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11 March to 14 April

Exhibitions – Opera – Concerts – Entertainment

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Monthly newspaper · year II - issue 5

www.romepost.it · 11 March – 14 April 2009

Easter in Roma

Exhibition at the Vittoriano

The global decline of tourism

The most complete exhibition ever dedicated to the painter known as the father of the Renaissance has opened at the Vittoriano in Rome. “Giotto e il Trecento. Il piu' sovrano Maestro stato in dipintura” (Giotto And The 14th Century: The most sovereign master of painting), features over 150 works of art, including twenty panels on loan from major museums around the world, exploring the life and times of Giotto di Bondone (c.1267-1337) and his groundbreaking impact on 14th-century art. The exhibition features wooden sculptures, illuminated manuscripts, goldwork and paintings by a variety of key figures from the 1300s, including painters like Cimabue, Simone Martini and Pietro Lorenzetti. See pg. 11

Lazio: so much to see

Giotto and the 14th Century

Holy week in the Eternal City is a time of deeply-felt religious ceremonies when the faithful recall the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Good Friday is the darkest day of the Christian calendar when the Christ’s crucifixion is commemorated. This day ceremonies in Rome culminate with the traditional, torchlit Via Crucis (Way of the Cross) procession at the city's ancient Colosseum. See pg. 4

2008 was a difficult year for tourism worldwide. The global decline also affected Rome – but the Eternal City was hit much less harder than many other European capitals. To understand why we spoke to Claudio Mancini, head of tourism for the Lazio regional government. See pg. 3

Slice and easy

Interview with Elio Germano

One of the best things that Rome has to offer visitors in search of a quick and satisfying snack is takeaway pizza or pizza al taglio. The city is packed with takeaway pizza stores that provide office workers, students and tourists a cheap, quick alternative to traditional restaurants or imported fast food outlets. See pg. 14

The 28-year-old Rome-born actor Elio Germano is relatively little-known outside Italy, but here he has already claimed a host of glittering prizes including a “David di Donatello” (the Italian Oscar) as Best Actor in 2007 for his performance in Daniele Luchetti's fluent, heartfelt movie “My brother is an only child”. See pg. 12

Claudio Mancini

Hold your breath From 17 July to 2 August Roma will host the 13th World Swimming Championships. To find out how preparations for the event are going we spoke to Roberto Diacetti, director general of the Organizing Committee.

See pg. 15

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2 ITALIAN JOB OECD: economic recovery in 2010

Italy worse off than others Italy should not expect to see an economic recovery until “sometime” in 2010, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

OECD's chief economist Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel photo: ansa

(ANSA) Rome – According to the OECD's chief economist Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel, the numbers for Italy this year will probably be “much worse” than for other OECD countries. In Italy's case, Schmidt-Hebbel predicted that Italian GDP will be much worse than the 1% drop for 2009 and 0.8% increase for 2010 forecast in the last OECD

Strategy for safeguarding the monuments

Coca-Cola wars in Venice

outlook. In order to boost growth, Italy should reduce taxes on low incomes and finance this through public spending cuts and cracking down on tax evasion. In its report, the Organization observed that Italy needed to “reduce the gap in salaries which exists with more advanced countries and which is above all caused by slow growth in productivity”. Italy needs to continue down the path of deregulating professions and prices and reduce state ownership of public services of public interest. By deregulating professions and prices the OECD was referring to reducing barriers keeping people from practicing certain profes-

sions and abolishing the set prices adopted by professional associations. The public services which the state had to move out of included the supply of electricity and gas, the postal service and transportation. The OECD also said that local governments also needed to reduce their presence in companies which offer local services. ¶

Ok to Messina Bridge (ANSA) Rome – The CIPE (Interdepartmental Committee for Economic Planning) has given the go ahead for funding for the construction of the Strait of Messina Bridge. According to government sources, the total cost of the construction will be approximately 6.1 billion euros and the funding which the CIPE had to approve and which was given the okay is 1.3 billion euros. The Messina bridge project was originally presented by Berlusconi's 2001-2006 government, when it had been a key campaign promise in the 2001 general election, but was shelved during the two-year centre-left government headed by Romano

Italy's return to Nuclear Power

Signed Nuclear Deal with France

(ANSA) Venice – Venice Mayor Massimo Cacciari made a public call for tenders in a bid to calm polemics over a potential deal with Coca-Cola that would see 60 vending machines placed around the city. The deal grabbed headlines last month, with critics claiming that Venice was “selling itself” to the drinks giant in a 2.1 million-euro agreement that would see vending machines in St Marks Square, where tourists are forbidden from picnicking under strict council rules on urban decorum. The city council's assurances that the vending machines would be restricted to vaporetti landing stages and car parks and would not bear the Coca-Cola logo has failed to quell the row. “Everyone who has publicly declared that under the same conditions as the Coca-Cola deal they would happily make more advantageous offers will now be able to come forward and compete,” he said. Cacciari has long bemoaned a lack of state funds for the upkeep of city monuments and churches and insists that the Coca-Cola deal is no different from others adopted in the past as part of an “indispensable” financial strategy. “This is a financial strategy that today is simply indispensable for safeguarding our monuments and artistic heritage and is in line with culture ministry guidelines,” Cacciari said. “It follows a strategy we've adopted with other equally prestigious collaborators – Lancia for the restoration of the Ducal Palace, Swatch for the Biblioteca Marciana, Replay for Ca' Rezzonico and Bulgari for the Scala d'Oro”. The mayor added that the idea that Venice could be safeguarded “by philanthopy alone” was unrealistic. ¶

(ANSA) Rome – Italy and France signed a landmark cooperation accord which set the stage for Italy's return to nuclear power after more than 20 years. The accord calls for the building of at least four nuclear power plants in Italy, using French technology, and the participation of Italian electricity utility ENEL in the construction of another five plants in France. “We must wake from our slumber because renewable energy and nuclear power are the future. With France by our side and thanks to its know-how we will be able to make up for a lot of years and build plants in an acceptable period of time,” Berlusconi said after the signing. Italy abandoned nuclear energy after a 1987 referendum, the result of which was strongly influenced by the Chernobyl disaster in Russia the previous year. However, a poll taken last August, when oil was at a record high, found that an absolute majority of Italians now favor a return to nuclear power, while only French President Sarkozy one third oppose it. ¶ and Italian Premier Berlusconi / photo: ansa

Italy to give $100 Million to Gaza (ANSA) Sharm el-Sheikh – Italy will contribute 100 million dollars to help Palestinians in the Gaza Strip, Premier Silvio Berlusconi told an international donors' conference in Sharm el-Sheikh. Berlusconi also reiterated Italy's idea for a 'Marshall Plan' for the Palestinian economy, saying it would be one of the priorities of Italy's term at the helm of the Group of Eight this year. “There can be no real peace between two peoples divided by such different liv-

A computer mock-up of the Messina bridge photo: ansa

Prodi. The Messina bridge has been hailed as a huge job-creation scheme that would give Italy's image a major boost while bringing Sicily closer to the mainland in both physical and social terms. But it has been opposed by environmentalists and dogged by concerns over its safety and fears of potential Mafia involvement. When and if completed, the bridge would replace slow ferry services between Sicily and the mainland. The 3,690-metrelong bridge has been designed to be able to handle 4,500 cars an hour and 200 trains a day. ¶

ing standards,” he said, urging leaders from 70 countries to help raise Palestinian living standards. Berlusconi reiterated that major hotel groups and top multinationals had been contacted with a view to building infrastructure in Gaza and the West Bank, including airports to boost tourism to the Holy land. In all, the donors pledged around some $3 billion to help Gaza after an Israeli offensive that killed 1,300 people, wounded many more and left some 16,000 homeless. ¶

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ITALIAN JOB

The global decline of tourism

The numbers:

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% forecast for growth in international tourism in 2009 by the World Tourism Organisation.

photo: gret@ lorenz / flickr

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million euros allocated by the Lazio Region for support of companies/individuals working in tourism.

-5 25

% the drop in numbers of tourists visiting Rome in 2008. % a quarter of all visitors to Rome in 2008 came from the United States.

its enormous appeal to enhance tourism still further and at the same time develop a viable promotional campaign to convince visitors to extend their stay and take in attractions outside the capital. Steps have been made; for example by supporting the rich programme of historical and cultural events which take place throughout the region all year round. These events have an enormous potential to attract visitors but many of the small towns where they take place simply lack the resources to promote themselves either nationally or internationally. The Regional Tourism Board has produced a programme collecting all these events which we are promoting with foreign tour companies – and it’s proving very popular. – One of your office’s latest initiatives is a promotional campaign for historic pilgrimage trails in Lazio. Pilgrims have been making their way to Rome for centuries. Is religious tourism a way out of this 21st century crisis? – Cultural and religious tourism attracts millions of visitors every year. Boosting promotion of the enormous cultural heritage on offer throughout Rome and Lazio can clearly only bring positive results. It will help to develop sustainable tourism and make the whole region a more attractive proposition. Obviously it’s not the only way forward towards recovery and growth but it does offer enormous potential. That’s why we’ve decided to work closely with Opera Romana Pellegrinaggi [ORP, the Vatican organisation for pilgrims] and why the Region has allocated 14.5 million euros for investment in facilities, infrastructures and promotion of religious tourism. For the same reason the Lazio Region has joined “Cammini d’Europa”, the international network of pilgrimage trails which aims to boost religious tourism along historic routes in Europe. It’s also why we’ve signed a cooperation agreement with the Region of Madrid to promote joint tourism packages. – In an interview in 2007, not long after you were appointed as head of tourism and economic development for Lazio, you announced that one project which you held particularly dear was to make river transport viable again along the length of theTiber from Rieti in the north down to the Rome Trade Fair near Fiumicino on the coast. How are things going? – For this project we’ve invested 4 million euros from the Regional Tourism Fund for the construction of 14 new landing stages along the Tiber. In order to smooth administration of the programme between the various local authorities we’ve signed a coordinating agrement with Rome City and Provincial Councils and the Provincial Council in Rieti. Work is underway on stretches of the Tiber near Rieti. This a major project: it will help protect the environment and at the same time boost tourism along the whole length of the River Tiber. ¶

Lazio: so much to see { Aniko Horvath }

2008 was a difficult year for tourism worldwide. The global decline also affected Rome – but the Eternal City was hit much less harder than many other European capitals. To understand why we spoke to Claudio Mancini, head of tourism for the Lazio regional government. – Last year the number of tourists visiting Rome dropped by 5%, but Paris saw visitors decline by around 20%. How do you explain this relatively strong showing by the Italian capital? – Because of the international credit crunch tourism has declined globally. In Italy, and especially in Rome, these negative effects have been less noticeable. Essentially our tourism has shown it is fundamentally sound. Rome remains an extraordinary attraction for visitors from around the world. One of the capital’s strengths is that it offers something for everyone: from luxury fivestar tourism to low-cost budget packages. We are also seeing that – precisely because of the difficult economic and financial situation – tourism patterns are changing in Italy and throughout Europe. Long-range destinations are less popular. People are travelling closer to home; quite simply it’s cheaper. – Rome’s cultural and historic profile is so high that it obscures the rest of Lazio. Most foreign visitors seem to think of the region as

Claudio Mancini, head of tourism for the Lazio regional government

not much more than the capital’s hinterland. Tourists rarely venture outside the city to visit the rest of the region. What are they missing? – Lazio boasts a vast range of attractions for tourists. But first I’d like to make one thing clear: Rome does not “obscure” the rest of the region; on the contrary it’s a strong point for all of Lazio. What we must do is use

Some itineraries for visitors to Lazio calchi, one of the most noteworthy examples of Renaissance military architecture in all Italy. In 2006 the Castle provided the fairy-tale setting for the wedding of Hollywood superstar Tom Cruise with Katie Holmes. • Tel. : 06. 998 02 379

Olive Oil in Sabina Among castles and medieval villages the Sabine Hills, just an hour northeast of Rome, include more than 18,000 hectares of rich agricultural land given over to the cultivation of olives, a crop which produces one of the highest quality olive oils made anywhere in Italy. At the Casale Bertini farm at Canneto just outside Fara

Sabina you can see Europe’s oldest olive tree. Planted almost 2,000 years ago, its gnarled ancient trunk has a circumference of 7 meters and the tree rises some 14 meters. • Tel. 075. 34052 Wine in Frascati The small town of Frascati, southeast of Rome in the Alban Hills, is renowned for its white wine. It’s also enormously popular for its “fraschette”, traditional taverns selling the local wine. The oldest of these still in business is Osteria da Santino. Run by Felice Ramaccia, it has been selling excellent local vintages since 1450. A word of warning – bring your own food: the fraschette only sell wine! • Tel.: 06. 942 98 110 Lake Bracciano One of the most beautiful lakes in central Italy, this is now a major centre for sailing. The town of Bracciano on the southern shore of the lake includes the magnificently preserved 15th century Castello Orsini-Odes-

The Thermal Baths of the Popes Just outside Viterbo, along the ancient Roman road via Cassia, are the main hot springs that made the town such a well-known spa resort. The hot sulphur waters in the area were much appreciated by both the Etruscans and the Romans. The most famous spa is the Bullicame, a pool mentioned by Dante Alighieri in his Divine Comedy, which from the late 13th century onwards attracted regular visits from Popes and cardinals, earning itself the name Terme dei Papi, or The Popes’ Spa. • Tel.: 076. 3501

came to fast, pray and converse with Brother Wind. In 1223 he wrote the regulations for what would become the Franciscan Order. Two years later during another visit to the hermitage Francis underwent an excruciatingly painful eye operation. The name of Fonte Colombo comes from the spring waters, where in 1217 Francis saw white doves drinking; and so he called it “Fons Columbarum” – the dove fountain. • Tel.: 0746. 201 146

photo: birnardo / flickr

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The Sacred Valley Near Rieti hidden among magnificent mountains and majestic forests is Fonte Colombo, one of four ancient hermitages in the valley. Here in the early 13th century Francis of Assisi

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Direttore Responsabile: Giorgio Cirillo Editor-in-Chief: Aniko Horvath Contributors: Alessandro Mirra, Emiliano Pretto, Translator: Nicolas Stark Graphic & layout: KoPè / Epicmedia.hu

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4 ROME NEWS Masses and programs

Easter in Roma On Sunday April 12 christians in Rome and around the world will celebrate the most significant event in the liturgical year, Easter.

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oly week in the Eternal City is a time of deeply-felt religious ceremonies when the faithful recall the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Good Friday is the darkest day of the Christian calendar when the Christ’s crucifixion is commemorated. This day ceremonies in Rome culminate with the traditional, torchlit Via Crucis (Way of the Cross) procession at the city's ancient Colosseum. Pope Benedict XVI will carry a tall wooden cross for the entire Via Crucis – a one-kilometre procession symbolising Christ's walk to his crucifixion and death – which every year is watched by tens of thousands around the ancient Roman arena and millions of television spectators worldwide. Another timeless ceremony takes place at the Basilica of St. John Lateran the cathedral of the Church of Rome and the official ecclesiastical seat of the Bishop of Rome, who is the Pope. St. John Lateran includes the Scala Santa, or Holy Stairs, wooden steps that encase white marble stairs, which, according to Roman Catholic tradition, once lead to the praetorium of Pontius Pilate in Jerusalem and are said to have been climbed by Christ

before his trial. The marble stairs are visible through openings in the wooden risers. Their translation from Jerusalem to the complex of palaces that became the ancient seat of popes is credited to saint Helena, mother of the Emperor Constantine I, who donated them to Pope Sylvester I in the fourth century AD. Catholics believe some of the steps carry traces of Christ’s blood. On Good Friday pilgrims climb the Holy Stairs on their knees offering prayers. The stairs lead up to the ancient palatine chapel (the Sancta Sanctorum) which for centuries was used as the Pontiff’s private chapel. The Sancta Sanctorum also contains a celebrated image of Christ traditionally held to be “not made by human hands” but rather painted by St Luke. Holy Week is the busiest week of the year for the Pope who on Easter Sunday delivers his traditional, twice-yearly “urbi et orbi” blessing and message in St Peter’s Square. ¶ On Good Friday pilgrims climb the Holy Stairs on their knees

Vatican ceremonies leading up to Easter Traditional Via Crucis ends at the Colosseum photo: cantalavita / flickr

2 April St Peter’s Basilica, Papal Chapel, 18.00 Mass on the anniversary of the death of Pope John Paul II 5 April – Palm Sunday and the Passion of the Lord St Peter’s Square, 9:30 Blessing of the Palms, Procession and Holy Mass 9 April – Maundy Thursday St Peter’s Basilica, 9:30

This year, from 5-12 April, will see the 12th edition of Rome’s Easter Festival, a weeklong celebration of sacred art and music. For information: www.festivaldipasqua.org

Chrismal Mass Basilica of St. John Lateran, Papal Chapel, 17:30 Mass of the Lord's Supper

10 April – Good Friday St Peter’s Basilica, Papal Chapel, 17:00 Celebration of the Passion of our Lord Colosseum, 21:15 Via Crucis 11 April – Holy Saturday St Peter’s Basilica, Papal Chapel, 21:00 Easter vigil 12 April – Easter Sunday St Peter’s Square, 10:30 Holy Mass From the central loggia of St. Peter's Basilica, 12:00 “Urbi et Orbi” blessing

U-turn at the Campidoglio

Budget crisis halts major projects One year ago voters elected conservative candidate Gianni Alemanno, a former minister in the government of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, as mayor. The surprise result ended fifteen years of municipal government by the centre-left.

{ Emiliano Pretto }

The mayor of Rome Planned a referendum on Ara Pacis Museum photo: flickr

Cancelled the White Night Festival

Downsized the Roma Film Festival Seeks private financing for D-line of metro system

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ing to rip down a controversial he first year of Alemanno’s museum created by US architect term of office has seen a Richard Meier commissioned by brusque halt to many mathe previous centre-left adminisjor urban projects which had been tration. started by former centre-left mayAlemanno said the Ara Pacis or Walter Veltroni. Museum, which encases a 2,000The global economic crisis is one year-old sacrificial altar, “would be reason behind the abrupt cutback removed”. The striking structure, in city spending, as is the difficult which sits alongside the River Tistate of municipal finances which ber in the heart of Rome, was one Alemanno has blamed on 15 years of the first pieces of modern archiof inefficient administration by tecture to be built in central Rome the left. It is also due to the new since the time of the dictator Bemayor’s desire to distance himself nito Mussolini. from Veltroni’s high-profile cultural agenda and focus on what he says are the The first year of Alemanno’s term everyday needs of Roman citizens. of office has seen a brusque halt to In his first days in many major urban projects office the new mayor caused waves by vow-

The mayor later conceded that it would be Rome's citizens who would decide whether or not to pull down the museum, saying he planned to hold a referendum on the subject. The referendum has yet to be held. But Alemanno lost no time in reversing many of Veltroni’s initiatives, beginning with the hugely popular White Night Festival, an annual all-night event of free concerts, theatrical events, open galleries and museums. The next target was Rome’s Film Festival, founded by Veltroni in 2006, which Alemanno derided during his election campaign for what he said was a surfeit of Hollywood glitz. The new mayor downsized the festival, cut back on staff and reduced the allocation for the

Gianni Alemanno photo: ansa


ROME NEWS

Green light for green tables

Sexual assaults in and around Rome

Rise in sexual violence sparks fear and rage

Italy’s Government has approved a measure that will make it easier for hotels to open casinos. 27 5-star hotels around the country are thought to be ready to open for gambling business almost immediately. Giuseppe Roscioli, head of Federalberghi, the Italian hoteliers’ association, has welcomed the move as a much-needed boost to tourism. Roscioli also suggested some hotels in the capital might like to adopt an Ancient Roman theme, with columns and drapings and croupiers dressed as centurions... Alea iacta est? (The dice has been cast?). ¶

Sexual attacks in last two months: • Primavalle, 21 January – a 40-year-old woman raped by foreigner • Guidonia, 23 January – a young couple attacked by 5 Romanians. The man was beaten and locked in the trunk of his car while his girlfriend was gang raped. • Parco della Caffarella, 14 February – a teenage couple attacked by two men. The girl, 14, raped. Two Romanians have been arrested for the attack.

photo: ansa

A spate of rapes blamed on immigrants has prompted calls for tougher measures and raised fears of violent reprisals against East European migrants. There has been a series of rapes and sexual assaults in and around Rome in recent months. The attacks have grabbed headlines in newspapers and television and led to a

event in the city's budget. He also appointed a new festival director with a brief to put heavier emphasis on Italian cinema. After a few months in office Alemanno denounced what he said was a 7 billion euro “black hole” in city finances accumulated under centre-left administrations and warned that municipal debt was set to rise to 9.7 billion euros. Centre-left officials disputed the figures and insisted any debt was the result of massive investments to improve Rome’s undergound metro system, which is considerably less developed when compared to many European capitals. The mayor announced he intended calling a halt to work on the planned D-line extension for the city’s metro system. The announcement sparked furious protests and Alemanno later said his remarks had been “misinterpreted” and that his intention was simply to seek private financing for the project. But many projects have been cut; many others have been drastically reduced or face long delays. As Alemanno desperately seeks new sources of financing, there seems little hope of a radical revival for Rome until an upturn in the global economy. ¶

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climate of fear in some of the capital’s outlying districts, especially those close to camps housing nomads and illegal migrants. The brutal rape of a 14-year-old girl in a park in the Caffarella district sparked particular outrage. Two Romanians were arrested for the attack. Following the rape, Italian police demolished dozens of illegal shacks and

camps in and around the city. There were also several incidents of unprovoked attacks on foreigners by Italian youths and groups of self-styled and unregulated vigilantes began patrolling some areas, alarming law enforcement officials. Residents of housing projects on the fringes of the city, especially women’s groups, have expressed fear and accused the government and Rome authorities of leaving them unprotected. The office of Rome mayor Gianni Alemanno was also blamed for cost-cutting measures that left citizens in danger after a rape in the Primavalle district took place in an area where street-lighting had been turned off to save money. Fear is rising, tension is high and there is widespread anger against Romanians, Italy’s largest migrant community, whom many blame for rising violent crime. ¶

Rents continue to rise in Rome photo: danyanais / flickr

Municipalisation Rome below par ANSA – Between 2003 and 2007, Milan s municipal companies earned 1.6 billion euros in accumulated profits, those of Brescia reached 893 million, those of Turin were 191 million and those of Bologna 74 million. Rome, (-39 million) and Naples (-225 million) closed with accumulated losses. These are the results that emerged from 2009 research on the balance sheets of companies controlled by the largest municipalities in Italy, carried out by Mediobanca for Civicum. Excluding the important impact of energy companies (absent in Naples), the results were less alluring, with earnings in Milan at 281 million, 182 of which were ascribed to SEA, which is the only airport manager under municipal control. Turin showed 15 million in earnings (13 of which for the airport company SAGAT, in which it holds a relative majority stake), while Brescia (-2 million) and Bologna (+5 million) substantially break even. Naples was significantly below par (-225 million) and above all Rome, which without Acea reached 643 million in losses... ¶

Via dei Coronari

New pedestrian precinct One of the most pleasant streets in Rome’s historic centre to take a casual stroll has always been via dei Coronari, with its antique stores, art restorers and craftsmen of every kind. Unfortunately walkers’ pleasure was frequently ruined by scooters and cars who used the street as a shortcut – despite the ban on vehicles. City authorities have now installed 10-cm speed bumps and CCTV to keep out the cars and protect pedestrians. ¶

photo: james.stringer

/ flickr

Rent a flat

Rome is the most expensive ANSA – The cost of renting a home in Italy's leading cities has leapt between 130% to 145% in the past ten years, according to a new study. Carried out by the CGIL trade union together with the national association of renters Sunia, the report found that the average rent today is 1,100 euros. This average jumped to 2,300 euros for Rome and 2,250 euros for Milan, two cities where 25% of families live in rented homes, as opposed to a national average of 20%. Based on a survey of 10,000 residences put up for rent, the study also found that the rental market, which includes people seeking and offering homes to rent, expanded from 1999 to 2009 with a marked increase for small apartments, especially two-room flats offered in non-central city areas.


6 ROME NEWS Where to eat • Ristorante “Il fungo” Piazza Pakistan 1/a tel.: 06. 592 14 33 • La taverna del porto Via Cristoforo Colombo, 551 tel.: 06. 542 10 181 • La Glorietta (Hotel dei Congressi) Viale Shakespeare, 25-33 tel.: 06. 592 26 021

The city within the city Districts of Rome: EUR

Did you know there were two Colosseums in Rome? One is round, ancient and world famous. The other is square, 20th century and to be found in the most modern district of the city: EUR.

EURophiles

{ Emiliano Pretto }

Sergio Leone, the father of spaghetti westerns

Andrea and Raffaella Leone, the children of film director Sergio Leone, the father of spaghetti westerns, have always lived in EUR. “It’s peaceful, there’s very little traffic, lots of green spaces and excellent services; it offers a more relaxed lifestyle. Perhaps the only negative aspect is that it’s rather a long way from the centre, but that’s the price you have to pay to enjoy all the advantages.”

Breathe deeply The parks and gardens in EUR make it one of Rome’s greenest quarters. Parco del Ninfeo, Parco del Turismo, Parco degli Eucalipti and Parco Centrale del Lago cover more than 60,000 sqm. The area around the Lake offers Wi-Fi access with four hot-spots along the park perimeter.

Itineraries The travel company Suerteitinerarte offers guided tours of EUR. tel.: 06.44340160 www.suerteitinerarte.it info@suerteitinerarte.it

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littering business buildings and wide tree-lined boulevards laid out in a grid system. Corporate headquarters, banks and ministeries dominate this strange and unexpected suburb in south Rome. EUR also includes some of the most startling modern architecture in the Italian capital. Work on the new quarter began in 1935 under dictator Benito Mussolini. It was intended for a Universal Exhibition (Esposizione Universale Romana) scheduled for 1942 to celebrate twenty years of Fascist Italy. The planned exhibition never took place due to World War Two. Only some of the plans had been finished, and after the war work continued in a modernist style but without the same political agenda. Today you can note three distinct phases of architecture in EUR: the austere, monumental style beloved by fascism, 1960’s style office blocks or government buildings set in large gardens and parks and ultra-modern contemporary design projects from some of the world’s leading architects. Without doubt the most dramatic and representative building from the fascist era is the Palazzo della Civiltà di Lavoro, a tall and striking homage to the achievements of the Italian race, especially the ancient Romans. The Palazzo was designed by the architects Giovanni Guerrini, Ernesto Bruno La Padula and Mario Romano and constructed between 1938 and 1943. The many arches of the building were meant to mirror ancient Rome’s most famous arena and led to the new building being dubbed the 'square Colosseum'. The building is currently closed for restoration. It is due to reopen in 2011 as a major museum celebrating Italian Fashion and Design. Visitors to EUR will find a small cache of interesting museums, most of which are rarely visited. Hidden between two massive ministerial buildings (Telecommunications, The Environment) is the Museum

Rendering of Fuksas’ Cloud congress centre

of Roman Civilization where you’ll find a fascinating scale model of Imperial Rome among a host of other exhibits describing the history of the city. The building also houses a planetarium. The neighbouring National Museum of Prehistory and Ethnography features a superb collection of African, Chinese and American handicrafts. Other architectural landmarks from the fascist era include the massive domed basilica dedicated to Saint Peter and Saint Paul, the monumental National Archive building with its 100 columns and The Palazzo dei Congressi (Congress Palace), a low-domed building designed to reflect the style of the Pantheon. EUR is about to have a new Congress Centre thanks to the stunning design by Rome-born architect Massimiliano Fuksas. The new centre is essentially a vast oblong translucent building made mostly of glass. A 3,500 square meter steel and teflon cloud will be suspended inside the main auditorium. The construction also changes completely depending on the viewpoint of the observer. Current mayor Gianni Alemanno has pledged the centre will be finished by early 2011. Modernist architecture flourished in the district in the 1950’s and 60’s. The round UFO-shaped building near EUR's large lake is a multipurpose sports arena designed by architects Pierluigi Nervi and Marcello Piacentini for the 1960 Summer Olympics.

In 1999 the 11,000-seater arena was restructured and renamed after the main sponsor Lottomatica. It is now the home arena for the professional basketball team Lottomatica Roma. The building is also a popular concert venue. Nearby is a 45-meter high tower built to house the district’s water reservoir. A top the tower is a restaurant with a breathtaking view. The tower, another of Nervi’s designs for EUR, is nicknamed the mushroom for its striking form. At one end of the lake is the massive glass skyscraper housing the headquarters of Italian oil and gas multinational Eni which was built in 1962. Nearby, work is about to begin on a huge largely residential complex designed by internationally renowned Italian architect Renzo Piano. The project, that will rise right in front of Fuksas’ Cloud congress centre on Viale Europa, endeavours to be a prime example of sustainable architecture for the living modern city. What Piano has described as his “magic box” should also help breathe life into the district which in the evening, after the shops and offices have closed, can be eerily quiet. Until recently the historic fairgrounds and amusement park at Luneur, which included the largest big-dipper ride in Europe, regularly attracted thousands of visi-

tors and brought life and colour to evenings in EUR. But in 2008 after more than forty years the lights were switched off for the last time. One of the few bright spots on the EUR nightscene is Spazio Novecento, a vast high-tech disco and entertainment complex located inside the historic Palazzo dell’Arte Antica (Piazza Guglielmo Marconi 26/B). Regularly featuring some of Europe’s top djs, Spazio Novecento has quickly established itself as one of the trendiest nightspots in all Rome. The eerie, metaphysical quality of EUR’s dark deserted streets and massive buildings at night was an attraction for some. Legendary Italian director Federico Fellini was a frequent visitor and chose the district as the setting for scenes in classic films like La Dolce Vita and Boccaccio 70. What does the future hold for EUR? One intriguing possibility came to light in February when Formula One commercial supremo Bernie Ecclestone announced he was considering using the business district as a venue for a Grand Prix street circuit. Alemanno has expressed guarded optimism. Describing Ecclestone’s enthusiasm for the project as “very important,” he told reporters: “The negotiations will be serious and complicated, almost as much as for an Olympics.” ¶

Palazzo della Civiltà di Lavoro / photo: blackbird / flickr


ROME NEWS P R O G R A M S

I N

R O M E

A brief entertainment guide EXHIBITIONS Chiostro del Bramante

The Myth of Julius Ceasar, first ever show focusing exclusively on him alone; until May 3. Via della Pace, tel. 06.68809035

Vittoriano

Giotto e il Trecento; 150 works from world's top museums including 20 by pre-Renaissance master himself; until June 29. Via S. Pietro in Carcere, tel. 06.6780664

Villa Torlonia

• L'arte della pubblicità. Il manifesto italiano e le avanguardie 1920-1940; until May 24. • Laura Marcucci Cambellotti. The miracle of tapestries; until April 13. Via Nomentana 70, tel. 06.0608

Museo di Roma

“Roma, la magnifica visione” Panoramas of Rome as seen by visitors in the 18th and 19th centuries; until April 19. Piazza San Pantaleo 10, tel. 06.0608.

TEATRO DELL'OPERA Iphigénie en Aulide – Music by Gluck Director Riccardo Muti Teatro dell'Opera, Piazza Beniamino Gigli 7 17-29 March Il re nudo – Music by Luca Lombardi Teatro Nazionale, Via del Viminale 51 20-31 March Les Ballets Russes – Les Sylphides, Les Biches Director David Coleman Teatro dell'Opera, Piazza Beniamino Gigli 7 7-11 April

MACRO Future

• Futurismo Manifesto 100*100; until May 17. • Italian genius Now. Back to Rome; until April 13. Piazza Orazio Giustiniani 4, tel. 06.0608 – every day from 16.00 till 24.00

For You – Music by M. Berkeley Director Vittorio Parisi Teatro Nazionale, Via del Viminale 51 8-10 April

Palazzo delle Esposizioni

• Darwin 1809-2009; until May 3. • Madre Terra. Photography from National Geographic Italia; until March 29. Via Nazionale 194, tel. 06.39967500

Museo di Roma in Trastevere

• Italian landscapes. Photos by George Tatge; until April 5. • The Canvas of Roesler Franz; until May 3. Piazza S. Egidio, 1b tel. 06.0608.

Scuderie del Quirinale

Futurismo. Avanguardia – Avanguardie; until 24 May. Via XXIV Maggio 16, tel. 06.39967500

National Modern Art Gallery (GNAM)

Cy Twombly, the first major retrospective in Italy; until 24 May. Via delle Belle Arti, 31, tel. 06.3221579

AUDITORIUM – Parco della Musica

Museo dell'Ara Pacis

Bruno Munari, retrospective on one of the 20th century’s most interesting Italian artists; until March 22. Lungotevere in Augusta, tel. 06.0608.

Università La Sapienza – Aula Magna Lungotevere Flaminio 50 tel. 06.3610051 14. March 17.30 Fazil Say: Bach, Liszt, Musorgskij 21. Mar. 17.30 Sergei Khachatryan (pianist) and Lusine Khachatryan (violinist)

Auditorium Conciliazione

Via della Conciliazione 4 info. 800904560, tickets: 899500055 15., 16. March Bartók: Concert N. 3 – Orchestra Sinfonica di Roma conductor Berislav Skenderovic

29., 30. March Mendelssohn: Symphony N. 3 – Orchestra Sinfonica di Roma conductor Gunter Neuhold

• 13. March, Sala Petrassi 21.00 Kenny Barron, pianist – an event of Solo

4., 5. Apr. Liszt: Concert N. 2 conductor Francesco La Vecchia piano: Jean Yves Thibaudet

• 13. March, Teatro Studio, 21.00 Meet in Town: Animal Collective live • 19-22 March Festival of Mathematics For program details see pg. 12 • 22. March, Sala Santa Cecilia, 21.00 Wayne Shorter Quartet

• 27-29 March, Teatro Studio Festival of Archeological Movie www.capitellodoro.it

Opening to the public for the first time: 18th-century portrait painter Gregorio Guglielmi; until March 15. Via Dei Portoghesi 12, tel. 06.6829436

Istituzione Università dei Concerti

Auditorium – Parco della Musica Viale Pietro de Coubertin 30 Infoline: tel. 0680241281 www.auditorium.com

Museo Carlo Bilotti

Refettorio Vanvitelliano

• 4., 6. and 7. Apr. Sala Santa Cecilia Schubert: Symphony No. 8 in B minor (“Unfinished”) – Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia Conductor: Antonio Pappano

The programme includes special events of which only some are listed below. For full programme details contact:

• 25. March, Teatro Studio 21.00 Dialektos: Maria Pia de Vito & Huw Warren

100 Giorgio de Chirico metaphysical drawings; until April 19. Viale Fiorello La Guardia (Aranciera di Villa Borghese) tel. 06.0608

• 27. March Sala Sinopoli 20.30 Alexander Lonquich in recital

22., 23. March Rachmaninov: Concert N. 2 – Orchestra Sinfonica di Roma conductor Francesco La Vecchia piano: Cristina Ortiz

Museo del Corso

Hiroshige – The master of nature; until June 7. Via del Corso 320, tel. 899.666.805

• 21., 23. and 24. March Sala Santa Cecilia Beethoven: Christ on the Mount of Olives – Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia conductor Pinchas Steinberg

• 28. March, Sala Sinopoli 21.00 Omara Portuondo “Gracias” • 29. March, Sala Santa Cecilia 21.00 Antony and the Johnsons: “The Crying Light”

9., 10. Apr. – Eastern Concert Beethoven: Christ on the Mount of Olives conductor Francesco La Vecchia

I concerti al Quirinale

• 13. March Sala Sinopoli 20.30 Leonidas Kavakos: Bach • 14., 16. and 17. March Sala Santa Cecilia Poulenc: Les animaux modèles – Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia conductor Georges Prêtre

MUSICALS & SHOWS SKA-P

Palalottomatica, Piazzale dello Sport (EUR) www.listicket.it 21 March

Tango Metropolis

Teatro Olimpico, Piazza G. Da Fabriano, 17 tel. 06.3201752 www.vivaticket.it from 24 March to 5 April

Princesses – Disney on Ice

Palalottomatica, Piazzale dello Sport (EUR) www.listicket.it 25-29 March

THE BEST JAZZ CLUBS

RIFF – Rome Independent Festival

Independent Cinema from all over the world visits Rome in March Full length films, documentaries and short films Nuovo Cinema Aquila Via L'Aquila 66/74 www.riff.it from 19 to 27 March

Casa del Jazz Viale di Porta Ardeatina, 55 tel. 06.704731 Alexanderplatz Via Ostia, 9 tel. 06.39742171 Big Mama Vicolo di San Francesco a Ripa, 18 tel. 06.5812551 Gregory's Jazz Club Via Gregoriana 54/a tel. 06.6796386

CLASSICAL MUSIC

AUDITORIUM – Parco della Musica Viale Pietro de Coubertin 30 Infoline: tel. 0680241281 www.auditorium.com

Greed, a new fragrance by Francesco Vezzoli Galleria Gagosian Via Francesco Crispi, 16 tel. 06.42014765 www.gagosian.com until March 21

FILM

• 07. Apr. Teatro Studio 21.00 Leçons de Tènèbre – Soloists of Centro di Musica Antica di Pietà Turchini

Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia

Roma – New York Galleria Il Gabbiano Via della Frezza, 51 tel. 06.3227049 www.galleriailgabbiano.com from 1 to 31 March

Palazzo del Quirinale, Cappella Paolina Classical Music concert every Sunday, 12.00 Piazza del Quirinale tel. 06.46991

• 04. Apr. Sala Petrassi 21.00 Meshell Ndegeocello – an event of Il Basso

The programme includes concerts and events of which only some are listed below. For full programme details contacts below.

Daniel Lifschitz Galleria 105 Art Via di San Francesco A Ripa, 105/a tel. 06.588333505 www.105art.it from 14 to 28 March

Fonclea Via Crescenzio 82a tel. 06.6896302

GALLERIES Mario Merz (solo exhibition) Galleria Oredaria Via Reggio Emilia, 22-24 tel. 06.97601689 www.oredaria.it until May 23

Andrea Sala – Networks (solo exhibition) Schiavo Mazzonis Gallery Piazza di Montevecchio, 16 tel. 06.045432028 www.schiavomazzonis.com from 27 March to 13 May

Dimmidisi Via dei Volsci 126B tel. 06.4461855 Cotton Club Via Bellinzona 7 tel. 06.97615246 Bebop Jazz Club Via Giuseppe Giulietti 14 tel. 340.5560112 The Place Via Alberico 27/29 tel. 06.68307137

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10 NOT ONLY ROME Art s

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It a l y

The following is a city-by-city guide to some of Italy’s top art exhibitions ASCOLI Galleria d’Arte Contemporanea 'Sedendo e Mirando', 130 landscapes by famed cartoonist Tullio Pericoli; March 21-September 13.

AREZZO Museo Statale d'Arte Medievale e Moderna 130 works by Renaissance terracotta Della Robbia masters and contemporaries like Donatello and Ghiberti; plus five itineraries around Arezzo province taking in 25 towns and 168 works; until June 7.

FORLI' Complesso Monumentale San Domenico Canova, The Classical Ideal, Sculpture and Painting; until June 21.

GENOA Palazzo Ducale 'Lucio Fontana Light and Colour'; until February 15.

LUCCA Palazzo Ducale Show marking 300 years from birth of Grand Tour portraitist Pompeo Batoni (1708-1787); until March 29.

MILAN Palazzo Reale

BOLOGNA Museod'ArteModerna(MAMBO): More than 100 works by Giorgio Morandi in one of world's biggest ever retrospectives on Bolognese artist, sent from Metropolitan Museum in New York to Morandi's home town; until April 13.

CASERTA Reggia Women, Landscapes and Impressionism; major works from Pavia galleries; until March 29.

FERRARA Palazzo dei Diamanti Giorgio Morandi – the art of engraving; until June 2.

Samurai. First major show in Italy on the samurai; helmets, weaponry and armour for warriors and horses from the Azuchi Momoyama (1575-1603) and Edo (1603-1867) periods; 100 items gathered from Milan's Castello Sforzesco and Koelliker collections; until June 2. same venue: Futurism 1909-2009 – Velocità + Arte + Azione: Italy's biggest show marking 100th anniversary of Futurism; 500 works including Marinetti, Boccioni, Balla, Carrà, Severini, Russolo; until June 7. same venue: René Magritte and the Mystery of Nature; one of Italy's largest-ever Magritte events; around 100 paintings featuring Magritte's signature apples, blue skies and birds; until March 29.

Pinacoteca di Brera

NAPLES

ROVIGO

Archaeological Museum

Palazzo Roverella

Herculaneum: Three Centuries of Discoveries; until 13 April 2009.

Castel Sant'Elmo Renato Mambor, On Loan From Infinity: works commissioned from friends like Ceroli, Boetti, Pascali, Marotta; until March 31.

Museo Principe Diego Aragona Pignatelli Cortes Vincenzo Gemito, the “genius and insane” Neapolitan sculptor (1868-1925); from 28 March until 5 July.

Madre Alighiero Boetti – Alighiero & Boetti: Mettere l'Arte al Mondo; works of the famous Italian conceptual artist; until May 11.

Art Deco in Italy 1919-1939; January 31-June 28.

SERRA SAN QUIRICO Ex Monastero di Santa Lucia Pasqualino Rossi – protagonist of the Baroque.

SIENA Santa Maria della Scala museum Art, Genius, Madness: 300 works including Van Gogh, Ernst, Dix, Guttuso, Ligabue; until May 25.

TREVISO Casa dei Carraresi Canaletto, Venice and its Splendours; until April 5

TURIN Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo PADUA Musei Civici agli Eremitani 100 Years of Portrait Painting In The Age of Galileo, 1550-1650; 70 works including Titians and Tintorettos; until July 15.

PESCARA Ex Aurum

Four famed Caravaggios united for gallery's 200th anniversary year: two versions of Supper At Emmaus (1601 and 1606); The Musicians (1595) and Boy With A Basket Of Fruit (1593); until March 29. (04)

CROMOFOBIE. Percorsi del bianco e del nero nell’arte italiana contemporanea; until May 31.

Forma

Sala delle Colonne

Mario Giacomelli; until March 22. same venue: Robert Capa – Gerda Taro: War; until 21 June.

49 paintings and sculptures by Antonio Ligabue including celebrated Self Portrait With Dog; until June 7.

PONTASSIEVE

Adel Abdessemed – The God's Wings; until May 18.

Palazzi Bricherasio Akhenaton: Pharaohs of the Sun; until 14 June

Pinacoteca Giovanni e Marella Agnelli State of Mind – works from Ebrahim Melamed's private collection; from 3 April until 5 July.

La Venaria Reale Egypt’s Sunken Treasures; until May 31.

URBINO Palazzo Ducale Raphael and Urbino; from 4 April until 12 July.

VENICE

Arnaldo Pomodoro Foundation

Collezione Peggy Guggenheim

Great Works 1972-2008; until March 22.

Masterpieces of Futurism – of the Gianni Mattioli Collection, with additional paintings, sculptures and works; until December 31.

FIRENZE Palazzo Strozzi

Palazzo Grassi Italics. Italian art between tradition and revolution. 1968-2008; until March 22.

Galileo. Images of the universe from Antiquity to the telescope; until August 30. same venue: Emerging talent Award; until March 29.

Museo Podi Pezzoli Japanese 'netsuke' mini-sculptures from four Italian collections and Stuttgart's Linden Museum; until March 15.

Palazzo della Ragione Extreme Beauty in Vogue; from March 3 until May 10.

ROVERETO MART Gallery Futurism 100: Illuminations, Avant-Gardes Compared, Italy, Germany And Russia: first major show this year marking 100th anniversary of Futurism; works by Marinetti, Kandinsky, Der Sturm, Chagall, Klee, August Macke, Franz Marc; until June 7.


The Best of Youth

Slice and easy – Pizza to go

The 28-year-old Rome-born Elio Germano is unanimously acclaimed as Italy’s best young actor. See pg. 12

One of the best things that Rome has to offer visitors in search of a quick and satisfying snack is takeaway pizza or pizza al taglio. See pg. 14

XI

Hiroshige – The master of nature { Aniko Horvath }

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Hiroshige – The master of nature 17 March – 7 June Museo Fondazione Roma, Via del Corso, 320 Infoline 899.666.805 (toll service) Opening hours: 10.00 - 20.00, Closed Monday Tickets: € 9.00 (reduced: € 7.00)

ne of Japan’s greatest ever artists, Utagawa Hiroshige, will be featured for the first time in Italy this spring when over 200 of his works on loan from the Honolulu Academy of Arts go on show at the Museo del Corso in Rome. Hiroshige (1797-1858) is considered one of the most significant figures in the Japanese artistic tradition of ukiyo-e, meaning “pictures of the floating world”. The Rome exhibition will include some of the artist’s most representative work, sublime embodiments of nature's awesome lyrical grace and some of the most unforgettable landscape images of all time. Also on show will be a vast selection of Hiroshige’s prints dedicated to every aspect of life in his hometown of Edo (present day Tokyo) and The Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido. This series, which Hiroshige painted during a 500km-trip along the Tokaido Road, includes a variety of landscapes – shorelines, a snowy mountain range, lakes and villages – and is today widely regarded as his masterpiece. Hiroshige was born in 1797 in the Yayosu barracks just east of Edo Castle, where his father was a hereditary retainer of the shõgun whose duty was to work as an official within the fire-fighting organization that protected the Castle. When he was 13 both his parents were killed and the young boy inherited his father’s position at the Castle. The salary was not much but

sufficient to allow him to study art. At 15 he began studying under Utagawa Toyohiro, one of the foremost ukiyo-e artists of the time. Hiroshige's first genuinely original publications came six years later in 1818. His Eight Views of lake Biwa and Ten Famous Places in the Eastern Capital were moderately successful. But it was not until the publication of Hiroshige's Famous Places in the Eastern Capital (1831) that he attracted real public attention. Hiroshige largely confined Sugura Street himself in his early work to common and popular ukiyo-e themes such as warriors, courtesans and actors. But it was his passion for nature and landscape painting which was to make his fortune. He contemplated his natural subjects with religious devotion and produced works of surprising harmony with improbable – but never unatural colours. Flowers, flocks of birds, mountains and rivers. His prints are almost photographic, capturing one moment in the flux of time: poetry in colour. From the early 1830’s Hiroshige dedicated

more and more time to travelling and to recording his travels in series of landscape paintings. With The Fifty-Three Stations of the Tokaido (1833–1834), his success was assured. Other hugely popular series followed, including The SixtyNine Stations of the Kisokaido (1834-1842), Famous places in Kyoto (1834) and One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (1856-1858). In 1856, Hiroshige “retired from the world,” becoming a Buddhist monk. He died aged 62 during the great Edo cholera epidemic of 1858. Even during his lifetime Hiroshige’s paintings were acclaimed outside of Japan. In Europe, the Impressionists quickly became passionate admirers of his work. Many of Hiroshige’s prints inspired Impressionist tributes, particularly from Monet and Van Gogh. Three of the Dutchman’s masterpieces were based on paintings by Hiroshige. Reproductions of Van Gogh’s “The Bridge in the rain”, “Flowering Plum Tree” and “Blossoming Pear Tree” are included in the exhibition. ¶

Exhibitions – From the father of the Renaissance to a Japanese master of nature

Giotto and Hiroshige in Rome

Giotto And The 14th Century The most complete exhibition ever dedicated to the painter known as the father of the Renaissance has opened at the Vittoriano in Rome. Giotto e il Trecento. Il piu' sovrano Maestro stato in dipintura (“Giotto And The 14th Century: The most sovereign master of painting”), features over 150 works of art, including twenty panels on loan from major museums around the world, exploring the life and times of Giotto di Bondone (c.1267-1337) and his groundbreaking impact on 14th-century art. The exhibition features wooden sculptures, illuminated manuscripts, goldwork and paintings by a variety of key figures from the 1300s, including painters like Cimabue, Simone Martini and Pietro Lorenzetti, and sculptors such as Arnolfo di Cambio and Tino di Camaino. Giotto was born in the countryside outside Florence, probably in 1267, to a peasant family named Bondone. Legend has it that as a young shepherd boy Giotto was discovered by the great Florentine painter Ciambue, drawing pictures of his sheep on a rock. Whether the tale is true or not, the young Giotto certainly went to study as an apprentice at Cimabue’s studio in Florence.The later 16th century chronicler of the greatest Renaissance artists Giorgio Vasari says Giotto’s contribution to art history was nothing less than grounbreaking: “...He made a decisive

While the debate will probably never be settled, many experts believe that Giotto’s involvement in the work marked the true beginning of his career as an artist and that the magnificent cycle of 28 frescoes depicting the life of St. Francis are a landmark in Western art. At the turn of the 14th century Giotto produced a series of major paintings, including the Badia Polyptych and his most influential and acclaimed work, the painted decoration of the interior of the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua between 1303 and 1305. These frescoes are acknowledged as a universal masterpiece and, unusually for Giotto, universally acknowledged as his work. It is thought that Giotto’s Crucifix in the

break with the ...Byzantine style, and brought to life the great art of painting as we know it today, introducing the technique of drawing accurately from life, which had been neglected for more than two hundred years.” It was Giotto who used perspective and chiaroscuro to breathe life into art and to make it truly human. The feature which more than any other sets Giotto's work apart from that of his contemporaries is his depiction of the human face and of human emotion in both expression and gesture. Giotto's earliest works were for the Dominicans at the church of Santa Maria Novella in Florence. These include a fresco of the Annunciation and an enormous painted Crucifix about 5 meters high, where the physical agony of Christ is rendered as never before. As the year of Giotto’s birth and his early career remain subjects of dispute, so does the order in which he completed his works and even their attribution. The most controversial case concerns the frescoes in what was at that time the largest “buildGiotto di Bondone: Crucifixion, ing site” in Italy, the church Scrovegni Chapel, 1303-1305 of San Francesco in Assisi.

Giotto And The 14th Century: The most sovereign master of painting At the Vittoriano until 29 June Via San Pietro in Carcere (Fori Imperiali) Opening hours: Monday to Thursday 9:30 – 19:30 Friday and Saturday 9:30 – 23:30 Sunday 9:30 – 20:30 Tickets: 10 euros Information: tel. 06/6780664

Church of St. Francis in Rimini also dates from this period. From 1306 to 1311 Giotto was in Assisi, where he painted frescoes in the transept area of the Lower Church, including The Life of Christ, Franciscan Allegories and the Maddalena Chapel. In 1311 Giotto returned to Florence, a document from 1312 shows his presence in Rome, where he executed a mosaic for the façade of the old St. Peter’s Basilica. In 1318 Giotto began to paint some chapels in the Church of Santa Croce: like the Bardi Chapel (Life of St. Francis) and the Peruzzi Chapel (Life of St. John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist) which was especially renowned during Renaissance times, and Michelangelo is known to have studied it. Giotto died in Florence in 1336, aged 70. His greatness was even acknowledged by Dante in the Divine Comedy: “Once Cimabue thought to hold the field as painter; Giotto now is all the cry, dimming the lustre of the other's fame”. Giotto’s contribution to Western art was nothing short of revolutionary. He marked the turning-point between the middle ages and that classical flowering of human virtues that was the Renaissance. ¶


XII Interview with Elio Germano

The Best of Youth

Unanimously acclaimed as Italy’s best young actor, Elio Germano seems destined to follow in the footsteps of screen greats like Gian Maria Volontè, Marcello Mastroianni and Vittorio Gassman. { Emiliano Pretto }

Elio Germano

T

he 28-year-old Rome-born actor Elio Germano is relatively littleknown outside Italy, but here he has already claimed a host of glittering prizes including a “David di Donatello” (the Italian Oscar) as Best Actor in 2007 for his performance in Daniele Luchetti's fluent, heartfelt movie “My brother is an only child”. Just what is the state of Italian cinema forty years on from its golden age with Fellini, De Sica and Rossellini? – How did your career in acting begin? – I enrolled in drama school in 1994. After that it was the usual business of any aspiring actor: treading the boards in little theatres, small parts, big parts, endless auditions, a little money here and there from commercials. I landed my first screen role in 1999. I was about to leave for a season in repetory when I was offered a part in Carlo Vanzina’s “Il cielo in una stanza”. My teachers advised me to say yes. It’s far harder to find work in cinema than it is in the theatre. – Why acting? – Probably all forms of artistic endeavour spring from some kind of sickness or inability to get on with an everyday life. I don’t think it’s a special desire to communicate something. I don’t believe an actor should be aware of what he’s communicating, but rather he should simply substitute himself for a character and just be him. If anyone it’s the director who’s in charge of any message to be conveyed. For me acting is a way of avoiding finding a real job. At the start of shooting for each film you begin everything from scratch: a new film, new people, a new life. What

interests me is the opportunity for change, for transformation. – There’s a new generation of thirty-something Italian actors who are starting to make a name for themselves both here and abroad: yourself, Claudio Santamaria, Pierfrancesco Favino to name but three. What do this generation need to enjoy the same levels of success as stars like Mastroianni, Gassman or dei Volontè? – Making a film involves lots of people and a lot of money. Quite simply, fewer films are made nowadays and so there are fewer stars. Also directors are far more tied to making commercial films. I don’t believe there’s a scarcity of talent. If Gassman or Mastroianni were young actors today they would face the same situation as us. Before you can start talking about actors you have to look at all the problems concerning production and distribution of movies; not to mention the almost total lack of support for cinema from the government… – What are the problems for distribution of films in Italy and how could the state give better support for cinema? – The distributors do their job. They distribute films which are going to do well at

“My brother is an only child” (2007)

The best of Italy Stefano Lazzarini, owner of the “Tanto di...” gourmet store is a man who enjoys his work. This cheerful foodie reckons he has tasted at least 70 % of the products from the shelves in his shop which is in the heart of the lively, workingclass area of Testaccio around five minutes walk from the Pyramid of Cestius. “I have to taste everything, otherwise how can I be sure of the quality?” explains Lazzarini. And who can blame him? Swordfish patè, capers from the island of Pantelleria, pecan nuts, the finest oils from Liguria, red tuna bottargo, pistacchio pesto.The store is a treasure

the box office. The problem is the absence of regulations. If 900 prints of the latest blockbuster are released, then there are hardly any screens left for quality art-house movies. This is where the state should intervene. For example, by introducing laws like those in other countries that establish a quota for a set number of domestic movies in a set number of cinemas. If you think the current government is supposedly made up of nationalist parties… Then there’s the fact that the two biggest Italian movie distributors are the same who control the national television networks. Those same networks who instead of broadcasting films fill up their schedules with quiz shows and reality programmes. How do you expect Italians to develop an interest in quality cinema? – How do you prepare for a role? – I don’t think there’s just one way, there are many different ways depending on the character. Having said that I certainly don’t believe in a tightly controlled ultra rational approach when I’m working. What I try and do is to create a situation where I’m on the set and I just experience it as if I didn’t know what’s going on. I try not to be aware of what’s going to happen next. An actor should never look at himself from the outside. – Have you any role models among great Italian actors from the past or any of the international stars working today? – I wouldn’t say models but there are certainly some great actors working today who’ve done fabulous things. Daniel Day Lewis, Gary Oldman, Sean Penn, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Among the Italian actors from the past I particularly admire are Gian Maria Volontè, Nino Manfredi and Enrico Maria Salerno… – You’ve already worked with many top Italian directors like Gabriele Salvatores (1991 Academy Award for Best Foreign Film with “Mediterraneo”), Ettore Scola, Michele Placido. What goals have you set yourself?

“As God commands” (2008)

“Quo vadis, Baby?” (2004)

trove of Italian delicacies from the Mediterranean to the Alps. “Since we opened in 2006 we’ve selected from among the best regional products from Sicily to Trentino Alto Adige,” says Lazzarini. “We prefer working with small craft producers who use local products and often use traditional recipes and procedures which not even most Italians know.” The result is a small gem of a shop stacked with goodies where you can enjoy a gastronomic tour of the best of Italy. Tanto di... Regional culinary products and organic foods Via B. Franklin, 7 / 06. 43415141 / tantodi@tiscali.it

Are there any foreign directors you’d like to work with? – Actually I try not to set specific goals. I would be terrified by the idea of having to start all over, maybe with the aim of working in the States. The beautiful part of this job is being able to work with so many different people with different languages and cultures. That’s why it would be interesting to work abroad: to meet actors who’ve experienced different theatrical and cinematic languages. I especially like the way actors work in England or Eastern and Northern Europe. The way Ken Loach and Mike Leigh work is simply fantastic: they help their actors eliminate every trace of “acting” until they end up living a real experience. – Is there any difference between a movie set in Italy and one in America? – In America there’s much more money. Everything’s bigger: the equipment, the sets, the number of people in every department. And there are huge differences on a strictly professional level. In the States everything revolves around the actor. For those who aren’t used to it there’s a terrifying silence when they’re shooting. The whole method is different too: you act as part of the whole scene which is shot all together. Here what often happens is that they’ll shoot the general context and then send the minor actors off-set before filming the close-ups and cutaways for the stars. Here in Italy we can’t use certain methods because they simply cost too much. We’re famous for making films, even quality films, with low budgets… Can I add one final thing? – Of course. – For the good of cinema and the cinemagoing public in Italy: please stop interrupting films half-way through. The interval is just an invention designed to sell popcorn and ice cream. And let’s have more films in original language versions! ¶

“Breath” (2002)

“N” (2006)


E

XIII

xactitudes: equally different Palazzo Incontri

All of us like to believe we’re unique, that we possess our own individual style. A fascinating exhibition at Rome’s Palazzo Incontro suggests we’re far less unique than we might think.

D

utch photographers Ari Versluis and Ellie Uyttenbroek have spent the last 14 years documenting the disconnection between our human desire to feel unique while also belonging to a greater whole. Since 1994 they have travelled the world seeking to document the dress codes of different social and cultural groups. What they discovered was a series of modern fashion tribes – people who dress the same, often without even realising it. Elderly muslims in the Casablanca casbah, football fans in Rotterdam, street kids in Rio de Janeiro, chic metrosexuals in London. Versluis and Uyttenbroek have called their series Exactitudes: a contraction of exact and attitude. By registering their subjects in an identical framework, with similar poses and a strictly observed dress code, they provide an almost scientific, anthropological record of people's attempts to distinguish themselves from others by assuming a group identity. Versluis and Uyttenbroek have traveled the world in search of fresh sub-cultures to ex-

Auditorium – Parco della Musica

Festival of Mathematics

F

ollowing the huge success of the Festival of Science in January, The Auditorium – Parco della Musica from 19 to 22 March will see the third annual Festival of Mathematics. Scientists, philosophers, writers, religious thinkers and scholars will speak on a broad range of issues on the marvellous world that is mathematics and how mathematics shape our world: from a simple game of bridge to the mechanisms of the global economy. Some years ago the German philosopher Hans Jonas entitled a brief essay ‘Is God a Mathematician?’ If you are neither a philosopher nor a German the question can be made more elementary: Is the world mathematical? Or rather, to be more down to earth, and avoid giving the word “world” too profound a meaning: Have the things that surround us and that we experience directly anything to do with mathematics? How come mathematics is so useful in formulating the laws of nature? In other words, what has the symbolic language of a discipline that is often considered abstruse, arbitrary and far removed from nature to do with disparate phenomena such as falling apples, the movement of the stars, the division of cells, population dynamics and species interaction in an ecosystem? Among this year’s speakers will be three winners of the Fields Medal for their influence on the development of mathematics: Edward Witten, Timo-

plore. Whether the catalyst to fit in is created by class, gender, rebellion or other faces of identity, each individual subject in a series is posed and shot exactly the same as the others. When placed together in groups, it’s the ubiquitous style code that’s immediately apparent. The real interest is that by looking through the convenient veneer of sameness, it’s actually each person’s differences that unexpectedly shine through. The exhibition is hosted by Rome Provincial Council. Nicola Zingaretti, council president, says Exactitudes offers a simple but vitally important truth and a plea for tolerance: even within tribes every group member has their own personal identity, formed by culture, religion, sexual orientation, history

Programs: 19 March – Sala Petrassi, 18.00 Mathematics, economics and chess Lectio Magistralis of Robert Mundell 19 March – Sala Petrassi, 21.00 From Gödel to Dylan Dog – Lecture and show 20 March – Sala Petrassi, 16.00 “Mathematics in Chemistry?” Lectio Magistralis of Roald Hoffmann 20 March – Sala Petrassi, 18.00 The mathematics of magnetic resonance Lectio Magistralis of Richard Ernst 21 March – Sala Ospiti, 10.00, 14.30 and 17.00 2° live brain Trainer Championship

thy Gowers and Vaughan Jones; the Nobel prizewinners: Arno Penzias (physics), Roald Hoffmann and Richard Ernst (chemistry), Robert Mundell, John Nash and Thomas Schelling (economics). The festival will feature a wide range of exhibitions. The foyer will offer visitors a historical tour of mathematical machines, from the perspective projections of renaissance genius Leon Battista Alberti to the Analytical Engine of the 19th century mathematician and inventor Charles Babbage on to the computer. AuditoriumArte will show a collection of the well-known Impossible Figures by Swedish artist Oskar Reutersvärd (1915-2002). ¶

Auditorium – Parco della Musica Viale Pietro de Coubertin 30 Infoline: tel. 0680241281 Tickets and bookings: Tel. 199.109.783 (toll service) www.auditorium.com

21 March – Sala Petrassi, 11.00 “Flatland, a great place to do algebra” Lectio Magistralis of Vaughan Jones 21 March – Sala Sinopoli, 16.00 John Nash, Thomas Schelling “Terrestrial games with mathematics” 21 March – Sala Sinopoli, 18.00 Arno Penzias, Nicola Cabibbo “Cosmic Meditations with mathematics” 21 March – Sala Petrassi, 21.00 “Flatland and Flatterland” Lectio Magistralis of Ian Stewart 22 March – Sala Sinopoli, 11.00 Mathematics in bridge Lectio Magistralis of Peter Winkler 22 March – Sala Ospiti, 11.30 2° live brain Trainer Championship 22 March – Sala Sinopoli, 16.00 The long-term effect of the internet in the Mathematical research Lectio Magistralis of Timothy Gowers 22 March – Sala Sinopoli, 18.00 Geometry and the quantum Lectio Magistralis of Edward Witten 22 March – Sala Sinopoli, 21.00 Prospective and Beyond. From Brunelleschi to Reutersvärd Lectio Magistralis of Bruno D'Amore

and individual taste. Exactitudes presents the 112 series produced so far. With large format photos on the first floor and a chronological display of the small format collages on the second floor documenting 14 years of fashion tribes from around the world. ¶

Exactitudes: equally different By Ari Versluis and Ellie Uyttenbroek Rome, Palazzo Incontro – Via dei Prefetti, 22 From 14 February to 26 April Free admission Opening hours: 10:00–19:00 every day except Monday Tel.: 06.692050220 / www.exactitudes.com

The Monster of Florence Bestselling thriller writer Douglas Preston moved with his family to a villa at Giogoli outside Florence in 2000. Chance would have it that Preston met a local Italian journalist Mario Spezi, who told him the olive grove next to his home had been the scene of a horrific double murder committed by a serial killer known as the Monster of Florence. The brutal killer, who ritually murdered fourteen young lovers over e period from 1974 to 1985, has never been caught. The victims were couples who had parked at secluded spots in the hills outside Florence. In each case, police believe, the man was killed first. The woman was then shot and, with the exception of one attack, sexually mutilated. The same Beretta automatic was used in all fourteen killings. The case became the longest and most expensive criminal investigation in Italian history. Various men were accused, imprisoned and then released. Suspects in the case have included members of a clannish group of immigrants from the island of Sardinia, and a peasant farmer who was tried, convicted and then acquitted on appeal. Police methods were ridiculed for incompetence and corruption. One of the principal judges heading the investigation believes the killings were the work of a Satanic sect, dating back to the Middle Ages, that needed female body parts as offerings to the devil in Black Masses. Preston and Spezi think this theory is rubbish and have said so. They also put forward the name of who they believe is the real Monster of Florence. The suspect they name has never been arrested. This is the true story of their search to uncover and confront the man they believe is the Monster. But it is also a gripping account of how Preston and Spezi themselves become targets of the police investigation. Preston had his phone tapped, was interrogated for alleged obstruction of justice and told to leave the country. Spezi was arrested and thrown into prison for three weeks. The Monster Of Florence tells a dark and bloody tale involving ghoulish ritual murder, suicide and revenge – with Preston and Spezi caught in the middle. Is their solution true? Time will tell, perhaps. ¶


XIV

S

acred and modern

Contemporary churches in Rome

Dozens of small churches have been built in Rome since the 1950’s, few are of distinction. In 2000 the Vatican launched its “100 Churches” project to fund the building of new chucrhes across the city. None, however, have matched the beauty, or the architectural importance, of the three buildings described below.

{ Emiliano Pretto }

T

he Church of Dio Padre Misericordioso, commonly known as the Jubilee Church was commissioned for the Roman Catholic Church’s Holy Year in 2000. Designed by the American architect Richard Meier it was opened in 2003 in the nondescript working-class Roman suburb of Tor Tre Teste. Meier’s building, a dramatic church and community centre surrounded by 1970’s apartment blocks. has already become an iconic landmark of contemporary architecture in one of the world’s most historic cities, and has set new standards for international church design. The building is bright white – and it will remain so; specially treated building materials mean the church is permanently protected from urban pollution thanks to a process whereby, reacting with oxygen, the church is effectively self-cleaning. The project features concrete, stucco, travertine, and glass. Three dramatic concrete shells, like huge gliding white sails, arc in graduated heights alongside the main church building. The proportions of the complex are based on a series of displaced squares and four circles. Three circles of equal radius generate the profiles of the three shells that, together with the spine-wall, make up the body of the church nave – and discreetly imply the Holy Trinity. Basilica of St Peter and St Paul

Pizza to go

Slice and easy { Alessandro Mirra }

One of the best things that Rome has to offer visitors in search of a quick and satisfying snack is takeaway pizza or pizza al taglio. You just go in and choose the amount of pizza you want by weight or by price. There are an almost infinite variety of toppings to suit all tastes and most places will offer a wide range of other hot foodstuffs such as suppli (balls of risotto with tomato sauce bound together by eggs around a piece of mozzarella, the whole surrounded by breadcrumbs and then fried) filletti di baccalà (salt cod in batter) or potato crocchette. The city is packed with takeaway pizza

city were generally also undistinguished. We must go back to 1955 to find a large church of real interest: the massive domed basilica dedicated to Saint Peter and Saint Paul which was inaugurated in the modern business suburb of EUR. Work on this squared church with is huge dome began in 1938 under fascist dictator Benito Mussolini. The new suburb was intended for a Universal Exhibition (Esposizione Universale Romana) celebrating Fascist Italy – planned in the 1930s and scheduled for 1942 but abandoned upon the outset of war. Only some of the plans – had been finished, and after the war work continued in a modernist style but without the same political agenda. EUR is now dominated by corporate ofGlass ceilings and skylights in the church span the entire fices and wide leafy boulevards. length of the building filling the space with natural light. At The church perfectly echoes Musnight, light emanates from within solini’s dictates for fascist archicreating an ethereal presence and There are more than 900 churches tecture: massive, imposing, grananimating the landscape. diloquent. In a green and flowery In the Jubilee Church, the three in Rome dating back to the very setting, the basilica is built in white concrete shells define an enveloping first years of Christianity travertine at the highest point of atmosphere in which the light from EUR so that the church dominates the skylights above creates a lumithe entire district. At the top of the steps, two big statues of nous spatial experience, and the rays of sunlight serve as a mysSaint Peter and Saint Paul welcome visitors. From the terrace tic metaphor of the presence of God. that surrounds the building, you can enjoy a beautiful view Meier’s church attracts thousands of visitors. It has rapidly over all of EUR. Since 2007 the church has undergone major achieved iconic status as an example of modern sacred archirestoration. tecture and contemporary architecture in general. Of far more classical design is the Church of Gran MaIn recent years contemporary architecture has enjoyed a dre di Dio at Ponte Milvio. Commissioned by Pope Pius renaissance in Rome, with a series of major public projects XI, it was completed in 1937 but so faithfully did arinvolving high-profile international architects like Meier, chitect Cesare Bazzini follow Neo-Classical principles Renzo Piano, Zaha Hadid, Odile Decq, Santiago Calatrava that it would be easy to believe it dates back to the 18th and Massimiliano Fuksas. But for much of the second half century. The large dome is flanked by two bell-towers, of the last century contemporary architecture seemed to be and rests on an octagonal drum with eight rectangular greeted with indifference – and occasionally outright hoswindows. ¶ tility – by city authorities. For decades, new churches in the The Church of Dio Padre Misericordioso was designed by Richard Meier

stores that provide office workers, students and tourists a cheap, quick alternative to traditional restaurants or imported fast food outlets. One of the most famous is Lo Zozzone, tucked away down the Via del Teatro Pace behind piazza Navona. Zozzone’s pizza is so go good you can often find members of the Senate from the nearby Palazzo Madama who have deserted the luxury parliamentary restaurants for a quick and tasty snack. Another popular place among pizza afficionados is Pizzarium in Via della Meloria (Metro Cipro). This gourmet takeaway outlet not far from the Vatican Museums is run by celebrated pizza chef Gabriele Bonci, who combines slow-rise dough made from special flours with fresh, seasonal toppings like

wild asparagus, or pesto and aubergine. You’ll also find super suppli and a wide range of imported beers to wash down your lunch. Antico Forno Roscioli in Via dei Chiavari 34 (Campo dei Fiori) is one of the oldest pizza bakeries in Rome. The choice of toppings is perhaps not as vast as in other places but the quality of the ingredients is unparalleled and the pizza itself is second to none. Near Piazza San Silvestro is Pecora Pazza (Via della Mercede 18). Despite fierce competition from the mass-market “Spizzico” pizza joint in Via del Corso, this place is always packed. To finish on a sweet note, Laboratorio Pasticceria Lambiase, better-known as “Il Sorchettaro”, is a superb bakery store at Via Cernaia 49/a (not far from Porta

Richard Meier

photo: daniele muscetta / flickr

Pia) famous for its deadly luscious pastries. Pride of place goes to the Sorchetta doppio schizo a freshly-baked croissant covered with whipped cream and melted

chocolate. But they also sell a vast array of pizza fresh from the oven. Open until late, it’s the perfect spot for a tasty treat after a night on the town. ¶


SPORTS

15

Hold

13th World Swimming Championships

{ Marco Fagioli }

your breath

From 17 July to 2 August Roma will host the 13th World Swimming Championships. To find out how preparations for the event are going we spoke to Roberto Diacetti, director general of the Organizing Committee.

R

oma09, the 13th FINA World Championships, will feature 17 days of intense competition between swimmers and aquatic athletes for world crowns in swimming, diving, water-polo and synchronised swimming. Roberto Diacetti, the director general of the Organizing Committee, is not prepared to make any predictions over who the medal winners will be, but of one thing he’s sure. On 2 August, when the curtain comes down on the championships everyone – competitors and spectators alike – will have enjoyed a great festival of sport. – There are just over four months to the opening ceremony on 17 July. At what stage are preparations for the event? – We’re on schedule. There’s a lot of excitement here in Rome and people are excited about coming to Rome. We’re carrying out a major promotional campaign in Italy and abroad. I’m confident it will be a highly successful event. – There was huge expectation over the sports complex at Tor Vergata designed by the Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava. It was supposed to host many of the pool events and provide accommodation for competitors but the project has now been set aside. Are you disappointed? – There has been a great deal of misunderstanding over this. When Rome presented its bid for the World Championships there was no mention of the Sport City at Tor Vergata. Obviously, if in the meantime new facilities had come onstream we would have asked for FINA’s approval to include them. But this did not happen. The Foro Italico was always intended to be the main facility at the championships. It’s a magnificent setting and I believe it was one of the strong points of our bid. We’re currently modern-

Italian actress Monica Belluci is the testimonial for Roma09

The opening ceremony will be held in the Stadio dei Marmi photo: flickr

/ antmoose

Organisers will use eco-friendly transport to move around the city during the championships: their cars will be powered by electricity or methane.

ising the whole complex. In addition to the four permanent pools at the Foro Italico we’re adding two temporary pools just for the championships. These will be placed within the top two courts at the international tennis center next door. [The venue for the Italian Open Tennis Championships.] – At the Beijing Olympics thanks to the fast pool and new swimsuit technology there was a slew of new world records. Do you expect results at Roma09 to be equally memorable? – I’m not sure I accept the explanation that the pool in Beijing was unusually fast, the new swimsuits probably had far more impact. But I believe the key factor was the swimmers’ motivation. I hope they’ll be equally motivated in Rome: either to confirm their success or to seek revenge. These world championships could well see more technological innovation for the sport: we’re waiting for FINA to approve the introduction of new starting blocks which could help reduce times still further. – The overall budget was set at 45,200,000 euros. – And we’re on course to stay within budget. We’re very satisfied with the income the event is generating, our marketing campaign has proved highly effective. Although football dominates the sports market in Italy, we’ve managed to eat into marketing areas that previously went to basketball and volleyball. In 2006 we were forecasting sponsorship contracts for Roma09 of around 5.5 million euros. At the end of February we had already reached 7.5 million. – What will the 2009 World Swimming Championships leave behind for the city of Rome? – The strength of our project was always based on a range of social benefits. Apart from the new public swimming complexes at Pietralata, Valco San Paolo and Lido di Ostia and all the privately-owned pools being built in the run-up to the championships, what I’m really hoping for is that there will be a surge in public interest for swimming. The hospitality village will be open to families, top swimming stars will be meeting the public, there will be concerts. Above all there will be a chance for youngsters to take an interest in swimming. At long last swimming is getting the recognition it deserves, including from the media. ¶

Roberto Diacetti, director general of the Organizing Committee

Roma09: the numbers • 17 days of competition: from 17 July to 2 August • A total of 180,000 tickets on sale • Ticket prices from 5 to 90 euros • 5 acquatic disciplines: swimming – diving – water polo – synchronized swimming – open water swimming (Ostia) a total of 400,000 spectators expected for events at the Foro Italico and Lido di Ostia • 2,000 volonteers • 2,500 athletes from 170 nations • 80 tv networks from around the world


16 SPORTS Rome Marathon 15

Be there!

ROAD RACES MARCH 2009 when

{ Aniko Horvath }

I

can still remember that chilly morning in March 10 years ago; what warmed me up was the thrill of running in my first mini-marathon through the streets of Rome. There were thousands of us – with no intention of covering the classic distance of 42,195 meters (26 miles 385 yards) or even the half marathon. Our aim was to complete the fun run – a far more accessible circuit over just 5km on what must be the most beautiful course in the world: starting in via dei Fori Imperiali, past the Colosseum and down to Circo Massimo. For a rank amateur it’s difficult to imagine a more enjoyable experience: a complete lack of hard edged competition – a vast crowd of people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities – mothers pushing baby strollers at full tilt, dogs that easily overtook their masters, elderly experienced runners with huge smiles on their faces as they breezed past younger less fit participants. Of course the real heroes of the day are those runners ready to push themselves to the limit over the full marathon course. Like Stephen Gaudet, a 54 year-old from San Francisco, California who has been hospitalized nearly 100 times since just after his birth because of severe and persistent asthma. He'll be speedwalking the full marathon – just as he did last year. And look out for the competitor wearing number 1927, the Flying Grandma Betty Jean McHugh. Canadian McHugh, who was born in 1927, boasts a personal best of 4:49.45. over this toughest of all distances and at 82 has decided to enter her first European marathon. Making a welcome return to Italy is an athlete with a truly inspirational story, double amputee Richard Whitehead. The 33-year-old Paralympic athlete from Nottingham in England completed the 2008 Rome Marathon in a personal best time of 3:39.00. Gary Latella might take longer to complete the course but is sure to find a lot of spectators cheering him on.

15th ROME MARATHON 22 March 2009 9.00 Via dei Fori Imperiali (Colosseum) ROMA FUN RUN a non-competitive event over 4 km open to everyone. Registration fee: € 7.00 You can register at the Marathon Village Palazzo dei Congressi Eur – Piazzale J.F. Kennedy, 1 Tel. 06.40 65 064 / 06.40 65 079 www.maratonadiroma.it E-mail: info@maratonadiroma.it

The 23-year-old Frenchman, who suffers from cystic fibrosis, was inspired to take up running after watching the gold-medal winning exploits of Italian Stefano Baldini in the marathon at the 2004 Athens Olympics. Veteran Zimbabwean athlete Luwis Masunda is delighted simply to be in Rome. Masunda, 32, claimed high-ranking finishes at the World Half-Marathon Championships in New Delhi in 2004 and at the World Cross-Country Championships in St. Etienne in 2005, but the deepening humanitarian and economic crisis in his home country forced him to withdraw from international competition. Thanks to the organisers, Musanda will be able to run in Rome, where he’ll be trying to improve his personal best of 2:16.00. And don’t be worried if you see a Roman Centurion among the thousands of runners. It’s only 28 year-old Englishman Ian Michael Sharman. Last year Sherman ran Rome dressed as Elvis Presley, completing the course in 2:57:03. – the world record for a marathon in fancy dress. ¶

where

race

start

distance

info

8 March

Fregene

Corri Fregene

10:00

10 km

tel. 06.4061453

8 March

Frosinone

Frosinone Run

10:30

10 km

tel. 0775.5890060

15 March

Ladispoli

A Run in the Park

10:00

10 km

tel. 329.0215140

15 March

Collefferro

Spring

10:00

10 km

tel. 349.7322879

22 March

Rome

Rome Marathon

9:00

42.195 km

tel. 06.4065064

29 March

Roma

Vola Ciampino

10:00

10 km

tel. 333.5286319

5 April

Gazzetta Run

Roma Appia Run

10:00

13 km

tel. 06.6990498

Clericus Cup

Sporting spirit When was the last time you went to a football game where all the players joined in prayer before kick-off? The Clericus Cup is like no other football tournament. The players Sixty-nine nations are represented are all priests and trainee clergy drawn from among the 16 teams taking part in Rome's seminary colleges. The games take Clericus Cup place against the most amazing backdrop – the pitch overlooks the dome of St Peter's Basilica. Sixty-nine nations are represented among the 16 teams taking part in the tournament every weekend except Easter until the final on 23 May. The date has been chosen to be just before this year's Champions League final which will be held at the Olympic Stadium in Rome. The games follow the standard rules of football, except they last 60 minutes.The teams pray together before and after games and there is a strict code of sportsmanship – where fair play is more important than winning. The competition is sponsored by the Italian Olympic Committee, the John Paul II Foundation for Sport, and lay Catholic sports body the Centro Sportivo Italiano. The 3rd annual Clericus Cup will feature some experimental innovations to rules of play, including time-outs and the use of a “sin bin” blue card ahead of its discussion by world governing body Fifa. If a blue card is showed to a player he will have to go off for five minutes to contemplate what he has done, and perhaps ask for absolution. It's hard not to admire a tournament that sets out in a spirit of fair play. Perhaps the professional game could learn a thing or two from these priests. ¶

Luwis Masunda

The 12th Man

T

he Curva Sud in the Olympic Stadium is the home to the most passionate fans of AS Roma. This sweeping, steeply-banked stand behind the south goal has room for 8,500 fans and is always sold-out. The eagerly-awaited last 16 Champions League clash with Arsenal on 11 March is no exception and the Roma Ultras are preparing a spectacular welcome with flares, smoke bombs and specially-made banners and flags for when the two teams come out on the pitch. The Curva Sud is not just big, it’s also very loud. For key clashes they can crank up the volume to deafening levels and provide a real boost for the players in yellow and red. Sometimes that passion has spilled over into violence, with small groups of hardcore hooligans using the stadium and the streets of Rome as a battleground. In 2004 there were violent clashes between police and fans after the Rome derby between

Lazio and Roma was suspended following a false rumour that a child had been run over and killed by a police car outside the Olympic Stadium.There were arrests and injuries, and the match was abandoned despite repeated assurances from police over the Stadio Olimpico PA that in fact nobody had been killed. Luckily in recent years the violence seems to have waned. Let’s hope the game with Arsenal will be a celebration of all that’s best in British and Italian football. ¶

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FROM 3 JANUAR retailers Y until will be 13 February trying by offering Rome huge price to boost flagging stores marking reduction sales s. With up 50% feel spoilt many discount for s shoppers and so many choice. But may with so shopping many shops just where streets should across the bargain best deals? capital hunters Here are go to get to avoid the dodgy deals some simple tips on bargains and where how . to find the best See pg. 6

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– 10 Febru HREE AND A ary 200 2009 HALF 09 between HOURS Rome and red and Milan on silver super-tra a top speed a PALAZZOGAT in with By the end of 300 kilomete E rs per hour. of 2009 ROME be below the MAGISTR three hours. journey time ATES are investigati will was finally Italy’s TAV ng a massive introduce service leged property al2008 on d on 14 the scam involving Decembe more than Rome and 500-kilometer hundreds route betweenr Milan – of A-list properties the busiest ian railway in the capital on the Italnetwork. knockdow sold at a controver It came n prices. at the end sial 15-year The affair concerns initial cost of project 851 apartment estimates which saw buildings s to €66b that changed and at the end of €14b in 1991 for hands soar a total of of 2008. service 231 million shaves The speedier an hour – way below euros Rome–M off the their market ilan route, value. litical and connectin lucrative financial g Italy’s See pg. 4 pocapitals and 30 in three minutes hours 18 times construct a day. Further ion work on the between stretch Milan and of line other thirty Bologna will cut minutes anthe end of this year. off journey times by See pg. 4 INTERVIEW WITH ILARIA BELTR AMME

IT’S IMMEDIA TELY obvious that the young author Ilaria Beltramme is also an active sportswoman. She covered hundreds of kilometers throughou as part of t Rome research for her first book which has proved a surprise bestseller in Roman bookstores .

See pg. 10

!


March 09