BELOW RIGHT Kevin Jarman on Sydney National Meeting motorkhana course 1981. How to engage new Porsche Club members, without previous competition experience, was one of the challenges for the early PCV committees. It was assumed that most Club members at the time were keen to see how they and their cars performed, away from public roads. Motorkhanas were seen as a relatively gentle point of entry to Club Competition and because dirt was generally the preferred surface for this type of event, there would be little stress on the cars. The first opportunity for PCV members to compete in this type of event was when the Club was invited to attend a Triumph Sports Owners Association event in March 1976. This was an Autocrosse held at Broadford and conducted over a single designated route that involved avoiding, not only marker flags, but trees, stumps and even a dam! The 21 Porsche drivers who entered had an absolute ball, everyone keen to return again at the next opportunity. A repeat invitation was received the following year and once again there was a good field of Porsches, with spirited competition and everyone having a great day. However from then on the invitations dried up, possibly due to PCV members Bruce Harris and Kerry Reynolds winning outright each years and Porsches generally dominating the results! The Club then decided that because of the interest it should seek out its own venue and run events independently. The first of these was held in the car park at Highpoint West Shopping Centre on a bitumen surface.

Kevin Jarman in his Carrera 2.7 was the clear winner on the day, but the Club was somewhat disappointed at the relatively small number of entries, possibly due to owners being concerned about tyre wear and mechanical stresses imposed on their cars. As a result, this was to be the last of the early bitumen motorkhanas. The challenge was to get back onto the grass and the club was fortunate to have access to land at Tonimbuk in Gippsland, owned by PCV member Ian Nadenbousch. The first motorkhana there was held in April 1978 and there were 26 starters on a surface which was much more user friendly. As time went on these Tonimbuk events became more and more popular, often with fields of up to 40 competitors. Apart from one other dirt Motorkhana held at Nar Nar Goon, Tonimbuk continued to be the preferred destination for Cub Motorkhanas right through until 1981, when it was decided that due to increasing numbers and limited facilities, Tonimbuk was no longer suitable. There was quite a deal of disappointment among many drivers when the Club made this decision, as many intense battles had been fought there, with winning drivers including Alan Coleman, Warwick Freemantle, Kevin Jarman, Kerry Reynolds, Paul Sadler and Geoff Taylor.

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Warwick Freemantle remembers his first (grass) motorkhana: The first club competition event I ever attended in my new 911SC was a Motorkhana at Tonimbuk – the farm of the Nadenbousch family. The club had laid out a course of flags on a grassy paddock, with the odd cowpat thrown in for good measure. The grass was pretty damp and I could see the seasoned club competitors doing some neat handbrake turns around the flags and then scrabbling for traction to get moving again. I thought that this looked impressive,

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but when my turn came I decided to make sweeping arcs around the flags to keep the momentum up and avoided losing traction. This turned out to be very quick on the wet grass. I parked my car and was standing by myself watching the proceedings when one of the ‘experts’ broke away from his group and asked me “So where did you learn to drive?” I told him I had competed in forest rallies with the Monash Sporting Car Club. At that, he gave a big laugh and said; “I think we are going to have to keep an eye on you!” That person turned out to be Bruce Harris, later to become a multiple Club Champion.

He brought me over to the group and introduced me around and from then on I was hooked. Everyone was very friendly and before too long they were all doing sweeping arcs on the wet grass. I think I might have actually won the Motorkhana!


Barbara Darvall recalls the PCV’s early Motorkhana days: The club was welcomed at Nar Nar Goon, Tonimbuk, and definitely so at Porsche Park in the late 80s. At Geelong it was simply the business of hiring a suitable venue, as it was at Ballarat, Dookie and elsewhere. Werribee Park? We were initially welcomed there and it was a perfect setting. Close to Melbourne; the surface was almost manicured; we were surrounded with beautiful trees; plus there was the Trustclassified Mansion for family to visit.

We used it in 1984 and again in 1985, as it was perfect – for us, that is. I am now ashamed to say that the amount of dirt we churned up finally nearly drove the local farmers to despair, as it settled on their beautiful market gardens with crops just ready for harvesting. Werribee management was threatened with legal action and we were no longer welcome. It was a sad day. Interestingly though, it was at Werribee Park that the Club started running multiple start runs at the end of the day. Was that where the idea for PORA was born?

ABOVE The sign says it all, but is this Porsche going the right way at the Bendigo Saleyards motorkhana? BELOW Dennis O’Keefe in his Targa at Tonimbuk Motorkhana 1982.

ABOVE Not a rally, but the motorkhana course at the Sydney National Meeting in 1981.

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ABOVE PCV ‘experts’ plot out a grass motorkhana course in the early days. BELOW Bruce Harris in his 924 Carrera GT at the Club’s Tonimbuk Motorkhana 1981.

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ABOVE Russell Sturzacker rounds up the flags at Werribee Park in his then-new 924 Carrera GT in the early 1980s. BELOW Daryl Louey in his Carrera RS pictured at Werribee Park.

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ABOVE Dennis Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keefe in his Targa at Tonimbuk Motorkhana in1982. BELOW Mike Stillwell on the start line in his Carrera 3.0 at at Tonimbuk 1981.

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Motorkhana champion Peter White has some personal recollections: I had just bought a 1970s Porsche and it was around 1982 when I joined the PCV. I heard there was a Motorkhana event on a farm at Ballarat. Naive and young I thought ‘well I’ll have a crack at that’ and I’ll also be able to increase my flying hours on my newly acquired pilot’s license. So my wife and two very attractive girlfriends of hers drove there, while I took the easy way and flew in a light aircraft that I had hired. Anyway, the next day was the “real deal” and I watched in amazement as the better drivers made their way around each of four courses, completing eight courses. How do they do that? How do they make those handbrake turns? How do they know where to go? And how does the car revolve on the spot around a designated flag? I finished well back in the field and on the way home I determined to find a way to do better. I didn’t know what that would mean. Not long after this I became Competition Secretary (a position I held for about six or seven years). I noticed that some of the procedures for all events were not strictly enforced as they should have been, in my humble opinion, to make it fair for all competitors.

For instance the starting order of cars over eight Motorkhana courses saw the same car starting on all eight courses. I couldn’t see how this was fair, especially on soft surfaces that got chopped up as the day progressed! I acquired a CAMS manual that sets out all approved motorkhanas, the distance between the flags and the size of the garages, as until then the Club had not strictly adhered this to. So in conjunction with others, a whole new set of rules was drawn up. If your car moved before the official start whistle, you were penalised; if your finishing position was outside the garage, whatever the margin, you were penalised. Drivers could no longer take the advantages they had done in the past. There were of course some tough decisions to make and a driver always has a vested interest in his own efforts, but decisions had to be made. At times, Don Tryhorn and Dennis O’Keeffe would help adjudicate difficult decisions. EMU bottom venue was always a favourite, as we would eat dinner that night at the homestead. Werribee Park on soft pasture was also a favourite, until the farmers complained about the dust storms we created when the wind was blowing the wrong way. At one event down the

Mornington way there was even a hot exhaust that started a small grass fire! National Porsche club meetings were held in a different State each year and were very much the pinnacle of each year’s events. Motorkhanas had classes for different cars and an outright winner overall, regardless of class. I was lucky enough to win three National Porsche Motorkhana Titles outright and I still cherish the trophies today. Each year we would have an interstate Motorkhana competition against South Australia and I remember fondly attending about four or five of these. I always felt that Motorkhanas gave most people a chance to do well without having to have the most powerful car, or to spend a lot of money – it was largely up to the driver. The learning stages involved playing with tyre pressures, how best to use your hands on the steering wheel and to always be focusing two flags ahead, then you could be competitive. As an example, my last competition was in 1994 and I wanted to finish on a good note. I won all Motorkhanas that year and the Australian Porsche Clubs’ Motorkhana Championship title outright and surprisingly achieved a win in the Victorian Porsche Outright championship. And this was without competing in one sprint event. The following year they changed the Club Competition Championship rules!

BELOW The PCV’s Somerton Motorkhana in 2002.

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1

1 Porsche Club members line up at the Tonimbuk Motorkhana 1980.

Barbara Darvall recalls ‘A Gracious mistake’

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2 John Benson competing in a 356A at Tonimbuk Motorkhana in 1980. 3 Sally Stockley on the Motokana Sydney Nat 1981. 4 Harris contemplates a potential motorkhana win at Adelaide Nat Meet 1983. 5 Bob Hawker on the Skidpan at DECA in his 996 Mk2 GT3 2015. 6 Porsche Parade Editor Ron Widdison in his 1988 911 Clubsport at DECA 2012.

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Just outside Melbourne was the beautiful Emu Bottom homestead, circa 1836, with lovely surroundings and an expanse of GRASS. What an ideal location for motorkhanas, thought the Competition secretary. And Emu Bottom days were beautiful family days, with plenty of places for family activity as well as lovely grass for motorkhana layouts. By the end of the day, of course, there was not much grass left out there! At that stage it was permissable for competitors to take a passenger for a ride, and I asked Graham Stockley if I could sit in his passenger seat. He easily agreed. That event was at the end of the year, and I remember that Graham was a likely winner of the Championship that year, so his success hinged on the results from this final event. Now, also, I was pretty good at translating the motorkhana map to the ground; Wrong Directions did not happen much to me. So when I was sitting next to Graham, who was fiercely hugging each witches hat, I very quickly realised he was going the Wrong Way! I froze. What could I do; a driver has complete focus, a mumble from the passenger about ‘go clockwise here’ would have wrecked his driving concentration, but going anti-clockwise would give him a WD.

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Graham had so much style and appeared to do everything with ease, but here was I, a little slow driver, knowing I was right but there was nought I could do. Either way he was stuffed for the day. I never admitted to him I saw the error and I saw no hint from Graham that he was annoyed at his WD, with no display of anything but grace. Hats off to Graham!

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Porsche Parade 1980

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RIIGHT Somerton Motorkhana 2002

6. Chronology of Motorkhanas (The numbers in brackets indicate the issue of Porsche Parade that the event featured in) Compiled by Will Darvall

Motorkhana in Sept 1996 DECA in Mar 1997 DECA in June 1997

The earliest PCV Motorkhana event was held after an invitation from Triumph Sports Owners Association in March 1976, at Broadford and was called an Autocrosse. A similar event was held in 1977.

Motorkhana in July 1997

A bitumen Motorkhana was then held at the Highpoint West Shopping Centre.

DECA Special event in 1998

Subsequent grass/dirt events were held twice yearly from 1978-1981 at Tonimbuk, with another being held at Nar Nar Goon.

Driveskill Motorkhana twice in 1998

DECA Motorkhana in 1998 Driveskill Motorkhana twice in 1999

They were then subsequently held at Geelong, Ballarat and Dookie.

DECA Motorkhana in 1999

Many grass events were held at Werribee Park during ‘84-’85. (Porsche Parade issues #54, #55, #56)

Broadford Special event in 1999

Highpoint West again in March ‘86. (PP #59) Geelong in Oct 1987. (PP #69) Shepparton Khanacrosse in Nov 1990. (PP #84) Dandenong in Mar 1991 (PP #86) Porsche Park in Sept 1991 (PP #88) Shepparton Khanacrosse in Oct 1991 (PP #89) Mangalore Edukhana in Feb 1992 (PP #90) Mangalore Motorkhana in Feb 1992 (PP #90 Emu Bottom in May 1992 (PP #91) Rye Edukhana in Jan 1993 (PP #95) Swan Street in Feb 1994 (PP #99) Calder in 1995 Canberra at Nationals in 1995 DECA in 1995 Laverton in 1995 Adelaide at Nationals in 1996 Motorkhana in April 1996 DECA June 1996

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Laverton in Mar 2000 DECA in Jun 2000 Laverton in July 2000 Laverton in Mar 2001 DECA in June 2001 Laverton in July 2001 BP Motorkhana in Mar 2002 DECA Motorkhana in June 2002 DECA special event in Aug 2002 DECA in Jun 2003 DECA in Sept 2003 DECA twice in 2004 Since 2004, PCV Motorkhanas have been held at DECA on an annual basis, usually in conjunction with a Winton Sprint meeting over the June Queen’s Birthday Long Weekend. Since 2005, The Police complex at Attwood has been a popular site, usually twice a year, until about 2013, when the complex was closed. Thus, it is easy to see the importance of Motorkhanas at a multitude of venues in the history of PCV and their importance in training many of the Club’s top drivers, particularly in the 1990’s.


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Porsche Parade 1980

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7. Spit and Polish The objective of the Concours d’ Elegance is the presentation and or restoration of a vehicle to the specification, style and intent of the manufacturer for the particular model and the presentation of that vehicle in its ultimate form. Of course some PCV members, being competitive by nature, have been known to exceed these boundaries! Originality is a key objective. Replacement of parts is allowed but they must be factory replacement parts or an authentic replica, where the factory part is no longer available. It is a more passive competition event in the Club and broadens the opportunity of participation beyond that of driving competition.

The Concours d’ Elegance has been described by critics as ‘elevating of the carwash to an art form’, but, to the adherents, this act of cleaning and polishing is an inner experience and approaches the symptoms of an obsessive compulsive disorder! Disinterested people look on this activity as akin to lunacy, while those obsessed consider it deeply fulfilling, though there can be a sense of masochism. “I must be mad, I’ll never do this again” they cry. But, next year the obsession takes over again and the polishing cloths and cotton buds reappear, as they once again become antisocial, spending long hours in the garage.

Concours d’Elegance, for the perfectionists. The hedonistic days of Concours came to an end after the last 50 Years of Porsche gathering in Melbourne in 1998. From then on, the cleaning clothes stayed mainly dry until the Club displays at Federation Square in 2008 to 2010, although there was a display at a club in Brighton in 2005. The PCV has since moved to a Show ‘n’ Shine in conjunction with Motorclassica at the Exhibition Building in 2011 to 2014 with increasing interest being shown in true Concours preparation. Perhaps this obsessive art form will return!

This new category opened up the competition to many more members, while retaining the ultimate competition, the FACING PAGE Motorclassica Show ‘n’ Shine 2014. BELOW 908, 934 and 906 at the Melbourne National Meeting Concours in 1984.

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ABOVE Paul Mauger’s award-winning 911S ready to be judged. BELOW ‘How clean it is’ 912 engine Adelaide National Meet 1983.

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An insight from multiple award winner, Graeme Redman: Chasing the Concours crown over several years, as I did, saw me as a living, walking example of the above, as it did for many of my fellow members. I recall many a long night in the garage; 2 and 3AM wasn’t out of the question. One particularly obsessive occasion, on a beautiful Saturday afternoon, I was working on my 911 in the driveway. In order to get to inaccessible places, I had taken the doors off and they were lying on the lawn (just how obsessive can you get?). A couple of little boys came riding by on their bicycles, pausing to watch for a few minutes, then politely enquired “Gee Mister, why have you taken the doors off your car?”

My reply; “Doesn’t your Father take the doors off his car when he cleans it?” left them wondering! They rode on with puzzled looks on their faces! Finally, after many runner-ups Class place trophies, I succeeded in nailing the National Outright Trophy in ‘84. It was quite a challenge to then use the car for other competition events and even limited road use. In those days there were many with the same affliction that provided stiff competition; notable in my memory were Paul Mauger and Russell Sturzaker, both also using their cars in all other aspects of club competition. Thanks for putting the pressure on guys! Each year the competition grew stronger and the standard

kept rising to levels difficult to attain. This led to fewer having the passion to push the boundaries. By the 1990s, the standard had become so high that only the dedicated few were competing and it became impossible to maintain Concours standards and still use the car in other competition events. This saw the split into two categories in the late 80’s – the full Concours or “Master Class” and the “Show and Shine”. The Show and Shine only looked at the visual presentation of the car above the sill line – a much kinder form of competition on all aspects of social and family life and even the bank account.

RIGHT Concours judges confer at the Adelaide National Meeting in 1983. BELOW RIGHT A row of then-new front-engined Porsches lines up for a PCV Concours in 1981.

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Paul Mauger, who played a major role developing and running the PCV’s Concours d’Elegance for almost a decade confesses: I was part of a sub-committee that was formed to organise the first interstate Meeting between South Australia and Victoria in Mount Gambier in 1977 and from there, the annual National Meetings became a PCV institution for many years. The South Australian, New South Wales, Queensland and the ACT Clubs variously took turns at being involved and in 1980 at a meeting with the NSW Club in Albury, an unused cowshed was used for the Concours, entertainment and the evening meal, with gas fired blow heaters to keep us warm. In 1978, when driving past Hamilton’s Showroom in Church Street, I saw and bought my third Porsche, a black Turbo 3.0.

It was sitting in the elevated front window begging me to have a closer look. I paid Austin King the required deposit and asked him to leave it in the window. After driving past on many further occasions my wife asked “Why do you keep looking at that Porsche? If you like it so much you should buy it”. Clever!! It was with that car that I decided to try my hand at the Concours d’Elegance in the upcoming club competition. While I was cleaning under my car in the garage at home, a young neighbour, who had always been interested in the cars I was driving, asked if he could help. Matthew Stoupas began his passion for Porsches then, later going on to work at Hamilton’s Service Department as a technician. Matt’s work on my car (with Brasso on cotton wool to eliminate swirl marks) made it one of the best examples its class.

Because of my passion for it, I was coopted as the Concours co-ordinator for most of the ‘80s and ‘90s. This involved organising not only Victorian Concours, but also assisting National Concours directors in Judging. In 1998, these efforts culminated in the largest assembly of over 900 Porsches for the 50th anniversary of Porsche in Melbourne’s Alexandria Gardens. My large team of more than 30 had to judge the largest number of Porsches ever entered for full Concours and Wash and Polish. Enthusiasm for full Concours preparation has waned these days, but ‘on reflection’ it is an engaging art that gave many people – Porsche owners and admirers – a lot of pride and pleasure.

LEFT Team Tryhorn prepares for the concours at Qld Nat Meeting with the help of Mike Tankard, 1987. BELOW LEFT John Clark’s Concours preparation for the Sydney National Meeting 1981. FACING PAGE National Meet Concours Melbourne 1984. BOTTOM RIGHT THIS PAGE Show ‘n’ Shine at Motorclassica 2014.

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TOP The Concours at the Canberra National Meeting 1985.

BOTTOM LEFT THIS PAGE Show ‘n’ Shine at Motorclassica 2012.

CENTRE Show ‘n’ Shine at Federation Square 2010.

BOTTOM RIGHT THIS PAGE AND FACING PAGE Show ‘n’ Shine at Motorclassica 2014.

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Porsche Parade 1980

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8. The Club Grows . . . and Divides. While the 356 models had initially participated in the PCV’s competition events, by the mid-1980s they were clearly outclassed in comparison with their much more modern and powerful six-cylinder siblings and were increasingly becoming collectible. So the Club’s band of dedicated 356 owners, with support from other early Porsche enthusiasts, decided to set up their own Register in 1986, not as some sort of renegade movement, but as an independent arm’s length organisation to cater for the increasingly different needs of early Porsche owners.

ABOVE The 356 Register’s annual Porsche Parade has become THE place to debut your newlyrestored 356.

TOP RIGHT FACING PAGE Australia’s very first 356 Cabriolet is now restored and owned by 356 founder, Phillip Schudmak.

BELOW A racing 356 is a rarity in Australia these days, but PCNSW member Ron Goodman makes up for the lack of numbers with enthusiasm.

BOTTOM RIGHT FACING PAGE Early 356s are now coming into their own in historic racing in Regularity (average speed) events.

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Founding President of the Australian 356 Register, Phillip Schudmak, explains: Our first meeting was held at the Karmann Volkswerks garage in North Caulfield on January 10, 1986 and this gives us part of the reason for the Register’s origins. Some of those at the inaugural meeting were VW Beetle and Karmann guys, while others owned 356s, or aspired to. Only a few of us were PCV members and I don’t think that any of us thought we were deserting the mother ship. From the outset we had quite different interests and objectives and in any event, the PCV had already moved well away from 356s and with the advent of newer Porsche models there was little interest in the early cars or their owners. Several of us were aware of our namesake organisation in the USA, Porsche 356 Registry, established some nine years earlier, and we were more than happy to

copy their objectives. These were basically to generate and maintain interest in 356 Porsche, to exchange information and ideas about the cars between members, particularly in relation to the restoration and maintenance of their cars.

the regular Newsletter to members and Annual 356 Parade each November – the next this year will be our 30th. The ‘Gathering’ each April has also become an important annual event, with this year’s 22nd meeting held in Mt Gambier.

The degree of interest in the new ‘club’ was shown by the 62 curious enthusiasts (wives and partners included) who came to the first meeting in 1986, including a couple from Sydney and one from New Zealand.

From the outset we aimed to be a national club– in fact we are Australia’s only National Porsche Club – and have maintained a broad membership in all states, very much assisted by state co-ordinators who are responsible for organising local activities. The strong support of our wide membership base has been a feature of the Annual Parade meetings.

From the beginning there were some differences of opinion as to the direction of the Register. Several did not see it as needing any formal structure – just a get-together of like-minded enthusiasts. As a result, not all of the original group actually joined as financial members when we became an Incorporated Association. Sixteen of the original members remain on the list today. Almost from the beginning, there were two key activities that held the young club together and they remain vital ingredients:

Today we have about 320 members, a figure that has been fairly steady for several years, and along with PCV and the other interstate clubs, we are recognised by Porsche AG as an ‘Officially approved’ Porsche Club (official number 109). We estimate that almost 90 per cent of 356 owners in Australia are now members of the Register.

The Australian Porsche 914 Register Did you know that there’s an official Australian Porsche 914 Register? Many PCV members don’t. It was started in the mid-90s by a committee comprising the late Brian Clearihan as President, Max Preen as Vice President and Peter Carmichael as Treasurer. The Porsche factory acknowledged it and 28 members were listed. A newsletter was printed for a short time, edited by Brian, but unfortunately the Register only remained active for a year or so, although it is still mentioned on the Shannons list of Car Clubs. Records are kept by Ursula Weidenmuller, 356 Register stalwart and magazine editor and she and Max still field the occasional query and offer assistance to the small but loyal band of Australian 914 owners. Although the Register’s formation had nothing to do with dissatisfaction with the PCV, it confirmed the need for different model lines to have their own identity, something that the PCV recognised and formalised a few years later with the establishment of the various Club Registers in the early 2000s.

Clyde Boyer describes the formation of The Australian TYP 901 Register: A chance meeting of 2 early 911 owners at Phil Hearn’s workshop in early 2003 created the initial impetus for the formation of a group that had a specific interest in the driving and preservation of the 901 cars, 1964-1973 911s. An inaugural, casual meeting was held at Spyder Automobiles in October 2003, followed by the formation and incorporation of The Australian TYP 901 Register Inc in June 2004. This register is not recognised as an official Porsche club, unlike our 356 counterparts. The 356 Register must have had some empathy with the 901 owners however, as we have enjoyed a great relationship with them, being invited to display at their Annual Concours event for the past 9 years. Many owners of these early 911 cars wanted to be part of a like minded group; however at the time of formation PCV did not seem to cater for this need, with the emphasis definitely towards track events. So when a group was formed where drive, display, social and tech events were part of the structure, it certainly struck a chord with many early 911 owners. The creation of the TYP 901 forum was also a vital part of the TYP 901 Register and it is now the hub of much of the activity for early 911 cars in Australia. With 150 members Nationally our Register is steadily growing and is a permanent and important part of the Porsche landscape here in Australia. FACING PAGE As many as 100 early Porsches turn out each year, rain or shine, for the Australian 356 Register’s annual Parade in Melbourne

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Porsche Parade 1981

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9. For Richer or PORA Sprint days have always been very successful within the club. In 1986 they became even more interesting with the introduction of ‘Super Sprints’ at the end of the day. Perhaps illegal under CAMS rules of the day, cars would line up three abreast and every 10 seconds a line would be waved off. The end result would be a race for the four or five laps. These ‘super sprints’ became so successful that a meeting was called by the late Don Watson at the offices of Bob Street in Doncaster to discuss forming a race series for Porsche owners. This was the genesis of the Porsche Owners Racing Association – aptly abbreviated to PORA committee was formed and Dennis Bath took the mantle of chairman, following which a series of demonstration races were held in 1987 at PCV sprint meetings. The first of a four-round series was held at Winton Motor Raceway over the weekend of May 3031,1987, with a strong field lining up. The ‘Owners’ word in the title was deliberate as the series was designed for the ownerdriver rather than the well-funded young hot-shoe who might see it as a step on the ladder to motor racing stardom. In fact the later years of Porsche Cup did attract several young drivers with such ambitions and, reflecting this, the name was eventually changed to the Porsche Racing Association. The rules were based on the UK Porsche race series. There were four classes, A, B, C and D based on power to weight and the points system was designed so that in theory an entrant from any class could be Australian champion, even driving a relatively low powered car.

As the series developed the outright race winners inevitably were driving Class A cars (RSRs, 930 Turbos, etc) and with more entrants in the premier class (and hence more points on offer) this class usually provided the annual series winner. The early years saw every model of rearengined and front-engined Porsche on the track (apart from 356s), and even a few 914/6 mid-engined racecars. In Class D Ken Price (924 turbo) and Phil Bernadou (ex-London to Sydney 1968 911) humbled many drivers of more powerful cars. Don Watson was another standout performer and he went on to drive in what became V8 Supercars, very sadly to later lose his life at Bathurst. Races were held at Calder (on the road circuit and the Thunderdome), Sandown, Winton and Phillip Island in Victoria, Oran Park and Amaroo Park in NSW, Mallala in SA, Symmons Plains in Tasmania and Lakeside and Surfers Paradise in Queensland. In the later years there were also annual appearances on the grand prix tracks in Adelaide and Albert Park. Race and/or series winners included Graham Stockley, Bruno Hess, Greg Lovett, Andy Nicolaides, Rodney Jay, Peter Fitzgerald, Danny Loypur, Rex Broadbent, John Pollard, Ed Aitken, Mike Tankard, Harry Witham, Ken Jarrett, Martin Wagg, Chris Meulengraf (SA), Wayne Park (Qld) and the NSW pair of Geoff Morgan and Chris Hones.

ABOVE Don Tryhorn

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Founding PORA member and series Administrator Philip Bernadou recalls the meeting:

ABOVE Don Tryhorn and Dennis Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keefe.

Not long after the formation of the series, PORA was invited to support the 9th Round of the 1987 World Touring Car Championship at Calder Park Raceway.

TOP FACING PAGE Brett Richardson driving hard at Winton in an early Porsche Cup event.

On the Saturday qualifying session, Graham Stockley beached his 1974 RSR 3.0 in the sandpit so out came the red flag putting an end to the session.

MIDDLE FACING PAGE The late Don Watson was a leading competitor in the early Porsche Cup events.

Now, we were all fairly new at racing and had been told that when the red flag was displayed you had to return to the start line. One of our competitors thought the quickest way to return was to do a U-turn and travel back in the wrong direction! This did not go unnoticed by then Clerk of Course, Tim Schenken. As administrator I was summoned to the office and was told in no uncertain terms that this series will never amount to anything. I often think of those words some 27 years later! The series grew over the next few years with entries coming from NSW, Queensland and South Australian Porsche Club members. A highlight that really took the series to the next level was an invitation to the Australian Grand Prix on the streets of Adelaide in 1991. By now the series was part of the V8 program and was televised through the 7 Network. In hindsight, it was the progenitor of the GTS Cup Challenge Australia and the Carrera Cup Australia that have taken over its role today.

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BOTTOM FACING PAGE PORA founder Philip Bernadou always drove his ex-London-Sydney Marathon Porsche hard, whether on the track or in Club Motorkhana and Autocross events.


A competitor’s perspective. Richard Batchelor tells: As its first Series Administrator, Philip Bernadou was a persuasive and charismatic salesman for Porsche Cup, as well as an enthusiastic participant in the races and before long he convinced members of interstate clubs to join PORA. In those days few PCV members bothered to wear race suits and the 10 or so entrants in the demo race following a PCV Calder Sprint in 1986 made an impressive sight as they lined up in all their race gear. Of course all the would-be PORA drivers first had to obtain full CAMS race licences and Murcott’s Driving Excellence experienced a surge in demand! Those early Australian Porsche Cup races flourished and certainly drew the crowds – I was still a spectator at that stage. Initially there were some snide remarks from a few people about ‘white shoe warriors’ but people who actually watched the racing immediately realised that these guys were serious, hard racers, as evidenced by the desperate passing moves, expensive prangs and spectacular engine blow-ups. With so many alpha males taking part, strong rivalries soon developed and the completion of many races saw formal protests being ‘discussed’. However any disputes invariably were sorted out over a glass or two at the end of a day’s racing. In fact if you ask any of the participants now what PORA was like they will recall the great camaraderie that existed between the drivers, for which Phil Bernadou can take the main credit. Undoubtedly the highlight of the Porsche Cup era was the invitation to take part in the 1991 Australian Grand Prix meeting in Adelaide on the full circuit (Clipsal today is run on a shorter version of the GP track). The success of this event introduced Porsche racing onto the Grand Prix race programme, a position it still holds today. There was no practice and drivers went straight into a first qualifying session on the Thursday to determine grid positions. Phil Bernadou addressed the drivers before qualifying to emphasise that the eyes of the motor sport world were on us, so be sure to put on a good show. He then handed over to our most experienced racer who stressed that we should not spin off as it might result in qualifying being stopped. As it happened, he was the only driver to spin! Come the Saturday a big field of 30 greeted the starter and at the end of the race many of the 21 surviving cars, including mine, sported body damage. It had been that sort of race, but the crowd loved it. It was the best fun I have had with my clothes on! Next day the Adelaide Advertiser had a prominent article headed ‘Rubber, smoke, flames in Porsche Cup opener’. We must have also impressed the organisers as PORA was invited back for the remaining three AGPs in Adelaide and the first two AGPs in Melbourne. In the early years of Porsche Cup most drivers towed their cars to the races on simple tandem trailers, accompanied by one or two friends to help change wheels or fetch fuel. A few even drove their racecars to race meetings on the public roads. Inevitably as the series matured big money, big sponsors and big egos came into it and the increasing professionalism and desire for expensive TV coverage to please sponsors raised the costs for everybody, squeezing out the less wealthy competitors who had supported the series from its earlier days. Many drifted off to race in Marque Sports, the 944 Challenge, historic racing, or simply retired. Finally in the mid-1990s Porsche Cars Australia took over management of the Australian Porsche Cup. It had been a great ride.

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ABOVE, BELOW AND TOP RIGHT Hard racing was a hallmark of early Australian Cup events.

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ABOVE Richard Batchelor and Ed Aitken in his 959 look-alike battle for honours at Winton.

BELOW Like a number of other PORA competitors, Richard Batchelor, seen here at the Morwell Hillclimb, also lined his 911 RSR up for other PCV events.

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ABOVE Dummy grid in early Porsche Cup racing Winton 1989.

TOP RIGHT FACING PAGE Graham Stockley chasing Porsche Cup honours 1988.

BELOW Porsche racing in Adelaide. Porsche Cup racing was a major support category to the Australian F1 Grand Prix in Adelaide.

BOTTOM RIGHT FACING PAGE Jim Rolfe in his 924 Turbo Porsche Cup racing Winton 1989.

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PCV The First 40 Years

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Porsche Parade 1981

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10. Game Changer By Peter White By the early 1990s there was concern that owners of unmodified, or earlier model Porsches, were being disadvantaged by some of the Club’s competition rules. This concern was basically driven by a number of members who wanted to see fair and decent rules that did not allow people to take advantage in their given class. I remember one instance at Winton Raceway when four cars were lined up to complete their timed laps. At the same time a sprinkle of rain appeared on our windscreens and the competitor at number two position suddenly decided he needed to go off and get more petrol - which he did. When he came back the track was dry and clean and he won his class. I was on the line behind him and felt very aggrieved and it was at this time I decided I put my hand up to be Competition Secretary to level the playing field. To get things moving I organised a sub-committee of around four experienced PCV members to look at redrafting new proposals for sprints and motorkhanas to make them better and fairer. At the end of some months of drafting and redrafting, we wholeheartedly believed we had made significant progress to make the competition more even. I remember one rule that we changed. Until then, a car could put slicks on and merely go up a class, despite the fact that these tyres gave it a significant advantage over road-legal tyres. This was just a small example. The result of the Sub-Committee’s work was major changes in the Club Competition Rules. BOTTOM Old Morwell Hill Climb.

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Standard cars and ‘Power to Weight’ became more important and some cars were selected at random for dynamometer checks at the end of a day’s competition to ensure they were correctly classified. Making the changes resulted in a lot of discussion in the Club, as there it included a lot of very competitive people with vested interests in the outcome! For example, the initial basis of selecting classes on ‘Power to Weight’ using Porsche factory figures looked a simple idea, but we soon realised that any car could reduce their weight quite simply and there was no rule that said they had to tell the Club about that! So we determined that these changes should be notified and if necessary, the car in question would be moved up a class above their standard class. We also talked about octane rating and what should be allowed before a standard car became subject to scrutiny. This caused consternation from some members, but this was always going to happen. So apart from being a standard car in a given class we wanted to know about changes to weight or power that could possibly change the class of that car. Many cars were found wanting. We relied upon truth and honesty from competitors but as the stakes became higher, we had to do a little bit more to protect the genuine ‘standard’ competitors. Such changes could never be perfect, but at the time we did the best we could and it was a game changer for many.

FACING PAGE Wet track at Winton.


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LEFT Graham Stockley ‘rallies’ his RSR in the Geelong Autocross.

MIDDLE THIS PAGE Entree Class at Phillip Island 2015.

TOP THIS PAGE Dummy grid - Phillip Island 2004.

BOTTOM THIS PAGE Somerton Motorkhana BP servo 2002.

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Porsche Parade 1981

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11. The Bigger Playground By Ian Knight

ABOVE Ian Knight in his 993 RSCS at Mt Buller Hill Climb 2006.

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I commenced my love affair with Porsches in the early 1990s, which my wife would call a mid-life crisis, but I saw it more as an evolution in a lifelong love of motorsport and fast cars. In the 80’s I was involved with the 4WD Club in WA, where I competed in mud gymkhanas and dune races. I then progressed into the Jag Club with an XJS and subsequently an XJS-C with a full Tom Walkinshaw Racing Kit, competing in a number of motorkhanas and even a Concours, where I won 2nd Place. I lost points for having the audacity to fit an aftermarket 10 stacker CD unit in the boot (the first in WA), along with one of the early mobile phone antennas to attach my ‘brick’ to. Moving back to Melbourne after selling up home and cars in Perth, it took a few years to re-establish and to finally acquire my first Porsche, a 944 Cab. It wasn’t really the best car to compete in, but this was the era of ‘race on Sunday, drive to work on Monday’, with Club cars then being very much a rarity. Having heard through a friend about the Dutton Rally, I decided I wanted to give it a try, but first I needed to hone some skills, join a club and get a CAMS licence. So I looked up where the next PCV event was, I thought I would have a look and see what it was all about.

Little did I know that the visit to the Army Barracks in Richmond to a motorkhana, where the current AAMI Stadium is now located, would lead to over 20 years of friendship and fun, albeit with a somewhat lighter wallet.

Mmm, this was starting to resemble a Club Car. With the suspension tightened up and the negative camber, my track tyres were not lasting very long on the road and every time I drove over a 20-cent coin, I felt it.

My first introduction was to Robyn Anderson (now Begley). Those who know Robyn will understand that this was a sure way to convince a new male to join, as she is one of the nicest persons and very attractive. She also made me feel very welcome and introduced me to a number of members.

So along came a second Porsche for dayto-day driving. Sticking to my convertible penchant I put an order in for a Boxster S and impatiently purchased a near new Boxster 2.5 to tide me over. Little did I realise that some of my so-called friends Chris Alp and Mark Cummings would call it a hairdresser’s car.

On meeting Paul Stuart, we discovered common friends and that we had crossed paths in our youth. Paul spent a long time talking to me about the PCV and things I needed to think about in prepping my car, as he had a wealth of motorsport experience and was very willing to share it with me.

I am a firm believer that the more you put in the more you get back. This is particularly true in clubs and it is also a great way for a new member to get to know people. Also, if you are like me and work better at the centre of the hub, this is where the decisions are made.

Well, of course I joined the Club and competed in a number of events in my standard 944 S2 Cab. Being somewhat competitive (who isn’t in this Club!) and finding myself near the bottom of my Class, I determined that a series of modifications were required, including 968 CS suspension (ex Simon Froude), larger and wider wheels, and then a chip, some R rated racing rubber, harness, racing seats and ultimately a half cage, along with a few advanced driving courses. All legal, of course!! “Trust me it’s stock!”

Like many accountants that get involved in clubs, I was soon asked to take over the Treasurer’s role. Many look at our accounts today and think the Club is on easy street. Well, let me tell you that in 2000 we were technically insolvent, as we were holding back payment of expenses waiting for enough revenue to come in. Luckily, we now had an extremely cohesive and experienced group of business people on the Committee, with a vision to strengthen the Club across many areas, including Competition and finances.

LEFT Stewart Webster in his 911-engined 356 at Mt Buller Hill Climb 2006. BELOW Rex Broadbent at Mt Buller Hill Climb 2006.

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LEFT AND ABOVE Parts Manager Paul Girt lines up for the Mansfield Prologue in PCMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 911 3.6.

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Yes, we were lucky, as this period also coincided with an economic climate of profits and prosperity; however in many other ways there were many challenges. In this era competition was the backbone of the Club’s existence. Wanting to be more involved, I joined the Competition Committee, learning many aspects of Porsches thanks to the wide knowledge of people like Mike Herrod and Greg Cook. I am no mechanic, so my contribution came in other areas, including the admin part of competition, scrutiny and timing. I have never seen so many grown men complain about timing irregularities. These were vehemently rejected, but having worked in the timing box on the stopwatches, I knew there were many occasions when a mistimed lap was averaged out, or where some laps just couldn’t be counted, due to missing the lap time or just confusing which red car you were actually supposed to be timing! There had to be a better way. After much investigation and discussion with the various track owners to get access to their timing systems, we decided to make the move to Dorians, offering both Club-owned Dorians for hire, or ones for sale at a discount to members. This also entailed having special holders manufactured, so that the Dorian could be used without drilling holes and developing an antenna to register the car across the line. It was not 100 per cent fail-proof, but far more reliable than fallible human beings with stopwatches! We were also able to create a great buzz at all of our club nights, particularly with the trophy presentation for each event, through the very humorous, but ‘roast- like’ comments, from Mark Cummings and Sven Burchartz, who managed to pick on everyone’s soft points, but in a very friendly way that caused great laughter.

One of the big events in this period was the June long weekend at Winton and DECA. This used to attract incredible numbers, with much frivolity and banter on the Saturday night at dinner. I remember one night at our motel in Benalla finding the local police looking at our cars, then going to every other motel, looking for a red Porsche that had been reported by a local, who stated the vehicle was travelling at ridiculous speeds on the back road to Benalla. Luckily, this was the era of the ‘resalered’ Porsches and nearly every second or third car was red, so they were somewhat hamstrung as they had no number plate info. However, it made for some interesting threats, with blank responses from the Committee as to whom it could be. To this day we do not know who it was....do we Perry? We also tried to bring some variety into the events. One particular event that created a lot of interest was the Economy Run, where we all gathered at a servo, filled our cars with fuel, sealed our tanks and then embarked on a run to another servo to fill up again and take count. This was serious stuff, as competition points were at risk and we were chasing fancy trophies and bragging rights. Many members went to extremes to grease up wheel bearings, pump up tyres to crazy pressures and even to lean off the motor. One member, Jan Jinidassa, took the run to Shepparton so seriously that he sent his girlfriend up by train to lighten the load! In another run to Lorne, Matt Stoupas nearly seized the motor on the drive back, it was running so lean.

RIGHT PCV members having lunch at Targa Tasmania.

BELOW Targa Tasmania - 2000.

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The year that I won the event in my RSCS, we were up in the Dandenongs and I was rolling down the hills with the motor off, but in gear with the clutch out, ready to start when required. This worked well until I found I was actually going faster than some of the cars in front and rather than slow down, I decided to pass some with the motor off. This made for some interesting looks when all of a sudden the RS came to life, to get back onto the correct side when traffic was coming. Given the lack of power steering or power-assisted brakes, it was one of the scariest drives – but I won!

For a number of years Greg Cook was Competition Director. I remember arriving late to a Drivers’ Briefing at a Point Cook motorkhana and being severely reprimanded for my tardiness by Greg. Little did I know at the time that Greg would become a lifelong mate. His disciplined approach was also reinforced another time, when my late entry was rejected for Phillip Island, notwithstanding my position on the committee! During this period virtually all events had a waiting list of members wanting to compete, as competition was probably at its peak and the chase for points was at its fiercest. Many

wanting to win their class would be seen at driver training, drive days, or other club events at the selected tracks in the week before an event, trying to perfect their lines and familiarize themselves with the track. Many of our members also embarked on other motorsport events. This tended to be focused on either circuit racing or bitumen rallies. I went the rally route. The Dutton Rallies were great fun and in its peak attracted over 300 entries, travelling from Melbourne to the GP in Adelaide. Competition was fierce and to win you needed to master both the navigation and the various speed events. The hardest was the night navigation, traditionally around Geelong. It was on my first rally that I saw these two guys in an Alfa Spider with propeller hats on. They were a formable team on the Nav and the driver was pretty good at the motor events. The two subsequently moved on to a 911, and then a 911RS, competing in over 10 Dutton Rallies, Porsche Club, Targa Tasmania and numerous other rallies. This dynamic duo was Mark Cummings and Chris Alp, with Chris’s attention to detail excelling in the navigation. He won many a Silver Star for cleaning all Dutton Rally navigation stages. This focus was also reflected in Chris’s management of many Winton 6 Hour relay events on behalf of Porsche Club teams, where he would find all the loopholes in the rules to maximise performance.

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TOP - FACING PAGE Paul Blackie at Targa NZ.

TOP Mark Clair gets some air at Classic Adelaide.

BOTTOM - FACING PAGE Garry Voges and David Oscar in 2005 Grand Prix Rally.

BOTTOM Michael Browning in his 3.0 Carrera at the Phillip Island Historics 2011.

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TOP Kerry and Tim Reynolds at the finish of the GP Rally 1989. BOTTOM Vin Smart pushing the 3.0 RSR to FTD at Lakeland Hill 1980.

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LEFT - FACING PAGE Barb and Will Classic Adelaide 2003. BOTTOM - FACING PAGE Kerry Reynolds, Bob Watson and Chris Meulengraf at the GP Rally 1990.


This rewarded his team with many first, second and third places, until such time as we were banned from the Winton event for being too competitive! The Winton 6hour events became an annual pilgrimage for many PCV members, participating in multiple Porsche teams, representing either PCA, Weltmeister, or Fitzgerald Racing sponsored teams. Many years later I returned to compete in one of the new Dutton Rallies with Greg Cook as a co driver. With this event, each entrant did a run on each event and the times were aggregated. At that time the criterion for being a ‘rookie’ was that you had not competed in the event before and they did not count previous incarnations of the Dutton Rally. At the presentations, there was much booing when they announced that Greg and I were the winners of the Rookie award, but to this day we haven’t actually received our trophies. The attraction of tarmac rally events such as Targa Tasmania, Rally Tasmania, Mount

Buller Sprint and Classic Adelaide created an almost cult following. Many of the Club stalwarts competed in all these events. Some, included Geoff Taylor (who has competed in every one of the 24 Targa Tasmania since its inception in 1992) and Greg Cook (all but one), come to mind. This is not a racing style for the faint-hearted. Targa Tasmania in particular is a world-class events, with the highest of risks attached. Drawn directly from the best features of the Targa Florio, Mille Miglia, the Coupe des Alpes and the Tour de Corse, it has gathered a worldwide recognition for the grueling challenge it presents. Regrettable we have also lost four of our beloved members to accidents in these rallies: Gary Tierney, Andrew Carra, Paul Flintoft and John Mansell. Other members competing have included (with apologies for those I have omitted): Tony Robertson, Stuart McAuley, Paul Stuart, Mike Herrod, Mark Cummings, Chris Alp, Peter Fitzgerald, Carol Fitzgerald, Rusty French, Mike Mansour, Rex Broadbent, Gary Tierney, Mark Tierney, Geoff Taylor, Stuart Webster, Winston Kim, Max Warwick, Lee Harper, Gavin James, Duane Rodgers, Andrew Farmer, Matt Close, Casey Close, Michael Browning, Mark Clair, Jim Richards and David Cooper. Many of these are Platinum and Diamond Trophy winners, legends and outright winners of modern and classic classes.

There were many changes to the Club during my time on the Committee and as President, including the new Club emblem, the establishment of the Registers, the introduction of the Hall of Fame to recognize the characters and skilled drivers that really make a Club, but may not qualify for Life Membership, the Club sponsorship of Club night meals; the focus on safety at events (thanks to Michael Chapman), the continued move to improve the professionalism of the Club (particularly with the introduction of paid staff) and proper timing systems, dedicated flag marshals and safety vehicles. It was really quite a Club of change through that era. The era also saw the proliferation of the ‘trailer queens’, with Club cars being towed to the track, rather than driven and the proliferation of Modified and Open class cars appearing, as competition heated up. Now the latest development has been the influx of former Carrera Cup cars in Club competition events. I look back over my time in the Club and see the strength of membership, the number and success of both Register and main Club events and the sustained competitive spirit. I am proud to be a member and to have been part of the growth of the PCV.

A small contingent of PCV members also shipped their cars across to New Zealand to compete in Targa New Zealand. The team included Greg Cook, Mark Cummings, Chris Alp, Gary Tierney, Mark Tierney, David Cooper and myself. This was a challenging event, which may have lacked the finesse of Targa Tasmania and the level of volunteers, but there were many unforgettable stages and the challenge of competing without pace notes.

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TOP Phillip Island Historics 2011 BOTTOM Kerry Reynolds and Noel Valentine Targa Tas 1992.

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TOP Bob Watson 911S GP Rally 1990. BOTTOM Don Tryhorn and Dennis Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keefe at Mt Buller Hill Climb 2006.

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ABOVE Kerry Reynolds and Denny Hulme cars at the GP Rally.

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Porsche Parade 1981

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12. Competition Evolution

On The Dummy Grid - Phillip Island Sprints 2015.

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TOP Mike Herrodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 993 RSCS at Haunted Hills 2012. BOTTOM Bryan Fitt in his 993, Phillip Island 2015. TOP FACING PAGE Theo Mihelakos in his 993 Cup Car at Winton Sprints 2014. BOTTOM FACING PAGE Ian Jenkins in his 993 at DECA skid pan 2004.

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Getting Serious and The Bigger Playground describes how PCV members graduated from ‘dipping their toes in the water’ to jumping right in to competition, both within the Club and abroad, in a multitude of ways and events. Cars and Classes have changed dramatically, particularly since the millenium. Current President Andrew Bonwick relates his experiences, as Competition Official, Competition Director and competitor: I started competition with PCV in late 2003, after a couple of years with other clubs. The joy of the track days for me is the ability to put the car in a safe environment where the limit to my speed and cornering is my (lack of) skill. I don’t have to stay within road laws designed to protect other road users from my mistakes and vice versa.

The result has been remarkably successful. The Marshals Co-ordinators, Michael Chapman, Will Darvall, John Baker, Robin Humphries and Mark Behan, have created a highly professional team, widely acknowledged by CAMS and other car club organisers. The Club now provides all its own flag, grid, Scrutiny, Clerk of Course and Stewards marshals, and contributes timers when required. When the chips are down in competition incidents, the Club marshals have been recognised as delivering a thoroughly competent safety response. We now have over 30 CAMS qualified motorsport officials in the team and a total team of 70+ members. Current Competition Director and keen competitor Tony Carolan brings us up to date:

I first started in PCV competition back in early 2008. It is certainly very interesting to look back on some of the entry lists from that time. The standard A through D classes weren’t radically different from today and it is a great testament to the Porsche marque that many of the individual 996s, 993s, 964s, 911 SCs, 3.2s, 944s and Boxsters that were competing in 2008 are still competing today. Some have changed owners several times, but these cars just keep going. The number of entries in the standard classes however, in those days, usually tended to be far greater than today, with it not being unusual to have 15 or more entrants in both B and C class.

The Club has always been welcoming to me as an unskilled enthusiastic driver. No-one complains about my slower speeds than the 993 can deliver when driven well. There is a place for all types of drivers on the track and that developed further with the introduction of Entrée Class in 2007. Since then, 750 people have participated in Entrée, as an introduction to the track day Porsche experience. Another evolution has been the move away from drivers and a few officials providing scrutineering, race control and stewards, with interruption to their day when rostered as flag marshals. The development of the PCV Marshal group aimed to improve access to motorsport for a wider group of club members, provide a wider experience for those drivers who didn’t want to drive at all events in a year and to eliminate the lost time putting drivers out as flaggies.

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It is in the modified M1, M2 and Open classes where we see the greatest change in vehicles. I guess that these cars get used far more aggressively so it isn’t surprising that quite a few of them slip into retirement. This isn’t to infer that they are all worn out; it is often the case, particularly with the 993s and earlier RSs and RSCSs, that their value is increasing at such a rate that their owners are wary of risking them on the track. Back in 2008, M2 was a very popular class with 12 or more entrants, with numbers in M1 and Open usually less. It was also worth noting that several of the Open cars were road registered and driven to the track. So how have things changed over the years? The main influence is that our beloved marque, to our absolute delight, insists an producing ever more powerful and lighter cars. When the Club competition is structured around grouping cars by power to weight ratios, these more powerful and lighter cars kept falling outside the class boundaries.

1

An off the show room floor Turbo or GT3, without any racing modifications, other than ‘R’ spec tyres, ended up in Open class competing with full race cars on slick tyres. This led to the introduction of the GT classes, which have now been expanded to GT1, GT2 and GT3 classes, which are really doing a great job of attracting those owners that have a late GT3 model and want to predominantly use it as an unmodified road car, but also have the opportunity to seriously test their skills in competition against like vehicles. The other area where just recently we have seen radical change is in Open class. This has largely come about on the back of the globally successful Porsche Carrera Cup Series. Every 3 or so years Porsche produces a new model Cup car and almost instantly there are dozens of Cup cars on the market, feeding down into lesser racing series. PCV members are now picking these up and it isn’t unusual to have 7 or 8 Cup cars at our sprint events.

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So how different do our events look today? With all the brightly coloured Cup cars we have taken on the look of a professional race series rather than a Club event, some members with mechanics supporting every pit stop, with airjacks, compressed air, spare wheel sets, etc., with all these vehicles trailered in. Then we have these blindingly fast and beautiful 991 GT3s and Turbos. Then we get to the standard A to D classes which aren’t much different to 8 years ago. In fact, the car I started in is still there in Phil Treloar’s hands, doing much better than in mine, I hate to admit. It is probably a result of improved tyre technology!!! One thing that hasn’t changed is the spirit, camaraderie and friendly nature of the competition group. There are some serious competitors, but everybody will take the time to give someone else a hand and pass on tips, even if it helps a competitor.

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1 Kees van Ek and Sally-Anne Hains in their 991 GT3’s at DECA Motorkhana 2015. 2 President Andrew Bonwick in his 993 at Presidents Day 2014. 3 Ron Widdison in his 3.2 Carrera at the Old Morwell Hill Climb 2003. 4 Tony Hughes at Calder Sprints 1989. FACING PAGE 997 GT3 at speed, Sandown Sprints 2014.

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1 993 RSCS at Haunted Hills 2012 2 Editor Cliff Herbison in his 944 Turbo at Sandown 2004 3 Dummy Grid Sandown 2013.

4 Arctic weather at Haunted Hills 2015 FACING PAGE Mark Chrzanowski and Aaron Ireland do batttle for the C Class Crown in their SCs at Phillip Island.

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4 Will Darvall recalls ‘a nerve-wracking ride!’ In the early years of competition, a willing Club member was deputised to take a car trailer to events, in order to return dead cars. Obviously, this was before the days of trailering cars to events. The Club purchased a trailer, which disappeared into the ether at some stage. In the early ‘80’s I hired a trailer from the local service station and towed it to Winton, behind my 300 SEL 3.5 Merc. During the day, Max Errington’s famously nurtured immaculate Turbo refused to start. It had previously been checked over thoroughly at Hamiltons for the same intermittent complaint, with lots of parts being replaced. The car was duly pushed on to the trailer, with lots of advice from every free competitor, and I secured it carefully, with the jacking point ahead of the mid point between the trailer axles, so that the weight on the tow bar was just right.

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A trip to the then service station at Winton ensured that all car and trailer tyres were inflated accordingly, with the one leaking trailer tyre given a few extra pounds! Off we went, with my wife and me in the front and Max in the back. The trip back from Winton always seems to take forever and I was cruising at 70 mph (112 kph). Suddenly, the trailer starting fish tailing, pulling the back of the car with it. For a short eternity, probably 10 seconds, I sawed away at the wheel, trying to counter the rapidly swapping rear, not daring to do anything else, until calm was restored as we scrubbed off speed.

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Inspection revealed that the Turbo had only moved a little during the wild ride, the Merc hadn’t twisted, the towbar was intact and all was well. We cruised at 100 after that, somewhat subdued! Max, always a perfect gentleman, never uttered a peep during, or after, the wild ride, except to compliment me, and the Turbo was delivered safely to the curb at home, to continue its distinguished immaculate career in Max’s hands. The electronic glitch was eventually traced to a well hidden poor earth connection!

1 Rod Hunter, 991 GT3 at Haunted Hills 2015 2 Cars on the Grid at Sandown Sprints 2014.

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3 Gary Voges in his most successful 944 S2 at Phillip Island Sprints. 4 Christian Fitzgeraldl leading a 993 RS at Phillip Island 2014.

5 Aaron Ireland in his C class winning SC at Phillip Island 2012. 6 Theo Mihelakos (leading) and Nick Karnaros round turn 1 at Phillip Island. 7 In the Pits - Theo Mihelakos contemplates his 997 GT3 Cup Car.

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4 1 Howard Burton takes turn one in his 993 at the Island 2015. 2 Cup Cars at Sandown 2014. 3 996 GT3 Cup at WInton 2012, 4 Matt Stoupas heads down Gardner straight at Phillip Island 2011 in a GT3, 5 Driver training at Phillip Island 2011, 6 Nicholas Sampieri in his 991 GT3 at Phillip Island 2015,

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7 Rex Broadbent in his 993 GT2 at Winton 2011, 8 Phillip Island,

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Michael Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien charges down the back straight in his SC at Winton Sprints 1975 - 2015 113 2012.


13. Economy Runs

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Club founder, keen organiser and participant in all Club activities, Kerry Reynolds, remembers the Economy Runs in the seventies: It’s unlikely that anyone has ever bought a Porsche with fuel economy foremost in their mind; in fact at the time the Porsche Club of Victoria ran its first Economy Run in 1977 petrol was 17 cents per litre. Nevertheless, in the wider motoring community, fuel economy has always been of some interest, and although no longer the case, certain of the oil companies promoted and organised long distance and widely publicised Economy Runs. Vehicle manufacturers, keen to demonstrate the economy of their vehicles, would often sponsor cars in these competitions, sometimes driven by well- known motor sport identities. The events attracted wide publicity, and no doubt assisted the promoters including BP, Mobil and Total, as well as the vehicle manufacturers, to make exaggerated claims about the superiority of their products. As time went on, and the public became somewhat sceptical about the results, and the conniving that went on to achieve what were often unrealistic outcomes, interest in these events began to wane, and the public lost interest. These days of course, the claims made by manufacturers are verified by a Government controlled laboratory, and are advertised on the windscreens of all new passenger vehicles. Although this laboratory testing might also be somewhat artificial, it does provide the public with relevant information based on a common set of criteria, thus eliminating the somewhat fanciful claims made by manufacturers in years gone by.

Although the corporate based Economy Runs ceased, nevertheless at car club level, they continued to be conducted, more as fun events and to add some light hearted competition and variety to the club calendars, although my experience suggests that ‘light hearted competition’, might be somewhat of an oxymoron when considered in the Porsche Club of Victoria context. The first PCV Economy Run conducted in December 1977, attracted twenty two entries over a distance of 160 KM and covered an area to the north of Melbourne including Mt Macedon, Kilmore, Tooborac, Heathcote and finishing at Lazar’s Vineyard at Kyneton. Petrol tanks were filled and sealed at the start. Competitors were given mapped route instructions which had to be followed, to ensure that the full distance of 160KM was covered. There were secret controls along the way where competitors had to check in, to ensure that no short cuts were taken. At the finish, fuel caps were unsealed, tanks refilled and economy figures calculated. Being the first Economy Run, no one quite knew what to expect, although it was assumed that the 356 cars would have a distinct advantage. This proved to be the case, with Jack Godbehear, in his superb 356B being the clear winner at 4.91 litres per 100KM (57.49 miles per gallon), with Simon Golding in his 356A at 5.9 litres per 100KM (47.91 miles per gallon) second, and surprisingly, a 2.2 911, driven by Max Errington in third place, with 5.93 litre per 100KM (47.63 miles per gallon).

LEFT Max Errington filling up for the Economy Run in 1981.

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In some ways Jack Godbehear was not a surprising winner, as he was a most highly regarded motor engineer, with a great knowledge of the very early Porsche engines and in particular, for his expertise with the complex four cam unit used in the 550 Spyder and 356 Carreras. Of course Economy Runs were not everyone’s cup of tea and it was clear that some competitors, whilst very happy to participate, preferred instead to drive the cars in the way they were meant to be driven. In this first event, a certain Will Darvall was the last placed Porsche, recording a figure of 14 Litres per 100KM (20.1 MPG) in his 2.7 Carrera RS: Will was always happier flattening his accelerator foot, rather than feathering it. The second Economy Run was conducted a year later in December 1978, with a rather disappointing 16 starters`. At a distance of 108 kilometres, this was a much shorter event than the previous one and travelled through Healesville, Yarra Glen and Eltham. Again in contrast to last year’s event, the route was quite hilly, giving competitors the opportunity to travel quite long distances with engines switched off, even going uphill, after they had built up sufficient speed either on the flat, or after a downhill run. Another well-known Porsche motor engineer and club member John Gregory won this event, with a substantial improvement on his performance in the previous year, going from 7.0 litres per 100KM (40.24 MPG), to 4.4

litres per 100KM (64.16 MPG). Although PCV Economy Runs continued right through the eighties into the nineties, the last of the Runs in which I was involved was the December 1979 event. This was organised by the then Competition Secretary Warwick Freemantle, who set quite a demanding route from Ringwood, via Lilydale, Healesville and the Black Spur to Eildon, with a number of check points along the way. (As a matter of interest the cost of fuel at the time of this event had risen to around 30 cents per litre – still fairly cheap by today’s standards).

FACING PAGE Ros Poon fills up in the Economy Run 1995. TOP Economy Run lunch 1980. BOTTOM 944 Turbos fill up for the Economy Run.

John Gregory was again the winner recording 4.36 litres per 100KM (64.83 MPG) - similar to his performance the previous year.

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A surprise performer in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event year was the second placegetter Russell Sturzaker, in his 924 at 5.6 Litres per 100KM (50.75 MPG). Whilst these Economy Runs were good fun, with people getting up to all sorts of tricks to improve performance, including inflating tyres to almost bursting point, pushing cars with engines turned off, leaning off carburettors, etc., they were nevertheless regarded by some people as being antisocial. In the interest of weight reduction, serious competitors often travelled alone, with partners having to either stay at home, or make their own way to the end point. There was also the impact on the wider motoring community, who had to deal with competitorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cars crawling along in Sunday traffic, sometimes slowing down to almost walking pace, hoping to crest a hill without starting the motor again. This often resulted in much hostility and fist waving and reflected poorly on the image of the club generally. The ongoing challenge for the committee in subsequent years, was to continue the Economy Runs, but to ensure they were organised in such a way as to minimise the adverse impact on other road users. The selection of future routes along less travelled roads and maximum times being set for completing the course, went a long way towards avoiding further road rage and ensured the continuation of these events, which continued to provide a challenge and much ongoing enjoyment for many club members.

TOP FACING PAGE 356 fills up for the Economy Run 1995. TOP Mike Stillwell & Graeme Redman share a moment on Lake Eildon at the Economy Run 1980. BOTTOM FACING PAGE At Eildon for the Economy Run 1981. LEFT Economy Run lunch 1987. BOTTOM At Eildon for the Economy Run 1980.

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14. National Meetings 1977-1996 Paul Mauger, a keen organiser and participant, was involved in the early years: This describes my recollections of the Porsche Clubs of Australia National Meetings. When I look back at all the past issues of the Porsche Club magazine, I find it hard to believe how members fitted in all the racing, Concours and social events. The Annual Interclub Meetings took a lot of planning as well as a lot of stamina. All the formal details of National Porsche Club Meetings are recorded in the Club magazines. I will explain how much fun all the meetings were and how life-long friends were made through the Porsche Club competitions and social events. We were a bunch of competitive, business-building, energetic guys, eager to test our car racing and car care skills against one another. It was great fun meeting new members and watching their rise through the ranks. The early friends made were the Harrises, Reynolds, Clearihans, Redmans, Bensons, Sturzakers, Michael Pratt, Max Errington, John Edwards, the Stockleys, Loueys, Colmans, Toveys, Whites, Paul Sadler, the Pritties, Robin Versluys, the Fremantles and the Mansours. Many other friends were made as they joined the Club in later years. I still keep up with many of these people. The connections formed were deep, lasting many decades. Some of us old farts now don the lycra and saddle up for bike rides, stoking the competitive embers. The first Interstate social event was held in Mount Gambier in 1977, jointly arranged by the Porsche Clubs of Victoria and South Australia. This event was so successful that a National Meeting was suggested. And so it came to pass. On June 3 and 4, 1978, Victoria, NSW and South Australia Porsche Clubs combined for a weekend at Swan Hill. A Concours and Motorkhana events were scheduled for the Sunday. Victoria took out the first 6 places.

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The Interclub Meeting on Queen’s Birthday weekend 1979 involved not only a Motorkhana, but lots of fun events in Adelaide. The Club magazine noted that “Tim Lynas and Paul Mauger set the three Motorkhana courses: the Long Slalom, the T-shaped Long Slalom and a Paul Mauger Square,” which elicited mumbled complaints that the Porsches “will end up on their roofs”. McLaren Vale wineries were well attended, with their fare enjoyed by all. In the evening, a barbecue was held on the Glenelg foreshore. A local S.A. Television crew took film of Porsche Club members at their best for the nightly TV news. The Concours d’Elegance was dominated by the South Australians, and this event was followed by another barbecue dinner. The Motorkhana held the following day was followed by a dinner dance at the Ensenada Motel. It was a full-on racing, competing and socialising weekend. As President John Benson summed it up in his report, the Annual National Meetings were “a tremendous success” with members enjoying the pleasure of “meeting, competing and eating with other Porsche enthusiasts’’. The 4th Annual National Porsche Clubs of Australia meeting was held in 1980 in AlburyWodonga, again on the Queen’s Birthday weekend. Sprints, Concours, barbecues and a dinner dance kept everyone very busy. For the Sprints we raced on the seldom-used Hume Weir Circuit which unfortunately was very dirty. John Benson organized some large council brooms and we set about sweeping dirt and dust off the corners before we could do laps. This year saw the advent of a State Trophy to be awarded to the state accumulating the most points from the Concours, Motorkhana and Sprints. Victoria was a clear winner. Iain Corness, president of the Queensland Porsche Club, suggested his club organize four trophies and present them to the winners of 4 classes based on horsepower ratings. All classes were taken out by Victorians: Tony Brandt, Steve White, Bruce Harris and Vin Smart. The challenge was issued to the other states to outperform Victorian competitors in 1981.


911 Birthday event 1977.

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Host club Porsche NSW scheduled the 1981 National meeting during Easter in Sydney, which gave members more time to get to the meeting and the chance to include their families in the holiday long weekend. Five states were well represented by 80 vehicles. A car transporter delivered cars from Melbourne to Sydney for $140 return. A number of Victorians shipped their already clean cars by train on the roll-on roll-off car transporter with competitors travelling overnight in the sleeper car. A police escort was provided to get the large contingent of cars to the Concours, which was held at McMahon’s Point on the edge of the Harbour. The Concours was restricted to 3 cars per class per club owing to the large numbers. John Newell, the local Porsche distributor, won outright in his immaculate 1956 356A Carrera Speedster. It wasn’t long after this win, by a beautifully restored car, that we created a Master Class, for cars that were never driven. Dinner was at Noah’s, catering for over 100 people and we were briefed on the next day’s event, the Sprints at Oran Park. Graham Stockley took fastest time of the day in his Turbo 3.3L. Bruce Harris also gave a beautiful driving display in his rare 924 Carrera GT. At the presentation dinner, Victoria took home 9 of the 20 trophies for the Sprints. One of the most memorable National Meetings was held in Surfers Paradise over Easter in 1982. If you were on the road, driving to the event, you might have been passed en route by Graham Stockley. In his trusty 6.9 Mercedes sedan, Graham towed his RSR to Surfers non-stop (except for fuel and food) in 17 hours. You can imagine how that translated to the race track. He recorded the fastest time in the Sprints, despite the wet weather at the Surfers Paradise International Raceway, a fast, tricky circuit. The next day, everyone enjoyed a cruise on the Lady Lindeman through the $400 million man-made canal system. A stop off at Lindeman’s Nerang Cellars was made even more fun when resident Club stirrer, Bruce Harris, drew the raffle winner and selected his own ticket. It was a great honour being recognised for the effort made to compete in the sprints and Concours. Many times the Man of the Meeting, like the State Championship, was decided by merely 1 point. There were so many competitions and meetings and plenty of trophies were distributed. Platters, cups and shields adorn many people’s bars and fill boxes that store precious memories of great times.

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Subsequently, the ‘83 Meeting was held in the Barossa, the ‘84 in Melbourne, the ‘85 in Canberra, the ‘86 in SA, the ‘87 in Surfers, the ‘88 in Sydney, the ‘89 in Melbourne, the ‘90 in Canberra, the ‘91 in Adelaide, the ‘92 in Surfers, the ‘93 in Sydney, the ‘94 in Melbourne, the ‘95 in Canberra and the ‘96 in Adelaide, bringing to an end 20 consecutive years of National Meetings! As well as the National meetings, there were lots of other activities, like trips to the snow and cruises on the Murray on the paddle steamer Emmy Lou. These weekends were very productive for two couples, producing new offspring 9 months later. There were tennis competitions, weekend get togethers at our holiday properties, weekends at the casinos in Launceston or Hobart. We were always egging each other on and when we get together now the same competitive spirit thrives, although we pretend it doesn’t. So here’s cheers for four decades of great camaraderie and competition, thanks to the Porsche Club of Victoria. And boy, these recollections have certainly brought back so many great memories.

TOP LEFT Peter Harburg, Graeme Redman and Russell Sturzaker talk rain Surfers Nat Meet 1982.

TOP RIGHT Laurie O’Neill’s 935 at the Concours Surfers Nat Meet 1982.

BOTTOM John Gregory inspects the engine lid of a 911 for authenticity.


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FACING PAGE TOP RIGHT 911s at the Concours Surfers Nat Meet 1982. TOP LEFT Sydney National Meeting 1981. LEFT The Alan Hamilton 908 at Como Park Concours 1980. FACING PAGE CENTRE Ready for the sprints at Oran Park Sydney Nat Apr 1981. FACING PAGE BOTTOM The Bruce Harris 924 Carrera GT at Concours 1981.

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15. Ladies First

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FACING PAGE Ann Tyson. BOTTOM RIGHT Barbara Darvall and Robin Humphries at Phillip Island Sprints. To an outsider, the Porsche Club of Victoria might seem fertile ground for a very ‘blokey’ environment of fast cars, many self-made competitive owners and enough adrenalin and testosterone to sink a ship. But as the many female primary and associate members of the PCV will willingly tell you, women have played a guiding role in the Cub since its inception, welcoming Porsches into their families, driving them just as ably in competition events, participating enthusiastically in Social and Register activities and running the PCV’s membership and administration. Women had key roles on the first PCV Committees and have been strongly represented on it ever since; the PCV had one of Australia’s first female car club presidents in the 1990s and today the Club is very professionally administered on a date-to-day 24/7 basis by two very professional women, Carly Pasco and Lisa Gillespie. One of the Club’s earliest members was Barbara Darvall, then Barbara Clearihan: For me, the idea that I’d be able to drive on a track was fantastic. I had been a passenger to Brian’s adventurous driving but had never had the confidence to try getting the car sideways around corners on my own. I needed to be taught in safe conditions, and lo and behold, Frank Gardner had a driving school at Calder. So I was set to go, and it was a fantastic experience. Frank’s dry comments were worth every penny, and the excitement of foot-to-the-floor acceleration and braking was something I’d never experienced before; the whole experience was something I’d never contemplated.

One of the PCV’s most successful female competitors in the 1980s was Ann Tyson: I was fortunate to join PCV back in 1982, not long before I married John King. He very generously offered me the opportunity to have a go at driving his little navy 912 around Calder at a sprint meeting. “Well” I thought, “I can see Brenda (Moore) is doing it, so why can’t I?” Brenda was my inspiration to not worry about making a fool of myself. There was no Ladies Class in those days and, unfortunately for the men in the class, I took to the car like a duck to water! The National Meeting that year was on the Gold Coast and I joined all the guys. It was fun preparing the car for the Concours with John. But I had to learn how to do a handbrake turn for the Motorkhana and then there were the Sprints. I nervously waited my turn; only my second time ever on a racetrack. “Well it felt OK”, I thought. We had two or three goes out on the track that day and the total time for our three fastest laps was recorded. You should have seen the look on the guys’ faces when my times came in the fastest! “No!” they protested (not officially, just secretly amongst themselves). But yes, I had won the 4-cylinder class! The next National Meeting sprints were held at Mallala in South Australia the following Easter.

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Whoops! I won the class again! This time the men just had to accept that a lady could play their game too. It wasn’t long afterwards that a new Ladies Class was created, though. Nothing liker competition to force change! I spent a wonderful time over the next five years with the Club. I made some great friends and have lots of unforgettable memories (and trophies, too). In 1987 I made two very silly blunders. Firstly, I drove right through a garage in a motorkhana with my foot on the accelerator and the second time was at Winton. I had driven that track dozens of times before but at this meeting, I didn’t respond quickly enough when I entered the esses too fast. Oops! I ended up in the wall of tyres! Not long afterwards I was diagnosed with MS. Fortunately it is very mild and still doesn’t affect me much, apart from my reflexes. So it was time to let common sense prevail and not take any more risks like that. It’s great to see that the PCV has gone from strength to strength. But I enjoyed the days when we could just drive our car to Club events. Them was the good old days! Ros Poon recalls life on the PCV Committee: The Porsche Club of Victoria Committee is the only committee I have ever joined. Don Roe nominated me and my role of Social Secretary lasted for seven years. It was an exciting time of massive change as we transitioned the ‘boys with deep wallets’ club image into a more welcoming and family friendly vibe. I wanted everyone to have fun and so I had to put my money where my mouth was and get involved at the competition level. I wanted to set an example so that other Porsche owners would say to themselves “well if Ros can do it so can I”. I committed to do every event for an entire year, come rain, hail or shine. I remember driving to Morwell for my first hill climb and I thought I was going to have to drive up a steep sand dune because that’s what I saw on Sunday Sports! I had absolutely no idea what I was doing, but regardless I was going to do it and to prove to everyone that they could too, I photographed it all. Introducing the People Photographs had an enormous impact on everyone’s feelings towards the Club and I believe this was the biggest contributing factor to increasing our membership involvement. People who didn’t go to events could see photographs of people just like themselves having fun and enjoying themselves. Our annual ball went from 75 people to a whopping 250 in the first year and we all had a blast. I was always convincing members to get involved and have fun. We had a Rocky Horror party one night and I had four of the burliest, hairiest members dressed in fishnets and heels dancing on stage and we couldn’t get them off. I remember walking into the

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change room and seeing Beth Harris rubbing rouge on my brother’s bum just before he went on stage. Unbelievable but true! My PCV girlfriends would have to do crazy dance routines at the ball, or dress up in cat woman outfits and be grid girls. No one was safe around me. Our Club members were great when it came to getting involved and especially when it came to donating truck loads of stuff for our kid’s Christmas party. I never did anything on my own and I want to thank the hundreds of people who helped and always jumped in. What a great time it was. I never won the Ladies Trophy but I did win Open Class one year. I eventually left the committee to pursue Porsche Cup racing and all I can say is, that while qualifying for my licence, I won my first race crossing the finish line backwards. That should have told me something! Suzanne Ashley recalls the winds of change blowing through the PCV in the late 1970s and early 1980s: Exiting City Motor Panels workshop in late January 1979 after repair to a coin scratch in the paintwork, the amiable Ken Foo leaned in the window of the driver’s side door. “Are you going to the next Porsche Club meeting?”

he asked. “We need a secretary on the new committee. Come. I’ll nominate you”, he ordered. Yes. We ladies had our place in that macho era. In 1979 there was an almost complete change of the Porsche Club of Victoria (PCV) committee. John Benson was elected President, Michael Pratt was Vice President and Editor and Paul Mauger became Social Secretary. Graham Stockley became Treasurer, Warwick Freemantle was Competition Secretary and Russel Sturzaker became Sub- Editor and yours truly, Suzy Hooker (now Suzanne Ashley) was elected Secretary. Trevor Newnes stayed on from the existing committee to ensure continuity and became Assistant Competition Secretary. Continuity is vital in voluntary committees where so much of the Club procedure is handed down orally. Committee work can be frustrating, time-consuming, contentious, and mostly thankless and oft times requiring the diplomatic skills of the Dalai Lama. I remember one very upset and angry committee member, after going to extraordinary efforts to arrange a particular event and afterwards enduring much criticism for perceived failures beyond


FACING PAGE TOP Aranka Young and Ros Poon at Presidents Day. FACING PAGE BOTTOM RIGHT Lisa Gillespie and Carly Pasco at a Club night at Porsche Centre Melbourne. RIGHT Ann Tyson at Winton. BOTTOM RIGHT Melanie Treloar getting ready to head out at the 2015 Sandown Regularity.

his control, commenting that only former committee members should have the right to criticise the organisation of events! There is also the difficulty and very real disadvantage for committee members carrying out their organisational role on the day and attempting to remain competitive in events The 1979 PCV committee consisted mostly of business people heading up their own successful companies and their interaction produced a new and creative dynamic. With the perennial problem of developing and maintaining a robust and viable club, came the issue of promoting the growth of the membership and driver participation. These new committee members were mainly business-people, so they were sensitive to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;client expectationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and also possessed

well-developed skills in promotion due to their expertise in both wholesale and retail business. It was decided that partners and wives of Club members were mostly an untapped market. To appeal to them, more comfortable venue facilities would be required to entice them to accompany their partners. This proposal, of course, was not as selfless as it would first appear. Male members hoped there would then be the flow-on benefit that they would be allowed to attend more events if the women were included and enjoyed the day. Also there was the prospect of home prepared tasty lunches! Venues with

appropriate facilities were chosen where possible and these days were promoted as family fun days. The result was that the women DID come to more events and they DID bring tasty lunches and the men DID get to attend more events! Now all that was needed was to encourage the women to drive in events. Standing beside my car, hesitating as to whether my decision to drive in the motorkhana at Tonimbuck in March, 1979, was a wise one; Bruce Harris approached. He looked in my car, a 1968 2 litre 911 S Sportomatic (then white but now black). Bruce, then a Sportomatic owner himself, jumped into the passenger side seat and

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roared “Let’s show them how it’s done in a Sporto, as I took off. That run produced the best time of the day, but without Bruce’s tuition a WD and an ordinary time followed, along with a dispute about Bruce’s participation. However, it was proof that tutoring and encouragement worked and the committee set time aside so a group of experienced members could help new participants prior to competition on event days. The committee also decided to introduce some novice events. The former idea had been mooted by the previous committee, but was yet to be put into practice. These opportunities were a boon for new members, particularly for reticent female members and thus the number of women entering events increased. Nevertheless there were many contentious car issues between non-driving wives and driving husbands. There was the gravitation of car parts from the garage to the dining room table and this display was apparently imperative for perusal and contemplation. Then there were the copious hours spent by the men in the garage engrossed with car parts, usually accompanied by raucous companions from the Club. However, by far the most contentious issue, was the MONEY spent purchasing the car, followed by the MONEY spent on the car! This was divorce territory and was responsible for all manner of imaginative schemes to bypass prohibitions and agreements regarding car expenditure. Creative accounting was prolific and phantom payments made their way to ensure mechanics teased the most power from engines

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‘Yes Club tyres only cost $200 a set. . . .the same as they did 10 years ago!’ Beth Harris, along with many other wives, was very vocal about the significant sums involved in competing in Club events. “I don’t even have a Porsche in my name”, complained Beth. In May 1996, Alan Hamilton gave his wife Lorna a 1996 model 993 for a special birthday. While many of the male club members viewed this as a dangerous precedent, Bruce Harris obviously stored this event in his memory bank and accessed it when he was unable to drive his red 934 RSR Turbo in the Australian Porsche Cup series due to the restrictive regulations imposed.

He was desperate to buy a competitive car, so in January 2000 he unveiled Beth’s ‘birthday present’ – a 2000 model GT3 “It’s in your name!” he exclaimed proudly. “I’m not driving that”, came the cold reply. “Well I guess I’ll have to”, responded an undeterred Bruce. That moment may have belonged to Bruce but the next 12 months belonged to Beth as she happily spent equal to the purchase price of the GT3 on whatever she desired. . . .! Carly Pasco, who has been the PCV’s ‘part-time’ Administrator since September 2004, gives her perspective: I’ll always be thankful to my old boss in real estate (and ex-Committee Member) David Lawson for putting my name forward when the PCV was looking to hire someone to


assist the volunteer Committee in running the Club. No doubt having my husband working at Porsche Cars Australia was in my favour – at least I knew a bit about the marque and had someone to turn to when car queries came my way! During my time with the PCV I’ve had two babies, a son Hudson in 2008 and a daughter Delani in 2010. Both will be in school next year so I’m hoping my hours will return to more normal during the day work instead of all the evening and weekend work while they were young. Thank you PCV for giving me the flexibility to be at home to raise my children and give me an adult outlet at the same time. So far I’ve worked under eight Presidents, beginning with Ian Knight, Michael Chapman, Jeff Thomas, Ian Jenkins, Keith Ryding, Will Darvall, Peter Harrison and currently Andrew Bonwick. I’ve also worked extremely closely with the Treasurers Roger Holding, Roger Randle and Michael O’Brien; Social Directors Michael Dennis, Michael O’Brien and Felix Rieniets and Porsche Parade Editors Cliff Herbison, Jacqui Collihole and Ron Widdison. What makes up the Club Administrator role so interesting is its variety. By no means do we organise all of the events - PCV has a dedicated army of volunteers (General Committee, Social & Competition subcommittees, Register Captains) out there sourcing venues, tracks, restaurants, good roads etc. But when they’ve done the groundwork Lisa and I step in to set it up for bookings and publicise them accordingly, usually via the web and email. The financial transactions of PCV keep me especially busy with so many members and events and as a not-for-profit organisation; basically all money that comes in goes out again. Keeping track and allocating it all correctly is essential . I’m very grateful to the advances in technology over the past decade and the committee’s willingness to move with them. No longer is my fax machine running hot with entries, nor do I have to spend hours keying credit card details into the EFTPOS machine, or writing and posting cheques. Learning new online systems and how to get the most out of them for our needs is now the focus. There have been very memorable PCV moments during my time with the Club. Here are a few: 2005 - 30th Anniversary Ball with Babba, the Boxster raffle and 342 people - 142 more

than we expected and plenty of dramas in the lead-up. 2009 – Club Night & AGM – Fashion parade in the PCM showroom. I felt like a super model that night! 2013 – Easter Themed Family Day at Eltham Park – Kids sooo excited over chocolate eggs and old fashioned games like sack jumping and egg & spoon races. 2013 - Ladies Go Karts – Having to stop early due to motion sickness. Exactly why I’ve never accepted an invitation to be a passenger on President’s Day! 2013 – Dinner Dance & Presentation Night with Elliott Goblet & Elvis – very entertaining! Lisa Gillespie’s ‘President’s Day experience: I met Carly in Williamstown over coffee with our Mothers’ Group in 2008 and we got talking. She mentioned that she worked from home for the PCV, but the Club was getting busier and busier and with a baby she was finding it a little hard to stay on top of everything to her very high standard and could use some help. I knew nothing about Porsches then and my husband was definitely not a car person; he drives a 1993 Toyota Corolla that has done 146,000km! However Carly assured me it would not matter, so in March 2009 I started

working for the Porsche Club. It started out as four hours on a Wednesday but depending on the time of year and what was going on I often did a few extra hours. In 2012 I moved to the other side of town, but with the help of Andrew Bonwick we worked out a way that I could work from home. This has been great and I now average eight hours a week, so in between being Kinder President, Class representative at school, football team manager for my son’s U8 squad and the day to day craziness of being a mum, I am pretty busy. One of my highlights while working for the PCV has always been Presidents Day. At committee meetings and club nights people were always telling me how awesome it was to experience a Porsche on a circuit. The first year I went to Presidents day it was a wet and cold day. There was no way I was going around a race track in that weather, however my husband was braver and he went around with Grant Stephenson and loved it. The next year I had no excuses; the weather was perfect and my husband kept telling me to stop being chicken. Peter Harrison, who was President at the time, offered to take me out and I am very happy to say I survived and I actually loved it.

FACING PAGE TOP Ladies High Tea 2014. FACING PAGE BOTTOM Noela Semmens at Presidents Day Sandown. TOP RIGHT Sally-Anne Hains and friend at Sandown 2014. RIGHT Ros Poon on track.

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When people hear I work for the Porsche Club they always ask if I get a Porsche as a company car. Unfortunately I always have to say ‘no’, I don’t drive a Porsche but maybe one day! Sally-Anne Hains tells what its like to be a woman in the PCV today: On a sled downhill on the snow, racing with the neighbour’s kids in little metal pedal cars, a bolting horse … something to do with speed happened very early on, and then disappeared. So much so that I only eventually got my driver licence in my mid – twenties to lug the supermarket shopping. But then, a few years ago, a very fast car came my way. I find myself in 2015 driving a modified 997 Turbo in the PCV Competition. A magic combination of my husband buying the Turbo, Peter and Christian Fitzgerald tuning and modifying it, and the Porsche Club’s excellent Competition, created a car and set of circumstances that have given me so many thrills and experiences. There was no Grand Plan – Punt Road in peak hour proved to be no Autobahn, there was a Murcott Drive Day gift from my father-in-law, a fellow school parent, knew John Bowe and I did his erformance days. A Motor Magazine article lead me to contacting the Fitzgeralds, so on their encouragement I joined the Porsche Club and I did Peter Fitzgerald’s days at Winton. The car was tuned. Gradually other things happened: race seats, lowering, carbon fibre, harnesses, half roll cage, R tyres, and then slicks. Open Class here we are.

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Calder, Sandown, Phillip Island, Winton, Haunted Hills, have all been so challenging and exciting to drive. It was very daunting at first; not the least working out where all these places were, scrutineering, where to stick the car numbers and getting the CAMS licence. But everyone in the Porsche Club, from the other drivers, the officials, the marshals, to the safety and recovery people, provided a well-organised and friendly structure where I could begin to work out what to do.

There has since been Ice Driving with Porsche in Lapland in a Turbo S, drifting at night with snowflakes reflected in the headlights creating a mesmerising 3-D effect; The “Snowy Mountains 1000”, 0-1000 metres with the Turbo’s extraordinary launch control acceleration at Cooma Runway; drag racing at Calder under the light of the moon. All thanks to the Porsche Turbo, Porsche Club and Porsche enthusiasts, and my parents who let their daughter whoosh down the street in that pedal car!


FACING PAGE TOP Barbara and Annie Mould.

TOP What better way to enjoyi the Autumn Run than in a 993 GT2 clone!

FACING PAGE BOTTOM Christine O’Brien, Chris Carolan, Tony Carolan, Cheryl Randle, Phyl Drew enjoying the hospitality of the CFA on the Spring Run 2014. Barbara Darvall remembers ‘purchasing Paul Keating’s Porsche’ Back in the 70s and 80s, each Saturday’s Age Motor section was pounced on as early as possible, to see what Porsches were for sale. Sometimes there were none. I worked in advertising and our agency got the Sydney Morning Herald, so Monday mornings would see me going up to Media and, casually, sneaking the used car columns under ‘P’. We were always on the lookout for good cars coming up. So when I saw, one Monday, a 356C for sale in Sydney, I took the ad home and that night I phoned up, with Brian super-cool in the background. A youngish male voice answered, and I asked all the usual questions; the car sounded good. It was Paul Keating’s car and now their family was too big for the rear seats. The price was $2,700 which was pretty fair at the time, with low kms, good service history etc. Brian flew up that Friday night; it checked out well; he paid for it and drove it home on the Saturday. We owned it until 1982, driving it daily and even on some of my Frank Gardner driving days at Calder (it’s good to get the feel of a 356 on the track ... I think). We worked on it progressively, getting it from good to great condition and for some absurd reason we had it painted black. Ian Tate (VHRR) rebuilt the engine beautifully and Brian chromed some engine parts. In 1982 we sold it for what looked like a huge profit, however on contemplation we had probably spent much of that ‘profit’ on pedantic changes and somewhat whimsical styling!

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Porsche Parade 1984

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Porsche Parade 1984

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16. Holler for a Marshal! By Will Darvall

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As PCV competition hotted up and the trophies became bigger, a new focus on the rules, supervision and safety became paramount.

As well, driver training, drivers’ briefings and electronic timing (led by Ian Knight), all contributed to improving the professionalism of PCV events.

Drivers were called on to marshal in shifts during meetings in the 80’s and 90’s, while a small number of qualified marshals always controlled the meetings, acting as Clerk of Course and Stewards, under CAMS or (later) AASA permits.

The large bank of unsung willing manual timers, usually wives and girlfriends of drivers, were thus relieved of a very exacting, important and detailed task!

Around 2000, Michael Chapman brought his CFA expertise to track days, instituting written guidelines for marshals, which included use of flags, radio protocol, safe response to emergencies and attention to injured drivers, as well as safety clothing and proper management of meetings.

Michael worked with Jeff Thomas to increase the organisation and expertise of the marshals and I took over from Jeff, developing an increasingly capable and larger group over the next four years.

Andrew Bonwick then took over, until Mark Behan was appointed in 2014. A remarkable positive esprit has developed, with newcomers always offering time and talents, as others leave. In recent years, more marshals have attained senior qualifications in all aspects of event management, so that there are fewer demands on the senior group. Only rarely does PCV require outside marshals, usually controlling all meetings efficiently, professionally and safely.

I passed the flag to John Baker, then to Robin Humphries, who looked after and encouraged the team like a mother hen for over three years.

LEFT Jeff Thomas brings a session to a close at Phillip Island Sprints 2002. BOTTOM Tas chasing birds off the track at Southern Loop Phillip Island.

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1 Past Presidents Michael Chapman and Jeff Thomas at Winton Sprints 2005.

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2 Rowan Burnett, Theo Mihelakos, Tas Kozaris and Andrew Ingram 3 Marshals Scrutineering a car at Phillip Island 2015. 4 Barbara and Will Darvall wave the flag at Winton Sprints. 5 Letting the cars go at Broadford 2015.

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1 Sylvia and Mark Behan with Harriet and Ken Anson at Sandown 2015

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2 John Baker and Roger Johnston 3 Marshals in the gloom. 4 Marshalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; briefing.

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5 Ready for action.

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6 James Borg, David Hosking , Gordon Johnstone & Harriet Anson 7 Scrutineering cars at Philip Island 2015. 8 Tristan De Carro & Mark Behan 9 Who wants hot laps? 10 Will Darvall at Winton Sprints.

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17. Tracks

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Phillip Island The Club is blessed by its access to tracks. From the king of venues, Phillip Island, to complex hill climbs and the twisty Winton. They are the centre of attention for the Prince of Sports car Marques, in the largest competition calendar in CAMS. Phillip Island Truly the aristocrat: 4.5km of high speed undulating corners and that awesome corner 12 approach to the iconic main straight, with just time to catch your breath, admire the bridge and the sea, and then into turn 1, as quick as you dare. With many of its design elements mindful of the MotoGP, it has well placed gravel traps and excellent run of areas, so despite its high speeds, it is a very safe Club track. The Porsches love it, suiting the high power and excellent geometry of the 911. It continues to be a place where breaking a record is a true accomplishment.

friends for passenger laps, and the home of the PCV Regularly Relay which is growing in the PCV and Victorian Club calendar. Its city location has caused problems with the silly 75db restrictions, a problem for any car on a racetrack, much less the sweet bellow of the Porches, but we continue to run there. Enjoy the location, the straights, the tight curves; just the place for a Porsche at speed. PCV record 1:13.677, 28/6/15, Rick Mensa, 997GT3 Cup.

circuit to the Club circuit, and the lines change completely. PCV record, long track, 1:25.503, 6/6/15, Rick Mensa, 997GT3 Cup. Short track, 1:00.603, 29/6/13, Peter Fitzgerald, 997GT3. Calder A complex story for a track. On the one hand, one of the longest main straights in Australasia leading into a 90 degree fairly slow long curve, a difficult switch back over the hill (only the best drivers have spun off coming over the hill) and some twisty fun bits coming onto the straight. All this in a package less than an hour from town. In modern times, however, sharing the straight with the drag strip makes the track unusable if even damp, which makes booking it a lottery. A sad financial history also means that it looks more like a Mad Max set than a modern racetrack. The Club has had a great history there with track days, evening/night sprints and Thunderdome events, so we all hope it returns to being a Club staple venue.

Winton A nugget of a track tucked away in the Victorian countryside. The complex mix of curves and sweepers over the north side are extremely difficult to get right, and don’t tolerate excess approach speeds or mistakes in the lines. How many G series 911s (you know who you are) have explored the spoon drains at the end of the sweeper? PCV record OPEN Rick Mensa 997 GT3 Cup And who hasn’t decided that a drive straight 1:34.659 13/09/2015. ahead is a better decision than too much speed into the S’s at the end of the main Sandown straight? Is there a better spectator point What a delight! A terrific racing surface with on a Club than the lawn in front of the S’s? some complex andhttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ee/Phillip_Isla…nd_Prix_Circuit.svg/2000px-Phillip_Island_Grand_Prix_Circuit.svg.png challenging corners (have certainly Rex Broadbent’s rally heritage PCV record 0:59.680, 22/3/93, Ed Aitken, Page 1 of 1 you mastered the sweeper on turn 1 yet?) seems to give him quite a different line 959 Rep. over 3.1 km, 20 minutes from the CBD. The through these compared to others, but with Thunderdome record 0:33.970, 15/3/03, location for the President’s Day (thank you very respectable times. Then the track is Jeffrey Beeble, 996 Turbo. Chris Camamile), where we take family and reconfigured at lunchtime from the long

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Morwell Hillclimb (until 2007) The Morwell hill climb was 630m of mad, twisting, random curves finished off with a precipitous S bend all running through what seemed like looming berries of immovable heavy excavator tyres, just waiting for the smallest misjudgement. PCV record 0:33.560, 22/10/89, Graham Stockley, 3.0 RSR. Reverse record 0:34.820, 5/5/02, Richard Batchelor, 930 Turbo. Haunted Hills Hillclimb With Morwell consumed by the encroaching coal mine, the new spectacular track at Haunted Hills (great name guys) became just like every country road you have ever dreamed of, with no on-coming traffic. Sharp turns cut into the valley, steep sweeping drops, multiple configurations and a sign at the end that tells everyone your time; technically challenging and great fun.

encouragement from the spectators; who needs grass motorkhanas? Broadford The State Motorcylce Centre at Broadford started hiring out the circuit track to car clubs a couple of years ago. PCV has run there a handful of times and it is a handful of a track! Short back straights, sudden tight climbs and turns with a succession of off-camber and double apex corners. Very technical, narrow and lots of fun. PCV record 1:00.280, 8/6/14, Christian Fitzgerald, 997GT3.

Lakeland Hillclimb (until 1983) The Lakeland hillclimb course was built by the Light Car Club in 1962, off the Old Gippsland road, near the junction with the Warburton Highway in Lilydale. The LCC raced there until 1975, but club racing continued there until the early 80’s. It was a challenging course, with tight corners, steep rises and dips, a be-brave sweeper and a dive down and climb out carousel, which generated huge vertical and lateral G’s. PCV first raced there on 19/9/76, a month after the first Winton event, then returned there annually until 1980 and ran one last time in ‘83. The track was on private land and the owners eventually lost interest. PCV record 0:48.25, 5/3/78, Will Darvall, 2.7 RS.

Broadford

PCV record, clockwise, 0:53.390, 29/3/15, Christian Fitzgerald, 997GT3. Clockwise fig 8, 0:59.090, 12/8/12, Peter Fitzgerald, 997GT3. Short track, 0:36.940, 6/10/13, Peter Fitzgerald, 997GT3. DECA In recent years, combined with Winton for a Queen’s Birthday double. The delight is a skid pan large enough to land 747s, on which we lay side by side motorkhana courses. Competitors then run head-to-head; do they concentrate more on the layout or the race? The road track out the back of the facility will take a km or so of chicanes, curves and a hill; those trees can get very close though. Screeching tyres on the skid pan,

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Winton Track map for Calder Park in Australia

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Our favourite track, fabulous

Phillip Island

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18. Tall Tales. . . but True! Long time PCV member Richard Batchelor recalls “An unexpected movement”. Rex Broadbent’s account of the 18 March, 1990 motorkhana at Lang Lang described an unplanned lap by Romano Piva: “At this point it was noticed that Romano ‘Wrong Direction’ Piva had just entered the Porta-Loo for a quiet moment of contemplation, and it was felt in the interests of fair play, the least we could do would be to give him a preview of the next course. A tow car was quickly attached and the small cubicle soon became a ‘loo with a view’ as it swayed and rolled around the course, door flapping open on every turn giving glimpses of a seated Romano desperately trying to preserve his dignity. Everyone laughed till they cried!” ‘Comedy from Cummo’ Melbourne accountant and accomplished Targa Tasmania exponent (in a 993 RSCS) Mark Cummings enlivened many club nights with his rapier wit, also sharing commentary duties at a Morwell hill climb. For example, “Number 32 is away. He tops the rise then heads down to the right hander. Hey, he’s off the road, now he’s back on it and charging up the next hill, whoops he has two wheels in the dirt. Into the final bend he goes and I don’t believe it, he’s off the road again but this is nothing that 10 grand’s worth of driving lessons can’t fix!” For several years Mark presented the Bogie Awards at our annual dinners. At one dinner he warned, “This will be a sad/happy occasion, akin to watching your mother-in-law drive off a cliff in your brand new Carrera.” Mark then awarded “The Osama Bin Laden Apprentice Terrorist Prize” to a crash-prone member who “precisely reversed his GT3 at 140 km/h between a timing tower and the Armco at Sandown into a beautiful heritage shed. The attack was an outstanding success: the shed is rooted!” A PCV member ‘whose car was black and his face was red!’ The highlight of the Club’s annual dinner dance on December 3, 1988 was the raffle draw. Social Secretary Geoff Mould had done a brilliant job selling 450 tickets at $100 each, the prize being an immaculate black

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early 911 coupe. It wasn’t easy and the last tickets were sold on the night, including the winning one. Porsche Parade recounts what happened: “Newly elected Club President Graham Stockley announced at 10.30pm that it was time to draw the raffle. He then reminded the expectant hordes of his good fortune in winning the club’s previous major raffle three or four years ago, which he organized, and which had first prize of a trip to the Porsche Nationals in the USA. In view of this, Graham added, he felt it only proper to let somebody else do the draw. Dennis Rogers was duly appointed while Graham returned to his table.” Dennis drew out the ticket. “The winner is . . . Graham Stockley!” ‘Australia’s fastest tow car?’ Graham Stockley’s daily driver and tow car, a 6.9 litre Mercedes SEL, was quite possibly the fastest tow car in the country and many older members will recall Graham’s rig passing them at what seemed like about 150 km/h. One day after practicing at Calder Graham took off so rapidly from the traffic lights that he left the RSR sitting on the road behind his trailer (he blamed Bruce Harris for telling him to leave the Porsche in neutral but it might also have been something to do with Graham’s choice of tie-downs). Fortunately the RSR survived without a scratch. ‘One-forty’ at the Island on a damp track!’ These days a 1min 40 second lap at Phillip Island, in the dry at least, is nothing to rave about but it certainly was in 1994 when Perry Spiridis set a new Porsche Club lap record which was to last into the new millennium. Perry’s car was very fast but hardly state-ofthe-art at the time, being a Porsche 935 race car designed in the late 1970s. The former Formula Pacific and Porsche Cup racer (who is still racing today in historics) recalled his ‘lap of the gods’ several years later.

“I set the time at the Porsche Nationals in April, 1994. It had been raining heavily in the morning but by early afternoon the track was still damp but drying off. Up to that point I had not driven the car, but then I decided to go out, despite my mechanics saying ‘don’t, it’s too dangerous.’ My first lap was a 1:43.12 followed by a 1:40.40 and finally a 1:40.75. We actually did a 1:36 in testing at the Island the week before in better weather conditions.” Having comfortably won the National Sprint, Perry did not take the car out again, due to the arrival of the EPA man with his noise meter. However the car’s speed and flame belching exhaust would be long remembered, and everybody agreed Perry must have taken a few brave pills with his breakfast that morning. ‘The Grand Prix rally . . . er, race!’ A vast field of more than 160 cars contested the inaugural Grand Prix Rally in 1988, which was held in conjunction with the Australian Grand Prix meeting in Adelaide. The Porsche clubs of Victoria and South Australia were well represented with 15 cars. There were also 13 Ferraris and naturally a strong rivalry developed between drivers of the two marques. The route took us from Melbourne via the Barossa Valley to Adelaide. Crews then eagerly awaited some promised “parade laps” in front of the crowd at the Grand Prix. A safety car kept us in check for the first lap and then pitted. Immediately all hell broke loose as the Porsches tried to pass the Ferraris and vice versa. A full-on race was underway as the drivers of the Austin– Healeys, Jaguars and Triumphs watched the Porsche and Ferrari madmen disappearing into the distance. Considering none of us had driven on the track before, and no one was wearing a helmet, it was fortunate nobody was hurt. Soon the officials were frantically waving black flags, red flags and anything else they could lay their hands on, but no one took any notice.


Eventually one official twigged that as it was clearly a race, rather than a parade, it might be a good idea to wave the chequered flag and that stopped the track action. Looking back now it was not our finest hour, but it did seem like a good idea at the time! ‘The PCV member who broke the Phillip Island to Winton Land Speed Record!’ The PCV has dozens of members with Greek ancestry, and I always reckon they are the friendliest and most entertaining people in the club. They are also real lead foots! Many years ago one of our Greek friends was making a late afternoon dash from Phillip Island to take part in a PCV sprint to be held at Winton the following day. All was going well as he sped up the Hume Highway in his red 911 at well above the speed limit. Before long he spied a police Commodore slowly gaining on him. Whereas boring Anglo Saxons like me would pull over, our friend simply put pedal to the metal and disappeared from view at well over 200 km/h! Late that night in Benalla the police checked out the Porsches parked at the various motels. Eventually they found a red 911 and the befuddled owner was woken up from a deep sleep. It took him about two hours to convince the police they had the wrong man. Next day our Greek friend duly competed at Winton in his red 911. Where he and the car had spent the previous night remains a mystery but it’s believed that he did not use the Hume Highway for the drive home. ‘Some Tasmanian pyrotechnics’ After coming to rest in a paddock a long way off the road during a Tasmanian rally, former club president Ian Knight and his co-driver were discussing how best to extract his Porsche when they noticed a wisp of smoke coming from beneath the car. The exhaust pipe had started a grass fire which rapidly enveloped and consumed the whole car. As Porsche Parade columnist David Porritt reported: “Ian’s philosophical nature earned him respect from all who met him”. According to David, Ian said “add a few zeros to that and it almost compares to my losses in the stock market crash a few years ago!” Undeterred, Ian was soon back in Targa action in an even-faster Porsche! The Porsche that was Simply the best: For many older PCV members, their all-time favourite car is the Guards Red 934 RSR turbo owned, and driven with considerable expertise, by Bruce Harris. The Australian Porsche importer Alan Hamilton previously had driven the 934 in the Australian Sports Car Championship during the late 1970s, sharing the 1977 National title with John Latham’s 911 Carrera RSR, while Allan

Moffat won the 19870 Australian Sports Car Championship outright driving the same car. With around 400 horsepower as it left the factory, the 934 was already pretty quick, but Bruce wanted REAL power, so he put the standard engine on the shelf and replaced it with a full-race 935 engine producing well over 500hp! For several years the 934 in Bruce’s hands was simply unbeatable in PCV sprints. At the time Bruce could match the lap times of the Bathurst winning Group A Sierras and he was also the only PCV member to lap Calder in under one minute. The 934 was one of many Porsches to be owned by Bruce. On another page in this book you will see him competing at the Templestowe Hillclimb in Melbourne in the early 1960s driving a 356 Coupe, while he also competed in Rallycross a decade or so later driving an ex-London-Sydney Marathon 911 prepared by Reg Mort. However the 934 was truly his long-term love affair, as other Porsches came and went.

‘The hard charger’ Bruce’s great rival and good mate during the eighties and early nineties was the tall and aristocratic looking, but very friendly and down to earth, Graham Stockley. Although it was not his first Porsche, Graham really came of age when he acquired his 1974 RSR 3.0. This car had already achieved fame as the prototype 911 turbo when shown at the 1974 Paris car show, despite some of its ‘turbo’ engine components being skillfully-painted wood! After the Paris show the car sat in a corner at the Porsche Zuffenhausen factory until Alan Hamilton persuaded the company to fit it with an RSR engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Alan contested a few races in Australia in the car under the JAG clothing banner before selling it on.

During the period from 1976 to 1991 Bruce’s endeavours, principally in the 934, were rewarded with six club championships.

At some point the car was also converted to right hand drive, but continued to achieve success in the hands of Vin Smart and wound up eventually in Graham’s ownership after he traded the now mega-valuable 1974 RSR 2.8 currently owned by Ian Henderson in on it.

Sunday November 12, 1989 at Phillip Island saw Bruce’s reign in his 934 challenged by John Pollard in his Porsche Cup Kremer turbo, which he had been using to dominate the race series.

Graham rapidly came to grips with the car, which was putting out about 330 horsepower from its slide throttle RSR engine and which had a five speed 915 gearbox with oil cooler and the rare finned 917 brakes.

Porsche Parade described the contest: “The two red beasts took off together, each driver with something to prove. Weaving their way through the initial lap to warm up their steamroller slicks the throttles were then opened wide through the left hander leading on to the main straight. Howling across the start/finish line the daring duo launched into their first timed lap. Sheer unadulterated ‘grunt’ enabled Harris to lead into turn one but Pollard closed the gap through the next corner. Harris drew away through the back section but again Pollard drew level through the tighter corners.”

He concentrated on learning to drive it properly and did very little by way of modifications, apart from fitting a roll cage when he eventually went racing in the Porsche Cup. Graham amassed a large collection of sprint, hill climb and even motorkhana trophies which covered a wall at his Malvern home, which he dismissively called his “wanker wall.” Graham was unbeatable at the old Morwell hill climb and holds the PCV course record in perpetuity. At the time it was also the all-comers sports car record.

The two timed laps saw Pollard record 1:44.81 to Harris’s 1:44.97. Bruce then had to return to Melbourne for a social function, while John later shaved his time to 1:43.34. A police radar gun timed Bruce at 247km/h during the brief contest, and PCV members eagerly awaited a return bout. This was not to be as Pollard concentrated on the Porsche Cup race series. After the turn of the century Bruce sold the very valuable 934, by now fitted with its original and less powerful engine, to Ian Henderson, who continued to exercise the car in historic racing. Eventually Ian in turn sold it and the 934 is now in the Porsche collection of Queensland enthusiast Larry McFarlane. Bruce is a proud member of an exclusive club, the PCV Hall of Fame, one of only eight club members to be accorded this honour.

Graham won the 1981 and 1982 Club Championships, was outright award winner in 1986, ‘87, ‘88, ‘89 and ’91, and won several of the early Porsche Cup races. Graham also found time to be PCV President from 1989 to 1992, presiding over a wonderful period for the club. Small wonder that he is also one of the eight members in our Hall of Fame. ‘Two other exceptional PCV members’ DON TRYHORN’S sudden death from a stroke in 2008 robbed the Club of probably its most fanatical enthusiast and devastated his many friends. Previous ownership of a supermarket and a caravan park enabled Don to pursue his automotive passion with the same tenacity and panache he showed on the racetrack and I looked forward to our lunches to view his latest toy. Many of Don’s Porsches were sourced from Hong Kong, where he was a regular visitor, frequently to drive a Porsche in a sports car race on behalf of its wealthy owner.

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Don lived in Kilsyth adjacent to the Dandenongs and lunches invariably were held up in the hills, enabling a scenic and rapid drive to the restaurant. Don always owned about six or so very rare Porsches at any one time but only bothered to have one of them road registered – he simply transferred the number plates and rego sticker to whichever one he planned to exercise! This practice confused me one day when he invited me to drive what looked like a 993 GT2 but was registered as a 1972 Porsche 911. As soon as I merely touched the throttle I knew it wasn’t a 1972 Porsche but the real thing! A Porsche Cup race was held at the AGP in Adelaide in 1991. Like every other starter except Don, I took my car there on a trailer. Don DROVE his race car from Melbourne and in a brilliant drive against much faster cars, managed to spray the champagne with a hard-earned third place. The following year we joined forces and both took our cars on trailers. We also shared a hotel room with Don’s great mate and mechanic Louie Giosis. On arrival in Adelaide the night before qualifying Don insisted we drive around the circuit to reacquaint ourselves with the turn-in points to the various similar looking (but quite different) corners. We did several slow laps in Don’s Volvo while I made notes, e.g. start turn 8 at the “o” in the Fosters sign, start turn 9 opposite the manhole cover etc. We reviewed the notes over dinner. In the 10 lap main race Don’s homework resulted in my lapping on average 1.3 seconds a lap faster than in the previous year, but I still finished behind him.

Don Tryhorn

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Don emerged unscathed from several serious prangs on the track. A newly restored Carrera RS was rolled (with a startled passenger!) during a PCV day at Calder. At Phillip Island his 964RS made heavy contact with the wall after Don lost control on the very fast left hander leading onto the straight. At Calder in the early noughties he lost his 935 (a very potent Porsche race car, an example of which had achieved outright victory at Le Mans) at 250 km/h on the hump in the main straight. Fortunately Don was uninjured, although badly shaken, but he continued to race his various cars. It is fitting that the PCV’s Outright Award is named in Don’s memory. We will not see his like again. GARY TIERNEY. The fatal crash in the Classic Adelaide Rally in November, 2009, which cost the lives of Gary and his navigator David Carra, shocked the Australian motor sport community including his many Porsche Club friends. The surf lifesaving community experienced the same emotions. I first met Gary in 1964 when he joined the Point Leo Surf Life Saving Club. Gary developed into a crack surf swimmer, achieving Victorian representation on several occasions, later becoming president of the Point Leo club and a member of the club’s Hall of Fame. During the first Grand Prix Rally in 1988 Gary was an interested spectator at the Bendigo stage. He said he was keen to enter his Austin-Healey 3000 in the next year’s event. He enjoyed his first rally victory in the Tour t’Adelaide a couple of years later driving a 450 horsepower Cobra replica. A highly successful fuel distribution business enabled

Gary to indulge his passion for cars and he soon added a Triumph TR6 to his growing fleet. Gary then rallied a very hot Mustang followed by a succession of Porsches, including the turbo which Jim Richards had driven to several Targa Tasmania victories. In 2001 Gary invited me to navigate for him in the Grand Prix Rally in his recently acquired GT3. It did not go well. I became car sick during the first stage, the night navigation test from Shepparton, due to concentrating on the maps. After a quick stop to let me get rid of the evening meal, we swapped seats and I had my first drive in a GT3. My fading night vision meant that I was unwilling to maintain a fast pace in Gary’s new $250k toy and he continually urged me to speed up. For the next few days we climbed the leader board but then I made a major navigational cock-up and we had to crank on the pace to make the stage within our time limit. After hitting 200 km/h in places we made it, the only problem being we arrived at the control from the wrong direction! Fortunately our friendship survived. By now Gary was also a regular entrant in PCV sprints. After achieving some good tarmac rally results Gary started to have some worrying prangs in these events. In the final year of his life he also sustained a back injury in the Bathurst 12 Hour when his Subaru hit the wall at the top of Mount Panorama. Gary and I took part in the Group S races at the Sandown historic meeting in November, 2009. We agreed to meet for lunch before Christmas but very sadly that was not to be.


Porsche Parade 1988

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19. Feeling Social

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PCV Summer Run to the Polo Sunday 15th1975 February - 20152015.153 .


“The primary objective of the Club’s Social Committee is to organise events and activities at which members may gather in the spirit of goodwill and friendship based on their shared enjoyment in owning a Porsche” - The above is an excerpt from the introductory kit for new members prepared by former PCV Social Director, Michael Dennis. The PCV was originally formed in 1975 to cater for Porsche owners who wanted to exercise their cars in regular competition and until the early 2000’s, this was the predominant activity of the Club. Yet from the Club’s earliest days, before many began arriving on trailers and families sometimes followed, every PCV competition event had a strong social under-current. Sometimes this was limited to lunchtime and after-event gatherings, but the concept of leaving partners and family at home while you ‘played Porsche’ was not universally popular. Nevertheless social activities in the 1970s and well into the1980s were largely limited to Club meetings, the annual Dinner dance and randomly arranged visits to motoring institutions, like the Fox Museum. An event that broke the mould in 1986 was the inaugural ‘Midnight to Dawn’ run devised by PCV committee member Peter White, that saw members gather not long after dawn for an invigorating back roads drive to a scenic brunch. Many laws were broken but many friendships formed on these Midnight to Dawn events that were the forerunner of the much more

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socially acceptable Club and Register runs of today. The winds of change began to blow through the Club in the 1990s and the advent of Grand Touring Porsche models like the Porsche 928 and ‘daily drivers’ beginning with the Boxster soon created a growing demand for a parallel calendar of Social activities, rather than a random annual sprinkling. Today, following the rise of the Club Registers, Social activities now rank equally with Competition events in status, are greater in number and are cited regularly as the primary reason many Porsche owners join the PCV.

The growth of the Social calendar over the years can largely be attributed to the energy of many dedicated individuals on the PCV Committee. However the greatest growth in Social activities has occurred over the past 15 years, with successive presidents foreseeing the need to cater for the growing membership that joined more for social reasons than track time. Successful clubs endure and prosper when they are prepared to reinvent themselves in order to remain relevant to the majority of their memberships. This usually requires brave decision-making and the will to pursue change, often in the face of firmly entrenched opposing views. One of those pivotal periods in the Club’s history occurred from 2004 to 2008,


initiated by visionary President, Ian Knight and continued by his successors, Michael Chapman and Jeff Thomas. With the help of the Social Directors who served them, they rebalanced the Club’s priorities to restore much needed support to our social activities. In the years leading up to this, the organisation and promotion of annual social activities had been left largely to individuals such as Ian Percy, Michael Chapman and Linley Baxter, who, much to their credit, managed to single- handedly provide successful runs and some niche social events. This was in addition to organising the mandatory Club Nights, the AGM and the Annual Dinner – events usually shaped with the competition brigade in mind.

While the ‘spirit and backbone’ of the Club, its competition heritage, was being well served, the social scene that usually binds clubs like ours together had somewhat lost its mojo. A growing majority of non-competitor members felt disenfranchised, with many not renewing their memberships, often citing that there was little for them to do. In the face of declining numbers, a Committee level shake-up resulted in new Committee and Social Committee structures that in turn led to the type of vigorous social calendar we now enjoy. To get the ball rolling in late 2003, two social positions were created on the Committee, with accounting guru Roger Holding accepting the mantle of Social Director,

assisted by public sector advertising expert Michael Dennis. Roger brought with him a no-nonsense attitude and significant experience gained from serving on the committees of other prestigious clubs, while Michael added an interesting combination of administrative

FACING PAGE TOP Competition awards at the annual Ball 2012. FACING PAGE BOTTOM Kids Christmas party 1987. TOP RIGHT ‘Big Kids’ Party’ Bruce Harris taking a plunge at Graham Stockley’s pool party 1980. MIDDLE RIGHT Bruce and Graham surfacing. RIGHT Family day 2013.

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skills and marketing flair. Together, they set out to not only to double the number of social events, but also to double the attendances at them. The increased workload would have been enormous but for the coincidental decision to employ a paid full-time Administrator (another Ian Knight initiative), which is still filled to this day by the hard working Carly Pasco. This provided the necessary administrative support. Having laid the groundwork for this revival, Roger Holding was elevated to Treasurer in 2005, allowing Michael Dennis to step into the role of Social Director and accept the challenge of implementing many of the new social initiatives over the next four years. Michael rewrote the Club’s Social Manuals so that anyone organising an event had a step-by-step guide on ‘how to do it’. He also expanded the Social Committee to around 10 members, each of whom was encouraged to use their experience and skills to take ownership of the projects that they created and organised.

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This led to an absolute explosion of exciting and often unique events and a surge in attendances. An order of succession policy was also established, resulting in talented members such as Michael O’Brien and Felix Rieniets serving their apprenticeships as Deputy Social Directors before successfully filling the principal role after 2008. The social statistics for 2005 spoke for themselves: five standing-room-only Club Nights, four fully-subscribed Day Tours, a Show and Shine with lunch, a Themed Dinner, a Go Kart Night and a Gala Ball, were attended by a total of nearly 2,000 PCV members, families and friends. The growing number of day tours to a range of destinations also proved very popular, with upwards of 60 cars often in attendance, while the 30th Anniversary Ball at the Grand Hyatt, Melbourne in 2005, attracted 340 members. Following this successful renaissance, the Social Calendar became an increasingly large and well-oiled part of PCV life.

Documented procedure manuals were developed successively to cover everything from running club nights to catering and the development of run notes, bringing a new era of professionalism to these events. The Club also tried many different events to ‘track test’ their popularity with members. For example, the 2009 AGM night included a very special fashion parade, while a Diamond Display, a Porsche Cup Race Call and other speciality product displays have been arranged to address the breadth of PCV Members’ interests under Michael O’Brien’s Social Directorship. More recently under his successor, Felix Rieniets, the Club’s social agenda has encompassed summer runs to the Ballarat Cup polo, Barwon Heads Golf Club and Portsea Hotel, visits to the Fire Museum & Ford Performace Racing Centre, interstate tours to Tasmania and the Murray Valley, also the 911s 50th Anniversary at the MCG with Porsches on the hallowed turf.


FACING PAGE TOP LEFT PCM Club Night 2012.

TOP RIGHT Annual Dinner 1996 April Ros Ava and friends.

FACING PAGE TOP RIGHT Annual Dinner April, Ros, Ava.

MIDDLE LEFT Kids Xmas Party 1988.

FACING PAGE BOTTOM Ros Poon with April Houghton and Santa at the 1991 Christmas party.

MIDDLE RIGHT Michael Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien presents to the party faithful at the 2011AGM.

TOP LEFT Romana Altman takes aim at the trap shooting day 2008.

BOTTOM Annual Dinner Dance at the Windsor Hotel 2009.

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Technology advances have also resulted in Social Run drive notes progressing from single page photocopied instructions to publications that would pass as tourist brochures. And thanks to Porsche Parade Editor Ron Widdison, our events are captured in a sensational colour magazine. Former PCV Social Director Michael Dennis outlines a typical PCV social calendar today: Club Nights: around 150 of us gather five times a year to share a complimentary meal and a drink and listen to speakers tell us about Porsches and other topics of more general interest. Day Tours: up to five times a year, around 100 of us convoy our Porsches around the countryside, then to a restaurant for a meal and a drink. Club Night Barbecue: up to 200 of us converge on an attraction (Fox Car Museum, RAAF Museum etc) with our Porsches to launch the year with a complimentary ‘barbie’ and a drink. Show and Shine: at least once a year, around 100 of us gather at an interesting venue to admire each other’s pristine Porsches, maybe win a trophy and enjoy a meal and a drink. Annual Ball: over 300 of us don black tie or frock-up at a five-star venue and applaud as some of our members receive trophies for racing their Porsches (but really to be entertained, dance the night away, and have another meal and a drink or two). In certain years, groups of us may even take our Porsches away for a weekend tour or an interstate trip of around a week, where of course we will indulge in more meals and more drinks. We even have a Social Competition with some great prizes that rewards members “just for attending the most social events”. How good is that!

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FACING PAGE TOP Summer Run 2015. FACING PAGE MIDDLE 911 40th Anniversary at Domain Chandon 2003. FACING PAGE BOTTOM Summer club night Point Cook 2006. TOP Alf Carrigan and Ian Knight at the Annual Ball 2009. MIDDLE RIGHT Michael Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien and Santa on the Last Run 2012. BOTTOM Last Run morning tea at the Pearcedale CFA, December 2013.

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Club Night BBQ at Cairns Workshop February 2015. 1975 - 2015 161


TOP LEFT 911 50th Anniversary event at the MCG 2013. TOP RIGHT AGM Fashion Parade with Carly Pasco and Janet Conheady 2009. MIDDLE LEFT 911 40th Anniversary at Domain Chandon 2003. MIDDLE RIGHT Glen Ridge with Chris Alp at a PCM Club Night 2010. BOTTOM Yellow was the colour of the day on the 2009 Spring Run.

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TOP LEFT Rocky Horror night Bruce Harris. TOP RIGHT Cub Dinner at Sandringham Yacht Club 2005. MIDDLE LEFT Will Darvall receives his Life Membership Award at the Annual Ball. MIDDLE RiGHT Murray Valley Tour 2013. BOTTOM Greg and Robin Humphries at the Mid Year Dinner 2012.

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20. The Rise of the Registers

In the beginning, it was really simple: most members of the PCV in the 1970s owned either a 356 or a 911. It became more complex if you owned a 912, a 914 or a 924, but in a pragmatic way you were bundled in with the four-cylinder 356s, taking their place in Club competition as their owners found them less competitive and drifted away to do more social activities than lap dashes. But the arrival of the front-engined V8 928 confounded everyone. As a long-legged Grand Tourer, it didn’t really fit into either camp, so 928 owners tended to band together and take part informally in drives to lunch destinations via favourite roads. However the formation of official PCV Registers, dedicated to the interest of owners of specific Porsche models, didn’t occur until the early 2000s, hastened by the arrival of a new generation of Boxster-driving members, The proposed first run was not greeted with a lot of optimism by some sectors of the Club but the Great Ocean Road/Lorne Run of April 2003 had 40-plus Porsches of all types cruising down the Geelong Road to a sumptuous lunch at Chris’s on the Lorne foreshore.

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This run was to be the forerunner of regular social events for those members who wished to enjoy their cars in a friendly casual atmosphere and the response from a resurgent PCV membership surprised everyone.

Register events are now a major part of the PCV’s annual calendar and are conducted by a Register Captain, under the scrutiny of the Register Director, who is a member of the Club Committee.


As a result, the social membership of the PCV now forms a much greater part of Club life than was anticipated on its founding in 1975 and continues to grow as new models within the Porsche range cater less for the competitor and more for a diverse use of the marque. Today the Registers occupy a significant part of the Club Calendar, with around 28 individually promoted Register drive days, overnight runs and other events per year where between 10 and 20 cars normally participate. These smaller events allow members to get to know each other easily and to enjoy a common interest. The nine Registers each have two Captains, who between them organise between three and five Runs per year for their Register, identifying drive days, roads and destinations that suit the spirit of the types of Porsches in their Register. This, together with the clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general social and Competition calendar, creates a wide variety of activities for all PCV members to enjoy throughout the year. Most Runs comprise more than 50 per cent of cars from their Register, with cars from other Registers able to join in once the event has been advertised on the PCV website. To fit into the already crowded PCV annual calendar, these Register Runs are well spaced throughout the year with a variety of good driving roads around Victoria and provide a great opportunity for members to be able to maximise the driving enjoyment of their Porsche. A relatively recent register development is the inclusion of Mid-Week Register Runs, which suit many members and reward them with relatively uncrowded roads.

TOP LEFT FACING PAGE 993 Register Run . BOTTOM LEFT FACING PAGE Richard Oldham in the UK. Richard was the founder of the Registers and the first Registers Director. TOP THIS PAGE 2014 Modern 911 Run the long way to Apollo Bay. CENTRE TOP THIS PAGE 2015 Mid 911 Run to Galli Winery. CENTRE BOTTOM THIS PAGE 2014 Mid Week Run to Inverleigh. BOTTOM THIS PAGE 2014 993 Register Tech night at Cairns Garage.

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TOP LEFT THIS PAGE 2013 Register Captains. TOP RIGHT THIS PAGE 2015 Mid Week Run “A Romp through the Otways”. MIDDLE THIS PAGE 2014 Mid 911 Register weekend run to Hidden Vallley. BOTTOM LEFT THIS PAGE 2015 GT3 Register Run to-Whispering Vine. BOTTOM RIGHT THIS PAGE 2015 Torque Tube Register Run to Pitruzzello Estate.

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TOP LEFT THIS PAGE 2015 993 Register Run to the Macedon Ranges. TOP RIGHT THIS PAGE 2014 GT3/RS/RSR Register – Lunch Run to Galli Winery. MIDDLE THIS PAGE 2015 Modern 911 Register Run to Myrniong. BOTTOM LEFT THIS PAGE 2015 Boxster/Cayman Run to Trentham. BOTTOM RIGHT THIS PAGE 2011 Mid 911 Register Sea Change to Warrnambool Run.

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Early 911 Register cars.

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21.

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

PARADE

“Porsche Parade” is no just our club magazine, it is the detailed hstory of every event organised by the Club including competition events and results, social runs, nights and events, Register runs, Committee and financial reports. Up until the introduction of our web presence it also housed car and parts for sale. The Club sure has seen a lot of changes in the past 40 years and none more so than that in the Club Magazine “Porsche Parade”. Starting off as a photocopied newsletter in 1975 and finally becoming Porsche Parade Magazine in 1977. On the following pages displayed are all the different covers produced over the 40 years. You may notice that it skips issues up until 2004. That is because up until that stage the cover of the magazine was repeated over one or several years. For the sake of space shown are only the original covers. This all changed in 2004 when we introduced new digital offset printing technology that allowed us to change the cover of the magazine each issue economically. Up until that stage it was cheaper to reprint the same cover and just overprint the current date on it. So many magazines (188 to date) and so many stories and photographs. Thank you to everyone, including our advertisers, who have contributed to the Magazine over the last 40 years to make it the fabulous publication it is today. Special thanks to the following Photographers who have contributed constant outstanding photographs during my past eleven years working on the magazine. Felix Rieniets - Social Tristan De Carro - Motorsport Andrew Hutchison - Motorsport And to Will Darvall for his continuing contribution to “Whats In Your Garage” stories, which are very popular with the members.

Ron Widdison Editor Porsche Parade

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Porsche Parade Editors Ken Foo

1976

Trevor Newnes

1977-78

Russel Sturzaker

1979-83

Michael Browning

1984-90

Richard Batchelor

1987-92

Tom Williams

1992-96

Chris Camamile

1996-97

Paul Stuart

1996-97

Greg Cook

1998-99

Richard Batchelor

1999-02

Cliff Herbison

2002-05

Jacqui Collihole

2006-2008

Ron Widdison

2009 - present (2015)


what’s in your garage?

Story: Will Darvall Photos: Ron Widdison

Henry at home in his Garage

You can tell if a person is serious about car preparation by the condition of the paint and other items under the guards. I bought a car once, sight unseen, confident that the car would be as described, because I could see the gleaming paint under the front guard. (Well, it was only a $4000 Anglia 105E). Henry Arundel’s car preparation is definitely serious, with meticulous attention to detail in all areas. Yes, you could eat (and perhaps cook) off those oil lines, shown in Ron’s pic. You will remember when I last wrote about Henry, in the Holler For a Marshal segment 5 years ago. No? Well, he grew up in the AlburyWodonga region, where the family had dairy farms in the Kiewa valley. He joined the bank there, moving to Melbourne and overseas for many years. He became involved in GM and Ford finance in Albury-Wodonga, subsequently moving to Melbourne in the mid- 80’s. For the last 15 years he has been running his own finance broking business with associates.

Curvaceous hips on the Turbo bodied 3.2

‘76 3.0 Carrera

‘07 Cayman S

He has been a car nut since birth, starting with Holdens, including an XU-1, moving to more MG’s than he cares to remember, becoming a keen MG Club member and crewing at Bathurst. He has driven in a 24 hour regularity at Winton and run his favourite MGB GT in a Grand Prix Rally. Putting away childish things, he bought a Guards Red 1980 3 litre SC in 2003 and joined PCV. He and the car became well known at PCV events, with Henry becoming a keen marshal for many years and team manager for Weissach Sport at several 6 hour races. Subsequently, he had a 944 S2.

Henry and his charming partner Gillian have lived in East Malvern for 10 years, with his 2 and her 3 adult children so far producing 5 grand children. They enjoy travel and each other. Henry has always enjoyed exercise and keeping fit, although he is now “a fair weather bike rider”. His daily driver is a VW Up! (1 litre, 3 cyl, 5 speed manual), having had an R 32 and a Scirocco, after beemers in the past. Gillian is happy with her Golf. The current Porsche stable The vibrant Ascot Green ‘76 Carrera 3 litre is certainly the visual standout. It was sold by John Newell in Sydney and lived all its previous life in NSW, before Henry bought it in Eden. The motor (essentially the 930, without the turbo), with K-jetronic, develops 200 HP, down from the 210 of the mechanically injected 2.7 in the ‘73 RS and the ‘74-5 Carrera. The car sits low and purposeful on optional 7 and 8 x 15’s, with 205/50 and 225/50 tyres. Surprisingly, this gives a much smaller overall diameter than the standard 187/70 and 215/60’s, plus a smaller front diameter. Usually, Porsche has fitted a higher profile front tyre to compensate for the narrower section, until the Boxster and Cayman. This car shows 184 K’s and looks elegant with Cork trim. Amazingly, only 2564 coupes and 1123 Targas were made in ‘76-7, with 487 RHD coupes in ‘76. Compare that with 58,000 of the subsequent SC’s and 76,500 of the 3.2 Carreras! Amazingly, some 911 models slip under the radar and this is

‘89 3.2 Carrera

Story: Roger Holding Photos: Felix Rieniets

Summer Run to the Polo Sunday 15th February

ABOVE What’s In Your Garage and Summer Run stories from issues 3-2014 and 1-2015 of Porsche Parade.

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OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

SUMMER 2010/11

PARADE

WINTON SPRINTS

Print Post Approved PP 349069/00056

Plus AGM Last Run Haunted Hills

WINTER 2010

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

SPRING 2012 - Issue 173

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PARADE

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President’s Day

What’s in your Garage?

Annual Dinner Dance

Show & Shine Fed Square

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AUTUMN 2013 - Issue 175 OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

SUMMER 2012 - Issue 174

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PARADE

WINTER 2013 - Issue 176

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SPRING 2013 - Issue 177

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SUMMER 2013 - Issue 178

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WINTON SPRINTS

Phillip Island Sprints

550 SPYDER

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Plus Annual Dinner Dance Make Mine Rare Spring Run Broadford Last Run

Plus Early days of PCV Sandown 6 hour Summer Run Family Day WIYG

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PCV at the MCG

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OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

AUTUMN 2011

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

WINTER 2011

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

SPRING 2011

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PARADE

AUTUMN 2011

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OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

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SPRING 2011

1

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SUMMER 2011/12

AUTUMN RUN Plus

Plus

Plus Make Mine Rare Winton Sprints Calder Sprints Haunted Hills DECA

Phillip Island Sprints Phillip Island Classic Sandown Sprints Sandown 6 Hour Make Mine Rare WIYG

Annual PCV Dinner Dance Winton Sprints Spring Run Last Run WIYG

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AUTUMN 2012

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OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

Issue 3- 2014 No.181

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Issue 1- 2015 No.183

PARADE

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Spring Run

GTS WINTON BROADFORD

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CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

75 15

weekend

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WINTER 2012

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WINTER 2012 - Issue 172

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SHOW “N” SHINE Plus

Driver Training Day Winter Double Run Haunted Hills “Make Mine Rare” WIYG

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Hunter Valley Tour Haunted Hills Winton /Deca Weekend Autumn Run WIYG

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FABULOUS PHILLIP ISLAND

AUTUMN 2012

SUMMER 2011/12

PARADE

993 GT2

LEGENDARY PORSCHES

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE PORSCHE CLUB OF VICTORIA

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PORSCHE PARADE


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photos: Ron Widdison

993 GT2 “Make Mine Rare” story from issue 2 / 2011 of -Porsche 1975 2015 Parade. 175 WINTER 2011

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22. PCV People What is a Club without people? Nonexistent! Here we honour them. Treasurer Michael O’Brien compliments the members and administrators: Clearly over the past 40 years there have been many outstanding contributors to the club. Many stalwarts are very well known, but what impresses the most are the outstanding characteristics of ordinary members. We are friendly and welcoming, we share our abilities, give of our energies, and provide our expertise through working on committees, being marshals and officials, and engaging with our fellow club members with enthusiasm and support.

Competition, Social, Registers, Club Nights, or any other special occasion. We celebrate and reward success with encouragement and share knowledge. New members, many times a bit overwhelmed, are welcomed like old friends. The professionalism of organisers is outstanding. Our Competition Committee run what is recognised as the best club competition in the country. We provide competition events that are safe, competitive and well controlled, with fairness and transparency. Every competitor is heard and has the ability to influence our club rules annually at our review meeting.

The work undertaken by the Social Committee is very much “behind the scenes”. As well as organising our four Seasonal Club Runs, taking in some cases in excess of 120 people, and topping off the year with the Last Run, the Social Committee is also responsible for the organisation of our biannual Major Tours, special events, including Christmas parties, family days and Go Kart competitions. Our legendary Club nights are also organised by the Social Committee, as are the Annual Dinner and Presentation night.

The very roots of the Club are competition and camaradie, fulfilling the aim of Porsche design. We have the best marque, but it is complemented by the best people.

The running of competition events involves major voluntary work from our members, for race day officials, marshals and scrutineers.

The integrity of our administration and systems is superb. We are fortunate to be able to employ staff that provide a level of administration that is admired by other clubs Australia wide. The fact that our administrators are simply the best is just another bonus to us all.

Ever since joining I have been consistently impressed by the enthusiasm of everybody who becomes involved in whatever aspect of the club they enjoy. It is our members who make our events successful, be it

The Registers have greatly expanded the activities and involvement of the Club members, thanks to the enthusiastic organisation by the Coordinator and the Register Captains.

The rewards of participation in our wonderful club are tremendous and are enhanced by becoming more involved. Join one or more of the committees that work for our club, and you’ll be pleased you did!

Will Darvall nominates many significant people from the past and present: Who are the standout people of the thousands who have contributed to the life of PCV? They can be expansive personalities, great drivers, incredible enthusiasts, proactive committee members, thorough organisers, faithful stayers, or contributors in many aspects of club life. Out of hundreds of names racing around my mind, these are some.

Rex Broadbent is a Hall of Fame member, was Comp Sec for 3 years, has competed very successfully and consistently on dirt, track and tarmac and is a respected advisor. Adrian Evans had 9 terms on the Committee, 2 as Pres and was a wise influence, becoming the 4th Life Member.

Will Darvall

Kerry Reynolds was instrumental in forming PCV, served 3 terms as the first VP and then President, spent many years as a comp organiser and competitor, then returned to join the editorial committee of this book. Graham Stockley had 10 terms on the Committee over 13 years, was President for 4, was involved in all activities, particularly competition, and was a commanding presence in Club life. He was the first Hall of Fame member.

Ian Knight had 10 consecutive terms on the Committee, including 6 as Treasurer and 2 as Pres (and Social Director), uniquely rejoining for an 11th term this year. He is an authoritative competent organiser, with a long competition history.

Kerry Reynolds

Paul Mauger was Social Sec, then VP for 2 years, organised concours for many years, competed ferociously on the track and was another standout personality. Michael Browning was the 3rd Hall of Fame member, edited the magazine for many years, was President, has widely competed in motor sport, writes and presents generously and was an important member of the editorial committee of this book. Richard Batchelor was editor 8 times in 15 years, has written many informative articles, competed with PORA for many years and was on the editorial committee of this book.

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Ros Poon was Social Sec for 6 years, greatly expanding the social scene by throwing herself, her personality and her organising skills into every aspect of Club life. She became a formidable competitor, winning Open Class one year.

Bruce Harris has the longest Porsche club membership, having been a member of a previous short lived 356 club in about 1960 and a PCV member from, or shortly after, its formation. He was the second Hall of Fame member, winning the Club Championship in 4 of the first 5 years and twice later. A forceful legend. Many Committee members have contributed with longevity and purpose:

Graham Stockley

John King had 12 terms on the Committee, including 5 as President, and was the second Life Member, after Alan Hamilton. Paul Stuart had 7 terms, including 2 as Pres, and had a long competition history. Noela Semmens had 9 terms, including 4 as Comp Sec and 1 as President. She was the third Life Member.


Greg Cook had 8 terms, including 2 as President, and was the 4th Life Member. He has a long competition history.

passenger seat (at the circuit!) for Sprint events, later installing a Turbo charger, before updating the 3 speed Sporto to a 4 speed version! Finally he upped the ante even further by purchasing the Australian Championship winning 934 to run in Club events! A true Legend of the Club!

Michael O’Brien is in his 11th term, including 4 as Social Director and 4 as Treasurer. He enjoys competition and was part of the editorial committee for this book. Andrew Bonwick is in his 7th term, including 2 as Comp Sec and being the current proactive President. He was on the editorial committee of this book.

Paul Mauger

Ron Widdison has been Porsche Parade editor for the past six years. He has produced the magazine for the past 11 years and is responsible for vastly improving the magazine quality and has been the club’s Motorsport Photograper since 2002. Ron designed the current club logo and also designed and printed this book. However, my Involvement Award goes to Barbara Darvall (Clearihan), who has been a member since the inaugural meeting on 26th of August, 1975. She was a member of the second committee, Secretary for the next 2 and a Committee member later for 4 years. She had the longest competition history of any woman in the Club, competing from 1976 to 2010. Since then, she has been the authoritative track caller, never losing her place. Member of the Social committee for many years, she helped organise many events and wrote many articles. One of the most recognised and admired people in the Club, she probably knows more about the Club, its life and its people, than anybody else. She was the first non President to be made a Life Member. She gained a second Life membership by marrying me. She was a member of this book’s editorial committee. My Achievement Award goes to Michael Chapman, who spent 8 years on the Committee, including 2 as Social Director and 2 as President. He promoted familyfriendly events, instituted the enormously successful CFA morning tea visits on Social runs and, most importantly, introduced a raft of safety measures for competition events; driver training and assessment, written safety protocols, safety clothing and a trained and briefed PCV marshals group. He was made a Life Member. My Enthusiasm Award goes to Tas Kozaris, an associate member since 2012, whose vehicles are “a large orange tractor with front end loader, an Astra twin top, a Torana XU-1, a Caprice and a Barina”. He has been a thoughtful, reliable member of the marshals group for many years and a great contributor to the social life of the Club. He radiates goodwill and consideration wherever he attends. Rex Broadbent remembers several fellow competitors: Bruce Harris drove his new 3.0 Carrera very competitively to say the least! As threats to his domination emerged however, to save weight he initially began removing the

Michael Browning

Kevin Jarman was THE Motorkhana handbrake-turn specialist of his era and certainly the man to beat. Interestingly, in later years Peter White took up the mantle and never once did I see him perform a handbrake turn. I guess if you’re good enough either technique works just fine!! Don Tryhorn and Dennis O’Keefe. Inseparable friends who at one memorable Winton Sprint shared Dennis’s 2.7 Targa (Don’s Carrera was broken..) and all day frantically swapped wheels between their individual runs to make the car legal for the different Classes they were contesting! Dennis later reported that the poor Targa didn’t appreciate the abuse, as each time through the “sweeper” a gap large enough to put your hand through appeared between the windscreen pillar and the quarter vent window. Michael Chapman has his suggestions: Bruce Harris was a forceful legend, who put back into competition after he stopped driving, as a marshal.

Richard Batchelor

Ros Poon was the Social Director and she got me into the organising roles for Tricky Tours which were Runs with Questions and true to the PCV Psychie we could have a winner! Sven Burchartz comes to mind as a brilliant driver and a very quick thinking, witty person when he had the microphone in his hands.

Ian Knight

Richard Oldham came up with the idea of forming the Registers during Ian Knight’s Presidency and was the first Register Director. Mark Clair: the gadget man. If you want some left field ideas Mark has them. When the competition entries were starting to wane, Mark came up with Entrée Class for new members. Garry Voges adds more names:

Bruce Harris

Barbara Darvall (Clearihan),

Will Darvall. I salute his enthusiasm and energy, still contributing so much to our club. Ros Poon. The first time I went to a PCV event at Calder back in the 90’s there was the queen of the track, with long, shiny black hair, perfect make-up, in her PURPLE driving suit with high heels!! (worn only in-between driving stints). Mark Cummins. Bring back the Bogies! The PCV presentation dinner in 1999 was a highlight of the year with club member Mark Cummins presenting his hilarious “Bogie Awards”. Nobody was safe from Cummo’s eagle eye or sharp tongue when it came

1975 - 2015

177


to handing out cheap shots on somebody’s driving, partying, dress code or whatever else he wanted to have a go at you about! All in all good fun & I think only a couple of victims took offence & told Cummo where he could park his red 993! Noela Semmens honours a pair of great contributors: The standout members that spring instantly to mind for me would be

Alan Barbour and Bev Madden. Always willing to help without being asked, happy to stay and help pack up equipment, genuinely interested in the other members and promoting the Club. Bev spending all day organising the stop watch timing team and they never left an event without saying thankyou for the day. Both were wonderful people and truly embodied the Club spirit. (Sadly Alan is no longer with us.)

John King

Sven Burchartz

Noela Semmens

Michael Chapman

Richard Oldham

Greg Cook

Don Tryhorn and Dennis O’Keefe.

Mark Clair

Michael O’Brien

Ron Widdison

Rex Broadbent

Andrew Bonwick

Garry Voges

Mark Cummins

Tas Kozaris

Kevin Jarman

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PCV The First 40 Years


In the Pits

1975 - 2015

179


23. 40th Anniversary Run to Rochford Winery Sunday 20th September 2015.

180

PCV The First 40 Years


1975 - 2015

181


The Club celebrated its 40th Anniversary with a lunch in the fabulous Rochford amphitheatre. It was truly a marquee event. A wide cross section of members past and present. Over five hundred attendees. 232 Porsches. Please experience the event through the words of the people who were there and these wonderful photos. Tristan De Carro Fittingly the weather gods turned it on for the PCV 40th anniversary, allowing the Porsches to shine in the brilliant sunshine and when combined with the carefully orchestrated parking, provided a visual spectacle. With so many Porsches in attendance (although a representative of the 924 seemed to be lacking) it was a great opportunity to discover cars which I hadn’t seen for years and to drool over others which I had never seen before, with the viola metallic 964 Turbo 3.6 a personal highlight. It was an utter privilege to listen to Will’s speech with regards to the background of the club and its lasting legacy, with the celebration providing the opportunity to catch-up with fellow members I have met through the club, many who I now consider as friends, and to meet new ones. Michael Chapman It was a great pleasure to have attended Rochford Winery to celebrate 40 years of a great club. The display of cars looked fantastic and that was just from our club. Then you start to think back and realise that it was in 1998 that we celebrated Porsche’s 50th Birthday at Chandon. That’s 17 years ago! Then there was 2003, again at Chandon we celebrated the 40th Anniversary of 911. That’s 12 years ago! Where has all that time gone??? On Sunday there were many new faces but also a lot of the old ones. The company was excellent, the food was great and the speeches were just the correct length. Congratulations to all that put a huge amount of effort into making it another truly memorable day. Mark & Sylvia Behan Sometimes an event just goes right, Sunday was one of them. Sylvia and I headed in from the gathering on the Western Ring Road where eighteen cars set out together for Rochford. Of course the weather had done its bit and it was a glorious day, making the relatively short run a real pleasure. Arriving at Rochford, everything was so well organised we just slid into our designated parking and within minutes we were stood around, glass in hand, chatting to fellow club members. Not only drinks but a morning tea of muffins. Then came the excellent food and what a great venue, great background music and all so deceptively easy. One of the best PCV events ever!

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PCV The First 40 Years

Alvaro Del Gallo and Neil Drew The Gods shone upon the PCV for the 40th Anniversary. What a beautiful Spring morning with a cloudless sky and all these shiny cars arriving. The well organised Ken and Harriet Anson had all run notes ready for distribution. In this 40th year the Club is fortunate to have past Members rejoin after so many years. We welcomed back today Kenneth and Leonie Price, members from 1988, who have been part of the evolution of this great Club. We also welcomed new members Filippe Chiarella and Andrew Smith. The Roads chosen were scenic and busy, but gave us time to take in the lush green Spring atmosphere of farms and vineyards. Ken’s notes scheduled us to arrive at Rochford Winery at 11.15am. We actually arrived at 11.13am. Well done Ken! Michael Dennis I was invited to display my Marine Blue Metallic 930 in the official 40th Anniversary Line-up, to represent the year 1987. This raised the stakes somewhat, as the car had to look its best (a matter of pride of course). And what a day it turned out to be! The briefing at our Hallam meeting point, in glorious Spring sunshine, was conducted by Greg Humphries with efficiency and humour. Robin Humphries then released the 50 odd Porsches in small staggered groups, which resulted in a rather relaxed run over some mildly challenging roads through Clematis, Cockatoo, Gembrook, Hoddles Creek and Woori Yallock. The subdued pace may have also been a psychological response to the fact that all our cars would be on show this day, so unnecessary stone chips, dust and insect strikes were to be avoided if possible. Our arrival at Rochford Winery rammed home the fact that this was no ordinary Sunday run - the scale and logistics were simply staggering. Despite this, CFA volunteers and PCV members, led by our President, efficiently guided the 230 Porsches and 550 members to their designated areas - in our case, squeezing us into the Line-up. While the magnificent Rochford venue, the glorious panorama of Porsches, the efficient catering, the tasteful music from the Jenn Allas Duo, the childrens’ activities, and of course, Will Darvall’s hilarious history

presentation, were all brilliantly successful, it was the amazing camaraderie on the day that impressed us most. From the minute we parked the car, we were virtually overwhelmed by members throughout the day, either catching up, saying hello for the first time, or simply enquiring about the car (one lady, after viewing the 930 from a particular aspect, dubbing it ‘The Kim Kardashian of Porsches’ - priceless). Of course we spent time at our table with members whose company we regularly enjoy (Colin & Julia Anderson, Ray Graham & Sandi Osborne, Paul & Jane Graham and Felix Rieniets), plus Martin & Jill Willis, who had travelled all the way from Perth, not only to attend, but to drive to the event in a 993 they recently sold to Ron Widdison, (it’s a long story). However, equal time was spent wandering around the cars and encountering some wonderful people we had not seen for quite a while. This made us more aware of our own 16 year journey with this great club. It was a rare opportunity to catch up with past Presidents - Paul Stuart, Greg Cook, Noela Semmens, Michael Chapman and Jeff Thomas, particularly Noela, who, as the Club’s Secretary back in 1999, took my phone call and encouraged me to join. Yes this event was for many members a reunion, that in some cases went back 40 years! It was also an absolute triumph for Andrew Bonwick, Carly Pasco and all those members too numerous to mention, who were involved in its organisation.

Will Darvall presented a cracking speech on the history of the Club.


President Andrew Bonwick addresses the members.

New models on display.

Michael Chapman CFA Chiefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 993.

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183


Kerry Reynolds

Michael and Kris Dennis with their 930 Turbo.

Michael and Wendy Browning.

Neil Drew, Roger Randle, Cheryl Randle and Gay Carrigan.

Michael and Jenny Chapman and friends.

Romana, Ron, Jack and Max Widdison.

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PCV The First 40 Years


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2015 Po 5 r 7

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40th Anniversary Run to Rochford Winery, Yarra Valley ‘A DAY ON THE GREEN WITH PCV’ 1975 - 2015 185 Sunday 20th September 2015 - Maroondah Highway Coldstream


186

PCV The First 40 Years

1

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 1

1 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1

1

1 1 1 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 1

1 1

1

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1

1 1 1

Y

96/7

1

95/6

1

94/5

1

1

93/4

1 1

1

1

V W X

92/3

1

1 1

U

91/2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

T

90/1

1

1

S

89/9

1

R

88/9

1

Q

87/8

1

P

86/7

1 1 1 1 1

85/6

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

84/5

1

83/4

1

82/3

1

80

1

79

1 1 1

81/2

1 1 1 1 1 1

78

Michael Kerry Garnet Vin Jill Roger Ross Ken Barbara Trevor John Alan John Michael Suzy Graham Warwick Paul Russell Pam Mark Bruce Daryl Graeme Ian Steve John John Fergus Don Tracy Ann Bob Robin Peter Romano Geoff Gail Guy Vicki Don Michael Anne Dennis

77

Stillwell Reynolds Luckins Jacono Stillwell James McKinnon Foo D/C/Darvall Newnes Edwards Coleman Benson Pratt Hooker Stockley Freemantle Mauger Sturzaker Delaney Davey Lilley Louey Redman Nadenbousch White Dare King McPherson Tryhorn Monahan King/Tyson Perkins Versluys White Piva Binmore Morris Richards Matlock Hume Browning Binmore Bath

TOTAL 1 4 2 4 1 2 1 6 7 3 2 1 2 3 1 10 1 3 4 1 1 1 3 3 1 1 1 12 1 5 2 6 3 3 5 1 2 2 2 1 1 7 8 1

76

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48

75

Chronology of General A B CCommittee D E F Members G H I 1975 J K - 2015 L M N O P S MAG Social 1 VP T C/Sec Nat 2


1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

00/1 11/12 01/2

99/0 10/11

98/9 09/10

97/8 08/9

07/8 96/7

06/7 95/6

05/6 94/5

1 1

1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

04/5 93/4

81/2 93/4 82/3 94/5 83/4 95/6 84/5 96/7 85/6 97/8 86/7 98/9 87/8 99/0 88/9 00/1 89/9 01/2 90/1 02/3 91/2 03/4 92/3

79 91/2 80 92/3

78 90/1

77 89/9

76 88/9

TOTAL Mould Geoff 21 Street Bob 11 Aitken Ed 1 Jabara Lee 2 Batchelor Richard 8 Bernadou Phil 5 Broadbent Rex 4 Jinadasa Jan 2 Evans Adrian 9 Barbour Allan 3 Luther George 1 Woodhouse Egidia 3 Wakeling Graeme 1 Froude Simon 2 Rose Cathy 1 Poon Roselyn 6 Moody Jim 1 Williams Tom 4 Balodis Ojars 1 England James 1 Camamile Chris 6 Stuart Paul 7 Herrod Michael 8 Semmens Noela 9 Newman Roly 6 Lithgow Les 2 Cook Greg 8 Knight Ian 11 Ward Janice 1 Lawson John 3 Jonas Danny 1 Raymer Robin 1 Houghton April 1 Cummins Mark 5 Robertson Tony 5 Clair Mark 5 Chapman Michael 8 Percy Ian 3 Bier/Burchartz Sven 4 Baxter Linley 3 Stoupas Matthew 4 Alp Chris 3 Herbison Cliff 5 Thomas Jeff 7

87/8 75

86/7

85/6

84/5

83/4

82/3

81/2

4 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92

80

79

78

F G HChronology I A J K LofB MGeneral N CO Committee PD QE FR GS HMembers T IU JV KW 1975 Z OAAP ABQ ACR ADS AET AFU AGV AH AL AM AN AD AO L X M Y -N 2015 W AIX AJY AK Z AA AB AC S MAG Social P S MAG Social P S MAG Social 1P VP T C/Sec Nat VP T C/Sec Nat VP T C/Sec Nat V 2 77

76

E

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1975 - 2015

187

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1


188

PCV The First 40 Years

82/3 08/9

1

1

1

1 1 1

1 1 1

1 1

1 1

1

1 1 1

1 1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1

1

1

1

1 1 1

1 1 1

1 1 1

1 1

1

1

1

1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

U

92/3

81/2 07/8

1

T

91/2

80 06/7

1

89/9 15/16 90/1

79 05/6

1

87/8 13/14 88/9 14/15

78 04/5

1 1 1 1 1 1

85/6 11/12 86/7 12/13

77 03/4

1 1

83/4 09/10 84/5 10/11

76 02/3

TOTAL Ian 8 Graham 2 Duane 6 Michael 5 Roger 3 David 1 Richard 2 Nick 2 James 3 Keith 5 Michael 9 Rick 1 Roger 4 Jacqui 4 Grant 4 Jolanda 4 Graham 4 Ron 1 Peter 6 Andrew 7 Ron 6 Kerry 2 Felix 5 AnneMaree 1 Aaron 3 Stephen 2 Will 1 Neville 4 Wayne 4 Manny 3 Tony 4 Leon 3 Phil 2 Garry 2 Garry 2 Ken 1

75 01/2

00/1

99/0

98/9

4 93 Jenkins 94 Gorman 95 Rodgers 96 Dennis 97 Holding 98 Lawson 99 Oldham 100 Marandos 101 Caldow 102 Ryding 103 O'Brien 104 Barton 105 Randle 106 Collihole 107 Stephenson 108 Brezovec 109 Lachlan 110 Wishart 111 Harrison 112 Bonwick 113 Widdison 114 Leonard 115 Rieniets 116 Fitzgerald 117 Ireland 118 Wood 119 Darvall 120 Sampson 121 St Baker 122 Mezzasalma 123 Carolan 124 Christodulaki 125 Treloar 126 Vosges 127 Saber 128 Anson

97/8

96/7

95/6

91/2

94/5

90/1

Committee Members U Chronology V WA X of Y General Z B AA AB AH AJ AM NAN OAO PAP QAQ RAR S CAC AD D AE E AF F AG G 1975 H AI I - 2015 J AK K AL L M P S P MAG S Social MAG Social 1 VP T VP C/Sec T NatC/Sec Nat 2 93/4

T

92/3

S


2015 - 2016 PCV Members Ross Aanensen, James Aartsen, Graeme Aberline, Muriel Aberline, Noel Ackman, Mandy Adamson, James Adamson, Charles Agius, Brent Agius, Nick Agnew, Nathan Agnew, Anabel Agnew, Zen Agnew, Emily Agnew, Mardi Agnew, Etienne Agnew, Walter Agnoletti, Prateek Ajmera, Nicholas Alford, Dale Alford, David Allen, Kathleen Allen, Terry Allen, Boyne Alley, Ros Alley, Sandra Altmann, Scott Altmann, Myles Anceschi, Peter Andersen, Sam Andersen, Rob Anderson, Kimberley Anderson, Kelly Anderson, Leonie Anderson, Colin Anderson, Graeme Anderson, Julia Anderson, Yannick Anderson, Simon Ansell, Ken Anson, Harriet Anson, James Anthony, Danielle Anthony, Lyn Antonio, Chris Apostolatos, Ari Apostolatos, Bill Apostolopoulos, Lindsay Arthur, Rosemarie Arthur, Henry Arundel, Elio Ascenzo, Jim Askew, Joanna Askew, Harald Atkinson, Carlo Attard, Julian Augustini, David Austin, Greg Axiotis, Alex Babauskis, Michael Bailey, Richard Baird, Robert Baird, Mary Baird, Thomas Baird, Peter Baker, Wendy Baker, John Baker, Don Ballingall, Kelly Ballis, John Ballis, Eric Bana, Jadranka Banovic, Andrew Barclay, Greg Bardsley, Andrew Barlow, Vanessa Barlow, Sunny Barlow, Bonnie Barlow, Anne Barnes, Russell Barnes, Jane Barrington, Robert Barrington, Suzanne Barrow, Greg Barwick, Janelle Barwick, Bruce Batagol, Richard Batchelor, Tony Bates, Dennis Bath, Cameron Bath, Margaret Bath, Pamela Batrouney, Peter Batrouney, Malcolm Batten, Philippa Batten, Ray Baty, Sue Baty, Linley Baxter, Simon Baxter, Helen Baxter, Angela Baxter, Anthony Bayer, Belinda Bayer, Ian Bayfield, Chett Beavis, Alice Beavis, Tola Beavis, Olek Beavis, Peter Becker, Ian Begley, Jacinta Begley, Robyn Begley, Mark Behan, Sylvia Behan, Paul Belcourt, Alison Belot, Kathy Bennett, Paul Bennett, Pamela Benson, John Benson, Chris Benson, Allan Bensted, Allan Bensted, Karen Bentley, James Bergmuller, Andrew Berry, Zane Berzina, Lachlan Beveridge, Peter Billings, Asuka Billings, Ikuko Billings, Bob Bishop, Paul Blackie, Deborah Blackie, David Blackman, Judith Blanch, Greg Blanch, George Bloomfield, Jeff Bobik, Paul Bobik, Le Yen Boc, Steven Bodnar, Anna Boetto, Phillip Bolonis, Alexander Bolonis, Alexander Bolonis, Chris Bonehill, Joe Bonfa, Ernie Bonnes, Andrew Bonwick, James Borg, Paul Borobokas, Peter Bosland, June Bosland, Stan Bougadakis, Patrice Bougouin, James Bowden, Stephen Bradford, Jim Bradley, Deano Brandi, Loretta Brandi, Tony Brandt, Nanette Brandt, Garry Brennan, Juris Briedis, Ilona Briedis, Michael Britt,

Victoria Britt, Rex Broadbent, Rohan Brock, Fred Brock, Denise Brock, Bernadette Brown, Tim Brown, Michael Browning, Wendy Browning, Di Bryan, Marie Bryant-Smith, Geoff Bryant-Smith, Noah Buckell, Robert Buckell, Thi Bui, Malcolm Buley, Sven Burchartz, Luca Burchartz, Seth Burchartz, Simon Burgess, Jenni Burgess, Margot Burke, Brian Burke, Rowan Burnett, John Burns, Howard Burton, Matt Burton, Suzanne Burton, Annie Bushnell, Geraldine Caddle, Gregory Caddle, Nigel Cade, Nigel Cade, John Cahill, Claire Cairns, Shaun Cairns, Elke Calleja, James Calvert-Jones, Ann Camamile, Donald Cameron, Robert Cameron, Marilyn Cameron, Brian Canny, Alister Cant, Theodora Cantwell, Tony Cantwell, Jeremy Capon, Travis Carlin, Tony Carolan, Chris Carolan, Alf Carrigan, Gay Carrigan, Shaun Carroll, Justin Carter, Anthony Cascone, Lucy Cassidy, Jordan Catalano, Richard Catchlove, Rob Chaloner, Jonathan Chamberlain, Steven Champion, Mike Chandler, Michael Chapman, Jenny Chapman, Christopher Chesterfield, Filippe Chiarella, Gail Chittleborough, Mark Chittleborough, William Chow, Louise Christie, Robert Christie, Leon Christodulaki, Irene Christodulaki, Christopher Christophidis, Mark Chrzanowski, Connie Chrzanowski, Steven Chrzanowski, Andrew Chung, Val Ciconte, Robert Ciconte, Marc Cini, Frank Civelli, Mark Clair, Gabby Clair, Peter Clark, Glenn Clarke, Danna Cleugh, Stephen Cleugh, Matthew Close, Casey Close, Ugo Cocchis, Janet Conheady, Robyn Conrad, Alan Conrad, Robyn Conrad, Alan Conrad, Greg Cook, Helen Cook, Annemaree Coombes, David Cooper, Glen Cooper, Stephen Corcoran, Warren Corlett, Thierry Cornevin, Kevin Costa, Lorraine Costa, Nigel Cowie, Graham Cowley, Tania Cowley, Philip Cox, Fiona Cox, Julie Cox, Geoffrey Cox, Alan Craig, Sarah Cress, Max Cress, Julian Cress, Barbara Cressall, Jeff Cressall, Paul Crew, David Cripps, Peter Cromie, Clair Cromie, Gary Crosthwaite, Ann Crowhurst, Damian Cruickshank, Barry Cuneo, Sam Curtis, Dan Czarny, Robert Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alessandro, Michael Dancey, William Dancey, Melissa Daniels, David Danziger, Kathy Danziger, Anthony Darling, Will Darvall, Barbara Darvall, Jo Davey, Lois Davey, Mark Davey, Joan Davidson, Gary Davies, Lynette Davies, Chris Davies, Emma Davies, Geena Davies, Trevor Davis, Peter Day, Tristan De Carro, Lawrie De La Rue, Carolann De La Rue, Frank Deak, Pietro Decunto, Rex DeightonSmith, Alvaro Del Gallo, Maria Del Gallo, Ross Del Gallo, Raymond Delaney, Mark Dempsey, Michael Dennis, Kris Dennis, James Dent, Craig Dentry, Sandra Dentry,

Sandra Dentry, Dejan Derbogosijan, Sonia Derbogosijan, Jeff Devers, Lynne Dickins, Matthew Dickinson, Astrid Diercks, Peter Dimopoulos, Suzy Dodds, Jack Dodds, Emily Dodds, Michael Dodds, Ron Dodge, Cynthia Doherty, Peter Doherty, Kate Donaldson, Andrew Donaldson, David Doolan, Emanuela Doughty, Anna Dove, Andrew Dove, Michael Downard, Sandy Drew, Sasha Drew, Neil Drew, Phyl Drew, Vincent Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Rozario, Paul Drzewucki, John Duke, Tim Duncan, Simon Dunn, Kursti Dunn, Cooper Dunn, Kevin Duong, Michelle Dupuy, Samuel Dupuy, Russell Dupuy, Robert Dyer, Susan Dyer, Daniel Dyer, Pat East, Camille Edwards, William Edwards, Laura Edwards, Ray Edwards, Sam Elamirdache, Ken Ellaway, Hugh Ellis, Jacqui Ellis, Catherine Ellis, Heidi Elmer, Joseph Ensabella, Philippe Etienne, Leon Evangelistis, Adrian Evans, Allison Eve, Natalie Eve, Ken Eve, Campbell Ewart, Jodie Ewart, Eliza Ewart, Alexandra Ewart, Philip Ewington, Naomi Eyers, Rafael Fabris, Donna Fabris, Ben Faggetter, Allanah Fahey, Robert Fairley, Barbara Fairley, Rodney Fankhauser, Shirley Fankhauser, Shirley Fankhauser, Chris Farmakis, Andrew Farmer, Malcolm Farr, Tania Farrell, Carlo Fasolino, Chris Fawcett, Kim Fay, Jan Federico, Domenic Federico, Lindsay Ferguson, Mark Ferguson, Gillian Ferguson, Melissa Ferrie, Pat Ferrie, Brian Finn, Stephen Fisher, Joshua Fitt, Bryan Fitt, Luke Fitt, Peter Fitzgerald, Barry Fitzgerald, Christian Fitzgerald, Andrea Fitzgerald, Helen Fitzgerald, Barry Fitzgerald, Tim Flamuri, Dennis Fleming, Robert Flynn, Scott Follows, Clinton Ford, Jonathan Ford, Sharon Ford, Michael Foropoulos, Nicholas Foster, Matthew Fox, Alex Franes, Yolanda Franes Cid, Nick Frangou, Katrina Franklin, Teresa Freemantle, Warwick Freemantle, Phillip French, Rusty French, Janine French, Dieter Freystatzky, Bert Frigo, Sophie Fu, Zig Fuhrmeister, Tania Fuhrmeister, Zoe Fuhrmeister, Charlie Galea, Sandra Galea, Kerryn Gamble, Doug Gardiner, Renee Garner, Michael Garner, Paul Garriga, Peter Garriga, Peta Garriga, Charmian Gaud, John Gdanski, Ian Geekie, Ken Geier, Kieran Geier, Nathan Geier, Aaron Geier, Lyne Geier, John George, Sandra George, Andrew George, Peter Gibbs, Dirk Gierlach, Dawn Gierlach, Doukas Gigis, Aleczander Gigis, Jeff Gillard, Lisa Gillespie, Sandra Gillooly, Peter Gillooly, Nadia Giusti, Rob Gocentas, Michael Goedheer, Konstantine Gogos, Daniel Goldbloom, John Good, John Goodall, Marg Goodall, Cameron Goodyear, Ron Gordon, Margaret Gordon, Rodney Gordon, Penelope Gordon, Peter Gordon, James Goris, Andrew Gott, Naomi Gott,

1975 - 2015

189


James Gough, Grace Gough, Lachie Gough, Stephen Gough, Katherine Goulopoulos, Tom Goulopoulos, Andrew Goulsbra, Donna Goulsbra, Jane Gourlay, Geoffrey Gourley, Russell Graham, Ray Graham, Paul Graham, Delwyn Graham, Dean Grant, Bernard Green, David Greig, Lorelle Greig, Jennifer Griffiths, Tania Groesslinger, Stephen Grove, Tania Grove, Jayden Grove, Brenton Grove, Doug Growcott, Kylie Guerin, Jean-Daniel Guerin, Tony Hagg, Michael Hains, Sally Anne Hains, John Hall, Gregor Hall, Andrew Hall, Leigh Hallamore, Keith Hamann, Alan Hamilton, Fleur Hamilton, Travis Hamilton, Lorna Hamilton, Scott Hancox, Paul Hannah, Samantha Hardman, Charles Hardman, Helen Hardwick, Brittney Hardwick, Evan Hardwick, Andrew Hardwick, Adrian Harkin, Anuschka Harkin, Kylee Harman, Alex Harmati, Bruce Harris, Elizabeth Harris, Richard Harris, Spencer Harrison, Peter Harrison, Julie Harrison, Elizabeth Hartland, Elizabeth Hartland, Calvin Hartley, Bill Hartmann, Annie Hartree, Bill Hatzicostas, Evanthia Hatzicostas, Sandra Hatzl, Bob Hawker, Neil Hawker, Marg Hawker, Kate Hawking, Kate Hawking, Greville Hay, Dominic Healy, Phil Hearn, Thomas Heberling, Katrina Heine, Brett Helmers, Peter Hemphill, Ian Henderson, Kathy Hendrey, Robert Hendrey, Drew Hendrey, Malcolm Henley, David Henry, Jenny Henry, Stuart Hercules, Peter Hercules, Paul Hergstrom, Tom Herrod, Michael Herrod, Chris Hewitt, Alisha Hickey, Edwyn “John” Hider Smith, Gary Higgon, Janine Higgon, Martin Higgs, Jacqueline Higgs, Evelyn Hii, Ron Hill, Shane Hill, Bronwyn Hill, Allan Hines, Kerry Hines, Yoriko Hirao, John Hirjee, Craig Hobbs, Nicholas Hockaday, Helen Hoffmann, Roger Holding, Debra Holding, Michael Holland, Diane Holland, Mark Homer, Christian Honig, Belinda Honig, Craig Hook, Mark Horton Andrews, Caroline Horton Andrews, Andrew Hosking, David Hosking, Jillian Hosking, Nigel Houghton-Allen, Brent Howard, Christopher Howardwest, Madeleine Howard-west, Richard Howard-west, Alexander Howard-west, Adam Howard-West, Tony Hughes, Ann Hughes, John Huitfeldt, June Huitfeldt, Geoff Humphrey, Nathan Humphrey, Greg Humphries, Robin Humphries, Timothy Hunt, Kathleen Hunter, Rod Hunter, Ros Hurle, Peter Hurle, Richard Hurst, Andrew Hutchison, Fatime Hyndman, James Hyndman, John Iacovangelo, John Iacovangelo, Shelby Ingram, Andrew Ingram, Alessandro (Alex) Iodice, Aaron Ireland, Joe Italiano, Raymond Jackson, Nicole Jackson, Dale Jackson, Antoine Jacob, Brooke James, Toby James, David James, Julien Jane, Graeme Jane, Maryann Janssen, Geoff Janssen, John Jaworski, Eva Jaworski, Jenny Jay, Gillian Jellard, Richard Jellis, Ian Jenkins, Ruth Jenkins, Polina Jessop, Jan Jinadasa,

190

PCV The First 40 Years

Mark Johnson, Peter Johnson, Jenny Johnson, Roger Johnston, Loretta Johnston, Gordon Johnstone, Frank Jones, Ian Jones, Martin Jones, Darren Jones, Debbie Jonker, David Jonker, Brendan Jordan, Barb Joyce, Peter Joyce, Olga Junek, Richard Juzwin, Arthur Kabissios, Betty Kabissios, George Kallifidas, Antonia Kallifidas, Lou Karalis, Jezebel Karalis, Betty Karalis, Nick Karnaros, Victoria Karnaros, Maria Karnaros, Dean Katsivelis, Christos Katsivelis, Belinda Kay, Grainne Kearns, Greg Keays, Wayne Kenafacke, Lyndon Kennedy, Megan Kenney, Ian Kent, Mark Keny, George Kenyeres, Tracey Ker, Moshos Kesarios, Lindy Kew, Anou Khanijou, Adrian Kinderis, Jennifer Kinderis, Lilah Kinderis, Sally King, Austin King, John King, John Kirby, Fraser Kirchner, Danny Klashovski, Mary Klashovski, Anthony Klashovski, Nicholas Klashovski, Kate Klashovski, Tom Klaveniek, Paula Klaveniek, Anthony Klein, Karl - Heinz Klopfer, Roswitha Klopfer, Robin Knaggs, Christine Knapp, Ian Knight, Deb Knight, Travis Knipe, Jason Ko, Timothy Koehler, John Koinakis, Peter Koletas, Ange Koletas, George Kolliou, Michael Kolody, Ange Kondos, Peter Kopanidis, Steve Kosa, Phil Kotsanis, Dean Koutsoumidis, Tas Kozaris, Marlene Kozaris, Christian Kozaris, Elysia Kozaris, Peter Krohn, Jason Kunyik, Stewart Lachlan, Graham Lachlan, Alex Lacota, Flavio Lacota, Jason Laity, Nick Lambrinos, Vicki LambrouFernando, Denis Lambrou-Fernando, Esther Langenegger, Elizabeth Lasry, Alex Lasry, Lex Lasry, Jenni Latinopoulos, Sue Lawrie, Ian Lawrie, Jon Lawson, Binh Le, Teagan Le, Jenni Le Comte, Sophie Le Maistre, Randal Leacock, Jon Lechte, Anthony Lee, Aaron Lee, Michael Lentini, Frances Lentini, Patricia Leonard, Patricia Leonard, Davide Lettieri, Nada Letunica, Zoran Letunica, John Lewis, Jacqui Lewis, Jennifer Lewis, Geoff Ley, Julius LeydenDecunto, Ross Lilley, Julia Lim, Tow Lim, Douglas Ling, Lorraine Ling, Rachelle Liosatos, Christopher Liosatos, Victoria Liosatos, William Liosatos, Lambrou Liosatou, Rohan Little, Michael Loccisano, Marie Locket, Rod Locket, Nadia Lockwood, Andrew Lockwood, Roberta Lockyer, Garth Lockyer, Maria Lodder, Karl Lodder, Srecko Lorbek, Greg Lovett, Jamie Lovett, Garnet Luckins, Mardi Luff, Benjamin Luff, Amy Luff, Richard Luff, Pierre Lutgens, Trang Luu, Michael Lyons, Robbyn Macdonald, Stuart Macdonald, Anna Macgowan, Eddie Mackevicius, Mark Maclennan, Rod Macleod, Siggi Macleod, Kirsty Macmillan, Eleonora Madeira, Michael Madeira, Sandra Magill, Mark Magill, Tim Maguire, Zoe Major, Sammi Major, Gary Major, Leisa Makin, Mitch Makin, Katie Makin, Glen Makin, David Makin, Saskia Makin, Tom Makin, Keira Makin, Saskia Makin, Tom Makin, Keira Makin, Michael Malkoun, David Mallinson,

Nick Marandos, Linda Marandos, David Margary, Samuel Margin, Andrea Marlan, Paul Marlan, Ken Marriott, Chris Mason, Brett Mason, James Mason, Julie Mason, Mardi Mason, Pete Matherson, Alexander Matherson, Marika Matherson, Monika Matlik, Paula Matlock, Andrew Matlock, Paul Mauger, Peter Mayhood, Jan Mayhood, Don Mazzone, Stewart McAuley, Michael McCabe, Keiran McCartney, Susan McClure, David McClure, David McConnell, Alex McCulloch, Ken McDowall, Sheryleen McGlashan, Denise McGrath, John McGregor, Roderick McGregor, Warwick McKenzie, Mark McKnight, Colleen McKnight, Sarah McLaren, Rodney McLaren-Clark, Paul McLaughlan, Steven McLaughlan, Michael McLaurie, Ian McLennan, Julie McLennan, David McMillan, David McMillan, Nikki McMinn, Euan McMinn, Mark McNamara, Greg McPherson, Ewen McPherson, David Melrose, Janet Melrose, Rick Mensa, Manny Mezzasalma, Elvina Mezzasalma, Chris Mezzasalma, Luke Mezzatesta, Joseph Mezzatesta, John Michailidis, Lukas Michel, Tony Mihaloudakis, Theo Mihelakos, Anne Mihelakos, Graham Milford-cottam, Delian Mills, Lori Mills, Melissa Mills, Neil Milne, David Milne, Colin Mitchell, Gaye Mitchell, Peter Modica, Tony Monteleone, Angelo Monteleone, Mandy Monteleone, Tony Moodie, Helen Moore, Gail Morgan, Bob Morgan, Rowan Morison, Vickie Morris, Jennifer Morrison, Brendan Morter, Rick Moscati, Colin Moss, Geoffrey Mould, Barbara Mould, Lipika Mukherji, Devashish Mukherji, Greg Muller, Daniel Munnink, Simon Murray, Sonia Mursec, Mario Mursec, Daniel Muscat, Alexandra Muscat, Frank Mustica, Greg Myers, Lynne Myers, Tzena Naarden, Jonas Naarden, Keith Nadenbousch, Prakash Narula, Leno Natoli, Anne Neamontis, Adrian Nelson, George Neophytou, Karen Neophytou, Sandra Nesci, Suzette Nesire, Roly Newman, Trevor Newnes, Linda Newstead, Gavan Newstead, Jenny Nguyen, George Nichas, Michelle Nichas, Michelle Nichas, Tony Nicholls, Chris Nicodimou, Mark Nicolau, Cony Nicolau, Natalie Nicolau, Val Nigol, Christine Nigol, Graeme OBrien, Chris O’Brien, Michael O’Brien, Roger O’Brien, Sandra O’Brien, Leanne O’Brien, Christine O’Brien, Kzysztof Ochowski, Sam O’Connor, Warwick O’Dell, Jocelyn O’Donnell, Harrison O’Donnell, Cameron O’Donnell, Issabella O’Donnell, Scott O’Donnell, David O’Dwyer, Sandy O’Halloran, Dennis O’Keefe, John O’Keeffe, Bill Olayos, Louise Olayos, June Oldham, Michael O’Loughlin, Kaitlyn O’Neill, Tony Onley, Selvie Onley, John Orchard, Olivia Orchowski, Gavin Orr, Sandi Osborne, Cahit Osman, Bronwyn Owen, Steve Page, Kirsty Page, Peter Pandoleon, Oltem Pantall, James Papas, Kon Pappas, Piotr ( Peter ) Parajs,


Lidia Parajs, Gary Paring, Katrina Park, Baz Park, Kevin Parkinson, Margaret Parkinson, Jake Parsons, Kelly Parsons, Carly Pasco, Jason Pasco, Kieran Patel, Lucky Patsiotis, Sharon Patsiotis, Mark Patti, Jonathan Pau, Noel Pau, Russell Paul, Sam Pearson, Josie Pearson, Matt Peck, Pierro Pellegrini, Grant Penrose, Ian Percy, April Perry, Stewart Perry, Anthony Peterson, Harry Petsios, Sylvia Pettit-Rogers, Harry Philippou, Warwick Phillips, Katharina Phillips, Seng Phuah, Charles Pilgrim, John Pirpiris, Ian Pitcher, David Pitman, John Pitman, David Pitt, Anne Pitt, Sharon Pivac, Murray Pivac, John Plummer, Neil Plunket, Matthew Plymin, Bruce Pollard, Tricia Pollard, Jade Pomfret, Rada Popovic, Rod Popovic, Steve Porter, Chris Pouliassis, Harry Pouliassis, Roger Poulter, Suzanne Poulter, Brian Power, Bill Poynton, Julie-Anne Poynton, Richard Preen, Tony Presta, Rolf Preston, Susan Preston, Judith Price, Amanda Primrose, Jasmine Primrose, Sophie Primrose, Toby Primrose, Belinda Pryse, Joshua Pryse, Lachlan Pryse, Matthew Pryse, Belinda Pryse, Joshua Pryse, Lachlan Pryse, Matthew Pryse, Tony Psirris, Costas Psoras, Sara Psoras, Sarah Pursehouse, William Pye, Corey Quinn, Geoff Quinton, Drew Quinton, Helen Quinton-Widdop, Natalie Radin, Georgie Radin, Chris Radin, Roger Randle, Cheryl Randle, Rob Raymer, Craig Rayner, Teneille Rayner, Grayson Rayner, Clare Rayner, John Rayner, Stuart Rayner, Stuart Rayner, Rod Rayward, Matt Read, Sam Read, Ben Read, Justin Reed, Luke Reiser, Vivien Renzella, David Reynolds, Daniel Reynolds, Jim Richards, Steven Richards, Peter Richardson, Andrew Richmond, Dean Riddell, Jon Riddett, Carla Riddett, Felix Rieniets, Paul Rimmer, Paul Rimmer, Tom Rizzo, Elizabeth Rizzo, Gary Robbins, Jake Roberts, Tony Robertson, Gordon Robertson, Phil Robertson, Phillip Robinson, Peter Robinson, Zoe Rodda, Nick Rodda, Zoe Rodda, Nick Rodda, Duane Rodgers, Laura Rodgers, Shane Rodoreda, Stephen Rodoreda, Rob Rogers, Tony Rogers, Dawn Rogers, Adrian Rogers, Stephanie Roione, Paul Rojo, Phillip Rolls, Ivan Romanic, Vaughan Rose, Ian Ross, Phillip Ross, Jonathan Ross, Fraser Ross, John Ross, John Roumpos, Nicholas Rouse, Tim Rout, Shane Rowe, Matthew Rowland, John Rowland, Grant Rule, Tamara Rus, Margaret Russell-Borg, Lorraine Rutherford, Aggie Ryan, John Ryan, Garry Saber, Lois Saber, Mara Salievski, Ferdi Salievski, Terry Salipas, Nicholas Sampieri, Neville Sampson, Jeanette Sampson, Warwick Sampson, David Sanderson, James Sanderson, Prem Saranathan, Peter Savage, William Saville, Paul Sbrissa, Michael Scalzo, Tony Scanlon, Steve Scanlon, Joe Scarfo, Christine Scheggia, Jon Scholz,

Doug Seeto, Sue Seeto, Gemma Seeto, Noela Semmens, Wendy Setches, Bill Sevastas, George Sevastopoulos, Leanne Sevastopoulos, Gita Shankar, Darren Sharp, Peter Shaw, Margot Shaw, Jeanette Shaw, Robin Shaw, Alan Shaw, Adrienne Shaw, Darren Shepherd, Elena Shepherd, Sonia Sherriff, Alexander Sherriff, Andrew Sherriff, Fleur Sibbel, Basil Siganakis, Aaron Silluzio, Paulina Silluzio, Singithi Silva, Singithi Silva, Guy Simpson, Peta Slack-Smith, Michael Smallwood, Raymond Smit, Christopher Smith, Glenn Smith, Janet Smith, Debhra Smith, Graham Smith, Greg Smith, Lisa Smith, Bejay Smith, Cooper Smith, Norman Smith, Donna Smith, Brittany Smith, Isabelle Smith, Donna-lee Smith, Les Smith, Josef Smith, Ingrid Smith-rijneveld, Mark Smundin, Pam Smyth, Peter Smyth, Fred Solazzo, Susette Sowden, David Spencer, Alison Spink, Stephanie Spinoso, Perry Spiridis, Peter Spiridis, Lucas Sproson, Arthur Spyropoulos, Wayne St Baker, Lindsay St Baker, Jason Stables, Pamela Stables, William Stables, Indigo Stankiewicz, Adam Stanley, Terrence Stanley, Andrew Starr, David Steel, Kathryn Steenson, Brent Stephen, Tony Stephens, Bill Stephenson, Karen Stephenson, Grant Stephenson, Shelley Stepowski, Peter Stepowski, Brett Stevens, Tony Stevenson, Christopher Stevenson, Barbara Stewart, Barbara Stewart, Matt Stoupas, Steven Strange, Peter Struck, Noel Sturgeon, Tracey Sturgeon, Russell Sturzaker, Vicki Sturzaker, Danny Stutterd, Edin Subarazukic, Calvin Subara-zukic, Annette Sullivan, Scott Sullivan, John Swan, Barry Swan, Coralie Swan, James Syme, Andrew Taber, Jenny Taber, Marta Taborski, Jimmy Tan, Damien Tangey, Campbell Tangey, Paul Tanner, George Targownik, Jolanta Targownik, Matthew Tate, Simon Taylor, Ross Taylor, Jeremy Taylor, Heather Taylor, Jono Taylor, Geoff Taylor, Pam Taylor, Margot Templer, Colin Templer, Marco Terzini, Con Theoharidis, Jeff Thomas, Cathy Thomas, Richard Thompson, Rowan Thomson, Chantel Thornton, Mark Tierney, Christie Tierney, Tony Tilkeridis, Peter Tillack, Gloria Tocigl, Greg Tomkins, Maree Toohey, Bill Toohey, Sonia Tortelli, Frank Tortelli, Ken Townsend, Marilyn Townsend, Anthony Trantino, Michael Tratt, Phil Treloar, Melanie Treloar, Tara Treloar, Jon Trende, Kristy Trende, John Trenwith, Leanne Trenwith, David Trewern, Bethwyn Trewern, Celia Triolo, Peter Tripatgis, Wayne Troedson, Michael Trovato, Michael Trudgeon, Arthur Tsiagalos, Michael Tsigeridis, Jonathan Tu, Emre Turgut, Tarkan Turgut, Harold Turley, Matt Turnbull, Alison Turnbull, David Turner, Peter Turner, Jennie Turner, Alistair Turner, Christine Tursky Gordon, Adrian Tweddle, James Tweddle, Max Twigg, Michael Tyrrell, Chris Tzanis, Lies Van

Caelenberg, Gil Van Der Venne, Heath Van Der Waerden, Harvey van Driel, Michelle van Driel, Alex van Driel, Ian van Driel, Kees Van Ek, Pamela Van Ek, Alex Van Ravenswaaij, Brett Varga, Tracey Varga, Steve Varrasso, Dominic Varrasso, Peter Vasta, Michael Vati, Roger Vella, Leanne Vella, Sandi Vella Bonavita, Martin Vella Bonavita, Bjorn Vodanovich, Maree Vodanovich, Garry Voges, Robyn Voges, Tony Vollebregt, Alexandra Vollebregt, Jane Vollebregt, Stan Vukoja, Cara Wagg, Graeme Walkem, Michelle Walker, Campbell Walker, Audrey Walker, Stella Walker, Harry Walker, Elli Walker, Tom Walstab, Wayne Walter, Johanna Walter, Stephanie Ward, Steve Ward, Terry Ward, Janice Ward, Pamela Ward, Keith Warne, Brigitte Warne, Richard Waters, Jarod Waters, David Watson, Lyndon Watson, Lisa Watson, Remy Watson, Adam Watson, Nigel Watson, Brett Watson, Bradley Watt, Stewart Webster, Alex Webster, Carolyn Wende, Jesse Wende, Leigh Wende, Ingrid Werner, Steve Werner, Scott West, Mario West, Marcus White, Amanda White, Gerald White, Alison White, Clyde White, Darryl Whitelaw, Lynne Whitelaw, Mark Whyman, Rob Whyte, Ron Widdison, Greg Wiggill, Robert Williams, Tim Williams, Graham Williams, Dianna Williams, Jane Williams, Henry Williams, Wayne Williamson, Godfrey Williamson, Tilly Williamson, Samme Williamson, Matt Williamson, Lauren Williamson, Lauren Williamson, Martin Willis, Vicki Wilson, Kane Wilson, Simon Wilson, Kelly Wilson, Debra Wintels, Bill Wintels, David Withers, Peter Witt, Georg Wobbeking, Lynn Wolf, Klaus Wolf, Lynn Wolf, Klaus Wolf, Foong Chern Wong, Ray Wood, Diane Wood, Darryl Wootton, Alison Worland, David Worland, Adrian Wright, Stephanie Wylaars, Su Yalan, Nick Yannopoulos, Tracie Yates, Nick Yates, Aaron Yeats, Kerrie Yip, Gary Yip, Eric Yong, Egidia Yorke, Kenneth Young, Bruce Young, Aranka Young, Brooke Young, Daniel Young, Daniel Youssef, Ayman Youssef, Simon Zanati, Simon Zettl, Margaret Zettl, Lucy Zhang, Danny Ziakas, Sandro Zimmari, John Zourkas, Jillian Zsidy, Paul Zsidy,

1975 - 2015

191


24. The Future President Andrew Bonwick reflects on PCV’s past, changes and evolution, leading to its future:

The conversation is about the cars, when you bought it, how you are enjoying it, and what event you will come to next.

There is a beginning for each of us, which leads us to the Club and the future. Porsche is a marque that captures the imagination, however you describe it. For you, it could have been late night television of the 917s dominating Le Mans, or seeing the elegant sportscar with a distinctive growl driving past you on your bike. It could be your first passenger or driver experience of engineering and automotive excellence, stunning handling and awesome acceleration, or that engine song.

These pages celebrate some things that have been lost, possibly only to fashion. Economy runs, National and Interstate meetings and kids’ Christmas Party; should they return? The current healthy Club is a result of a number of changes over the years. The steady growth of activities developed by the Social Committee and the Register Captains complement the extensive competition calendar.

There is a second beginning. Many Club members can relate a story about the first Club member they met at a track day or club night or such. This is the point where our Club stands out; “our members are much more concerned with what you drive than who you work for” (Michael Chapman).

192

PCV The First 40 Years

The Registers are valuable, both to allow a smaller, more focussed social and technical event, but also to cater for different models within the marque; not just the 911. The Club benefits from the time, innovation and effort of the volunteers in the Social Committee and the Register Captains in planning and running events of interest to members.

Competition continues to develop as well. The introduction of the Entrée section on track days provides a safe way for new comers to the track to understand the outstanding enjoyment of a Porsche on a race track. Nearly three hundred members have tried Entrée since its introduction in 2007. The development of our own Competition Officials group (led by Michael Chapman and Will Darvall) since the early part of the century has meant a different participation in motor sport for some members, continued improvement of the professionalism with which we run our events, and increased track time for drivers who don’t need to provide corner flag marshals. Dedicated trackside marshals are also able to provide a better emergency response than part-timers, and this has been evidenced on several occasions in recent years.


The development of the PCV Sandown Regularly Relay is another example of the Club developing its position in Victorian motorsports. The Club also needs to continually improve the way we meet our members’ expectations. The introduction of dedicated administrators has been an outstanding success, mainly due to the wonderful support we get from Carly Pasco and Lisa Gillespie. Competent, pleasant and capable, they have made a fantastic contribution to your Club. Our move to an online member portal and the use of member feedback from every event are ways that the Club continues to improve its member service. “Porsche Club Victoria caters for many different tastes and interests and hopefully it will continue to do so. To date our wonderful Club has given its members 40 years of fun. Let’s aim to continue the same in the future” (Noela Semmons)

Editor Will Darvall concurs: How did we get here? Because our special demographic of Porsche owners who “always wanted one” love the quirky, iconic cars. They love to drive them, look at them, race them, polish them, talk about them, write about them and celebrate them with like minded friends. That’s how PCV has become the most successful single make club in Australia. We keep growing because our particular blend of capable inclusive egalitarian enthusiasts follow their ideas in many directions to broaden PCV’s activities and enjoyment. The introduction of paid administrative staff over 10 years ago, combined with efficient computer systems, has enabled our growth and easy communication. How did the Club’s officers cope with the work load before?

The formation of the Registers has expanded the appeal to a wider number of members, who love to get out in small groups for a great drive, lunch and talk, or learn some tech tips. In retrospect, we probably should have done that sooner, but had the 911 image so firmly fixed in our collective brain, that we failed to consider the new models and the ageing generations of 911s. The Club is now so large that multiple smaller activities fit well with the Club Nights, general Social Runs and Competition events. We got here because of the incredible number of people who have given their time, talents and enthusiasm. I’m not a club person, but I like PCV and its people. 91 new members (somehow that’s significant!) joined in the first 3 months of this year, so we’re in good health. So here’s to the past 40 years and the next 40!

1975 - 2015

193


ROLL OF HONOUR Life Members Alan Hamilton John King Noela Semmens Adrian Evans Greg Cook Barbara Darvall William Darvall Michael Chapman Hall of Fame Graham Stockley Bruce Harris Michael Browning Jim Richards Peter Fitzgerald Matthew Stoupas Rex Broadbent Mark Chrzanowski Presidents 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Michael Stillwell Michael Stillwell Roger James Ken Foo Kerry Reynolds John Benson John Benson Graeme Redman Graeme Redman John King John King John King John King Michael Browning Graham Stockley Graham Stockley Graham Stockley Graham Stockley John King Adrian Evans Adrian Evans Cris Camamile Cris Camamile Paul Stuart Paul Stuart Greg Cook Greg Cook Noela Semmens Ian Knight Ian Knight Michael Chapman Michael Chapman Jeff Thomas Jeff Thomas Ian Jenkins Ian Jenkins Keith Ryding Will Darvall Peter Harrison Peter Harrison Andrew Bonwick

Tony Jones Memorial Award 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984

Russell Sturzaker Russell Sturzaker Graham Stockley Paul Mauger Dennis Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keefe Ric Hallgren Tony Jones Memorial Award (Rookie of the Year)

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990

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Dennis Bath Ed Aitken Don Watson Cliff Geis Matthew Harris David Casey

PCV The First 40 Years

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Allan Barbour Wayne Camamile Ian Begley Richard Eldridge Mark Connolly Callum McClue Stuart Jackson Matthew Stoupas Lyle Potgieter David Lawson Jon Trende Benjamin Faggeter Jeffery Bobik & Cameron Cox Hung Do Matthew Kirwan-Hamilton Simon Baxter David Trewern Bob Hawker Aaron Ireland Nick Karnaros & John Swan Simon Dunn Stan Bougadakis & Melanie Treloar Brett Helmers Club Champions

1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

Bruce Harris Bruce Harris Kevin Jarman Bruce Harris Bruce Harris Graham Stockley Stephen White Graham Stockley Bruce Harris Ric Hallgren Peter White Dennis O'Keefe Ed Aitken Ken Price Rex Broadbent Danny Loypur Bruce Harris Ojars Balodis Ed Aitken Richard Eldridge Matthew Harris Paul Stuart Bruce Young Michael Herrod Sven Burchartz Theo Mihelakos Theo Mihelakos Theo Mihelakos & Ian Jenkins Sven Burchartz & Mark Chrzanowski Matthew Stoupas Mark Chrzanowski Simon Baxter & Mark Chrzanowski Mark Chrzanowski & Matthew Stoupas Matthew Stoupas Matthew Stoupas & Andrew Barlow Bob Hawker Aaron Ireland Aaron Ireland Rick Moscati Ben Faggetter Outright Award, Inc Don Tryhorn Memorial Award from 2008

1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996

Bruce Harris Don Tryhorn Graham Stockley Graham Stockley Graham Stockley Graham Stockley Rex Broadbent Graham Stockley Paul Sadler Danny Loypur Peter White Graeme Hitchell Danny Loypur

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

Danny Loypur Matthew Stoupas John Woodward Greg Muller Greg Muller Theo Mihelakos Greg Muller Jon Trende Lyle Potgieter Don Tryhorn Stewart Lachlan Stewart Lachlan Matthew Stoupas Stewart Lachlan Peter Fitzgerald Peter Fitzgerald Bob Hawker Peter Fitzgerald Ladies Championship

1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

Ann Tyson Ann Tyson Ann Tyson Ann Tyson Ann Tyson Brenda Moore Jill Willis Suzy Versluys Ava Balodis Ava Balodis Delyce England Aranka Figge Aranka Figge Aranka Figge Aranka Young April Houghton April Houghton Jill Willis Aranka Young Aranka Young Aranka Young Aranka Young Aranka Young Aranka Young Club Member of the Year

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

Ian Nadenbousch Max Errington Graeme Andrews Dianna Foo Daryl Louey Barbara Clearihan Graham Stockley (No award) (No award) Egidia Woodhouse Paul Mauger Bev Madin Elspeth Froude Raymond Poon Alex Robertson Beth Harris Selwyn Hall & Ray Poon George Cairns Danny Jonas Tim Wadsworth Jeff Thomas (No award) Duane Rodgers Marnie Gorman James Caldow Annie Mould & Alf Carrigan Janet Conheady & William Darvall John Baker Peter Witt Felix Rieniets Peter Cromie & Clair Cromie Robin Humphries Grant Stephenson Michael Bailey Ken Anson & Harriet Anson


1975 - 2015

195


196

PCV The First 40 Years

Profile for Composite Colour

PCV 40th Anniversary Book  

PCV 40th Anniversary Book