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GLOBE TOWN COMMON

VISION Report #1 • March 2018


Introduction This report documents the engagement work conducted by Roman Road Trust in Roman Road West, Globe Town, Bethnal Green over the past eight months. As part of a partnership with London Borough of Tower Hamlet’s Town Centre and High Street’s team, Roman Road Trust was invited to manage the engagement with businesses, market traders and residents in the area to support the delivery of activities that are part of the Thriving High Streets Regeneration programme funded by Greater London Authority. Roman Road Trust is a community development organisation working to revitalise the high street in collaboration with its local stakeholders and existing communities. Roman Road Trust believes strong community governance is essential for the long term health of the high street. Successful economic and community development of the local economy can only happen by involving the existing communities and stakeholders. For this project, Roman Road Trust helped to bring people together in Globe Town with the aim of creating connections, networks and partnerships; developing community governance and creating a common vision for the neighbourhood that will inform the local authority’s Town Centre Strategy over the next few years.

Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

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Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

4


Introduction

2

Context & Landscape

12

Executive Summary

1 2 3

History Demographics Town Centre strategy survey Visitor survey Shops & Vacancy Study

Objectives & Methodology Objectives Methodology

4

Six steps of engagement

Outreach

Table of Outreach Market stalls consultation Youth mapping Signposting to Roman Road Trust Hamper flyers Volunteers Fostering relationships with students Halloween Survey Improving communications Keeping Friends and Members of RRT updated

36

Improving efficiency and performance of RRT communications Developing RRT’s Social Media presence Introducing new sections/features to the website Developing RRT’s database of contacts

Engagement

Engagement with businesses Engagement with community groups & stakeholders Place-making Workshops 1 Identity & Heritage workshop

31

50

2 Food & Markets workshop 3 Public Realm workshop 4 Arts & Culture workshop

Pledge Afternoon workshop Music on the Square East End garlands Roman Road E2 Hamper Globe Town Common Vision Film Globe Town Knee’s Up

Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

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5

Impact

Projects seeded

Plastic Bag Free Globe Town Reopening the railway underpass Roman Road green corridor Clean up Canal Day

Small businesses animate the street scape Naming & Identity Heritage Funding issues Community representation Youth activities Parking Market Square Arts & Culture Food market & Evening economy

79

Collaborations/connections Insights

6

Case study: Lizzy Mace Globe Town Common Vision Feedback Survey

Recommendations

Building community governance

Constituting a formal Steering Committee Building community capacity and legacy

Promote engagement with high street website Promote participation in social media training Promote business skills & support schemes Turn ideas into manifesto

Key spaces to activate Shop front improvements Businesses under thread Improve night time street scene

Greenery on Market Square Expanding existing market Consultation event on designs for market square

Engagement Better representation of participants Skills training for businesses

High street improvements Creating a green and pleasant area

Market Square Develop programme of special events and markets

Supporting projects Plastic free city Event board Green corridor Thanks

99


Executive Summary Roman Road Trust’s work began by researching the area’s demographic and population statistics as well as looking at the high streets existing offering. The area is notable for its increasing in population over the last few years, which is projected to grow by circa 10% in the next three years, reaching in the region of 17,000 residents by 2021. There is also a high representation of BAME groups identifying as Muslim. The percentage of children living in income-deprived families is over 50%. To gather insights from businesses and residents, we carried out three consultation activities: i) Town Centre Strategy Consultation, ii) Visitors Survey and iii) Shop Use & Vacancy. Businesses, residents and community groups were involved in all meetings and consultations. This creates strong networks between the key players within the community. It also ensures the high street develops in a way that serves the community to ensure long term sustainability. Roman Road Trust’s engagement operates on a six-step methodology, gradually increasing the community capacity of the group: i) introductory meetings, ii) unfamiliar meetings, iii) familiar meetings, iv) one-to-one sessions, v) group session & workshop and vi) networking with wider community. Four place making workshops focused on different key thematics for the high street. These were heritage and identity; food and evening economy; arts and culture; public realm and environmental initiatives. We then celebrated our findings with a final networking event.

Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

Outreach was made to faith groups; education groups and community groups to ensure participants in our activities are representative of the area, culturally and geographically. Relations were made with all key groups and will be used in the next phase of the project to deepen relations where needed. There was extensive outreach to all businesses on the high street, by email, phone and face-to-face, to explain the benefits of being on the project. We visited 115 businesses in total and 30 of them attended our workshop series. We also engaged with new business owners on the High Street and integrated them into the business community. The total number of businesses we connected with personally is 62 and we supported 42 of those with our activities. It was apparent from the outset that the local community in Globe Town has a particularly strong appetite to be involved in local initiatives and to develop local governance. By the end of this stage of the project, Roman Road Trust has developed excellent relationships with key businesses and community stakeholders, and has enabled connections and collaborations within the community, and surfaced a number of community projects. These include a campaign for plastic bag free Roman Road and the vision for a green corridor between the Market Square and QMUL. Having developed trust and enthusiasm in phase one, phase two must build on this momentum by helping the community to realise the ideas, projects and plans that were seeded in the place making workshops. The next steps are to help the businesses and residents to form a constituted group; to support the delivery of emerging projects and initiatives; and to provide the skills and training needed for this group to be able to manage themselves and the projects beyond the funding cycle.

8


Roman Road West context map


1

Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

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Context & Landscape Our work begins with research into the area’s demographic and population statistics as well as looking at the high streets existing offering. The illustrations provide an overview of the area’s business community, community initiatives and other stakeholders. To gather insights from businesses and residents, we carried out three consultation activities, Town Centre Strategy Consultation, Visitors Survey and Shop Use & Vacancy.


Globe Town Shop use & vacancy map


Bethnal Green Principal Estates ca. 1836 (1 Bishop’s Hall, 1a Robinson’s Charity, 2 Cass, 3 Goosefields, 4 Pyott, 4a Pyott Sotheby, 5 St. Paul’s, 6 Eastfield, 7 Cradford, 8 Broomfields)

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History Globe Town Town Centre is one of the seven neighbourhoods created by London Borough of Tower Hamlets when it divided the borough for local administrative purposes in 1986. It takes in the eastern part of the former Borough of Bethnal Green and most of the Mile End area of the former Borough of Stepney. Globe Town is bordered by Mile End Road to the south, Cambridge Heath Road to the West and the canal to the east. The moniker of Globe Town revived a name for the area that was first used in the 1820’s to help organise the rapidly growing populations around what is now Roman Road and Globe Road. It is also said that Globe Town was originally named after a local Inn in the early 18th century. The area is known for its iconic housing estates. In the late 1940s the borough council built the Rogers Estate, named after a local war hero. The Greenways Estate was completed in 1959. Sulking House and Trevelyan House were designed by Denys Lasdun as part of the first phase of the project in 1958. They became known as ‘cluster blocks’ and are both Grade II listed.  Cranbrook Estate used to be 17 acres of decaying Victorian terraces, workshops and one large factory. In 1957 over 1500 people were displaced for the estate to be built. The council appointed architects Messrs Skinner, Bailey and Lubetkin for the new design. The Estate as a whole was officially opened in January 1965 and completed in 1966. It consists of two fifteen-storey blocks of 60 homes each, two thirteen-storey blocks of 52 homes each, two eleven-storey blocks of 44 homes each and five four-storey blocks of 28 homes.  With ancillary dwellings, there were 529 new homes in total. In 1963 the Blind Beggar of Bethnal Green, a bronze sculpture by Elizabeth Frink was moved to the Cranbrook Estate. It is said to be a local mythological figure dating back to the seventeenth century. The sculpture was grade II listed in 1998. Meath Gardens used to be a cemetery called Victoria Park Cemetery and was established in 1842. It was closed in 1876 and contains over 300,000 bodies. In 1885, Metropolitan Public Gardens Association led an initiative to turn the cemetery into a public garden, which was designed and laid out by female landscape architect Fanny Wilkinson. It opened in 1894 as Meath Gardens. In 1990s, many trees were cut down as new modern housing was established, but its Gothic entrance arch remains. The Bethnal Green Tube shelter disaster took place on the evening of Wednesday March 3, 1943. 173 people died in a terrifying crush as panic spread through the crowds of people trying to enter the station’s bomb shelter in the East End of London.


High Street Victoria Fish Bar and Four Corners in Mid 1970s

Sulkin and Trevelyan houses Greenways estate, Bethnal green, 1958

Cranbrook Street Before slum clearance initiative, 1957

The Florist Arms Globe Road, 1983

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Bethnal Green Tube Shelter East end residents taking shelter during blitz,1940s The Blind Beggar and his Daughter of Bethnal Green (1790) A Blind Beggar that had long lost his sight He had a fair daughter of beauty most bright. And many a gallant brave suitor had she. For none was so comely as pretty Bessey. My father said she is plain to be seen. The silly blind beggar of Bethnal Green. That often sits begging for charity. Yet he is the father of pretty Bessy.

Cranbrook Estate Mace Street is a figure of 8 loop road 1955-66

Victoria Park Cemetery Pre 1894


Demographics The context for this report is set by the London Mayor’s plans for regeneration in specific areas of London. Those town centre and high streets will see major growth in the form of regeneration and investment. Globe Town is situated in one of those regeneration areas. Tower Hamlets is now the second most densely populated local authority in the country, next to Islington (Mid-2016 population estimates for Tower Hamlets). Over the next 10 years the population of the ward (Mile End & Globe Town) is projected to grow by 7% to 14%, reaching somewhere between 16,300 and 17,400 residents by 2021. As a result of extensive inward migration over the past few decades, Tower Hamlets boasts an extremely ethnically diverse population (New London Architecture, 2016). 52.6% of residents identified as black and minority ethnic (BME) groups, with 31.1% of them being of Bangladeshi ethnicity. In terms of religion, with 34.3%, the majority of people in Globe Town & Mile end are Muslim, followed by 25.6% of people identifying as Christian. With 46.4%, the main household composition of residents was family households with dependent children. Single adult households account for a further 32.4% of households. The percentage of children living in income deprived families is over 50% in Globe Town (Department of Communities and Local Government in 2010). The main types of crime happening in the area are mostly theft & handling (34%), and violence against the person (25%). (Mile End & Globe Town Recorded Crime). Interestingly, Tower Hamlet’s residents’ major concern to do with ASB was teenagers hanging around in the streets (58%). (Annual Residents Survey 2011/12 – Tower Hamlets). Initial research showed a lack of community organisation or internal communications, with no activities that brought together local businesses, residents and community groups, present or historic. Our place making workshops gathered local knowledge about the high street’s offering in terms of heritage & identity, food & evening economy, arts & culture, public realm & environmental initiatives and other community groups.

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Better social media and digital marketing skills Low priority Medium priority High priority

21%

55% 24%

Improve visitor perception of RR as a high street

3%

Low priority Medium priority High priority

10%

86%

Better social media and digital marketing skills Low priority Medium priority High priority

21%

55% 24%

Improve visitor perception of RR as a high street


Town Centre strategy survey

We consulted 29 local businesses in Bow and Globe Town on the Council’s Town Strategy for 2017-2022. Businesses felt that better footfall, wider geographical catchment, and better visitor satisfaction were crucial factors to improve the performance of the high street. Businesses felt that Roman Road lacks a strong identity as a high street in the sense that it is not well enough known as a shopping destination and they believed that a market will be an efficient way for Roman Road to attract more footfall. At least three businesses mentioned the problems in the management of the market, deploring the lack of stalls, garbage management and order. Another important, yet divisive, issue was car parking. Some businesses complained about the price of parking and the lack of business parking available. Vacant units were also a topic that generated a lot of comments and many did not want them filled with a business would not complement the existing offer (i.e. another coffee shop or convenience store). When asked what support business owners wanted the most, the main priority was a website for the high street. Businesses were also highly interested in participating in social media training and being involved in business skills training.

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Shop Use in Roman Road West 60

NUMBER 55 13 12 2 4 2 14 13

ng

Visitor survey

Would you be interested in being involved in the event?

45 Yes Maybe No

8%

The visitor survey was conducted with support from QMUL volunteers over a period 24% of 10 days between September and December 2017 in multiple town centres, such as Bethnal Green, Roman Road East and 67%green and Mile West, Whitechapel, Stepney Yes End. Most surveys were conducted around Maybe No Roman Road Market and Globe Town Market.

30

There were 164 responses gathered and the majority of people who were questioned shopped in Bethnal Green and Roman Road 15 East (Bow). People’s opinions were very diverse on what they wanted to see in Globe Town. Answers 0 ranged equally between greenery and seating, better evening economy, better retail offering or community and events space.

A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 C1 D1 N/A

Shop Use in Roman Road West 60

Which town centre in Tower Hamlets do you shop in/use most?

What do you feel Globe Town needs the most?

45

A community/even Better evening econ Better food o ering Better retail o erin More green and ple

t? NUMBER

15

20%

15

30

A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 C1 D1 N/A

Bethnal Green Brick Lane Roman Road East (Bow) Roman Road West (Globe Town) Whitechapel Chrisp Street Stratford, Westfield Watney Market All

0

0

18%

22%

30

39 47 41 45 mlets 48

45

21%

19%

60

What do you feel Globe Town needs the most? Bethnal Green Brick Lane Roman Road East (Bow) Roman Road West (Globe Town) Whitechapel Chrisp Street Stratford, Westfield Watney Market All

A community/event space Better evening economy Better food o ering Better retail o ering More green and pleasant places

18%

22%

3

60

21% 20% 19%

Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

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Shop Vacancy Shop Vacancy 11% 11%

1% 1%

No Yes N/A No Yes N/A

88% 88%

Shop use above shop Shop use above shop 3%5% 3%5%

Flats/residential N/A Shop extension/commercial Flats/residential N/A Shop extension/commercial

93% 93%

Shop Use in Roman Road West 60

45

30

15

0

What do you feel Globe Town

A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 C1 D1 N/A


Shops & Vacancy Study We carried out a shop front and vacancy study over a period of four days in November 2017 to audit the number of vacant units in the area. We gathered information from 115 properties in Globe Town by observing their current status and chatting to available shop keepers. With 52%, the majority of businesses on the high road are shops (retail warehouses, hairdressers, undertakers, travel agency, post office, pet shop, sandwich bars, showrooms, domestic hire shops, dry cleaners), followed by 13% of financial & professional services (banks, building societies, estate agencies), 12% of food and drink premises, and 11% of hot food take aways. We counted 13 empty shops in Roman Road West at that time. Their user class was unclear and three of these properties seemed vacant above shop and 10 of these properties seemed to be residential above shop.

Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

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1

2

3

4

5

6

7

9

10

11

12

13

14


8

15

15

Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

1

251 Globe Rd, Vacant

2

253 Globe Rd, Vacant

3

260 Globe Rd, Vacant

4

65 Roman Road, Vacant

5

67 Roman Road, Vacant

6

75 Roman Road, Vacant

7

83 -85 Roman Road, Vacant

8

107 Roman Road, Vacant

9

106 Roman Road, Vacant

10

122 Roman Road, Vacant

11

144 Roman Road, Vacant

12

152 Roman Road, Vacant

13

190 Roman Road, Vacant

14

191 Roman Road, Vacant

15

205 Roman Road, Vacant

29


2

London Buddhist Centre • Srivati


Objectives & Methodology

Roman Road Trusts works to bring together businesses, residents and community groups through enjoyable activities that build positive relationships. Developing links between businesses and the wider community ensures the high street develops in a way that serves the community, increasing the sustainability of economic growth. Our objectives included consulting the business community on proposed regeneration plans and encouraging them to take part in business improvement schemes; making connections between different stakeholders within the community, and discussing proposed and new ideas for public realm improvements. We used an exhaustive six-step methodology to help break down barriers and build trust.

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Objectives Roman Road Trust was asked to manage engagement and consultation activities with businesses, residents and market traders to support the delivery of a range of initiatives under the thriving High Streets programme. These activities included:

Consulting local businesses on the council’s draft Town Centre strategy, and gathering feedback on their priorities

Helping businesses, community organisations and residents to develop content for place marketing & promotion campaigns

Bringing together local businesses, residents and community organisations in discussing a common vision for Roman Road West (locally known as Globe Town)

In terms of our communication activities, our objective was to i) encourage businesses to participate in local initiatives to promote the high street and increase footfall ii) promote the businesses on the high street iii) encourage businesses to join RRT as Members or Friends iv) encourage local businesses to increase their activity on social media.

Encouraging businesses to engage in high street schemes and opportunities that will help them adapt to changing customer base and market opportunities Consult businesses, residents and community groups on proposed public realm improvements to the high street with a focus on the Market Square Support businesses, community organisations and residents to activate a program of events and activities that will attract footfall to the area Consulting local businesses on the council’s draft Town Centre strategy, and gathering feedback on their priorities

Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

Supporting the delivery of activities and events to help animate & promote Globe Town’s town centre with focus on the Market Square Engaging with property owners of vacant units to promote activation of vacant shop units Engaging with local schools and other public bodies to discuss public realm improvements to minimise crime in the area

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1

Introduction

4

First visit, conducting consultation or email introduction

Fourth visit, establishing trust These meetings are one-to-one sessions with businesses, community groups and other stakeholders. The objective of these meetings is to get people involved in our workshop series. We offer a platform to communicate their knowledge and ideas to the community as well as give access to valuable knowledge from more experienced groups and businesses.

This is the first introduction to the businesses on the high street. Each business is visited in person and time is taken to listen and gather views as well as explain about the project and our objectives. At this stage we also reach out to local organisations by phone and email to arrange a meeting in person.

2

3

Unfamiliar meetings

One-on-one sessions

5

Group sessions, workshops

Second visit, consultation follow up

Community organisation & education

During this second round of outreach businesses and organisations are still unfamiliar with us and may not know us by name. It is important for this stage to be done in person too to build up familiarity and trust. To build trust we also share results of any survey conducted in step one.

Workshops are an opportunity for different local stakeholders to meet for the first time. They can speak about their own ideas concerning the neighbourhood and find common ground. New collaborations are formed and projects ideas born. During this stage we help community members come to agreement on a common vision.

Familiar meetings Third meetings, inviting businesses to take part These are the third and fourth meetings with the businesses on the high street. The meetings are more familiar and we invite them to take part in our workshop series. We also propose to support and promote their business with multimedia content shared through our online platforms.

6

Networking event with wider community Co-production model This is the final step of our outreach methodology. After several months of workshops, participants are familiar with each other. The final networking event deepens established relationships and discusses ways in taking ideas and projects forward. Community members are invited to contribute their expertise into initiatives.


Methodology Six steps of engagement

Our outreach methodology is based on a process of sensitive and painstaking community outreach and engagement to build up trust. This involves us engaging with a wide range of the community by addressing a diverse set of community stakeholders. These stakeholders can include local businesses, residents and residents associations, schools, faith organisations, environmental groups, arts or cultural institutions and other social organisations. We approach local business owners who usually haven’t previously been engaged with business improvement programmes or other community initiatives. We engage with local resident associations and community groups who have been active in the neighbourhood from their own initiative. They usually come with knowledge about the area and valuable ideas on how the neighbourhood can be improved. The value of our engagement activities is in bringing this diverse town centre community together and gathering their shared knowledge. The stages outlined opposite describe the stages of outreach.

Roman Road Trust’s long-term goal is to help constitute a local group that will become part of the partnership between us and the local authority.

Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

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3


Outreach To increase community capacity, care is taken to gather views from a wide representation of the community. Our outreach involves contacting faith groups, education groups and community groups to ensure participants in our activities are representative of the area, culturally and geographically.

Market stalls consultation We set up a stall on the Market Square from where we spoke to passers by and asked them to take part in the Visitor Survey. Outdoor market stalls are a good opportunity to reach out to groups that don't have access to our online communication platforms. We spoke to many elderly people.

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Engagement with community groups Organisation

Contact

Email

Calls

Converted

Faith Groups / Charities 27

0

3

Father Alan Green

5

1

2

Globe Town Mosque

Shabbir Chowdhury

2

1

0

Bengali East End Society

Saif Osmani

7

2

0

Museum House TRA

Tracy Barbe

5

0

5

Tower Hamlets Homes

Allyson Matthews

19

4

1

15

1

2

Oxford House

Joseph Grey

St Johns Church

Residents

Cranbrook Lizzy Mace Community Garden Friends of Meath Gardens

Tunde Morakinyo

45

2

7

Chater House TRA

Tareshvari Robinson

32

2

5

4

0

1

32

5

3

3

0

0

Education Bonner Primary School

Sarah Wildbore

Morpeth Secondary Jo Baily School Jemima Reilly Bangabandhu School

Taslima Sultana

Queen Mary University

Volunteer Network

18

4

5

Four Corners

Howard Francis Lyn Turner

35

3

5

Balik Arts

Yesim Guzelpinar

18

4

2

Art Represent

Baiqu Gonkar

12

1

1

London Buddhist Centre

Darshavini Srivati Skelton

21

1

3

Rich Mix

Tracy Barbe Margot Pryzmierska

73

2

8

Roman Road Gallery

Marisa Bellani

10

2

1

Numbi

Kinsi Abdulleh

4

0

0

Kazzum (Oxford House)

Nouria Bah

7

0

0

Arts & Culture


Table of Outreach The table of outreach shows how we reached out to various community initiatives.

Youth mapping The 2011 census shows that the number of young people in the Globe Town area has sharply increased. Yet during our engagement activities, young people have proven to be a hard to reach group. It has commonly been cited in literature that young people feel marginalised and further alienated by the regeneration processes that radically alter the areas they live in. To ensure young people are involved in future plans for the area we conducted a youth engagement study. This provides youth engagement case studies to inform youth outreach strategies Roman Road Trust could potentially deploy in the future. (See more details in our youth engagement report)

Hamper flyers We sent 10,000 hamper flyers to all households in the Roman Road West area. This enabled those who are not engaged with us via our online platforms to access information about the project whilst engaging with their high street. The hamper flyer allowed those who are not involved directly with our monthly Globe Town Common Vision workshops to get involved through an activity on their high street. They could enter the competition by filling in details on the flyer and handing to a drop off point at a local shop. Residents could also find out more about the project by visiting the Roman Road Trust website displayed on the flyer. By allowing both an online and offline sign-up, this ensures those with and without access to the Internet are reached.

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Volunteers In order to get local people involved in their community and high street, we reached out to recruit volunteers through newsletters, social media platforms, and through the Queen Mary University Student Union Volunteering scheme. There were a number of volunteer opportunities including data collection, market research, event organisation, interviewing, and hospitality. Reaching out to young people fosters long-term relationships with the younger generation and students living locally. Additionally we provided an internship opportunity that resulted in the development of a youth engagement strategy for Globe Town. We also worked with a group of young creatives from Rich Mix who created a short film about our engagement work. These collaborations have provided valuable experience and training for local young people and encouraged them to engage in community action from a young age.

Fostering relationships with students Roman Road Trust has provided academic and professional opportunities to a variety of students and graduates. QMUL students have helped us to carry out several data analysis activities and assisted us at our workshops. Journalism students from City University attended our identity & heritage workshop to cover it for local news channels. We were also interviewed for a feature about Roman Road Trust. A planning & economics students from UCL University helped manage the data collection projects. Jack Ratcliffe, a UCL PhD student attended our arts & culture workshop and voiced his and his colleges enthusiasm to collaborate with RRT in future activities.

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Chloe McFarlane • Intern, wrote youth engagement report

Calum Somerville • volunteer videographer, shooting Globe Town Common Vision Short


“Roman Road is growing day after day and for a newcomer like me it is really nice to be involved in the community.” (Francesco Ragazzi, manager Quarantacinque, local coffee shop)

Christmas Hamper No of leaflets distributed Christmas Hamper No of dedicated Mailchimp campaigns

10,000 1

No of leaflets distributed No of dedicated Social Media posts promoting eachofbusiness No dedicated Mailchimp campaigns

10,000 16 1

Total number reached No of dedicated Social Media posts promoting each business

21,650 16

Total number reached

21,650

Valentine’s Hamper No of leaflets distributed Valentine’s Hamper No of dedicated Mailchimp campaigns No of leaflets distributed No of dedicated Social Media posts promoting each No ofbusiness dedicated Mailchimp campaigns Total number reached No of dedicated Social Media posts promoting each business Total number reached

10,000 2 10,000 15 2 21,425 15 21,425


Halloween Survey October’s Halloween Survey was an opportunity to gather insights from 50 businesses about the idea of an annual event on the square, using Halloween as a timely example. The majority of businesses liked the idea of a recurring event on the market square. 67% of the businesses would like to be involved in such an event and were keen to have their windows decorated in a seasonal theme. There were some reservations about the idea including a couple of shopkeepers who said events alone would not change the area for the better; that an Autumn theme might be more inclusive than Halloween, and a few businesses did not want to participated in guided ‘trick-or-treating’ tours as they didn’t want children in their space.

Would you be interested in being involved in the event? Yes Maybe No

8%

24%

67%

Which town centre in Tower Hamlets

Signposting to in/use Roman Road Trust do you shop most? A leaflet about the Globe Town Common Vision project was printed and handed out at our market stalls and workshops as well as left inside shops and distributed at other events. This helped raise awareness of the project to a wider audience.

Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

43 Bethnal Green Brick Lane Roman Road East (Bow) Roman Road West (Globe Town) Whitechapel


Improving Communication Keeping Friends and Members of RRT updated

During the project a monthly newsletter was sent to the Friends of Roman Road mailing list to raise awareness of our activities and the workshops, as well as other news relevant to the surrounding community and high street. This involved setting up the following work-flow:

Every activity undertaken by the Trust was reported on the website and then promoted via the newsletter and email. A regular newsletter was launched. This ensured regular communications with subscribers to make sure they were updated about all our projects. This is sent on fourth Wednesday of the month at an optimized time of day.

Chapter 5: Impact Communication performance

Monthly Newsletter Date Sent

No of recipients

No of opens

No of clicks

Tues 26th Sept 2017

1,100

308

65

Thurs 26th Oct 2017

1,100

304

64

Mon 27th Nov 2017

1,200

416

101

Thurs 21st Dec 2017

1,900

655

123

Thurs 25th Jan 2018

1,800

656

210

Thurs 1st March 2018

2,100

663

108

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Dedicated Mailchimp Campaigns Campaign Name

No of recipients

No of opens

No of clicks leading to


Improving efficiency and performance of RRT communications During this project we improved the communication practices of the Roman Road Trust to help secure better quality of engagement. This included:

Personalised greeting message We have added the first name of subscribers to newsletter campaigns. This not only allows the email to be more personal to each recipient, encouraging them to read on, but it also reinforces our values as a citizen-led organisation.

Back-links to website All mail campaigns and newsletters link back to the RRT website where readers can find out more about us as an organisation, helping raise awareness of the project

RRT profile box Each newsletter includes an ‘About RRT’ sign off to remind and consolidate our values, aims and objectives as an organisation.

Flash emails When necessary we send dedicated mail campaigns to promote a specific event/ activity. This has been particularly useful with the Roman Road Hampers and has resulted in a high amount of sign-ups.

Segments Using segments to send highly relevant information to certain groups such as businesses increasing engagement. For example, we were able to send a campaign regarding the new All Points East Festival which will be taking place in Victoria Park this summer to those who are ‘traders’ as well as re-sending the campaign to our ‘Markets & Events’ mailing list.

Eventbrite We use Eventbrite to promote, organise and manage all of our ticketed events such as our Globe Town Common Vision Workshops. This allows us to track ticket sales, send private and personalised invitation and automatic event reminders that can then be followed up by a phone call.

Text messaging We regularly send text messages to businesses as this allows them to quickly and easily respond at their convenience. Text messaging enables us to directly send links to events as well as directly sending leaflet copy for approval (e.g. - confirming copy for hamper flyer.)


Developing RRT’s Social Media presence The project was an opportunity to increase followers and engagement with the Trust’s recently launched Facebook and Twitter page. This was done in the following ways:

Scheduling social Media posts The scheduling feature allows us to post at optimum times allowing us to pre-warn businesses to like, comment and share the “power post” in advance to maximise post performance.

Tagging businesses We spend time tagging all relevant businesses in the post to increase post outreach and encourage businesses to engage online. We then emailed then to let them know they have been tagged, helping teach them how to amplify the high street’s online activity

Using Facebook events This allows our events to be visible on RRT’s Facebook page with a link to Eventbrite to book tickets.

Created ‘Living in Globe Town’ Facebook group This is an unbranded online forum for local residents to share upcoming events, archive images and memories between themselves helping develop peer-topeer networks. It also provides a platform for RRT to promote the Globe Town Common Vision events to residents.


Introducing new sections/features to the website In order to help people engage with the project more easily online improvement were made to the website. This included:

Improving User Experience on the website Pages and posts were kept up-to-date and were relocated if necessary to allow important content to be surfaced more easily.

Documenting all RRT’s work All events, activities and projects are archived on the RRT website as both blog posts and portfolio items. This keeps users up to date with our current work and allows an archive of previous work to be stored and viewed increasing confidence in new users.

Case studies A local volunteer, business owner or beneficiary is interviewed each month for a case study. These have included Janna Brom (volunteer), Jess Currie (UEL design student), Salim Kebir (business owner), and Chloe McFarlane (intern.) This has helped communicate our grassroots values.

Survey section A survey section was created to enable users to easily locate surveys to complete them.

Hamper page We created a dedicated hamper page to include images of each business owner, the donated item(s) and short ‘insight’ about each business. This page provides back-links to all businesses websites to help bring traffic to their online platforms.

Place experts We created a Place Experts page within our ‘About Us’ section which features a photo and bio of each local place expert as well as more information about their work.


Developing RRT’s database of contacts To make our outreach and engagement communications effective and efficient we have developed a central contact database to securely store contact information for businesses, community groups and local champions.

Enhanced entry for businesses Chapter 5: Impact A more in-depth record for Communication performance businesses is kept including address, opening times and website/social media links to allow efficient and Monthly Newsletter effective contact. This was shared the local auDate Sent No of with recipients No of opens thority to help them develTues 26th Sept 2017 op a new mapping 1,100 service as part of their #ShopTowThurs 26th Oct 2017 1,100 erHamlets initiative.

Collecting mobile numbers from businesses We have personal mobile numbers for businesses who regularly engage with us. This allows us to make direct and successful conNo of clicks tact when needed. 308 304

Mon 27th Nov 2017

1,200

416

Thurs 21st Dec 2017

1,900

655

Thurs 25th Jan 2018

1,800

656

Thurs 1st March 2018

2,100

663

65

Adding Contacts 64 We ensure 101 that contacts made during each project/ 123 event are collated and added onto 210the newsletter mailing list and to our cen108 tral contact database.

Dedicated Mailchimp Campaigns Campaign Name General Meeting Christmas Hamper Winner

No of recipients

No of opens

No of clicks leading to RRT website

35

28

15

601

263

10

71

18

All Points East Callout

203 (trader segment of Friends)

All Points East Callout

253 (Markets & Events list)

123

46

Valentine's Hamper launch

1,800

469

128

Valentine's Hamper Winner

2,107

924

22

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Paradise Cycles • Louis


4

Peckover Butchers • Gavin


Engagement The aim of our engagement work during this first phase of the community and economic development project was to make connections and develop relationships with local stakeholders, build a local network of empowering connections; gather views from everyone and help the community formulate a common vision for their neighbourhood. To cater to varying levels of individual engagement we structured our engagement programme around three types of activities: i) a series of place making workshops for those who want to be directly involved in making things happen i) a series of seasonal promotional activities that involved the businesses in a fun, hassle-free way iii) public events on the square to reach people who do not want to be involved but would support activities and improvements. During this process we introduced ourselves to 115 businesses, we connected personal with 62 businesses, we supported 42 in our seasonal activities, and 30 different businesses attended our workshop series. We also engaged with new business owners on the high street and integrated them into the business community. We delivered a series of four themed place making workshops (heritage & identity, food & evening economy, arts & culture, public realm & environmental) and celebrated our findings with a final networking event, which attracted 47 attendees. A total of 108 local residents and community stakeholders attended our workshop series and we had 37 one-to-one meetings with some of them. We gave 33 local stakeholders the opportunity to speak to the wider community at our events.

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Engagement with businesses

Engaging with the business community always proves to be the trickiest of all kinds of engagements. The majority of businesses don’t usually see the value in attending community driven activities. Many business owners do not live in the area and find it hard to attend events in the evening due to other duties (childcare). However, we began by developing relationships with the most engaged businesses, providing a positive example to other businesses. Bamboo & Bee hosted our workshops on 2 occasions. Bamboo and Bee’s Kerry, Simply Fresh’s Mehmet, Quarantacinque’s Francesco and Peckover’s Gavin attended our workshop and shared their experiences with attendees. Quarantacinque, Hugga Mug and the Florist offered us their premises to hold our workshops. During the project we visited businesses in Globe Town on 23 separate occasions. In total, we visited 115 local businesses, speaking personally with 62 business owners. During our visits we handed out flyers about our workshops and collected contact information such as email, number and if applicable online presence. We had continual engagement with the two market traders on the Market Square to discuss improvements and collected their feedback. Our activities, workshops and social media, provided opportunities for businesses to connect with each other and develop relationships. We also promoted council led schemes such as graffiti removal and business training.

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Quarantacinque • Massimo


Eyes London • Samir

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XTrim • Mita


Simply Fresh • Mehmet


Ginger White • Chris


Massinghams Chemist • Sally

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Bamboo & Bee • Francesca


Whistles • Ken

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Rockafella • Mani


Meze • Suat

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Lama’s Pyjamas • Abhayanandi


Morpeth Secondary School • Year 8s


Engagement with community groups & stakeholders

Part of our engagement involved contacting key community groups. Our workshop series presented the opportunity for these groups to address a wider audience within the local community about their projects, and to seed ideas for collaboration for projects and community events to support the high street. We made close relationships with:

Rich Mix.

School & Outreach Officer Tracy Barbe. Tracy attended all our events and has helped bring about collaboration between Rich Mix, RRT and New London Architecture on a youth engagement project about the built environment. Rich Mix New Creatives group attended and participated in our arts and culture workshop.

Morpeth Secondary School.

Morpeth Secondary School involved us in their Pledge Afternoon Initiative with Year 8 students. Jemima Riley. We met with the Principle of Morpeth Secondary School regarding antisocial behaviour on the Market Square and discussed how their students can be involved in our future activities.

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St. Margaret’s House They hosted our public realm workshop free of charge.

Four Corners.

They hosted our arts & culture workshop free of charge.

Balik Arts.

We helped them generate relations with Four Corners, who offers them space to screens some of their cinema.

Tower Hamlets Homes.

THH owns the blocks overlooking the square. We are in discussion about community supported events in the Market Square.

London Waterways Project.

They are helping us explore how we can encourage access to the road from Regents Canal.

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St. Margaret’s House • The Gallery Cafe


Tower Hamlets Homes • Back of Globe Town Square

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Place-making workshops We managed five workshop events each themed to discuss aspects of improving the high street. Workshops were creative and playful to encourage positive messaging and conversations. This included showing local films, inviting experienced guest speakers, offering food and drink, and having Q&A games. The workshops then opened up into round table discussions where everybody could voice their opinion, sometimes partnering different types of people into smaller groups to work on ideas together. The guest speakers were experts in ‘place’ in a variety of ways depending on the workshop theme, and provided inspiration and advice to the group.

“It brings people together and promotes initiatives” (Dario Garcia de Viedma, local UCL student)

Our guest speakers included:

Sandra Scotting

Kerry Mounsey

Diane Cunningham

Andrew Kay

Victoria Stewart

Carla Mitchell

Kay Richardson

Srivati Skelton

Tunde Morakinyo & Julia Miller

Baiqu Gonkar

Lee Wilshire

Margot Pryzmierska & New Creatives

Stairway to Heaven Memorial

Chatsworth Market

London Street Foodie

Well Street Market

Friends of Meath Gardens

London Waterways Project

Eleanor Image

Play Association Tower Hamlets

Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

Verry Kerry at Bamboo & Bee

LDA Design

Four Corners

London Buddhist Arts Centre

Art Represent

Rich Mix

Andras Horvath Balik Arts

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Bamboo & Bee • Identity & Heritage Workshop


Identity & Heritage workshop Our first workshop explored the area’s identity, history and heritage and attracted 20 attendees. We invited two guest speakers: Sandra Scotting from Stairway to Heaven memorial and Tim Band, a local artist. We showed two documentaries of the artist. The first one, ‘Sheltered Lives’, was about the the Bethnal Green Tube Disaster of 1943.

Date 3rd October 2017 Time 6-9pm Guest speakers 3 Attendees 20 Business 2 Resident 8 Community groups 3

Food & Markets workshop Our second workshop explored the area’s food offering, evening economy and how the market square could be expanded. We had three guest speakers: Diane Cunningham (Chatsworth Market), Victoria Steward (London Street Foodie) and Kay Richardson (Well Street Market). We had 21 attendees in total and two local businesses, Mehmet Guzel (Simply Fresh) and Francesco Ragazzi (Quarantacinque) contributed as well.

Date 7th November 2017 Time 6-9pm Guest speakers 3 Attendees 21 Business 7 Resident 12 Community groups 3

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Public Realm workshop Our third workshop explored how the area’s public realm can be improved, looking at wayfaring, green spaces, lighting & seating and re-designing the market square. The workshop attracted 33 attendees. We invited five guest speakers: Tunde Morakinyo and Julia Miller from Friends of Meath Gardens, Lee Wilshire from London Waterways Project, Eleanor Image from Play Association Tower Hamlets, Kerry Mounsey from Verry Kerry and Andrew Kay from LDA Design. Date 5th December 2017 Time 6-10pm Guest speakers 4 Attendees 33 Business 4 Resident 10 Community groups 5

Arts & Culture workshop Our final workshop explored the existing arts and culture offering in Globe Town as well as discussing what it is missing. The event attracted 34 attendees and we had 5 guest speakers: Carla Mitchell from Four Corners, Srivati Skelton from London Buddhist Arts Centre, Baiqu Gonkar from Art Represent, Margot Pryzmierska and New Creatives from Rich Mix and Andras Horvath from Balik Arts.

Date 7th January 2018 Time 6-9pm Guest speakers 5 Attendees 34 Business 3 Resident 24 Community groups 5


Pledge Afternoon workshop Roman Road Trust took part in Morpeth Secondary School’s Pledge Afternoon with 18 pupils from their Year 8. Most of the students live locally and pass the square on at least two occasions during the day. After watching a video summary of the public realm workshop, the young people were asked to share their thoughts on what improvements should happen on Globe Town Market Square.

Date 3rd December 2017 Time 15-16:30 pm Students 18 Attendees 20 Business 2 Resident 8 Community groups 3

Globe Town Common Vision Film To document our work during this first phase of the project, we created a short film. This featured local school children, residents, traders and community groups, voicing their vision to promote Globe Town as a destination. The short film featured a variety of ideas for the Common Vision from the community about how to develop the identity and location of Roman Road West. We worked with young volunteers to help produce the video at no cost and to provide real-life work experience for recent graduates and students. The videographers were Janet Onabanjo and Calum Somerville from Rich Mix New Creative program; Ryan Bowen from Balik Arts, and the local videographer George Watson. Date 8th February 2018 Time 10-14pm Volunteers 4 Hours invested 16 Business 1 Resident 8 Community groups 3

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East End garlands East End Garlands was a collaboration between RRT and Make:good, funded by the local authority, to design and install bespoke, seasonal window decorations into businesses in Roman Road West. Businesses were visited to share the ‘tools of their trade’ before the garlands were designed to combine these unique items with traditional Christmas foliage. The result brought unique but uniformed window decorations to 11 businesses to create a sense of festive community along the high street.

Music on the Square Music on the Square was a pilot Christmas event on Roman Road Market Square to animate the usually empty market square with festive music from Stepney Salvation Army’s Brass Band and the Musical Santas as well as free marshmallows and chestnuts for all 200 attendees. RRT had a consultation stall to discuss plans for the market square and Hui’s Kitchen provided Malaysian street food.

Roman Road E2 Hamper The Roman Road E2 Hamper showcased and celebrated the range of shops and services available on Roman Road West high street. A total of 24 businesses took part across both Christmas and Valentine’s hampers and a total of 1,100 entries to win the prizes worth over £1000. Entrants signed up by subscribing to our Friends of Roman Road newsletter or filling in a hamper flyer that was sent to 10,000 local residents and returning to Simply Fresh.


Globe Town Knees Up This was the final event for this stage of the Globe Town Common Vision. Not only did the event provide an opportunity for us to thank all those who have been involved and to celebrate the efforts made during the last six months, but it also provided an opportunity for more connections to be made within the community. Most importantly we invited Deputy Mayor Sirajul Islam. Part of the community capacity work is to facilitate introductions between local residents and businesses to people of influence. This is an important part of empowering local communities and ensuring legacy is created. Fifty one people attended the event including Father Alan Green from St Johns Church, and thirteen local business owners including owners of Globe Town’s newest businesses, Ben from Nola and Michael from EP Lifestyle. Deputy Mayor and Cllr Sirajul Islam spoke to the businesses and residents about their ideas for the future of the high street. The short film was screened and thank-yous were made.

Date 22nd March 2018 Time 18-22 pm Attendees 47 Business 13 Resident 17 Community groups 8

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5

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Impact

It is clear from our time spent in the neighbourhood that the Globe Town community is highly invested in the future of their neighbourhood. Before starting our work, there were a small number of groups active in the area. For example, Friends of Meath Gardens had planted trees on the high street and Mehmet from Simply Fresh had also planted tomatoes in one of the planters outside of his shop. However, these people did not have an opportunity to come together and support each other. During our six-month programme, we have brought together the most engaged members from the business, resident and cultural communities and given them the space and opportunity to meet each other and exchange ideas. This has seeded a number of new connections, collaborations and projects.

“I was really glad to be invited to the Arts & Culture workshop. It made me realise how much is really going on around here that I didn’t even know about; and to meet new people who got a similar passion for community cohesion and improvement of our area.� (Srivati Skelton, London Buddhist Arts Centre, local cultural centre)


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Projects seeded Plastic Bag Free Globe Town Lizzy Mace from the Cranbrook Community Food Garden together with local artist Tarishvari Robinson from the Buddhist community want to create a plastic-bag free high street. We are working closely with them on funding applications.

1

Reopening the railway underpass During the Public Realm workshop Tunde Morakinyo from Friends of Meath Gardens suggested that the railway underpass between Meath Gardens and Queen Mary University should be reopened to encourage footfall from south of the railway line. With our support and connections, this is now being investigated by the Council who has established that the underpass is owned by Network Rail Infrastructure Limited.

2

Roman Road green corridor Tunde Morakinyo also raised the idea of a green corridor to connect the many green spaces around Roman Road including Meath Gardens, Cranbrook Estate, Bethnal Green Gardens and Mile End Park. This could potentially be of connected to Roman Road Trust’s Common project proving even bigger impact.

3

Clean up Canal Day Kerry Mounsey would like to hold a Clean up the Canal Day in the summer, inspired by the Clean Up Australia Day from her home. The event happens yearly on a Sunday and encourages people to clean up their local areas. Any person can register a place they plan to clean up on the Clean Up Australia website, and others can join them there.

4


Collaborations Various potential collaborations and opportunities have come up during our work that will be explored in the next stage.

Juliet McNelly from Clear Village would like to partner with RRT on community development projects London Buddhist Arts Centre would like RRT to support its campaign to save Eastbourne House FoMG would like to work with nearby residents associations, QMUL, local schools and LBTH on the Roman Road Green Corridor project Kevin Siaw and Eleanor Image from Play Tower Hamlets would like to collaborate on potential children play spaces Morpeth Secondary School student representatives are keen to join future activities Tower Hamlet Homes would like to work with RRT on arts & crafts projects on Globe Town Market that would involve its residents St. Margaret’s House event manager George Paris would like to collaborate with RRT on future events QMUL students would like to work with RRT on a digital art project in collaboration with other art groups Parris Langridge from Camden Council would like to support the RRT Board by offering expertise in street market.

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Eastbourne House • London Buddhist Arts Centre & Globe Town Community Association


St John on Bethnal Green • Father Alan Green


Connections During the Globe Town Common Vision project Roman Road Trust has successfully established excellent relationships with a number of local businesses and community group, and facilitated connections between them.

Rich Mix + New London Architecture + Mulberry UTC

Our work has activated a project between Tracy Barbe from Rich Mix, Lettie Mckie from New London Architecture and David Hobbs from Mulberry UTC. As part of the Culture for Changing City programme a group of students from Mulberry UTC in Bow will have the opportunity to get acquainted with architecture and design skills through visiting important sites in Roman Road and attending workshops led by the NLA team.

Business to businesses

Businesses are recommending RRT to other businesses. As a result, a number of new businesses have reached out to us. These include hairdresser Lydia Keen, Nola and EP lifestyle Tattoo who attended our networking event.

East End Trades Guild

We introduced 13 local businesses to East End Trades Guild at our networking event. East End Trades Guild supports independent local businesses’ interests by bringing them together.

Tower Hamlet’s High Streets and Town Centre

We introduced local business, community groups and residents to the council’s HS and TC team at our public realm workshop.

Cllr and Deputy Mayor Sirajul Islam

We introduced Cllr Sirajul Islam to many businesses and organisations at our networking event including Friends of Meath Gardens, Quarantacinque, Nola, Peckovers, Simply Fresh and local architect Sarah Bland. Introducing the community to a person of influence is a key component of community capacity building.

Friends of Meath Gardens (FoMG)

We introduced FoMG to Chater House Resident’s Association, Cranbroook Community Food Garden and Parkview Community Estate. They plan to work with LBTH on the Roman Road Green Corridor project.

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Insights Small businesses animate the street scape Attracting more small, independent businesses to the square (market traders and surrounding shops) is key to improving public life to the high street. This is clearly evidenced on Saturday mornings at the Market Square. Shoppers come from as far as Stratford and Hackney to buy fruit and vegetables from Marc at Lesley and Herbert Fruit & Veg or buy their fresh fish at Downey’s. Attracting more street life to this space will have a ripple effect on the wider high street.

Naming & Identity Many people do not identify with the name Globe Town or Roman Road West. Many people refer to the location as Bethnal Green or Bethnal Green East. The older democratic refer to the high street as Green Street. At our Food and Markets workshop, the consensus was that if Market Square were re-branded, Green Street Market might be a good way to refer to the era when the market was thriving and Roman Road was called Green Street. The colour green was also identified as the colour for the area due to the Cranbrook Estate facade and green projects.

Funding issues During our outreach and engagement work, many community groups asked Roman Road Trust to assist with funds for their activities. In our future work, we need to find a way of managing those expectations and providing signposting to funding. One of the tasks of the Steering Committee could involve organising focus groups to build community fundraising skills.

Parking Some shop keepers mentioned a decline in customers since parking along Roman Road has changed and suggested schemes like shop and park.

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Heritage At the Identity & Heritage workshop, the group discussed what should be celebrated, cherished and saved in their local area. Attendees valued: • Multiculturalism - a ‘Global’ place • Green networks such as Meath Gardens, Cranbrook Community Food Garden, Museum Gardens, Paradise Gardens • East End heritage • Bethnal Green Library and Museum, The Camel, The London Buddhist Centre and The Tramshed • Architectural heritage such as Cranbrook Estate and the blind beggar statue, Sulkin House/Usk St Estate

Representation The priority for the first stage of the Globe Town Common Vision was to engage with local businesses. The businesses who have attended our events come from a wide variety of backgrounds reflecting the multi-cultural nature of the business community. However the residents who have attended are less representative. This is often the case at the beginning of a community development project. During initial stages of outreach, those with the most community capacity - typically those from an educated, middle class background - are the quickest to make the most of the opportunity. During the next stage, the priority will be to increase the representation of the group by deepening relationships with the schools and faith groups and holding activities in community centres. This will ensure that the high street improvements are informed by a true representation of the local community.

Youth activities and the Tramshed Upon thorough research, it was found that few major youth projects have been done in the Tower Hamlets borough. We are pleased to hear about plans to turn the Tramshed community centre into a youth centre.


M

arket Square

Everybody agreed the Market Square is in need of improvement. This could be investing in trees and greenery or shop front improvements.

More stalls

The idea of increasing the number of market stalls was approved, however existing traders were concerned they may be evicted or their fees increased. It was also suggested that the rates are reduced for new local traders looking to begin trading on the Market Square, and that making stalls available for one-off uses would increase pop-up or additional activities to the square. At the moment stalls can only be rented from the local supplier on a long term basis.

Greenery FoMG said that planting substantial, tall trees on the square will be important to provide shade and a canopy for activities in the square including a market and other community activities. This would also provide essential scale to help soften the visual dominance of the surrounding housing blocks. Visually beautiful Rainbow Square is a proposed project from a local business, Verry Kerry, that transforms the grey space into a lit, colourful, green space that will inspire the school children, involve residents in the blocks and increase eco credentials. Lighting and colour Morpeth Secondary School students also suggested adding playful or colourful light to the square as well as sweet smelling flowers to make the space more welcoming and safe in the evenings. Events & pop up market

There was support for activities that involved local school children including a Teenage Market.

Local architect Sarah Bland She is concerned that the designs for improving the square must address the scale of space. Globe Town Common Vision Report • March 2018

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A

rts & Culture

Topics raised at our Arts & Culture workshop focused on the general shortage of all-year community space to host public events, community meetings and other activities in Globe Town as well as the difficulty to find out about upcoming events.

Display board

Install a display board on the square showing what’s on in the local area.

Events on market

The central location, high visibility and accessibility of the square to surrounding residents makes it an ideal venue for outdoor festivals, performances and other creative events.

Diversity

Attendees stressed the need to celebrate the diversity of the area. This could be achieved through inter-faith events on Sundays or a language board.


F

ood market & Evening economy

One particular discussion at our Food & Market workshop was around balancing different people’s needs.

Antisocial behaviour

One or two local residents were concerned that increased evening activities would cause noise and antisocial behaviour. On the other hand businesses such as Quarantacinque and Simply Fresh supported the evening economy saying it would bring in footfall and make the high street more inviting and safe during the evenings.

Food market

Attendees including Gavin from Peckover Butchers stated that if a food market were to happen, it should support and not compete with local food businesses, perhaps by using local produce in the street food stalls. The suggestion of encouraging young people to run their own market stall was popular.

Nola

During the project new business Nola opened its doors in Globe Town. This restaurant and late night bar is aiming to get a licence until 3am.


Food & evening economy map

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Case study What was it about the GTCV that interested you?

I picked up a leaflet about the GTCV place-making workshop at Four Corners on the high street. I was in there to discuss possible collaborations with the Cranbrook Community Food Garden. We’ve struggled to raise awareness of the community garden to the local community. Despite being here for nearly 10 years, many local residents don’t know about us unless they take a detour through the estate.

We speak to local Globe Town resident Lizzy Mace about taking part in Roman Road Trust’s Globe Town Common Vision.

I think a lot of this is due to the poor communications and lack of community networks in the area. There is no means to advertise events or reach out to the community. The community in Globe Town is so diverse that it’s even more of a challenge to connect with other cultural groups. We need to engage with minority and vulnerable groups to strengthen our community. When I heard about the GTCV monthly workshops, I thought this was an amazing opportunity to meet local people, help raise awareness of the food garden and connect with other community initiatives. I was also interested in having a say about the high street improvement plans being proposed by the Council. Often the local community is the last to hear about the Council’s plans and important decisions about the neighbourhood are made with insufficient input from local residents and businesses. The GTCV was an opportunity to discuss the plans and put forward our own ideas for our community.

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What have you liked most about the GTCV

Do you feel you have a stronger relationship

The GTCV has introduced me to lots of new people very quickly. Before, when I was trying to gather support for the food garden, I would have to approach people on a one-toone basis via email/phone, or call the Tower Hamlets Homes’ Engagement Officer who could only offer limited support. Thanks to the GTCV workshops I’ve had the opportunity to meet a huge number of like-minded people in a short space of time, and to meet them in person, which has helped build good relationships quicker.

Definitely. There are more business owners who I now know by name as well as by face. It was great to learn something about them personally and to see that they feel as invested in the area as other residents do. These workshops have helped break down barriers between residents and the business owners of shops, some of which I didn’t even realise existed on the high street!

project?

It’s been amazing to feel that we’re not alone anymore. It was great to be in a room of people who love the area and want to work together to change it for the better. I’ve particularly enjoyed the positivity and creativity that people have brought to the meetings. It’s very inspiring! I really hope the connections, positivity and energy that has been unearthed by these workshops will be harnessed and taken forward into new community projects. RRT: What new experiences has the project provided for you? It’s the first time I’ve been involved in a consultation for renovating a public space. Often decisions about large-scale investments by councils are made without input from the communities that will be most impacted. It was really empowering to be involved in the process at this stage, as well as eye-opening to learn about the time-scales and complex requirements that need to be considered for such a big infrastructure project.

to the high street and its business owners?

I had not realised the value of getting to know local business owners more personally, or the barriers that were formed by not knowing them. Roman Road Trust helped reveal this barrier and then break it down. Taking part in these workshops, that involved both businesses and residents, showed me how local businesses share similar concerns for the community. Now I feel like I have a completely different relationship with some of those business. Before it was more of a transactional relationship whereas now I feel I can go to them with an issue and we come up with solutions together. I understand them more as individuals rather than solely someone who is providing a service. In fact I’m going to speak to Kerry from Bamboo Bee and Daria from The Larder about collaborating with me on the plastic free project.


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Globe Town Common Vision Feedback Survey The Globe Town Common Vision Feedback Survey was carried out after our first phase of work to find out how our activities were perceived by all the attendees of our workshops. We collected 39 response, with almost 40%, of the attendees between 30-40 years old.

• 44% of attendees made <5 new connections and 41% made 5-10 new connections. • 70% of the people expect to continue making use of those new connections. • And over 90% want to stay involved in our future s which I expect to activities.

e use of

NUMBER

s which I expect 82.6% to e use of 4.3% 2.2% NUMBER 10.9% 82.6% 4.3% 2.2% 10.9%

I have made new connections which I expect to continue to make use of I have made new connections which I expect to continue to make 2% 11%use of

Yes No Not sure Maybe

4% 2%

Yes No Not sure Maybe

11%

4% 83%

83%

“Roman Road is a wonderful place to live and work. I am very grateful to Roman Road Trust for engaging the whole community through events g to participate and workshops throughn initiative? out the year. The RRT is also very supportive of NUMBER local issues and businessg to participate es with a clear vision to 91.3% n initiative?create the very best for 2.2% our community.” 6.5%

Would you be interested in continuing to participate in the Globe Town Common Vision initiative? Would you be interested in continuing to 7%Globe Town Common participate in the Vision initiative? 2%

Yes No Maybe

7% 2%

NUMBER

(Sarah Bland, local resi91.3% dent and architect, 2.2% Studio Wic) 6.5%

Yes No Maybe

91%

91%


6

Meath Gardens • Playground

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Recommendations After building up momentum and enthusiasm within the community during the first stage, it is crucial to convert this energy into sustainable activities to secure legacy beyond the funding cycle. In this last chapter of the report, we draw on the evidence and insights we have collected to recommend the next steps. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the things I found really exciting about the meetings was that lots and lots of people are excited about bringing new energy and revitalisation back to the area. So it would be really exciting to see that momentum continue through all the connections that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made.â&#x20AC;? (Tunde Morakinyo, Friends of Meath Gardens, local environmental group)

Building community governance Constituting a formal Steering Committee

Building community capacity

Globe Town community shows a particularly strong appetite for participating in community development yet the existing community organisation is limited. Having successfully identified and engaged with key business owners and community organisations during the first phase, the next step is to formally constitute a steering committee. This steering committee should be representative of the community to ensure improvements to the high street reflect the needs of the local community. This steering committee must also include a rich mix of local business owners, cultural organisations and resident groups. A constituted group will provide the community with greater influence when communicating with the local authority and funding bodies.

Training in community organisation is needed to ensure the newly constituted group is built on strong foundations and that members have the skills to sustain the group beyond the funding cycle. It is recommended that Roman Road Trust continues to deliver monthly meetings and that the first half of each meeting is spent on providing advice and assistance about constituting the group e.g. aims, activities, remit, geographic boundary, job roles. The second half of the meetings will move onto furthering projects and engaging with high street regeneration activities. Part of the work will involve deepening links between steering groups members and influential local stakeholders such as the local authority, local councillors and local community leaders from schools and cultural organisations.


E

ngagement

Better representation of participants We have not been able to fully reach out to the large amount of BAME groups, Muslim groups or those from a range of economic situations. This needs to be addressed as a priority to ensure the Globe Town steering committee is representative. In the next stage it is recommended to extend and deepen relationships with a wider range of community groups to ensure the high street develops to serve the needs of the multi-cultural community.

Youth engagement Compared to other town centres in Tower Hamlets, Globe Town’s community has a young demographic, and the high street strategy should reflect this to develop in line with the needs of its community. Forty percent of the Globe Town community is under the age of 25. Morpeth School is a large secondary school at the heart of the community attracting children from surrounding neighbourhoods. Globe Town high street is the closest high street to Queen Mary University and many students find temporary accommodation in the area during their studies. There is also a need to address the stark statistic that 50% of children in the area live in income-deprived households.

“It’s great to see a bunch of passionate people activating the community and bringing us all together to talk about our ideas and hopes for the future for our neighbourhood.” (Margot, visitor, Rich Mix, cultural centre)

Stage two of the project must engage with local young people and help develop projects and initiatives that will involve and inspire local children, provide opportunities for local young people, and harness the creative talents from local students.

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kills training for businesses

Promote high street website A high street website was the top priority for local businesses according to the Town Centre strategy survey. Stage Two should offer a workshop about the existing Roman Road LDN high street website. This workshop will show how the current website can promote them, how they can submit events and discounts, and will also establish what type of coverage the businesses must seek.

Promote participation in social media training Social media training was the number two priority for local businesses according to the Town Centre Strategy survey. Stage Two should offer digital marketing training suited to the hours and capacity of independent business owners. This means one-to-one coaching delivered on-site during the day for beginners, or short two to three unit courses in the evenings for improvers.

Promote business skills & support schemes The third highest request from businesses according to the Town Centre Strategy survey was for business skills training to help local traders feel more confident and empowered to improve their shopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic performance. In the second stage. We will encourage local businesses to take part in council funded business training schemes.

Turn ideas into formally adopted Vision Businesses have made specific requests for further help and these should become the basis of an official Vision written and adopted by the steering committee and then circulated to the local community. Ideas to discuss include campaigns to reduce the cost of licences to use the pavement; more greenery; digital marketing training, and support from an online platform promoting the high street. During the second stage, advice and guidance should be provided to help businesses create a local manifesto and to present this to the council and councillors.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;More positive about Globe Town Market and the community.â&#x20AC;? (Marc Herbert, local market trader, Herbert & Leslie Fruit and Vegg)


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igh street improvements

Creating a green and pleasant area Making the public realm greener was what visitors most wanted according to the Visitor Survey.

Shopfront improvements No formal survey was undertaken about shop front improvements. However, during the place making workshops, there were frequent requests to ‘animate’ the main square with year round festive street lighting. There was also support for a seasonal high street shop lighting scheme where external string lights are provided to be hung above shops during festive seasons. Some businesses were reluctant to have these in their shops as it would disrupt their window displays. No businesses requested improvements to shop frontage or for graffiti to be removed.

Businesses under threat A handful of businesses are under threat of closure due including Green Truffle and Flowerescent. Stage two should provide one-onone sessions with these businesses to help identify the nature of the threat and help them to keep operating.

Improve night time street scene With Globe Town’s young population and proximity to evening economy hot spots in Paradise Gardens and Cambridge Heath Road, there is opportunity to successfully stimulate Globe Town evening economy. The arrival of new bar Nola is indicative of this trend. Local residents said that improving the night street scene would make the area feel safer. Local business owner Simply Fresh, whose shop opens late, was keen to encourage late night economy by facilitating licences, installing open grilled shutters and attractive evening lighting on the square.

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ey spaces to activate

The Shop Use Audit highlighted the following spaces as being key to the health of the high street.

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120 Roman Road, E2 0RN Formerly a florist and currently vacant, this unit enjoys a central position on the market square. This unit is easily accessible and highly visible making it an ideal space for a small community hub offering a programme of cultural activities that could spill out onto the market square. The space is small enough to be affordable and convenient enough to provide storage necessary for events. The owner has been identified as Richard Arthur of Amadis Properties LTD. It is recommended that the Council and RRT works together on an offer to the landlord for five-year lease in the name of RRT but run by the RRT’s Globe Town Steering Committee.

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Eastbourne House, Bullards Place, E2 OPT Eastbourne House currently provides the only space in Globe Town that can be hired for cultural programming and community events. London Buddhist Arts

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Angel & Crown, 170 Roman Rd, E2 0RY Angel & Crown pub had long-standing issues with noise and drug dealing, which had a major negative impact on the life of residents living above at Chater House. The pub has now closed. The space has great potential to be kept in communities’ hands. It could be used as a community centre on the high street. Suggestions were made to keep operating it as a pub, run by local people. This could tie in with the campaign to save East End pubs as part of local heritage.

Globe Town Surgery 82-86 Roman Road Globe Town Surgery will soon be moving out of the area. In the second stage of the project, all businesses and key community groups will be formally consulted to gather views on how the local community wishes to use this space.

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Centre is renting two thirds of the building and manages full programme of cultural and well-being activities. Owners Globe Town Community Association are seeking to evict tenants to sell or develop the building. The loss of this space, which is located a short distance behind the central square, would have a negative impact on the offering and footfall of this town centre. London Buddhist Arts Centre should be supported in its campaign to save this important community asset.

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Re-open connection between Meath Gardens and QMUL. This is essential to enable the 40,000 students from QMUL to access the High Street. This could dramatically increase footfall on Roman Road giving a much needed economic boost to the shops on the Hight Street.

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arket Square

Develop programme of special events and markets There was wide consensus among businesses and community groups that animating the market square with events and pop-up markets would improve the high street, providing a performance space for local cultural and arts groups, and attracting extra footfall. It is recommended that a cultural programme builds on the existing ‘mind, body and soul’ offering set by the London Buddhist Centre with a focus on cultural and religious festivities, mindfulness and green or eco events. Additionally it is recommended that special events and pop-up or semi-regular markets address the local youth, with an emphasis on collaborations with local schools. This could include arts and crafts workshops, youth arts groups, and a teenage market: • • • • • • • •

Morpeth School Cranbrook Community Food Garden Chisenhale Gallery Rich Mix Verry Kerry Art Represent Balik Arts Teenage Market

The second phase would help provide steering committee members with the information and knowledge needed to devise a programme of events and raise funding for them.

Green spaces on the market Making the Market square greener with large trees, green planting and seating will be an important aspect of making the square a more conducive space for commercial and cultural activities.

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Expanding the existing market A funded programme of special events and markets (see above) could help attract more traders to the square. The publicity to promote the special events will raise awareness of the trading opportunities. The Visitor Survey reveals that people want the high street to offer more fresh produce, hot food and arts and crafts. This would indicate a similar desire for the market offering on the square. Their preferred day for a market was Saturday. It is recommended that the Council considers partnering with an specialist market operator and provides a discounted lease for the use of the entire square for an extended period while footfall grows e.g. a year or more. This should be accompanied by a well-resourced and extensive marketing campaign. Roman Road Trust has developed many contacts with experienced market operators and could help broker this deal.

Consultation event on designs for market

square

The appetite for community involvement in high street initiatives is particularly pronounced in Globe Town. Businesses and residents are keen to stay involved with proposed plans for the improvement of the Market Square. Phase two should organise a further consultation presenting the findings of the feasibility study. Any proposed plans should be discussed with local businesses and residents and other key community stakeholders and have the scope to be amended in response to feedback.

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Globe Town Market â&#x20AC;˘ Music on the Square December 2017


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upporting projects

A number of community-led projects have surfaced during the first phase of the Common Vision. During phase two, these projects should be supported by providing the community with event and fundraising advice. The following are recommended to be supported:

Plastic free city The plastic-free Roman Road project, led by Cranbrook Community Food Garden, is a timely opportunity to reduce plastic use on the high street. It is an excellent opportunity to engage with businesses, create a unique benefit to shopping on this high street and involve young people in education workshops.

Events board One idea that could be included in the design of the new market square is the installation of a giant digital, solar powered monitor that would display local events. This could be done in conjunction with Social Streets who publishes the local high street website for the community.

Green corridor The green corridor, led by Friends of Meath Gardens, would help deliver a greener more pleasant environment for the high street and surrounding area, which is what people said they wanted most for the area. This project would also connect with plans to improve green connections between Mile End Park, QMUL and Victoria Park and the Orchard spaces being developed by Roman Road Trust. Many community groups are interested in supporting this initiative including Chater House Residents Association, Cranbrook Community Food Garden, Parkview Residents Association and others.

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Thanks Roman Road Trust would like to thank the amazing network of volunteers who collectively provided over 150 hours to support our activities. Without their generosity, our work would not have been possible: Amarah Khan, Birgit Huseklepp, Calum Somerville, Chloe McFarlane, Dario Ferreras, Emma Cosmao, George Watson, Janet Onabanjo, Laura Kavanagh, Naimah Khatun, Rong Jin, Rowan Lowe, Ryan Bowen and Yujie Gao. Special thanks to Janet Onabanjo who took most of the pictures for this report. Also we would like to thank all the community members who took time out of busy lives to attend our place making workshops, contribute ideas, share knowledge and help develop a Common Vision for their high street. Thank you to everyone who hosted our activities, including Bamboo & Bee, St. Margaret’s House, Four Corners and The Larder, and to all our guest speakers who helped facilitate the events including Sandra Scotting, Diane Cunningham, Victoria Stewart and LDA Design. Thank you to fellow community development practitioners Make:Good. It was a pleasure to work with them on delivering their inspirational shop-front art work projects. And a special thanks to Deputy Mayor and local councillor Sirajul Islam for his generous support of our work. Finally many thanks to the local authority for enabling us to carry out this outreach our engagement work that is crucial for the development of a thriving high street, in particular Fiona Crehan, Maria Gerring and Abirahim Artan from Town Centres and High Streets. 

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Team Tabitha Stapely is founder and CEO of Roman Road Trust, she left her career in publishing to follow her passion for local community. Tabitha wanted to do something to help revitalise her local high street and realised that developing strong local governance was key to long term, citizen-led regeneration. She has since helped constitute several local community groups including the Roman Road Bow Neighbourhood Forum. Tabitha is also the founder and director of Social Streets, a publishing company for hyper local magazines.

Neba Sere is an architectural designer and graduate of Central Saint Martins. She previously worked at Studio Weave and Citymine(d) and is now a co-founder of WUH Architecture, a design collective that seeks to create interactive and socially-engaged art and architecture installations. She is also part of the Architecture Foundation’s Young Trustees. Neba is passionate about the intersection of building with community involvement and currently works with Build Up Foundation as a Youth Construction Leader.

Rosie Vincent is a local resident who graduated from Queen Mary University in 2017 with a BA Hons in Drama. Towards the end of her degree Rosie became focused on urban studies and the urban body. She facilitates drama classes at Half Moon Children’s Theatre alongside delivering Dramatic Maths classes to local primary school children. Originally from Suffolk, many of Rosie’s family members have their own businesses giving her a genuine passion for smaller high streets, independent shops, and local markets.


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Globe Town Common Vision Report #1 â&#x20AC;¢ March 2018

Globe Town Common Vision Report - Stage 1  
Globe Town Common Vision Report - Stage 1  
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